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(CNN)   T206 Honus Wagner baseball card sells for $2.1 million. Your 1983 Topps #55 Mookie Wilson card is still only worth $0.39   (money.cnn.com) divider line 141
    More: Followup, Mookie, baseball cards, short supply, Topps, West Berlin, Holy Grail, first World Series  
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4487 clicks; posted to Main » on 07 Apr 2013 at 9:24 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-04-07 11:36:05 AM

Igor Jakovsky: /Upper Deck was the shiat back in the day.


an upper decker still is a shiat
 
2013-04-07 11:39:02 AM

dave2198: MatrixOutsider: You can also thank Ebay Topps for flooding the market with cards and lowering their value. Whatever happened to Renata Galasso anyway?

FTFY.

The problem isn't eBay, the problem is that every card from the 80's and 90's were heavily mass produced compared to older cards. This, combined with everybody being aware of their potential value and holding onto them, has meant a gluttony of cards from that era have survived in mint condition.


True, but Ebay forced people to sell at wholesale prices to compete with other sellers. Selling became convenient, and it became a buyer's market. In the past, you had to take an ad out in the paper to sell cards, so you could charge higher prices.
 
2013-04-07 11:39:31 AM
upload.wikimedia.org
 
2013-04-07 11:40:17 AM

miniflea: What about my Star Trek the Next Generation CCG cards? How much are those worth? I have thousands of them in a box somewhere.

/nerd


Depends on the quality. Additionally, Book Value really means nothing compared to the population available. If you are the only person with a complete set or really nice cards, you may be surprised what they could bring.
 
2013-04-07 11:41:55 AM

Hollie Maea: John Buck 41: For those of you who are/were into the hobby, check out 'Card Sharks: How Upper Deck Turned a Child's Hobby into a High-Stakes, Billion-Dollar Business'.

Written in 1995 so some may find it dated, but it features lots of fascinating back stories/anecdotes.
Link

When I was a kid, it was all about the "errors".  We were all sure that our shiatty ass Nolan Ryan card was the error one worth fifteen bucks. And we were always scrutinizing our cards to find an error no one had noticed. At some point in the nineties, the card companies figured out it was easier to just make limited run cards with a piece of sweaty jersey in it and sell them directly to adults who hadn't let go of their dream of making it big with sports cards.


I remember looking for the errors. I remember at one point a few companies were accused of purposely making error cards to create a run on their sets..I also remember that the ink on the first sets of Upper Deck cards could easily be erased from the card with a pencil eraser, so there were a lot of people creating fake error cards.
 
2013-04-07 11:50:22 AM

ole prophet: miniflea: What about my Star Trek the Next Generation CCG cards? How much are those worth? I have thousands of them in a box somewhere.

/nerd

Depends on the quality. Additionally, Book Value really means nothing compared to the population available. If you are the only person with a complete set or really nice cards, you may be surprised what they could bring.


As someone with a ton of out-of-print CCGs, I've found that you have to find the communities dedicated to the cards.  I had some old Guardians boxes I had picked up at an old GenCon for $5 a piece, opened, and never bothered to learn how to play.  Last fall I sold them to some guy in Sweden for about $10/piece.  Not exactly the kind of windfall profit people are hoping for, but it cleared out shelf space, and the shipping was only mildly outrageous.

ongbok: MatrixOutsider: You can also thank Ebay for flooding the market with cards and lowering their value. Whatever happened to Renata Galasso anyway?

The market died even before that. Back in the day it was kids buying the cards, trading with each other to get cards to complete their sets, and playing all types of games with the cards that destroyed most of them. Between that and parents throwing out cards, not a lot survived and they were rare and collectable. Then in the 90's companies decided to cash in on this market and started producing premium card sets. These sets priced the kids out of the card market, and the buyers of cards went from kids that would destroy most of the cards to adults that bought cards, encased them in plastic and stored them. So now there really aren't anymore rare cards from probably 1990 on, even the cards that were purposely printed in limited quantities to create a rarity aren't rare because adults bought them all and stored them away.


For a long time Topps was literally the only game in town, until a 1981 court ruling that allowed other companies to seek licenses.  That's why you see the gradual expansion of Fleer, Donruss, and Score into the baseball market in the mid-80s.  But Topps' deal with the NFLPA was exclusive through 1988, so the football market did open up until 1989 - coincidentally, the same year Upper Deck got into the business in general, and they were the catalyst for transitioning sports cards from hobby to collectors' industry.
 
2013-04-07 11:56:08 AM
i220.photobucket.com
 
2013-04-07 11:58:47 AM

UNC_Samurai: ole prophet: miniflea: What about my Star Trek the Next Generation CCG cards? How much are those worth? I have thousands of them in a box somewhere.

/nerd

Depends on the quality. Additionally, Book Value really means nothing compared to the population available. If you are the only person with a complete set or really nice cards, you may be surprised what they could bring.

As someone with a ton of out-of-print CCGs, I've found that you have to find the communities dedicated to the cards. I had some old Guardians boxes I had picked up at an old GenCon for $5 a piece, opened, and never bothered to learn how to play. Last fall I sold them to some guy in Sweden for about $10/piece. Not exactly the kind of windfall profit people are hoping for, but it cleared out shelf space, and the shipping was only mildly outrageous.


Yep you are right. There is a collectors community for just about anything you can imagine, you just have to find them. And within in those communities stuff that most people from outside of that community  wouldn't think was valuable can get you quite a bit of money. I just recently found out that there is a collectors community for IPods. With the values on them ranging from less than a hundred dollars to a few thousand dollars for certain editions.
 
2013-04-07 12:00:06 PM

ole prophet: miniflea: What about my Star Trek the Next Generation CCG cards? How much are those worth? I have thousands of them in a box somewhere.

/nerd

Depends on the quality. Additionally, Book Value really means nothing compared to the population available. If you are the only person with a complete set or really nice cards, you may be surprised what they could bring.


If I recall correctly I am a hundred or so short of having every card from every expansion. One of these days I'll use ebay to exchange my duplicate rares for what I'm missing. The ones I have sleeved were mostly taken right from the packaging and never played with.

I doubt it would be worth much even as a complete set, for sure less than the nostalgia value to me.
 
2013-04-07 12:06:15 PM

ongbok: On the other hand if you have a Bowman, Fleer card or an Opeechee card there wasn't as many of those produced so they are rarer and worth more.


Holy shiat.  Instant transport back to childhood.  I used to collect cards with my Dad when I was a kid.  We'd go to shows and stuff all the time.  I haven't heard either of those companies mentioned in my presence in maybe 15-20 years.  I've got a bunch of Bowman & Fleer cards rattling around the house here somewhere.  Was never a big fan of the cheapy-feeling Topps crap.  I know I have 2 complete Upper Deck 1989 sets (one sealed from the factory)... wonder if those are worth anything now.
 
2013-04-07 12:16:18 PM
i.imgur.com

Did someone say sideburns?
/I think we've seen FF enough for today
 
2013-04-07 12:25:21 PM

miniflea: ole prophet: miniflea: What about my Star Trek the Next Generation CCG cards? How much are those worth? I have thousands of them in a box somewhere.

/nerd

Depends on the quality. Additionally, Book Value really means nothing compared to the population available. If you are the only person with a complete set or really nice cards, you may be surprised what they could bring.

If I recall correctly I am a hundred or so short of having every card from every expansion. One of these days I'll use ebay to exchange my duplicate rares for what I'm missing. The ones I have sleeved were mostly taken right from the packaging and never played with.

I doubt it would be worth much even as a complete set, for sure less than the nostalgia value to me.


And that is all that really matters. If it makes you feel good or happy, hold on to them. Browse around eBay or COMC.com and see what you have been missing. I'm not into "nerd" cards (though I suppose if you collect any card you are a nerd on some level) but if they are anything like sports cards there is some seriously sick looking cards out there nowadays.
 
2013-04-07 12:28:53 PM

Igor Jakovsky: I found this Honus Wagner card while raking leaves under the porch.


Item condition: Acceptable
images4.wikia.nocookie.net
 
2013-04-07 12:39:41 PM

miniflea: ole prophet: miniflea: What about my Star Trek the Next Generation CCG cards? How much are those worth? I have thousands of them in a box somewhere.

/nerd

Depends on the quality. Additionally, Book Value really means nothing compared to the population available. If you are the only person with a complete set or really nice cards, you may be surprised what they could bring.

If I recall correctly I am a hundred or so short of having every card from every expansion. One of these days I'll use ebay to exchange my duplicate rares for what I'm missing. The ones I have sleeved were mostly taken right from the packaging and never played with.

I doubt it would be worth much even as a complete set, for sure less than the nostalgia value to me.


The last time I looked (and this was a few years ago), a complete set of limited (black bordered) base set was worth something, and the Kivas Fajo collection and Data Laughing have generated enough interest in the Star Trek community at large that they have stable value.

I have about 1200 cards that I'm trying to get rid of - an 800 count box, a Two-Player starter box, and another small stack, plus about 200 cards from Fleer's TOS CCG (great mechanics, utterly putrid graphics).  I've been lazy about listing it on ebay.
 
2013-04-07 12:49:58 PM
Hey, did anybody post the Billy Ripken Fark Face card yet?
 
2013-04-07 12:57:20 PM
I've got every complete Factory set from Topps, beginning with the 1988 set.  All still wrapped in plastic.

/they ain't worth the $50 or more I've paid for each one
//don't know why I keep getting them every year
 
2013-04-07 01:05:20 PM
So when I was going to college I threw all my baseball cards into storage, and sold all my hockey cards. Those baseball cards are still worthless. But some of those hockey cards would have been worth a lot now.
 
2013-04-07 01:13:11 PM
I found some old Adams Family and The Monkey's cards.
 
2013-04-07 01:13:29 PM
fark some baseball cards.  I started collecting football cards after the 89 season, boring ass TOPPS.
Then I discovered Pro Set, then started buy box sets of Score cards every Christmas.

Anyway, I remember the 2 cards I wanted most was a 1981 Lawrence Taylor rookie card, book value said $35, and a  197? Joe Montana rookie card, book said $200

Local shop had the LT card for exactly $35, got that and was so proud of it. Gave it away a few years later after he was arrested for cocaine.

Checked the pricing of cards lately, it is horrible. The Montana card was $50 I think? LT was $5 or something crazy.

Having 86 different companies helped me lose interest. I'm not spending a crapload of money for packs of cards and not even breaking even. Sure collecting is fun but they jacked the prices up too much and who wants 108 duplicates of the Detroit Lions back up tight end? No me.


CSB?
 
2013-04-07 01:13:37 PM

Adolf Oliver Nipples: Hey, did anybody post the Billy Ripken Fark Face card yet?


I haven't noticed, too busy "laughing" at multitude of Pawn Stars cliches
 
2013-04-07 01:16:00 PM

puppetmaster745: I know the book says it's worth $0.39, but the picture is a little off center and the market is really, really tough lately. It's probably going to sit in the shop for a year and I'll end up taking the first $0.20 offer. I can give you $0.05.


You have the rare off-center Mookie Wilson error card? I'll take eight!
 
2013-04-07 01:18:08 PM
What killed it for me was the fact there was 1000 different sets per year. Fleer. Fleer Ultra. Fleer Elite. Fleer Flair. etc.
 
2013-04-07 01:19:36 PM

Arkanaut: puppetmaster745: I know the book says it's worth $0.39, but the picture is a little off center and the market is really, really tough lately. It's probably going to sit in the shop for a year and I'll end up taking the first $0.20 offer. I can give you $0.05.

You have the rare off-center Mookie Wilson error card? I'll take eight!


Oh  Arkanaut, you are finally becoming a crafty consumer!
 
2013-04-07 01:20:21 PM
And to think I feel silly when I pay a couple bucks for a Magic card. At least a Rancor doesn't cost a million bucks.

/can't beat Rancor in a green deck
 
2013-04-07 01:21:14 PM
A first series gpk set is worth 500 now. A box of em was $12 originally--now worth 2000. Fark late 80s bb cards, but hats off to whoever brought up score. I had forgot about them.1986 fleer update ftw.
 
2013-04-07 01:24:49 PM
Started collecting Topps cards a few years back to give to my son when he grows up...completed a '67 set, bought a 73 complete set and every sealed set 89 through 2013

Blew a few grand on cards that are just sitting around taking up space

My whole collection comes down to maybe 10 good cards, Seaver rookie, Schmidt rookie and Carew rookie...and a few other 67 cards that were expensive (around 50-100 bucks)

Even if I wanted to unload them I *might* make up my initial investment.

Pay for his college it won't

It was fun, and I learned a lot. I thought I was going to keep going with 68 set through 72, but it's just not worth it
 
2013-04-07 01:33:25 PM
This thread made me nostalgic for my childhood. I've just bought the whole set of Planet of the Apes cards from the sixties because of that.
Curse you and thank you, subby.
www.trading-cards.org
 
2013-04-07 01:38:13 PM
New cards are 4 bucks a pack. Eff that noise.
 
2013-04-07 01:57:20 PM

Swoop1809: And to think I feel silly when I pay a couple bucks for a Magic card. At least a Rancor doesn't cost a million bucks.

/can't beat Rancor in a green deck


i.imgur.com

^^^ Sold for $25,000 in 2010

/I find Skullclamp is superior on tempo if you're running the 8 1/1s (especially the Herald: tutor for Hermit and draw 2 for 2+G), but Birds + Rancor is a fun way to win
//nerdcore!
 
2013-04-07 01:59:56 PM

Igor Jakovsky: The most expensive one I ever had was a '89 Ken Griffey Jr Upper Deck card.  I collected when I was a kid in the '80s.  My favorite player back then was Roger Clemens, I bet I had 50 of his early cards.  I guess I picked the wrong horse to hitch that wagon too.

/Upper Deck was the shiat back in the day.


I was collecting at about the same time.  I had a few of those Upper Deck Griffey Jr. cards and sold all but one of them for 50 dollars each ungraded.     I wish I could say I took the money and invested it, but at the time I was in graduate school and needed gas money to drive home and see my girlfriend.

Those 80s and early 90s cards aren't worth jack.  Most people won't even take them for free. I had about 20,000 cards.  I went through them with a price guide, cherry picked the best cards and put them into one 5 inch binder.  The rest of the cards I set out in a box in my alley the day before junk collection day and somebody took them.
 
2013-04-07 02:06:56 PM
Makes me wonder what my '87 twins card set is worth. Probably ~$3.50.
 
2013-04-07 02:07:06 PM

DrBrownCow: Igor Jakovsky: The most expensive one I ever had was a '89 Ken Griffey Jr Upper Deck card.  I collected when I was a kid in the '80s.  My favorite player back then was Roger Clemens, I bet I had 50 of his early cards.  I guess I picked the wrong horse to hitch that wagon too.

/Upper Deck was the shiat back in the day.

I was collecting at about the same time.  I had a few of those Upper Deck Griffey Jr. cards and sold all but one of them for 50 dollars each ungraded.     I wish I could say I took the money and invested it, but at the time I was in graduate school and needed gas money to drive home and see my girlfriend.

Those 80s and early 90s cards aren't worth jack.  Most people won't even take them for free. I had about 20,000 cards.  I went through them with a price guide, cherry picked the best cards and put them into one 5 inch binder.  The rest of the cards I set out in a box in my alley the day before junk collection day and somebody took them.


And just for that reason when your grand kids are around 10 or twelve those 80's and 90's card will now be rare and worth some good money. And when you tell your grand kids that you had about 20k of them and threw them out, they will ready to kick your old ass.
 
2013-04-07 02:11:28 PM
I collected cards in the early 90's and gave up when there were dozens of sets for each sport each year. The last time I looked through a Beckett, there was 30+ sets for basketball for one year. fark that.

A friend traded a 1992 Topps Stadium Club Refractor Shaq card for a Game Gear and games. I think both lost on that deal. :)
 
2013-04-07 02:11:31 PM
A little thread jack here. Is anybody watching the Cubs/Braves game? Jeff Samardzijia just struck out 6 hitters in a row. The only hit he gave up was to Upton to lead off the game.
 
2013-04-07 02:13:02 PM

zekeburger: I collected cards in the early 90's and gave up when there were dozens of sets for each sport each year. The last time I looked through a Beckett, there was 30+ sets for basketball for one year. fark that.

A friend traded a 1992 Topps Stadium Club Refractor Shaq card for a Game Gear and games. I think both lost on that deal. :)


There were no winners that day.
 
2013-04-07 02:13:31 PM

try fect taa daa: New cards are 4 bucks a pack. Eff that noise.


They've been around that price since the mid-90s on (with a few exceptions). 4 bucks for a dozen? Maybe every now and then. 4 bucks for 4 or 5? Screw that.
 
2013-04-07 02:13:42 PM

ongbok: DrBrownCow: Igor Jakovsky: The most expensive one I ever had was a '89 Ken Griffey Jr Upper Deck card.  I collected when I was a kid in the '80s.  My favorite player back then was Roger Clemens, I bet I had 50 of his early cards.  I guess I picked the wrong horse to hitch that wagon too.

/Upper Deck was the shiat back in the day.

I was collecting at about the same time.  I had a few of those Upper Deck Griffey Jr. cards and sold all but one of them for 50 dollars each ungraded.     I wish I could say I took the money and invested it, but at the time I was in graduate school and needed gas money to drive home and see my girlfriend.

Those 80s and early 90s cards aren't worth jack.  Most people won't even take them for free. I had about 20,000 cards.  I went through them with a price guide, cherry picked the best cards and put them into one 5 inch binder.  The rest of the cards I set out in a box in my alley the day before junk collection day and somebody took them.

And just for that reason when your grand kids are around 10 or twelve those 80's and 90's card will now be rare and worth some good money. And when you tell your grand kids that you had about 20k of them and threw them out, they will ready to kick your old ass.


Things are different now. That was true when it was your dad with Mantle rookies, but everybody learned from that and they're all running the same hustle, hoarding cards in the hopes that they will appreciate. . Also, as mentioned, the million different sets overwhelm the market. It was enough to have Topps, Fleer and Donruss, then it got out of hand. now it's all just worthless cardboard, even more so than when your dad was collecting them. They will never appreciate to any significant degree.
 
2013-04-07 02:19:58 PM

Adolf Oliver Nipples: ongbok: DrBrownCow: Igor Jakovsky: The most expensive one I ever had was a '89 Ken Griffey Jr Upper Deck card.  I collected when I was a kid in the '80s.  My favorite player back then was Roger Clemens, I bet I had 50 of his early cards.  I guess I picked the wrong horse to hitch that wagon too.

/Upper Deck was the shiat back in the day.

I was collecting at about the same time.  I had a few of those Upper Deck Griffey Jr. cards and sold all but one of them for 50 dollars each ungraded.     I wish I could say I took the money and invested it, but at the time I was in graduate school and needed gas money to drive home and see my girlfriend.

Those 80s and early 90s cards aren't worth jack.  Most people won't even take them for free. I had about 20,000 cards.  I went through them with a price guide, cherry picked the best cards and put them into one 5 inch binder.  The rest of the cards I set out in a box in my alley the day before junk collection day and somebody took them.

And just for that reason when your grand kids are around 10 or twelve those 80's and 90's card will now be rare and worth some good money. And when you tell your grand kids that you had about 20k of them and threw them out, they will ready to kick your old ass.

Things are different now. That was true when it was your dad with Mantle rookies, but everybody learned from that and they're all running the same hustle, hoarding cards in the hopes that they will appreciate. . Also, as mentioned, the million different sets overwhelm the market. It was enough to have Topps, Fleer and Donruss, then it got out of hand. now it's all just worthless cardboard, even more so than when your dad was collecting them. They will never appreciate to any significant degree.


The point is that those cards from the 50, 60's and 70's were rare because most of them didn't survive. And in the 80's and 90's people started hording cards and companies started printing them like they were money which created a glut of cards, making them not rare. However like the poster I responded to said he threw his out, which a lot of people are doing now because they are worthless and are taking up space and will continue to do as time goes on. This is what will create a rarity for 80's and 90's cards in the future.
 
2013-04-07 02:20:17 PM
My first was 1986 topps. The year mets won the series. I'm sure I can get a set for 25 shipped. Might get one for the enjoyment.
 
2013-04-07 02:36:40 PM
Your 1983 Topps #55 Mookie Wilson card is still only worth $0.39

It's gone up!
 
2013-04-07 02:43:28 PM

Adolf Oliver Nipples: ongbok: DrBrownCow: Igor Jakovsky: The most expensive one I ever had was a '89 Ken Griffey Jr Upper Deck card.  I collected when I was a kid in the '80s.  My favorite player back then was Roger Clemens, I bet I had 50 of his early cards.  I guess I picked the wrong horse to hitch that wagon too.

/Upper Deck was the shiat back in the day.

I was collecting at about the same time.  I had a few of those Upper Deck Griffey Jr. cards and sold all but one of them for 50 dollars each ungraded.     I wish I could say I took the money and invested it, but at the time I was in graduate school and needed gas money to drive home and see my girlfriend.

Those 80s and early 90s cards aren't worth jack.  Most people won't even take them for free. I had about 20,000 cards.  I went through them with a price guide, cherry picked the best cards and put them into one 5 inch binder.  The rest of the cards I set out in a box in my alley the day before junk collection day and somebody took them.

And just for that reason when your grand kids are around 10 or twelve those 80's and 90's card will now be rare and worth some good money. And when you tell your grand kids that you had about 20k of them and threw them out, they will ready to kick your old ass.

Things are different now. That was true when it was your dad with Mantle rookies, but everybody learned from that and they're all running the same hustle, hoarding cards in the hopes that they will appreciate. . Also, as mentioned, the million different sets overwhelm the market. It was enough to have Topps, Fleer and Donruss, then it got out of hand. now it's all just worthless cardboard, even more so than when your dad was collecting them. They will never appreciate to any significant degree.


^This.

We have reached a saturation point with collectibles, and it's not just cards, it'e everything... People noticed that many old items, especially if they were branded, were worth a lot of money. So, people started collecting hoarding branded items (thermometers, advertising signs, plates, magnets, bottles of soda, Happy Meal toys...). And, of course, the companies whose material was being collected recognized this, and capitalized on it themselves, by releasing all kinds of "limited edition" exclusively numbered mass-produced crap.

Items made prior to the last half of the 20th century will always be more rare, and thus, more valuable, than similar items reproduced today, simply because people didn't hang onto everything back then. These items were also usually made of better materials (i.e. metal Lionel trains pre-WWII vs. plastic Lionel trains post-WWII). Now, everybody hoards every goddamn thing, and every 35-year old guy still has his baseball cards stashed away in some poor old hag's basement.
 
2013-04-07 02:55:18 PM

dave2198: Adolf Oliver Nipples: ongbok: DrBrownCow: Igor Jakovsky: The most expensive one I ever had was a '89 Ken Griffey Jr Upper Deck card.  I collected when I was a kid in the '80s.  My favorite player back then was Roger Clemens, I bet I had 50 of his early cards.  I guess I picked the wrong horse to hitch that wagon too.

/Upper Deck was the shiat back in the day.

I was collecting at about the same time.  I had a few of those Upper Deck Griffey Jr. cards and sold all but one of them for 50 dollars each ungraded.     I wish I could say I took the money and invested it, but at the time I was in graduate school and needed gas money to drive home and see my girlfriend.

Those 80s and early 90s cards aren't worth jack.  Most people won't even take them for free. I had about 20,000 cards.  I went through them with a price guide, cherry picked the best cards and put them into one 5 inch binder.  The rest of the cards I set out in a box in my alley the day before junk collection day and somebody took them.

And just for that reason when your grand kids are around 10 or twelve those 80's and 90's card will now be rare and worth some good money. And when you tell your grand kids that you had about 20k of them and threw them out, they will ready to kick your old ass.

Things are different now. That was true when it was your dad with Mantle rookies, but everybody learned from that and they're all running the same hustle, hoarding cards in the hopes that they will appreciate. . Also, as mentioned, the million different sets overwhelm the market. It was enough to have Topps, Fleer and Donruss, then it got out of hand. now it's all just worthless cardboard, even more so than when your dad was collecting them. They will never appreciate to any significant degree.

^This.

We have reached a saturation point with collectibles, and it's not just cards, it'e everything... People noticed that many old items, especially if they were branded, were worth a lot of money. So, people started col ...


Also, there is an assumption that the best time to sell collectibles is some far-off time in the future, when the item will surely become more scarce.  That's simply not the case.

Example 1: Ken Griffey, Jr. 1989 Upper deck rookie card. That card's peak price has already come and gone. Even if Griffey is clean of steroids, and even if he is remembered as one of the greats, and even if baseball cards recover in value, this card will never reach the ridiculous price it was demanding in the early 1990's.

Example 2: The "Death of Superman" comic book. People waited in long lines outside stores to buy this comic when it came out, thinking it would be a collectible. Well, there was one major problem. People believed a limited number of quantities were available, and the stores didn't do anything to dissuade that notion. So, the comic sold out in record time. A few days after the comic sold out, the rest of the prints made it to stores. A sea of them, actually. Thousands. Tens of thousands. The price for that comic book peaked in the 48-72 hours after the initial sell-out, but before the rest of the prints hit shelves. That comic will never be worth as much as it was for those 2-3 days.

Collectibles aren't always long-term investments. Like stocks, they can peak at unexpected times. You better know what you're doing before you start buying.
 
2013-04-07 02:59:10 PM
I spoke to a local baseball card dealer last month, and he said he buys baseball cards from the 80's and 90's in bulk. He doesn't even sort through the cards. He buys them buy the pound. They're not even worth thumbing through, they're so ubiquitous.
 
2013-04-07 03:02:08 PM
My preferred collectible cards:

gatherer.wizards.com

/worth about $600
//have one
 
2013-04-07 03:03:18 PM
Dave2198: kinda like the wii. Now pawn shops are struggling to get 50 bones. At peak they were fetching a grand
 
2013-04-07 03:05:26 PM
$0.39?  I was hoping for at least a Buck-ner.
 
2013-04-07 03:06:29 PM

try fect taa daa: Dave2198: kinda like the wii. Now pawn shops are struggling to get 50 bones. At peak they were fetching a grand


Yup, and in fact the best time to make money selling a game system is right after it comes out. Get in line at a Walmart midnight release right before the holidays and bring $500. Buy 2 game systems, and sit outside in the parking lot until it's clear they have sold out (or put them on eBay, if you're worried about getting stabbed). Sell your $500 investment for $700-800 or more. Fastest money ever.
 
2013-04-07 03:13:54 PM
I think I managed to catch the market just right.  In 1989-90, I traded a Dale Murphy 1989 Upper Deck error for a 1986 Michael Jordan "rookie" card.  Still have that card, need to get it graded some day.
 
2013-04-07 03:18:13 PM

SCUBA_Archer: I think I managed to catch the market just right.  In 1989-90, I traded a Dale Murphy 1989 Upper Deck error for a 1986 Michael Jordan "rookie" card.  Still have that card, need to get it graded some day.


I'd get it appraised soon, and sell it the day he dies. I know it's cliche, but a LOT of the yuppies on eBay buy things when people die, and at ridiculous prices.

They also bought the iron Monopoly piece for $20 when it was discontinued...

...and a box of Twinkies for $25 when it was announced they were closing... not realizing that they would likely come back.
 
2013-04-07 03:18:33 PM

Wonderduck: Your 1983 Topps #55 Mookie Wilson card is still only worth $0.39

It's gone up!


That's for Pristine 10, after you pay BGS $30 for grading
 
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