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(CNN)   T206 Honus Wagner baseball card sells for $2.1 million. Your 1983 Topps #55 Mookie Wilson card is still only worth $0.39   (money.cnn.com) divider line 141
    More: Followup, Mookie, baseball cards, short supply, Topps, West Berlin, Holy Grail, first World Series  
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4486 clicks; posted to Main » on 07 Apr 2013 at 9:24 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-04-07 09:27:29 AM
But Don West said it was worth 1500 dollars book value!
 
2013-04-07 09:28:12 AM
Whatever happened to flipping for it.
 
2013-04-07 09:30:00 AM
When I was I found 3 tobacco cards under the wood floors in the attic of our house (house is 110 years old).. Completely worthless as rot and mice had their way with them over the years they were up there (god knows how long).. The bulk of the card was there, player still viewable, name still barely readable.. But simply worthless. Chunks missings, spots everywhere, corners gone. Was cool though as a kid.. Think I sold them for a garbage pail kids complete series.
 
2013-04-07 09:30:51 AM
$0.39? That's like a 200% ROI !
 
2013-04-07 09:31:56 AM

Abox: Whatever happened to flipping for it.


I remember flipping cards. no one does that any more.
 
2013-04-07 09:36:24 AM
At some point people have to use common sense and realize these are fake.

I can't believe this many are coming out now in near mint condition after 100 years and when the first one sold for 2.8 million
 
2013-04-07 09:38:59 AM
Diddy buys it for his kids bike.
 
2013-04-07 09:39:45 AM

smerfnablin: At some point people have to use common sense and realize these are fake.

I can't believe this many are coming out now in near mint condition after 100 years and when the first one sold for 2.8 million


No, Honus said it's real.
 
2013-04-07 09:42:02 AM
farm4.static.flickr.com

You can keep your crappy Wagner card, this dickshot card is my Valkyrie.
 
2013-04-07 09:43:46 AM

styckx: When I was I found 3 tobacco cards under the wood floors in the attic of our house (house is 110 years old).. Completely worthless as rot and mice had their way with them over the years they were up there (god knows how long).. The bulk of the card was there, player still viewable, name still barely readable.. But simply worthless. Chunks missings, spots everywhere, corners gone. Was cool though as a kid.. Think I sold them for a garbage pail kids complete series.


The person you sold them to probably turned around and sold them to a collector for a very nice piece of change. Even if they are rotting, chewed up and falling apart, cards from the early 1900's and before are still worth a nice deal of money.
 
2013-04-07 09:44:26 AM
I know the book says it's worth $0.39, but the picture is a little off center and the market is really, really tough lately. It's probably going to sit in the shop for a year and I'll end up taking the first $0.20 offer. I can give you $0.05.
 
2013-04-07 09:45:48 AM
Holding on to my "Heros of America - Desert Shield - Stormin' Norman Schwarzkoph" just in case..

By the way, anyone want to buy a Heros of America - Desert Shield - Stormin' Norman Schwarkoph card?
 
2013-04-07 09:47:22 AM

styckx: When I was I found 3 tobacco cards under the wood floors in the attic of our house (house is 110 years old).. Completely worthless as rot and mice had their way with them over the years they were up there (god knows how long).. The bulk of the card was there, player still viewable, name still barely readable.. But simply worthless. Chunks missings, spots everywhere, corners gone. Was cool though as a kid.. Think I sold them for a garbage pail kids complete series.


You might be surprised what they are worth, even in that condition. Check Ebay for low-graded tobacco cards. I'd do it myself but I'm too goddamn lazy.
 
2013-04-07 09:48:49 AM
I need to see what my baseball card collection is worth, I know it was worth quite a bit before the bottom fell out of the market during the 90s player strike. Most if not all of the players from the 80s and early 90s are retired now.

Also I have some like 50s/60s cards that was dads when he was a kid, I know some of those are worth money.
 
2013-04-07 09:51:26 AM
I have a friend who specializes in sports memorabilia and he says it's worth less than half that. There just isn't a big demand for baseball cards right now. I can offer you $50, but that's as high as I go.
 
2013-04-07 09:52:31 AM
In before Billy Ripken card post
 
2013-04-07 09:53:59 AM
Found it..
www.hometownflashback.com
 
2013-04-07 09:55:24 AM

ongbok: styckx: When I was I found 3 tobacco cards under the wood floors in the attic of our house (house is 110 years old).. Completely worthless as rot and mice had their way with them over the years they were up there (god knows how long).. The bulk of the card was there, player still viewable, name still barely readable.. But simply worthless. Chunks missings, spots everywhere, corners gone. Was cool though as a kid.. Think I sold them for a garbage pail kids complete series.

The person you sold them to probably turned around and sold them to a collector for a very nice piece of change. Even if they are rotting, chewed up and falling apart, cards from the early 1900's and before are still worth a nice deal of money.


Yeah, but Garbage Pail Kids are appreciating faster. A complete set, man!
 
2013-04-07 09:55:46 AM

DubyaHater: I have a friend who specializes in sports memorabilia and he says it's worth less than half that. There just isn't a big demand for baseball cards right now. I can offer you $50, but that's as high as I go.


yodale.org

Rick, is that you?
 
2013-04-07 09:57:31 AM
ongbok: DubyaHater: I have a friend who specializes in sports memorabilia and he says it's worth less than half that. There just isn't a big demand for baseball cards right now. I can offer you $50, but that's as high as I go.

[yodale.org image 760x1024]

Rick, is that you?


$50? $40 sounds better.
 
2013-04-07 09:58:33 AM
I can only give you $225 for it....I've got employees to pay and it's gonna sit around for quite awhile...
yodale.org
 
2013-04-07 10:04:51 AM
I've got a Joe Shlabotnik card.
 
2013-04-07 10:10:25 AM

styckx: When I was I found 3 tobacco cards


When were you not?
 
2013-04-07 10:11:22 AM
T206?

I just KNEW he was an android.
 
2013-04-07 10:14:06 AM

Oldiron_79: I need to see what my baseball card collection is worth, I know it was worth quite a bit before the bottom fell out of the market during the 90s player strike. Most if not all of the players from the 80s and early 90s are retired now.

Also I have some like 50s/60s cards that was dads when he was a kid, I know some of those are worth money.


Most cards in the 80s and 90s aren't worth crap, unfortunately. I have a bunch in my parents house.
 
2013-04-07 10:17:48 AM

smerfnablin: At some point people have to use common sense and realize these are fake.

I can't believe this many are coming out now in near mint condition after 100 years and when the first one sold for 2.8 million


This particular one has provenance so they can be pretty sure its real.  It may have also been submitted to paper testing.
 
2013-04-07 10:20:08 AM
machoprogrammer: Oldiron_79: I need to see what my baseball card collection is worth, I know it was worth quite a bit before the bottom fell out of the market during the 90s player strike. Most if not all of the players from the 80s and early 90s are retired now.

Also I have some like 50s/60s cards that was dads when he was a kid, I know some of those are worth money.

Most cards in the 80s and 90s aren't worth crap, unfortunately. I have a bunch in my parents house.


Well average Joe Schmuck cards from the '80s aren't worth money, I'm pretty sure that like a Barry Bonds Rookie card is worth some money,
 
2013-04-07 10:21:12 AM
My great-great-grandfather worked for the American Tobacco Company.  We recently sold the house that had been in the family for generations.  Cleaning out the attic I found a box marked "Recalled Honus Wager Cards".  It looks like there's about a thousand or so in mint state, right-off-the-printing press.  I wonder if this new supply source is going to affect the demand and/or auction prices?
 
2013-04-07 10:22:06 AM
One of my former project managers was a transplant from NY. His dad used to work for Topps and would bring home cards for his kids. They would glue the cards into bricks and use them to build forts for their army guys. This was in the 50s where some of the cards would be worth $50k today.
 
2013-04-07 10:33:22 AM
Reminds me when I was a kid waking up xmas morning. A pack of 86 donruss cards in my stocking. I opened it and right on top was a rated rookie jose canseco. I wish I sold that farking thing the very next day.
 
2013-04-07 10:37:32 AM

Oldiron_79: machoprogrammer: Oldiron_79: I need to see what my baseball card collection is worth, I know it was worth quite a bit before the bottom fell out of the market during the 90s player strike. Most if not all of the players from the 80s and early 90s are retired now.

Also I have some like 50s/60s cards that was dads when he was a kid, I know some of those are worth money.

Most cards in the 80s and 90s aren't worth crap, unfortunately. I have a bunch in my parents house.

Well average Joe Schmuck cards from the '80s aren't worth money, I'm pretty sure that like a Barry Bonds Rookie card is worth some money,


A few bucks, 5 to 10 probably. Problem is, everybody at that age had a Barry Bonds rookie card. And nobody throws them out because of all the stories about Dad's Mickey Mantle rookie that his mom threw out that would be worth 50k if only he still had it, so a million of them are still around. I still have a couple somewhere.
 
2013-04-07 10:37:44 AM
The most expensive one I ever had was a '89 Ken Griffey Jr Upper Deck card.  I collected when I was a kid in the '80s.  My favorite player back then was Roger Clemens, I bet I had 50 of his early cards.  I guess I picked the wrong horse to hitch that wagon too.

/Upper Deck was the shiat back in the day.
 
2013-04-07 10:38:02 AM

Giltric: One of my former project managers was a transplant from NY. His dad used to work for Topps and would bring home cards for his kids. They would glue the cards into bricks and use them to build forts for their army guys. This was in the 50s where some of the cards would be worth $50k today.


And there's tens of thousands of stories like that, which is why, when combined with the lower print runs, the cards are worth so much.  Upper Deck really did stand the industry on its head, but when the market became collector-oriented it killed itself with its own bubble.

/collected football cards religiously from 1987 until sometime in 1993, I got priced out of the hobby as a kid
//gonna start finding one relatively inexpensive set a year and putting it together through packs.  Probably the Topps base set.
 
2013-04-07 10:39:11 AM

Oldiron_79: machoprogrammer: Oldiron_79: I need to see what my baseball card collection is worth, I know it was worth quite a bit before the bottom fell out of the market during the 90s player strike. Most if not all of the players from the 80s and early 90s are retired now.

Also I have some like 50s/60s cards that was dads when he was a kid, I know some of those are worth money.

Most cards in the 80s and 90s aren't worth crap, unfortunately. I have a bunch in my parents house.

Well average Joe Schmuck cards from the '80s aren't worth money, I'm pretty sure that like a Barry Bonds Rookie card is worth some money,


not all that much value: http://tonsofcards.com/Cart/CardView/f 8189382-ff34-e211-8c93-005056c00 008
 
2013-04-07 10:41:04 AM

GoldDude: My great-great-grandfather worked for the American Tobacco Company.  We recently sold the house that had been in the family for generations.  Cleaning out the attic I found a box marked "Recalled Honus Wager Cards".  It looks like there's about a thousand or so in mint state, right-off-the-printing press.  I wonder if this new supply source is going to affect the demand and/or auction prices?


Assuming you are telling the truth, that would be the biggest news in the collecting world possibly ever. And you would be a very rich person.

Oldiron_79: machoprogrammer: Oldiron_79: I need to see what my baseball card collection is worth, I know it was worth quite a bit before the bottom fell out of the market during the 90s player strike. Most if not all of the players from the 80s and early 90s are retired now.

Also I have some like 50s/60s cards that was dads when he was a kid, I know some of those are worth money.

Most cards in the 80s and 90s aren't worth crap, unfortunately. I have a bunch in my parents house.

Well average Joe Schmuck cards from the '80s aren't worth money, I'm pretty sure that like a Barry Bonds Rookie card is worth some money,


Nope. cards in the 80s and 90s, for the most part, were printed in gigantic quantities. There are a few exceptions, but most cards in the 80s and 90s aren't worth the cardboard they are printed on (there are "rare" versions of rookie cards of guys like Ripken, Clemens, etc that sell for a decent amount, but even most of their rookie cards sell for under $50). Bonds rookie card sells for at most $15, and that is if graded as perfect (getting the card graded alone costs about that, ironically).
 
2013-04-07 10:43:27 AM

Oldiron_79: machoprogrammer: Oldiron_79: I need to see what my baseball card collection is worth, I know it was worth quite a bit before the bottom fell out of the market during the 90s player strike. Most if not all of the players from the 80s and early 90s are retired now.

Also I have some like 50s/60s cards that was dads when he was a kid, I know some of those are worth money.

Most cards in the 80s and 90s aren't worth crap, unfortunately. I have a bunch in my parents house.

Well average Joe Schmuck cards from the '80s aren't worth money, I'm pretty sure that like a Barry Bonds Rookie card is worth some money,


It depends on what company they are from. If it is Topps or Donross, they aren't worth much because those cards were over produced and aren't very rare, exception being if they are from special sets. On the other hand if you have a Bowman, Fleer card or an Opeechee card there wasn't as many of those produced so they are rarer and worth more.
 
2013-04-07 10:47:19 AM

puppetmaster745: styckx: When I was I found 3 tobacco cards under the wood floors in the attic of our house (house is 110 years old).. Completely worthless as rot and mice had their way with them over the years they were up there (god knows how long).. The bulk of the card was there, player still viewable, name still barely readable.. But simply worthless. Chunks missings, spots everywhere, corners gone. Was cool though as a kid.. Think I sold them for a garbage pail kids complete series.

You might be surprised what they are worth, even in that condition. Check Ebay for low-graded tobacco cards. I'd do it myself but I'm too goddamn lazy.


I looked out of curiosity.  Most are offered from 10-50 bucks and look better than what he described.


Then there is this:



I found this Honus Wagner card while raking leaves under the porch.

Bid is $20 dollars so far. Have at it.
 
2013-04-07 10:49:15 AM
Third Leg: Oldiron_79: machoprogrammer: Oldiron_79: I need to see what my baseball card collection is worth, I know it was worth quite a bit before the bottom fell out of the market during the 90s player strike. Most if not all of the players from the 80s and early 90s are retired now.

Also I have some like 50s/60s cards that was dads when he was a kid, I know some of those are worth money.

Most cards in the 80s and 90s aren't worth crap, unfortunately. I have a bunch in my parents house.

Well average Joe Schmuck cards from the '80s aren't worth money, I'm pretty sure that like a Barry Bonds Rookie card is worth some money,

A few bucks, 5 to 10 probably. Problem is, everybody at that age had a Barry Bonds rookie card. And nobody throws them out because of all the stories about Dad's Mickey Mantle rookie that his mom threw out that would be worth 50k if only he still had it, so a million of them are still around. I still have a couple somewhere.


Well I have a few older like '50s/'60s cards that was dad's. None of them is like Micky Mantle Rookie rare, but I do have a signed Willie Mays and a signed Pete Rose (not like a rookie card for either, but a playing era card for both)
 
2013-04-07 10:54:16 AM

Deep Contact: smerfnablin: At some point people have to use common sense and realize these are fake.

I can't believe this many are coming out now in near mint condition after 100 years and when the first one sold for 2.8 million

No, Honus said it's real.


Google "The Card". I believe it was a New York Post article that went into details on how that card was trimmed, most if not all of the auction house members were or are facing federal charges, the PSA "grader" openly admitted that he juiced the grade because "it was such a beautiful card". Crazy shiat.
 
2013-04-07 10:57:40 AM
4.bp.blogspot.com
Better than money!
 
2013-04-07 11:02:52 AM
You can also thank Ebay for flooding the market with cards and lowering their value. Whatever happened to Renata Galasso anyway?
 
2013-04-07 11:03:51 AM
When I was a kid, we all knew that Mark McGwire was the next Mickey Mantle, and in a few decades those cards of his we got out of 1 dollar wax packs would be worth 50k. The problem was that all our friends knew it too so they didn't use them as noise makers in their bicycle spokes, Topps churned those things out as fast as they could cut down trees for the cardboard, and Mark McGwire didn't, in fact, end up being the next Mickey Mantle.

/geez I wonder how much my collection of miniature plastic vending machine helmets is worth these days? I traded Gary a Bengals and a Seahawks helmet for a 49ers one and that's super rare! Only 3 or 4 kids in my class had one!
 
2013-04-07 11:11:46 AM

MatrixOutsider: You can also thank Ebay for flooding the market with cards and lowering their value. Whatever happened to Renata Galasso anyway?


The market died even before that. Back in the day it was kids buying the cards, trading with each other to get cards to complete their sets, and playing all types of games with the cards that destroyed most of them. Between that and parents throwing out cards, not a lot survived and they were rare and collectable. Then in the 90's companies decided to cash in on this market and started producing premium card sets. These sets priced the kids out of the card market, and the buyers of cards went from kids that would destroy most of the cards to adults that bought cards, encased them in plastic and stored them. So now there really aren't anymore rare cards from probably 1990 on, even the cards that were purposely printed in limited quantities to create a rarity aren't rare because adults bought them all and stored them away.
 
2013-04-07 11:17:48 AM

MatrixOutsider: You can also thank Ebay Topps for flooding the market with cards and lowering their value. Whatever happened to Renata Galasso anyway?


FTFY.

The problem isn't eBay, the problem is that every card from the 80's and 90's were heavily mass produced compared to older cards. This, combined with everybody being aware of their potential value and holding onto them, has meant a gluttony of cards from that era have survived in mint condition.
 
2013-04-07 11:23:33 AM
So my daughters' old Pogs aren't sh*t?
 
2013-04-07 11:25:02 AM
Can you believe the guy at the Bugatti dealership turned up his nose at my offer of TWO boxes of Beanie Babies?
 
2013-04-07 11:29:09 AM
What about my Star Trek the Next Generation CCG cards? How much are those worth? I have thousands of them in a box somewhere.

/nerd
 
2013-04-07 11:29:36 AM

For those of you who are/were into the hobby, check out 'Card Sharks: How Upper Deck Turned a Child's Hobby into a High-Stakes, Billion-Dollar Business'.

Written in 1995 so some may find it dated, but it features lots of fascinating back stories/anecdotes.


Link
 
2013-04-07 11:32:16 AM

puppetmaster745: styckx: When I was I found 3 tobacco cards under the wood floors in the attic of our house (house is 110 years old).. Completely worthless as rot and mice had their way with them over the years they were up there (god knows how long).. The bulk of the card was there, player still viewable, name still barely readable.. But simply worthless. Chunks missings, spots everywhere, corners gone. Was cool though as a kid.. Think I sold them for a garbage pail kids complete series.

You might be surprised what they are worth, even in that condition. Check Ebay for low-graded tobacco cards. I'd do it myself but I'm too goddamn lazy.


Yeah.. Only $10-$60 or so and mine looked nothing like the ones selling on Ebay.
 
2013-04-07 11:36:02 AM

John Buck 41: For those of you who are/were into the hobby, check out 'Card Sharks: How Upper Deck Turned a Child's Hobby into a High-Stakes, Billion-Dollar Business'.

Written in 1995 so some may find it dated, but it features lots of fascinating back stories/anecdotes.
Link


When I was a kid, it was all about the "errors".  We were all sure that our shiatty ass Nolan Ryan card was the error one worth fifteen bucks. And we were always scrutinizing our cards to find an error no one had noticed. At some point in the nineties, the card companies figured out it was easier to just make limited run cards with a piece of sweaty jersey in it and sell them directly to adults who hadn't let go of their dream of making it big with sports cards.
 
2013-04-07 11:36:05 AM

Igor Jakovsky: /Upper Deck was the shiat back in the day.


an upper decker still is a shiat
 
2013-04-07 11:39:02 AM

dave2198: MatrixOutsider: You can also thank Ebay Topps for flooding the market with cards and lowering their value. Whatever happened to Renata Galasso anyway?

FTFY.

The problem isn't eBay, the problem is that every card from the 80's and 90's were heavily mass produced compared to older cards. This, combined with everybody being aware of their potential value and holding onto them, has meant a gluttony of cards from that era have survived in mint condition.


True, but Ebay forced people to sell at wholesale prices to compete with other sellers. Selling became convenient, and it became a buyer's market. In the past, you had to take an ad out in the paper to sell cards, so you could charge higher prices.
 
2013-04-07 11:39:31 AM
upload.wikimedia.org
 
2013-04-07 11:40:17 AM

miniflea: What about my Star Trek the Next Generation CCG cards? How much are those worth? I have thousands of them in a box somewhere.

/nerd


Depends on the quality. Additionally, Book Value really means nothing compared to the population available. If you are the only person with a complete set or really nice cards, you may be surprised what they could bring.
 
2013-04-07 11:41:55 AM

Hollie Maea: John Buck 41: For those of you who are/were into the hobby, check out 'Card Sharks: How Upper Deck Turned a Child's Hobby into a High-Stakes, Billion-Dollar Business'.

Written in 1995 so some may find it dated, but it features lots of fascinating back stories/anecdotes.
Link

When I was a kid, it was all about the "errors".  We were all sure that our shiatty ass Nolan Ryan card was the error one worth fifteen bucks. And we were always scrutinizing our cards to find an error no one had noticed. At some point in the nineties, the card companies figured out it was easier to just make limited run cards with a piece of sweaty jersey in it and sell them directly to adults who hadn't let go of their dream of making it big with sports cards.


I remember looking for the errors. I remember at one point a few companies were accused of purposely making error cards to create a run on their sets..I also remember that the ink on the first sets of Upper Deck cards could easily be erased from the card with a pencil eraser, so there were a lot of people creating fake error cards.
 
2013-04-07 11:50:22 AM

ole prophet: miniflea: What about my Star Trek the Next Generation CCG cards? How much are those worth? I have thousands of them in a box somewhere.

/nerd

Depends on the quality. Additionally, Book Value really means nothing compared to the population available. If you are the only person with a complete set or really nice cards, you may be surprised what they could bring.


As someone with a ton of out-of-print CCGs, I've found that you have to find the communities dedicated to the cards.  I had some old Guardians boxes I had picked up at an old GenCon for $5 a piece, opened, and never bothered to learn how to play.  Last fall I sold them to some guy in Sweden for about $10/piece.  Not exactly the kind of windfall profit people are hoping for, but it cleared out shelf space, and the shipping was only mildly outrageous.

ongbok: MatrixOutsider: You can also thank Ebay for flooding the market with cards and lowering their value. Whatever happened to Renata Galasso anyway?

The market died even before that. Back in the day it was kids buying the cards, trading with each other to get cards to complete their sets, and playing all types of games with the cards that destroyed most of them. Between that and parents throwing out cards, not a lot survived and they were rare and collectable. Then in the 90's companies decided to cash in on this market and started producing premium card sets. These sets priced the kids out of the card market, and the buyers of cards went from kids that would destroy most of the cards to adults that bought cards, encased them in plastic and stored them. So now there really aren't anymore rare cards from probably 1990 on, even the cards that were purposely printed in limited quantities to create a rarity aren't rare because adults bought them all and stored them away.


For a long time Topps was literally the only game in town, until a 1981 court ruling that allowed other companies to seek licenses.  That's why you see the gradual expansion of Fleer, Donruss, and Score into the baseball market in the mid-80s.  But Topps' deal with the NFLPA was exclusive through 1988, so the football market did open up until 1989 - coincidentally, the same year Upper Deck got into the business in general, and they were the catalyst for transitioning sports cards from hobby to collectors' industry.
 
2013-04-07 11:56:08 AM
i220.photobucket.com
 
2013-04-07 11:58:47 AM

UNC_Samurai: ole prophet: miniflea: What about my Star Trek the Next Generation CCG cards? How much are those worth? I have thousands of them in a box somewhere.

/nerd

Depends on the quality. Additionally, Book Value really means nothing compared to the population available. If you are the only person with a complete set or really nice cards, you may be surprised what they could bring.

As someone with a ton of out-of-print CCGs, I've found that you have to find the communities dedicated to the cards. I had some old Guardians boxes I had picked up at an old GenCon for $5 a piece, opened, and never bothered to learn how to play. Last fall I sold them to some guy in Sweden for about $10/piece. Not exactly the kind of windfall profit people are hoping for, but it cleared out shelf space, and the shipping was only mildly outrageous.


Yep you are right. There is a collectors community for just about anything you can imagine, you just have to find them. And within in those communities stuff that most people from outside of that community  wouldn't think was valuable can get you quite a bit of money. I just recently found out that there is a collectors community for IPods. With the values on them ranging from less than a hundred dollars to a few thousand dollars for certain editions.
 
2013-04-07 12:00:06 PM

ole prophet: miniflea: What about my Star Trek the Next Generation CCG cards? How much are those worth? I have thousands of them in a box somewhere.

/nerd

Depends on the quality. Additionally, Book Value really means nothing compared to the population available. If you are the only person with a complete set or really nice cards, you may be surprised what they could bring.


If I recall correctly I am a hundred or so short of having every card from every expansion. One of these days I'll use ebay to exchange my duplicate rares for what I'm missing. The ones I have sleeved were mostly taken right from the packaging and never played with.

I doubt it would be worth much even as a complete set, for sure less than the nostalgia value to me.
 
2013-04-07 12:06:15 PM

ongbok: On the other hand if you have a Bowman, Fleer card or an Opeechee card there wasn't as many of those produced so they are rarer and worth more.


Holy shiat.  Instant transport back to childhood.  I used to collect cards with my Dad when I was a kid.  We'd go to shows and stuff all the time.  I haven't heard either of those companies mentioned in my presence in maybe 15-20 years.  I've got a bunch of Bowman & Fleer cards rattling around the house here somewhere.  Was never a big fan of the cheapy-feeling Topps crap.  I know I have 2 complete Upper Deck 1989 sets (one sealed from the factory)... wonder if those are worth anything now.
 
2013-04-07 12:16:18 PM
i.imgur.com

Did someone say sideburns?
/I think we've seen FF enough for today
 
2013-04-07 12:25:21 PM

miniflea: ole prophet: miniflea: What about my Star Trek the Next Generation CCG cards? How much are those worth? I have thousands of them in a box somewhere.

/nerd

Depends on the quality. Additionally, Book Value really means nothing compared to the population available. If you are the only person with a complete set or really nice cards, you may be surprised what they could bring.

If I recall correctly I am a hundred or so short of having every card from every expansion. One of these days I'll use ebay to exchange my duplicate rares for what I'm missing. The ones I have sleeved were mostly taken right from the packaging and never played with.

I doubt it would be worth much even as a complete set, for sure less than the nostalgia value to me.


And that is all that really matters. If it makes you feel good or happy, hold on to them. Browse around eBay or COMC.com and see what you have been missing. I'm not into "nerd" cards (though I suppose if you collect any card you are a nerd on some level) but if they are anything like sports cards there is some seriously sick looking cards out there nowadays.
 
2013-04-07 12:28:53 PM

Igor Jakovsky: I found this Honus Wagner card while raking leaves under the porch.


Item condition: Acceptable
images4.wikia.nocookie.net
 
2013-04-07 12:39:41 PM

miniflea: ole prophet: miniflea: What about my Star Trek the Next Generation CCG cards? How much are those worth? I have thousands of them in a box somewhere.

/nerd

Depends on the quality. Additionally, Book Value really means nothing compared to the population available. If you are the only person with a complete set or really nice cards, you may be surprised what they could bring.

If I recall correctly I am a hundred or so short of having every card from every expansion. One of these days I'll use ebay to exchange my duplicate rares for what I'm missing. The ones I have sleeved were mostly taken right from the packaging and never played with.

I doubt it would be worth much even as a complete set, for sure less than the nostalgia value to me.


The last time I looked (and this was a few years ago), a complete set of limited (black bordered) base set was worth something, and the Kivas Fajo collection and Data Laughing have generated enough interest in the Star Trek community at large that they have stable value.

I have about 1200 cards that I'm trying to get rid of - an 800 count box, a Two-Player starter box, and another small stack, plus about 200 cards from Fleer's TOS CCG (great mechanics, utterly putrid graphics).  I've been lazy about listing it on ebay.
 
2013-04-07 12:49:58 PM
Hey, did anybody post the Billy Ripken Fark Face card yet?
 
2013-04-07 12:57:20 PM
I've got every complete Factory set from Topps, beginning with the 1988 set.  All still wrapped in plastic.

/they ain't worth the $50 or more I've paid for each one
//don't know why I keep getting them every year
 
2013-04-07 01:05:20 PM
So when I was going to college I threw all my baseball cards into storage, and sold all my hockey cards. Those baseball cards are still worthless. But some of those hockey cards would have been worth a lot now.
 
2013-04-07 01:13:11 PM
I found some old Adams Family and The Monkey's cards.
 
2013-04-07 01:13:29 PM
fark some baseball cards.  I started collecting football cards after the 89 season, boring ass TOPPS.
Then I discovered Pro Set, then started buy box sets of Score cards every Christmas.

Anyway, I remember the 2 cards I wanted most was a 1981 Lawrence Taylor rookie card, book value said $35, and a  197? Joe Montana rookie card, book said $200

Local shop had the LT card for exactly $35, got that and was so proud of it. Gave it away a few years later after he was arrested for cocaine.

Checked the pricing of cards lately, it is horrible. The Montana card was $50 I think? LT was $5 or something crazy.

Having 86 different companies helped me lose interest. I'm not spending a crapload of money for packs of cards and not even breaking even. Sure collecting is fun but they jacked the prices up too much and who wants 108 duplicates of the Detroit Lions back up tight end? No me.


CSB?
 
2013-04-07 01:13:37 PM

Adolf Oliver Nipples: Hey, did anybody post the Billy Ripken Fark Face card yet?


I haven't noticed, too busy "laughing" at multitude of Pawn Stars cliches
 
2013-04-07 01:16:00 PM

puppetmaster745: I know the book says it's worth $0.39, but the picture is a little off center and the market is really, really tough lately. It's probably going to sit in the shop for a year and I'll end up taking the first $0.20 offer. I can give you $0.05.


You have the rare off-center Mookie Wilson error card? I'll take eight!
 
2013-04-07 01:18:08 PM
What killed it for me was the fact there was 1000 different sets per year. Fleer. Fleer Ultra. Fleer Elite. Fleer Flair. etc.
 
2013-04-07 01:19:36 PM

Arkanaut: puppetmaster745: I know the book says it's worth $0.39, but the picture is a little off center and the market is really, really tough lately. It's probably going to sit in the shop for a year and I'll end up taking the first $0.20 offer. I can give you $0.05.

You have the rare off-center Mookie Wilson error card? I'll take eight!


Oh  Arkanaut, you are finally becoming a crafty consumer!
 
2013-04-07 01:20:21 PM
And to think I feel silly when I pay a couple bucks for a Magic card. At least a Rancor doesn't cost a million bucks.

/can't beat Rancor in a green deck
 
2013-04-07 01:21:14 PM
A first series gpk set is worth 500 now. A box of em was $12 originally--now worth 2000. Fark late 80s bb cards, but hats off to whoever brought up score. I had forgot about them.1986 fleer update ftw.
 
2013-04-07 01:24:49 PM
Started collecting Topps cards a few years back to give to my son when he grows up...completed a '67 set, bought a 73 complete set and every sealed set 89 through 2013

Blew a few grand on cards that are just sitting around taking up space

My whole collection comes down to maybe 10 good cards, Seaver rookie, Schmidt rookie and Carew rookie...and a few other 67 cards that were expensive (around 50-100 bucks)

Even if I wanted to unload them I *might* make up my initial investment.

Pay for his college it won't

It was fun, and I learned a lot. I thought I was going to keep going with 68 set through 72, but it's just not worth it
 
2013-04-07 01:33:25 PM
This thread made me nostalgic for my childhood. I've just bought the whole set of Planet of the Apes cards from the sixties because of that.
Curse you and thank you, subby.
www.trading-cards.org
 
2013-04-07 01:38:13 PM
New cards are 4 bucks a pack. Eff that noise.
 
2013-04-07 01:57:20 PM

Swoop1809: And to think I feel silly when I pay a couple bucks for a Magic card. At least a Rancor doesn't cost a million bucks.

/can't beat Rancor in a green deck


i.imgur.com

^^^ Sold for $25,000 in 2010

/I find Skullclamp is superior on tempo if you're running the 8 1/1s (especially the Herald: tutor for Hermit and draw 2 for 2+G), but Birds + Rancor is a fun way to win
//nerdcore!
 
2013-04-07 01:59:56 PM

Igor Jakovsky: The most expensive one I ever had was a '89 Ken Griffey Jr Upper Deck card.  I collected when I was a kid in the '80s.  My favorite player back then was Roger Clemens, I bet I had 50 of his early cards.  I guess I picked the wrong horse to hitch that wagon too.

/Upper Deck was the shiat back in the day.


I was collecting at about the same time.  I had a few of those Upper Deck Griffey Jr. cards and sold all but one of them for 50 dollars each ungraded.     I wish I could say I took the money and invested it, but at the time I was in graduate school and needed gas money to drive home and see my girlfriend.

Those 80s and early 90s cards aren't worth jack.  Most people won't even take them for free. I had about 20,000 cards.  I went through them with a price guide, cherry picked the best cards and put them into one 5 inch binder.  The rest of the cards I set out in a box in my alley the day before junk collection day and somebody took them.
 
2013-04-07 02:06:56 PM
Makes me wonder what my '87 twins card set is worth. Probably ~$3.50.
 
2013-04-07 02:07:06 PM

DrBrownCow: Igor Jakovsky: The most expensive one I ever had was a '89 Ken Griffey Jr Upper Deck card.  I collected when I was a kid in the '80s.  My favorite player back then was Roger Clemens, I bet I had 50 of his early cards.  I guess I picked the wrong horse to hitch that wagon too.

/Upper Deck was the shiat back in the day.

I was collecting at about the same time.  I had a few of those Upper Deck Griffey Jr. cards and sold all but one of them for 50 dollars each ungraded.     I wish I could say I took the money and invested it, but at the time I was in graduate school and needed gas money to drive home and see my girlfriend.

Those 80s and early 90s cards aren't worth jack.  Most people won't even take them for free. I had about 20,000 cards.  I went through them with a price guide, cherry picked the best cards and put them into one 5 inch binder.  The rest of the cards I set out in a box in my alley the day before junk collection day and somebody took them.


And just for that reason when your grand kids are around 10 or twelve those 80's and 90's card will now be rare and worth some good money. And when you tell your grand kids that you had about 20k of them and threw them out, they will ready to kick your old ass.
 
2013-04-07 02:11:28 PM
I collected cards in the early 90's and gave up when there were dozens of sets for each sport each year. The last time I looked through a Beckett, there was 30+ sets for basketball for one year. fark that.

A friend traded a 1992 Topps Stadium Club Refractor Shaq card for a Game Gear and games. I think both lost on that deal. :)
 
2013-04-07 02:11:31 PM
A little thread jack here. Is anybody watching the Cubs/Braves game? Jeff Samardzijia just struck out 6 hitters in a row. The only hit he gave up was to Upton to lead off the game.
 
2013-04-07 02:13:02 PM

zekeburger: I collected cards in the early 90's and gave up when there were dozens of sets for each sport each year. The last time I looked through a Beckett, there was 30+ sets for basketball for one year. fark that.

A friend traded a 1992 Topps Stadium Club Refractor Shaq card for a Game Gear and games. I think both lost on that deal. :)


There were no winners that day.
 
2013-04-07 02:13:31 PM

try fect taa daa: New cards are 4 bucks a pack. Eff that noise.


They've been around that price since the mid-90s on (with a few exceptions). 4 bucks for a dozen? Maybe every now and then. 4 bucks for 4 or 5? Screw that.
 
2013-04-07 02:13:42 PM

ongbok: DrBrownCow: Igor Jakovsky: The most expensive one I ever had was a '89 Ken Griffey Jr Upper Deck card.  I collected when I was a kid in the '80s.  My favorite player back then was Roger Clemens, I bet I had 50 of his early cards.  I guess I picked the wrong horse to hitch that wagon too.

/Upper Deck was the shiat back in the day.

I was collecting at about the same time.  I had a few of those Upper Deck Griffey Jr. cards and sold all but one of them for 50 dollars each ungraded.     I wish I could say I took the money and invested it, but at the time I was in graduate school and needed gas money to drive home and see my girlfriend.

Those 80s and early 90s cards aren't worth jack.  Most people won't even take them for free. I had about 20,000 cards.  I went through them with a price guide, cherry picked the best cards and put them into one 5 inch binder.  The rest of the cards I set out in a box in my alley the day before junk collection day and somebody took them.

And just for that reason when your grand kids are around 10 or twelve those 80's and 90's card will now be rare and worth some good money. And when you tell your grand kids that you had about 20k of them and threw them out, they will ready to kick your old ass.


Things are different now. That was true when it was your dad with Mantle rookies, but everybody learned from that and they're all running the same hustle, hoarding cards in the hopes that they will appreciate. . Also, as mentioned, the million different sets overwhelm the market. It was enough to have Topps, Fleer and Donruss, then it got out of hand. now it's all just worthless cardboard, even more so than when your dad was collecting them. They will never appreciate to any significant degree.
 
2013-04-07 02:19:58 PM

Adolf Oliver Nipples: ongbok: DrBrownCow: Igor Jakovsky: The most expensive one I ever had was a '89 Ken Griffey Jr Upper Deck card.  I collected when I was a kid in the '80s.  My favorite player back then was Roger Clemens, I bet I had 50 of his early cards.  I guess I picked the wrong horse to hitch that wagon too.

/Upper Deck was the shiat back in the day.

I was collecting at about the same time.  I had a few of those Upper Deck Griffey Jr. cards and sold all but one of them for 50 dollars each ungraded.     I wish I could say I took the money and invested it, but at the time I was in graduate school and needed gas money to drive home and see my girlfriend.

Those 80s and early 90s cards aren't worth jack.  Most people won't even take them for free. I had about 20,000 cards.  I went through them with a price guide, cherry picked the best cards and put them into one 5 inch binder.  The rest of the cards I set out in a box in my alley the day before junk collection day and somebody took them.

And just for that reason when your grand kids are around 10 or twelve those 80's and 90's card will now be rare and worth some good money. And when you tell your grand kids that you had about 20k of them and threw them out, they will ready to kick your old ass.

Things are different now. That was true when it was your dad with Mantle rookies, but everybody learned from that and they're all running the same hustle, hoarding cards in the hopes that they will appreciate. . Also, as mentioned, the million different sets overwhelm the market. It was enough to have Topps, Fleer and Donruss, then it got out of hand. now it's all just worthless cardboard, even more so than when your dad was collecting them. They will never appreciate to any significant degree.


The point is that those cards from the 50, 60's and 70's were rare because most of them didn't survive. And in the 80's and 90's people started hording cards and companies started printing them like they were money which created a glut of cards, making them not rare. However like the poster I responded to said he threw his out, which a lot of people are doing now because they are worthless and are taking up space and will continue to do as time goes on. This is what will create a rarity for 80's and 90's cards in the future.
 
2013-04-07 02:20:17 PM
My first was 1986 topps. The year mets won the series. I'm sure I can get a set for 25 shipped. Might get one for the enjoyment.
 
2013-04-07 02:36:40 PM
Your 1983 Topps #55 Mookie Wilson card is still only worth $0.39

It's gone up!
 
2013-04-07 02:43:28 PM

Adolf Oliver Nipples: ongbok: DrBrownCow: Igor Jakovsky: The most expensive one I ever had was a '89 Ken Griffey Jr Upper Deck card.  I collected when I was a kid in the '80s.  My favorite player back then was Roger Clemens, I bet I had 50 of his early cards.  I guess I picked the wrong horse to hitch that wagon too.

/Upper Deck was the shiat back in the day.

I was collecting at about the same time.  I had a few of those Upper Deck Griffey Jr. cards and sold all but one of them for 50 dollars each ungraded.     I wish I could say I took the money and invested it, but at the time I was in graduate school and needed gas money to drive home and see my girlfriend.

Those 80s and early 90s cards aren't worth jack.  Most people won't even take them for free. I had about 20,000 cards.  I went through them with a price guide, cherry picked the best cards and put them into one 5 inch binder.  The rest of the cards I set out in a box in my alley the day before junk collection day and somebody took them.

And just for that reason when your grand kids are around 10 or twelve those 80's and 90's card will now be rare and worth some good money. And when you tell your grand kids that you had about 20k of them and threw them out, they will ready to kick your old ass.

Things are different now. That was true when it was your dad with Mantle rookies, but everybody learned from that and they're all running the same hustle, hoarding cards in the hopes that they will appreciate. . Also, as mentioned, the million different sets overwhelm the market. It was enough to have Topps, Fleer and Donruss, then it got out of hand. now it's all just worthless cardboard, even more so than when your dad was collecting them. They will never appreciate to any significant degree.


^This.

We have reached a saturation point with collectibles, and it's not just cards, it'e everything... People noticed that many old items, especially if they were branded, were worth a lot of money. So, people started collecting hoarding branded items (thermometers, advertising signs, plates, magnets, bottles of soda, Happy Meal toys...). And, of course, the companies whose material was being collected recognized this, and capitalized on it themselves, by releasing all kinds of "limited edition" exclusively numbered mass-produced crap.

Items made prior to the last half of the 20th century will always be more rare, and thus, more valuable, than similar items reproduced today, simply because people didn't hang onto everything back then. These items were also usually made of better materials (i.e. metal Lionel trains pre-WWII vs. plastic Lionel trains post-WWII). Now, everybody hoards every goddamn thing, and every 35-year old guy still has his baseball cards stashed away in some poor old hag's basement.
 
2013-04-07 02:55:18 PM

dave2198: Adolf Oliver Nipples: ongbok: DrBrownCow: Igor Jakovsky: The most expensive one I ever had was a '89 Ken Griffey Jr Upper Deck card.  I collected when I was a kid in the '80s.  My favorite player back then was Roger Clemens, I bet I had 50 of his early cards.  I guess I picked the wrong horse to hitch that wagon too.

/Upper Deck was the shiat back in the day.

I was collecting at about the same time.  I had a few of those Upper Deck Griffey Jr. cards and sold all but one of them for 50 dollars each ungraded.     I wish I could say I took the money and invested it, but at the time I was in graduate school and needed gas money to drive home and see my girlfriend.

Those 80s and early 90s cards aren't worth jack.  Most people won't even take them for free. I had about 20,000 cards.  I went through them with a price guide, cherry picked the best cards and put them into one 5 inch binder.  The rest of the cards I set out in a box in my alley the day before junk collection day and somebody took them.

And just for that reason when your grand kids are around 10 or twelve those 80's and 90's card will now be rare and worth some good money. And when you tell your grand kids that you had about 20k of them and threw them out, they will ready to kick your old ass.

Things are different now. That was true when it was your dad with Mantle rookies, but everybody learned from that and they're all running the same hustle, hoarding cards in the hopes that they will appreciate. . Also, as mentioned, the million different sets overwhelm the market. It was enough to have Topps, Fleer and Donruss, then it got out of hand. now it's all just worthless cardboard, even more so than when your dad was collecting them. They will never appreciate to any significant degree.

^This.

We have reached a saturation point with collectibles, and it's not just cards, it'e everything... People noticed that many old items, especially if they were branded, were worth a lot of money. So, people started col ...


Also, there is an assumption that the best time to sell collectibles is some far-off time in the future, when the item will surely become more scarce.  That's simply not the case.

Example 1: Ken Griffey, Jr. 1989 Upper deck rookie card. That card's peak price has already come and gone. Even if Griffey is clean of steroids, and even if he is remembered as one of the greats, and even if baseball cards recover in value, this card will never reach the ridiculous price it was demanding in the early 1990's.

Example 2: The "Death of Superman" comic book. People waited in long lines outside stores to buy this comic when it came out, thinking it would be a collectible. Well, there was one major problem. People believed a limited number of quantities were available, and the stores didn't do anything to dissuade that notion. So, the comic sold out in record time. A few days after the comic sold out, the rest of the prints made it to stores. A sea of them, actually. Thousands. Tens of thousands. The price for that comic book peaked in the 48-72 hours after the initial sell-out, but before the rest of the prints hit shelves. That comic will never be worth as much as it was for those 2-3 days.

Collectibles aren't always long-term investments. Like stocks, they can peak at unexpected times. You better know what you're doing before you start buying.
 
2013-04-07 02:59:10 PM
I spoke to a local baseball card dealer last month, and he said he buys baseball cards from the 80's and 90's in bulk. He doesn't even sort through the cards. He buys them buy the pound. They're not even worth thumbing through, they're so ubiquitous.
 
2013-04-07 03:02:08 PM
My preferred collectible cards:

gatherer.wizards.com

/worth about $600
//have one
 
2013-04-07 03:03:18 PM
Dave2198: kinda like the wii. Now pawn shops are struggling to get 50 bones. At peak they were fetching a grand
 
2013-04-07 03:05:26 PM
$0.39?  I was hoping for at least a Buck-ner.
 
2013-04-07 03:06:29 PM

try fect taa daa: Dave2198: kinda like the wii. Now pawn shops are struggling to get 50 bones. At peak they were fetching a grand


Yup, and in fact the best time to make money selling a game system is right after it comes out. Get in line at a Walmart midnight release right before the holidays and bring $500. Buy 2 game systems, and sit outside in the parking lot until it's clear they have sold out (or put them on eBay, if you're worried about getting stabbed). Sell your $500 investment for $700-800 or more. Fastest money ever.
 
2013-04-07 03:13:54 PM
I think I managed to catch the market just right.  In 1989-90, I traded a Dale Murphy 1989 Upper Deck error for a 1986 Michael Jordan "rookie" card.  Still have that card, need to get it graded some day.
 
2013-04-07 03:18:13 PM

SCUBA_Archer: I think I managed to catch the market just right.  In 1989-90, I traded a Dale Murphy 1989 Upper Deck error for a 1986 Michael Jordan "rookie" card.  Still have that card, need to get it graded some day.


I'd get it appraised soon, and sell it the day he dies. I know it's cliche, but a LOT of the yuppies on eBay buy things when people die, and at ridiculous prices.

They also bought the iron Monopoly piece for $20 when it was discontinued...

...and a box of Twinkies for $25 when it was announced they were closing... not realizing that they would likely come back.
 
2013-04-07 03:18:33 PM

Wonderduck: Your 1983 Topps #55 Mookie Wilson card is still only worth $0.39

It's gone up!


That's for Pristine 10, after you pay BGS $30 for grading
 
2013-04-07 03:20:41 PM

dave2198: SCUBA_Archer: I think I managed to catch the market just right.  In 1989-90, I traded a Dale Murphy 1989 Upper Deck error for a 1986 Michael Jordan "rookie" card.  Still have that card, need to get it graded some day.

I'd get it appraised soon, and sell it the day he dies. I know it's cliche, but a LOT of the yuppies on eBay buy things when people die, and at ridiculous prices.

They also bought the iron Monopoly piece for $20 when it was discontinued...

...and a box of Twinkies for $25 when it was announced they were closing... not realizing that they would likely come back.


Oh man candy collecting is crazy. Whenever there is a holiday edition on special edition type of candy released people will buy them up by the box, hold on to them for a few years and then sell them.
 
2013-04-07 03:27:03 PM

SCUBA_Archer: I think I managed to catch the market just right.  In 1989-90, I traded a Dale Murphy 1989 Upper Deck error for a 1986 Michael Jordan "rookie" card.  Still have that card, need to get it graded some day.


The problem is that even if the cards do go up in value, it doesn't matter because by the time they do it isn't that much money any more.  When you are a kid, the idea that your Jordan rookie card will be worth fifty bucks is amazing....that's the most money ever! You'd have to mow yards for at least a whole summer, maybe more.  By the time that card is actually worth fifty bucks, you are in your thirties and it is about one or two hours of salary, and will pay for half of a trip to the grocery store.

As far as the multi thousand dollar cards go, none of the shiat we all collected will ever be worth anywhere near that.
 
2013-04-07 03:36:46 PM
Magic is guilty of causing a lot of the same issues, but there are things that make it suck slightly less.  For one thing, you can actually play a game with them, obviously.  But also, there are certain cards that are actually unique and artificially rare that drive up the price.  Finally, big factor is that Wizards has a system of making cards older than about 2 years ago ineligible for play in many formats, forcing the player base to move onto new card sets.
 
2013-04-07 03:45:01 PM

dave2198: I spoke to a local baseball card dealer last month, and he said he buys baseball cards from the 80's and 90's in bulk. He doesn't even sort through the cards. He buys them buy the pound. They're not even worth thumbing through, they're so ubiquitous.


Doesn't surprise me in the least. Just before the bubble burst (mid 90s) there were 4 or 5 card shops in this area (pop 60,000 give or take with a few suburbs thrown in). Now? Zero. Only place you can find cards is the occasional convo store or (I suppose) Walmart.
 
2013-04-07 03:52:21 PM

SCUBA_Archer: I think I managed to catch the market just right.  In 1989-90, I traded a Dale Murphy 1989 Upper Deck error for a 1986 Michael Jordan "rookie" card.  Still have that card, need to get it graded some day.


Early 90s Jordan cards (at least the special inserts) were, well, not gold, but they were very good for trading for something you really wanted. EVeryone wanted non-basic Jordan cards. I traded one (don't remember what it was, exactly) for an autographed Alonzo Mourning ball, which I wanted more than another Jordan card. I like(d) Mike and all, don't get me wrong, but after Larry Bird retired, I pretty much focused on 'Zo.
 
2013-04-07 03:54:32 PM
How much is my late 1970s collection of "Wacky Packs" cards worth?

2.bp.blogspot.com
 
2013-04-07 03:56:35 PM

dave2198: Collectibles aren't always long-term investments. Like stocks, they can peak at unexpected times. You better know what you're doing before you start buying.


So you're saying that the bank vault I have full of beanie babies isn't gonna pay for my retirement?
 
2013-04-07 03:58:34 PM
Fished an elite series frank thomas back in the day. Taught me some good negotiating skills by dealing with the local card shops. Value was 660 back in the day...1995. Now the card sells for about 30 accroding to ebay comps. "The other shop said they would give me more..." always use one against the other.
 
2013-04-07 04:10:54 PM

SpaceBison: dave2198: Collectibles aren't always long-term investments. Like stocks, they can peak at unexpected times. You better know what you're doing before you start buying.

So you're saying that the bank vault I have full of beanie babies isn't gonna pay for my retirement?


I knew a guy who was keeping a few Furbies in unopened condition, we're talking about five boxes sitting on the top shelf of his kitchen. Wonder how that went.
 
2013-04-07 04:38:34 PM

dave2198: Items made prior to the last half of the 20th century will always be more rare, and thus, more valuable, than similar items reproduced today, simply because people didn't hang onto everything back then. These items were also usually made of better materials (i.e. metal Lionel trains pre-WWII vs. plastic Lionel trains post-WWII).


Also, there were a lot fewer people in the population. Also also, fewer still could afford cool stuff. Just about anything from the 1930s is worth money, simply because so many people couldn't buy anything but daily necessities.
 
2013-04-07 04:49:37 PM

i upped my meds-up yours: also, fewer still could afford cool stuff. Just about anything from the 1930s is worth money, simply because so many people couldn't buy anything but daily necessities.


Good point. It transcends the 'it's valuable 'cos it's old' angle and explains further why, exactly.
 
2013-04-07 04:54:34 PM

UNC_Samurai: miniflea: ole prophet: miniflea: What about my Star Trek the Next Generation CCG cards? How much are those worth? I have thousands of them in a box somewhere.

/nerd

Depends on the quality. Additionally, Book Value really means nothing compared to the population available. If you are the only person with a complete set or really nice cards, you may be surprised what they could bring.

If I recall correctly I am a hundred or so short of having every card from every expansion. One of these days I'll use ebay to exchange my duplicate rares for what I'm missing. The ones I have sleeved were mostly taken right from the packaging and never played with.

I doubt it would be worth much even as a complete set, for sure less than the nostalgia value to me.

The last time I looked (and this was a few years ago), a complete set of limited (black bordered) base set was worth something, and the Kivas Fajo collection and Data Laughing have generated enough interest in the Star Trek community at large that they have stable value.

I have about 1200 cards that I'm trying to get rid of - an 800 count box, a Two-Player starter box, and another small stack, plus about 200 cards from Fleer's TOS CCG (great mechanics, utterly putrid graphics).  I've been lazy about listing it on ebay.


I have a few black bordered cards, although the complete base set I have is white border.  It was so long ago that I don't remember what the deal was, but I do remember obtaining a Data Laughing through the original offer.  I may or may not still have that card though, I vaguely remember not being able to find it.  I've got a Fajo Collection that I picked up on ebay for way cheaper than they originally sold for, and I think I've got most of the "special edition" cards, although I may be missing a few of the "so and so of borg" cards.  Other than that I'm mostly just missing rares that I didn't get in booster packs.

Man, now I want to dig them out, and I had so much that was going to get accomplished today.
 
2013-04-07 04:57:42 PM
I find it incredibly ironic that while everyone was chasing and speculating over sports cards, all that early Magic: The Gathering stuff ended up becoming the actual speculation gold mine.  Which bears the point: The second you purchase something because you think it will be worth more, there's a thousand like you, and you're already screwed.
 
2013-04-07 05:42:50 PM

Mike_LowELL: I find it incredibly ironic that while everyone was chasing and speculating over sports cards, all that early Magic: The Gathering stuff ended up becoming the actual speculation gold mine.  Which bears the point: The second you purchase something because you think it will be worth more, there's a thousand like you, and you're already screwed.


Well I have some early Magic the gathering stuff, but I used them for playing and not collecting, so not really worth much for collectors.
 
2013-04-07 05:56:53 PM
shlabotnikreport.files.wordpress.com
 
2013-04-07 06:02:19 PM
The largest growing collectible market right now is videogames. Prices on a lot of in-demand/semi-rare NES and SNES titles are doubling or tripling every year. It's crazy.
 
2013-04-07 06:55:33 PM

Oldiron_79: Well I have some early Magic the gathering stuff, but I used them for playing and not collecting, so not really worth much for collectors.


Well, that's the second step: Not only does nobody perceive the item is a collectible, but nobody was taking good care of the items, either.  So there you go: Alpha, Beta, and Unlimited Magic: The Gathering stuff had this ridiculously low print run, and people lowered that supply by playing with the cards.  Which beats having a bunch of people storing overproduced baseball cards in perfectly controlled storage conditions.

portnoyd: The largest growing collectible market right now is videogames. Prices on a lot of in-demand/semi-rare NES and SNES titles are doubling or tripling every year. It's crazy.


I'm still not sure what to make of that market, and believe me, it's a topic that I've given a lot of looking at.  It seems to me that the regular items (i.e. desirable games with high print runs) are underpriced and the oddball items are overpriced.  Fortunately, outside of consoles like the Sega Master System, the Sega Saturn, and the Neo Geo, the really good titles are still pretty easy to come by.  We'll see how long that holds out.  That generation has disposable income now.
 
2013-04-07 07:16:33 PM
Well I have a card that is worth like nothing to most people but is worth something to me, I have a signed rookie card for a guy I work with that was a MLB bench warmer back in like the mid 90s. Where I actually know and work with the guy it has a little sentimental value for me even though its probably not worth the cardboard its printed on.
 
2013-04-07 07:25:19 PM
I disposed of my baseballs cards at the right time, back in the late 80's.  Paid for my first computer.  That computer isn't worth much today, but the career trajectory it started me on is worth a couple bucks.
 
2013-04-07 07:48:25 PM

try fect taa daa: My first was 1986 topps. The year mets won the series. I'm sure I can get a set for 25 shipped. Might get one for the enjoyment.


Same here. '86 all the way.

Hey, is my 1985 Oh-Pee-Chee Pete Rose Expos card worth anything.

/'ol Pete played for the Expos for half a season before moving to the Phillies.
//Don't care, it's hilarious to see Rose in a Canuck team's jersey.
 
2013-04-07 07:52:50 PM

Mike_LowELL: I'm still not sure what to make of that market, and believe me, it's a topic that I've given a lot of looking at. It seems to me that the regular items (i.e. desirable games with high print runs) are underpriced and the oddball items are overpriced. Fortunately, outside of consoles like the Sega Master System, the Sega Saturn, and the Neo Geo, the really good titles are still pretty easy to come by. We'll see how long that holds out. That generation has disposable income now.


Check out Ebay. You can get a NeoGeo and games for $150-200. The prices on them tend to fluctuate though. A little more than a year ago they were selling for close to $1000 with a few games on Ebay.
 
2013-04-07 07:54:11 PM
Almost forgot. A good friend of mine had a HUGE collection of early, early Magic cards. He played when he was in the Navy and the closed shipboard environment meant that large amounts of cards changed hands, many of which he won (they played by the rules, you surrender your cards or something like that when you lose).

It was weeks before the release of the first wave of repros or something when he got back to the States. Sold every card he had. Bought a Eagle Talon with the proceeds. Nowadays, Magic: The The Gathering Online Exchange is the leading Buttcoin trading center.
 
2013-04-07 08:52:14 PM

Oldiron_79: Well I have a card that is worth like nothing to most people but is worth something to me, I have a signed rookie card for a guy I work with that was a MLB bench warmer back in like the mid 90s. Where I actually know and work with the guy it has a little sentimental value for me even though its probably not worth the cardboard its printed on.


I can't remember who said it, but to paraphrase someone else: "Collect what you think is valuable, not what others think is valuable."  I collected baseball cards going through the late nineties and made the speculation mistake, and towards the end, I finally started tailing towards the sets with better aesthetic appeal.  If it's worth something to you, that's what counts.

ongbok: Check out Ebay. You can get a NeoGeo and games for $150-200. The prices on them tend to fluctuate though. A little more than a year ago they were selling for close to $1000 with a few games on Ebay.


Cool deal, I haven't actually looked into it that much.  I think I just assumed that the Neo Geo stuff would be very tough to find.  Thanks.  If push comes to shove, I've been genuinely considering the Neo Geo Gold X as a substitute, but I want that to drop down in price before going crazy on it.  (I'm almost certain that thing will be on sale for cheap someplace.  Too hardcore for the typical player, and the Neo Geo crowd already has what they want.)
 
2013-04-07 09:26:40 PM

machoprogrammer: GoldDude: My great-great-grandfather worked for the American Tobacco Company.  We recently sold the house that had been in the family for generations.  Cleaning out the attic I found a box marked "Recalled Honus Wager Cards".  It looks like there's about a thousand or so in mint state, right-off-the-printing press.  I wonder if this new supply source is going to affect the demand and/or auction prices?

Assuming you are telling the truth, that would be the biggest news in the collecting world possibly ever. And you would be a very rich person.


Alas, no 'tis not a true tale.
But my point is that if I did make such a find, I would not have a thousand cards worth $2M each ($2.0B).  So maybe the price collapses to $100K, and I've still got $100M worth of cards.  But if I find 1M of these cards in a warehouse, then the price probably collapses to $0.39.  At some point, it would make more sense to destroy any new cards found to maintain the low supply and the high price.
 
2013-04-07 09:36:16 PM

GoldDude: machoprogrammer: GoldDude: My great-great-grandfather worked for the American Tobacco Company.  We recently sold the house that had been in the family for generations.  Cleaning out the attic I found a box marked "Recalled Honus Wager Cards".  It looks like there's about a thousand or so in mint state, right-off-the-printing press.  I wonder if this new supply source is going to affect the demand and/or auction prices?

Assuming you are telling the truth, that would be the biggest news in the collecting world possibly ever. And you would be a very rich person.

Alas, no 'tis not a true tale.
But my point is that if I did make such a find, I would not have a thousand cards worth $2M each ($2.0B).  So maybe the price collapses to $100K, and I've still got $100M worth of cards.  But if I find 1M of these cards in a warehouse, then the price probably collapses to $0.39.  At some point, it would make more sense to destroy any new cards found to maintain the low supply and the high price.


That is very true.
 
2013-04-07 10:36:32 PM

Mike_LowELL: Cool deal, I haven't actually looked into it that much.  I think I just assumed that the Neo Geo stuff would be very tough to find.  Thanks.  If push comes to shove, I've been genuinely considering the Neo Geo Gold X as a substitute, but I want that to drop down in price before going crazy on it.  (I'm almost certain that thing will be on sale for cheap someplace.  Too hardcore for the typical player, and the Neo Geo crowd already has what they want.)


Before you go for the Neo Geo X Gold, check out this review from Ashens.

A friend of mine brought out his Magic cards from 15-20 years ago to try out against my Eldrazi deck.  After I destroyed him, he offered to give me his cards, as they seemed pretty useless.  I decided to be nice and tell him how much his dozen or so Revised Dual Lands were worth...
 
2013-04-07 11:44:05 PM
Wow, was that really thirty years ago?

Mooooookie!
Moooooooooooooookie!
 
2013-04-08 12:04:18 AM

Oldiron_79: machoprogrammer: Oldiron_79: I need to see what my baseball card collection is worth, I know it was worth quite a bit before the bottom fell out of the market during the 90s player strike. Most if not all of the players from the 80s and early 90s are retired now.

Also I have some like 50s/60s cards that was dads when he was a kid, I know some of those are worth money.

Most cards in the 80s and 90s aren't worth crap, unfortunately. I have a bunch in my parents house.

Well average Joe Schmuck cards from the '80s aren't worth money, I'm pretty sure that like a Barry Bonds Rookie card is worth some money,




Not really, maybe if its graded a 10, but they didn't short print rookie cards back then.
 
2013-04-08 12:13:53 AM

ongbok: DrBrownCow: Igor Jakovsky: The most expensive one I ever had was a '89 Ken Griffey Jr Upper Deck card.  I collected when I was a kid in the '80s.  My favorite player back then was Roger Clemens, I bet I had 50 of his early cards.  I guess I picked the wrong horse to hitch that wagon too.

/Upper Deck was the shiat back in the day.

I was collecting at about the same time.  I had a few of those Upper Deck Griffey Jr. cards and sold all but one of them for 50 dollars each ungraded.     I wish I could say I took the money and invested it, but at the time I was in graduate school and needed gas money to drive home and see my girlfriend.

Those 80s and early 90s cards aren't worth jack.  Most people won't even take them for free. I had about 20,000 cards.  I went through them with a price guide, cherry picked the best cards and put them into one 5 inch binder.  The rest of the cards I set out in a box in my alley the day before junk collection day and somebody took them.

And just for that reason when your grand kids are around 10 or twelve those 80's and 90's card will now be rare and worth some good money. And when you tell your grand kids that you had about 20k of them and threw them out, they will ready to kick your old ass.




Lmao, have you been reading anything in this thread? FFs
 
2013-04-08 12:21:54 AM

ongbok: Adolf Oliver Nipples: ongbok: DrBrownCow: Igor Jakovsky: The most expensive one I ever had was a '89 Ken Griffey Jr Upper Deck card.  I collected when I was a kid in the '80s.  My favorite player back then was Roger Clemens, I bet I had 50 of his early cards.  I guess I picked the wrong horse to hitch that wagon too.

/Upper Deck was the shiat back in the day.

I was collecting at about the same time.  I had a few of those Upper Deck Griffey Jr. cards and sold all but one of them for 50 dollars each ungraded.     I wish I could say I took the money and invested it, but at the time I was in graduate school and needed gas money to drive home and see my girlfriend.

Those 80s and early 90s cards aren't worth jack.  Most people won't even take them for free. I had about 20,000 cards.  I went through them with a price guide, cherry picked the best cards and put them into one 5 inch binder.  The rest of the cards I set out in a box in my alley the day before junk collection day and somebody took them.

And just for that reason when your grand kids are around 10 or twelve those 80's and 90's card will now be rare and worth some good money. And when you tell your grand kids that you had about 20k of them and threw them out, they will ready to kick your old ass.

Things are different now. That was true when it was your dad with Mantle rookies, but everybody learned from that and they're all running the same hustle, hoarding cards in the hopes that they will appreciate. . Also, as mentioned, the million different sets overwhelm the market. It was enough to have Topps, Fleer and Donruss, then it got out of hand. now it's all just worthless cardboard, even more so than when your dad was collecting them. They will never appreciate to any significant degree.

The point is that those cards from the 50, 60's and 70's were rare because most of them didn't survive. And in the 80's and 90's people started hording cards and companies started printing them like they were money which cre ...




So are you investing money in 80s and 90s common cards? Lol
 
2013-04-08 01:12:05 AM
Wish I had this card, my most valuable one is about $15-$20.
 
2013-04-08 07:24:15 AM

BakaDono: Before you go for the Neo Geo X Gold, check out this review from Ashens.


Hmmm, thanks for the heads-up.  Eh.  Guess it's time to be a hipster and buy the old stuff.

BakaDono: A friend of mine brought out his Magic cards from 15-20 years ago to try out against my Eldrazi deck. After I destroyed him, he offered to give me his cards, as they seemed pretty useless. I decided to be nice and tell him how much his dozen or so Revised Dual Lands were worth...


Yeah, I got into the game around 1997, so the era of high print runs was already in full force.  The only card I own which really, really brings any value is a Gaea's Cradle.  Hilariously broken thing.  Good lord.
 
2013-04-08 08:17:26 AM

Mike_LowELL: BakaDono: Before you go for the Neo Geo X Gold, check out this review from Ashens.

Hmmm, thanks for the heads-up.  Eh.  Guess it's time to be a hipster and buy the old stuff.

BakaDono: A friend of mine brought out his Magic cards from 15-20 years ago to try out against my Eldrazi deck. After I destroyed him, he offered to give me his cards, as they seemed pretty useless. I decided to be nice and tell him how much his dozen or so Revised Dual Lands were worth...

Yeah, I got into the game around 1997, so the era of high print runs was already in full force.  The only card I own which really, really brings any value is a Gaea's Cradle.  Hilariously broken thing.  Good lord.


I got in magic around the time it launched so Ive got cards from the first couple of editions I quit maybe a yar or two after you got in. The last time I broke out my deck to play with some whippersnappers a few years ago they was all like OMG you are playing with like Alpha and Beta stuff, that would be collectable if it was mint.
 
2013-04-08 09:34:35 AM

ongbok: MatrixOutsider: You can also thank Ebay for flooding the market with cards and lowering their value. Whatever happened to Renata Galasso anyway?

The market died even before that. Back in the day it was kids buying the cards, trading with each other to get cards to complete their sets, and playing all types of games with the cards that destroyed most of them. Between that and parents throwing out cards, not a lot survived and they were rare and collectable. Then in the 90's companies decided to cash in on this market and started producing premium card sets. These sets priced the kids out of the card market, and the buyers of cards went from kids that would destroy most of the cards to adults that bought cards, encased them in plastic and stored them. So now there really aren't anymore rare cards from probably 1990 on, even the cards that were purposely printed in limited quantities to create a rarity aren't rare because adults bought them all and stored them away.


Same thing happened to the early 90's comic book industry.  One story about a sole-surviving issue from the 30'shiats the news when it fetches 5 figures at auction, and before you can say "market bubble", the publishers are re-launching titles with new #1 issues, selling multiple cover versions of the same comic or coming with extras like stickers or foil holograms and making sure they all come in plastic bags you can seal so they'll stay pristine and be worth something "someday".  And since everyone and his brother bought that stuff convinced they were the only one smart enough to "hang on" to it convinced they could retire on the money they'd surely get for it in the far-off year 2001.....  the result was predictable. Nothing from that era is worth more than the bag it's still stored in today.
 
2013-04-08 09:36:14 AM

Oldiron_79: machoprogrammer: Oldiron_79: I need to see what my baseball card collection is worth, I know it was worth quite a bit before the bottom fell out of the market during the 90s player strike. Most if not all of the players from the 80s and early 90s are retired now.

Also I have some like 50s/60s cards that was dads when he was a kid, I know some of those are worth money.

Most cards in the 80s and 90s aren't worth crap, unfortunately. I have a bunch in my parents house.

Well average Joe Schmuck cards from the '80s aren't worth money, I'm pretty sure that like a Barry Bonds Rookie card is worth some money,


One of the main reasons older baseball cards are worth something is because they are rare. There are only 50 Honus Wagner cards in existence. How many hundreds of thousands (if not millions) of Baseball cards are produced every year...and how many people are holding their cards thinking they will be worth something in the future? I know people who buy box sets, year after year. and have like 20-30 years worth of cards.

50 years from now (I think) there is still going to be a lot of cards in existence. Sure, that Barry Bond card will be worth something, but it's probably never gonna be that rare.....and thus never that valuable.
 
2013-04-08 09:52:35 AM

KFBR392: 50 years from now (I think) there is still going to be a lot of cards in existence. Sure, that Barry Bond card will be worth something, but it's probably never gonna be that rare.....and thus never that valuable.


I have a couple shoe boxes stuffed with 79 Topps MLB cards.  I'm sure there's nothing in there worth more than a buck or two, if that.  But damned if I can't bring myself to throw them out.  It's sentimental more than anything.  Being 12 and getting a couple quarters together to go up to High's and pick up some baseball cards and maybe some candy.

I bought a few packs now and then as I got older, but nothing like back then when I thought I was "collecting".  I think the most interesting card I remember getting was a Frank Thomas rookie card with him in his Auburn uniform.  No idea if that is anything special.
 
2013-04-08 02:33:50 PM
Here's another T206 Honus Wagner that will be sold later this month--this one with a better story. It was once owned by Charlie Sheen, who loaned it to the All-Star Cafe in New York where it was stolen by a couple of chefs in the 1990s.
 
2013-04-08 02:37:37 PM

Ripken: Here's another T206 Honus Wagner that will be sold later this month--this one with a better story. It was once owned by Charlie Sheen, who loaned it to the All-Star Cafe in New York where it was stolen by a couple of chefs in the 1990s.

 
2013-04-08 06:30:50 PM

ISO15693: How much is my late 1970s collection of "Wacky Packs" cards worth?

[2.bp.blogspot.com image 850x620]


Funniest things EVAR!

http://images.search.yahoo.com/search/images?_adv_prop=image&fr=moz3 5& va=wacky+packs
 
2013-04-08 07:22:37 PM
<cool story bro>
Back in 1995 or so, I was teaching in a Twin Cities high school, and I saw a bunch of kids every day after class playing Magic for a few hours.  The first time I sat down to play with them, they were still in that frame of mind where they played every card they owned.  My first opponent dropped a stack of about 400 cards in front of him and said, "When I get through this stack, I'll get the next part of my deck from the box, okay?"
Me, with my mostly well tuned 70 card deck: "You're not gonna get through that stack."

I got at least one teacher mad at me, but not for playing cards with students; I introduced her husband (another teacher) to the game, and he gave up his other hobby (yachting) for it.
</csb>
 
2013-04-09 12:48:26 AM

GoldDude: machoprogrammer: GoldDude: My great-great-grandfather worked for the American Tobacco Company.  We recently sold the house that had been in the family for generations.  Cleaning out the attic I found a box marked "Recalled Honus Wager Cards".  It looks like there's about a thousand or so in mint state, right-off-the-printing press.  I wonder if this new supply source is going to affect the demand and/or auction prices?

Assuming you are telling the truth, that would be the biggest news in the collecting world possibly ever. And you would be a very rich person.

Alas, no 'tis not a true tale.
But my point is that if I did make such a find, I would not have a thousand cards worth $2M each ($2.0B).  So maybe the price collapses to $100K, and I've still got $100M worth of cards.  But if I find 1M of these cards in a warehouse, then the price probably collapses to $0.39.  At some point, it would make more sense to destroy any new cards found to maintain the low supply and the high price.


You could still make a lot of money, if you got... creative.

The price only drops once people realize there is an increased supply. If you eBay one card a week for a year, people will figure out the supply has increased. If you eBay one card, then private message every losing bidder, and tell each of them that the original buyer fell through, and that you'd like to sell them the card, you could probably sell 10+ cards per auction, at prices based on the earlier supply.
 
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