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(Onion AV Club)   Seventeen groups that broke up because on of their members released a successful solo album   (avclub.com) divider line 90
    More: Spiffy, human beings, In the Air Tonight, Justin Timberlake, Jacksons, Diana Ross, TRL, Stewart Copeland, Annie Lennox  
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9541 clicks; posted to Entertainment » on 06 Apr 2013 at 3:33 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-04-06 12:07:34 PM  
Do Phil Collins and Genesis really count?

I mean, most bands would probably love to have a "break-up" involve some of their biggest selling hits, as Genesis had in the mid-80s after Collins released his solo album.
 
2013-04-06 12:26:21 PM  
I've been a big Genesis fan ever since the release of their 1980 album, Duke. Before that, I really didn't understand any of their work. Too artsy, too intellectual. It was on Duke where Phil Collins' presence became more apparent. I think Invisible Touch was the group's undisputed masterpiece. It's an epic meditation on intangibility. At the same time, it deepens and enriches the meaning of the preceding three albums. Listen to the brilliant ensemble playing of Banks, Collins and Rutherford. You can practically hear every nuance of every instrument. In terms of lyrical craftsmanship, the sheer songwriting, this album hits a new peak of professionalism. Take the lyrics to "Land of Confusion". In this song, Phil Collins addresses the problems of abusive political authority. "In Too Deep" is the most moving pop song of the 1980s, about monogamy and commitment. The song is extremely uplifting. Their lyrics are as positive and affirmative as, uh, anything I've heard in rock. Phil Collins' solo career seems to be more commercial and therefore more satisfying, in a narrower way. Especially songs like "In the Air Tonight" and, uh, "Against All Odds". Sabrina, don't just stare at it, eat it. But I also think Phil Collins works best within the confines of the group, than as a solo artist, and I stress the word artist. This is "Sussudio", a great, great song, a personal favorite.
 
2013-04-06 12:59:48 PM  

shifty lookin bleeder: I've been a big Genesis fan ever since the release of their 1980 album, Duke.

until Peter Gabriel left.

/sorry, pet peeve
 
2013-04-06 01:12:31 PM  

shifty lookin bleeder: I think Invisible Touch was the group's undisputed masterpiece.


I just threw up in my mouth.
 
2013-04-06 01:23:09 PM  

2xhelix: shifty lookin bleeder: I think Invisible Touch was the group's undisputed masterpiece.

I just threw up in my mouth.


No shiat. Next he'll be saying he likes '80s Billy Joel.
 
2013-04-06 01:36:02 PM  
I notice that The Ramones were not on the list, even after this masterpiece:

i105.photobucket.com
 
2013-04-06 01:38:24 PM  

show me: No shiat. Next he'll be saying he likes '80s Billy Joel.


And Marillion's lyrics are way better with Hogarth than they were with Fish..
 
2013-04-06 01:39:22 PM  

shifty lookin bleeder: I've been a big Genesis fan ever since the release of their 1980 album, Duke. Before that, I really didn't understand any of their work. Too artsy, too intellectual. It was on Duke where Phil Collins' presence became more apparent. I think Invisible Touch was the group's undisputed masterpiece. It's an epic meditation on intangibility. At the same time, it deepens and enriches the meaning of the preceding three albums. Listen to the brilliant ensemble playing of Banks, Collins and Rutherford. You can practically hear every nuance of every instrument. In terms of lyrical craftsmanship, the sheer songwriting, this album hits a new peak of professionalism. Take the lyrics to "Land of Confusion". In this song, Phil Collins addresses the problems of abusive political authority. "In Too Deep" is the most moving pop song of the 1980s, about monogamy and commitment. The song is extremely uplifting. Their lyrics are as positive and affirmative as, uh, anything I've heard in rock. Phil Collins' solo career seems to be more commercial and therefore more satisfying, in a narrower way. Especially songs like "In the Air Tonight" and, uh, "Against All Odds". Sabrina, don't just stare at it, eat it. But I also think Phil Collins works best within the confines of the group, than as a solo artist, and I stress the word artist. This is "Sussudio", a great, great song, a personal favorite.


10/10
 
2013-04-06 01:41:06 PM  

BKITU: shifty lookin bleeder: I've been a big Genesis fan ever since the release of their 1980 album, Duke. Before that, I really didn't understand any of their work. Too artsy, too intellectual. It was on Duke where Phil Collins' presence became more apparent. I think Invisible Touch was the group's undisputed masterpiece. It's an epic meditation on intangibility. At the same time, it deepens and enriches the meaning of the preceding three albums. Listen to the brilliant ensemble playing of Banks, Collins and Rutherford. You can practically hear every nuance of every instrument. In terms of lyrical craftsmanship, the sheer songwriting, this album hits a new peak of professionalism. Take the lyrics to "Land of Confusion". In this song, Phil Collins addresses the problems of abusive political authority. "In Too Deep" is the most moving pop song of the 1980s, about monogamy and commitment. The song is extremely uplifting. Their lyrics are as positive and affirmative as, uh, anything I've heard in rock. Phil Collins' solo career seems to be more commercial and therefore more satisfying, in a narrower way. Especially songs like "In the Air Tonight" and, uh, "Against All Odds". Sabrina, don't just stare at it, eat it. But I also think Phil Collins works best within the confines of the group, than as a solo artist, and I stress the word artist. This is "Sussudio", a great, great song, a personal favorite.

10/10


I can't believe how many people just don't get it.
 
2013-04-06 02:02:52 PM  
And where's Yes, Rick Wakeman and The Six Wives of Henry VIII?
 
2013-04-06 02:04:23 PM  
They left out Gwen Steffani, and No Doubt.
 
2013-04-06 02:11:50 PM  

AirForceVet: And where's Yes, Rick Wakeman and The Six Wives of Henry VIII?


I don't think that really qualifies.
They just replaced Wakeman with Patrick Moraz, and continued to record, and tour.
 
2013-04-06 02:23:29 PM  

FirstNationalBastard: BKITU: shifty lookin bleeder: I've been a big Genesis fan ever since the release of their 1980 album, Duke. Before that, I really didn't understand any of their work. Too artsy, too intellectual. It was on Duke where Phil Collins' presence became more apparent. I think Invisible Touch was the group's undisputed masterpiece. It's an epic meditation on intangibility. At the same time, it deepens and enriches the meaning of the preceding three albums. Listen to the brilliant ensemble playing of Banks, Collins and Rutherford. You can practically hear every nuance of every instrument. In terms of lyrical craftsmanship, the sheer songwriting, this album hits a new peak of professionalism. Take the lyrics to "Land of Confusion". In this song, Phil Collins addresses the problems of abusive political authority. "In Too Deep" is the most moving pop song of the 1980s, about monogamy and commitment. The song is extremely uplifting. Their lyrics are as positive and affirmative as, uh, anything I've heard in rock. Phil Collins' solo career seems to be more commercial and therefore more satisfying, in a narrower way. Especially songs like "In the Air Tonight" and, uh, "Against All Odds". Sabrina, don't just stare at it, eat it. But I also think Phil Collins works best within the confines of the group, than as a solo artist, and I stress the word artist. This is "Sussudio", a great, great song, a personal favorite.

10/10

I can't believe how many people just don't get it.


Seriously.  Those people better be joking.
 
2013-04-06 02:25:46 PM  

robsul82: FirstNationalBastard: BKITU: shifty lookin bleeder: I've been a big Genesis fan ever since the release of their 1980 album, Duke. Before that, I really didn't understand any of their work. Too artsy, too intellectual. It was on Duke where Phil Collins' presence became more apparent. I think Invisible Touch was the group's undisputed masterpiece. It's an epic meditation on intangibility. At the same time, it deepens and enriches the meaning of the preceding three albums. Listen to the brilliant ensemble playing of Banks, Collins and Rutherford. You can practically hear every nuance of every instrument. In terms of lyrical craftsmanship, the sheer songwriting, this album hits a new peak of professionalism. Take the lyrics to "Land of Confusion". In this song, Phil Collins addresses the problems of abusive political authority. "In Too Deep" is the most moving pop song of the 1980s, about monogamy and commitment. The song is extremely uplifting. Their lyrics are as positive and affirmative as, uh, anything I've heard in rock. Phil Collins' solo career seems to be more commercial and therefore more satisfying, in a narrower way. Especially songs like "In the Air Tonight" and, uh, "Against All Odds". Sabrina, don't just stare at it, eat it. But I also think Phil Collins works best within the confines of the group, than as a solo artist, and I stress the word artist. This is "Sussudio", a great, great song, a personal favorite.

10/10

I can't believe how many people just don't get it.

Seriously.  Those people better be joking.


If they're not joking, I'm done with them professionally.
 
2013-04-06 02:28:31 PM  
Wow, this thread went to maximum trolling right away and got some nice nibbles. Great jorb. I nominate this for Troll of the Year.
 
2013-04-06 02:31:23 PM  

FirstNationalBastard: robsul82: FirstNationalBastard: BKITU: shifty lookin bleeder: I've been a big Genesis fan ever since the release of their 1980 album, Duke. Before that, I really didn't understand any of their work. Too artsy, too intellectual. It was on Duke where Phil Collins' presence became more apparent. I think Invisible Touch was the group's undisputed masterpiece. It's an epic meditation on intangibility. At the same time, it deepens and enriches the meaning of the preceding three albums. Listen to the brilliant ensemble playing of Banks, Collins and Rutherford. You can practically hear every nuance of every instrument. In terms of lyrical craftsmanship, the sheer songwriting, this album hits a new peak of professionalism. Take the lyrics to "Land of Confusion". In this song, Phil Collins addresses the problems of abusive political authority. "In Too Deep" is the most moving pop song of the 1980s, about monogamy and commitment. The song is extremely uplifting. Their lyrics are as positive and affirmative as, uh, anything I've heard in rock. Phil Collins' solo career seems to be more commercial and therefore more satisfying, in a narrower way. Especially songs like "In the Air Tonight" and, uh, "Against All Odds". Sabrina, don't just stare at it, eat it. But I also think Phil Collins works best within the confines of the group, than as a solo artist, and I stress the word artist. This is "Sussudio", a great, great song, a personal favorite.

10/10

I can't believe how many people just don't get it.

Seriously.  Those people better be joking.

If they're not joking, I'm done with them professionally.


They're making me feel the need to return some videotapes.
 
2013-04-06 02:33:53 PM  

robsul82: FirstNationalBastard: robsul82: FirstNationalBastard: BKITU: shifty lookin bleeder: I've been a big Genesis fan ever since the release of their 1980 album, Duke. Before that, I really didn't understand any of their work. Too artsy, too intellectual. It was on Duke where Phil Collins' presence became more apparent. I think Invisible Touch was the group's undisputed masterpiece. It's an epic meditation on intangibility. At the same time, it deepens and enriches the meaning of the preceding three albums. Listen to the brilliant ensemble playing of Banks, Collins and Rutherford. You can practically hear every nuance of every instrument. In terms of lyrical craftsmanship, the sheer songwriting, this album hits a new peak of professionalism. Take the lyrics to "Land of Confusion". In this song, Phil Collins addresses the problems of abusive political authority. "In Too Deep" is the most moving pop song of the 1980s, about monogamy and commitment. The song is extremely uplifting. Their lyrics are as positive and affirmative as, uh, anything I've heard in rock. Phil Collins' solo career seems to be more commercial and therefore more satisfying, in a narrower way. Especially songs like "In the Air Tonight" and, uh, "Against All Odds". Sabrina, don't just stare at it, eat it. But I also think Phil Collins works best within the confines of the group, than as a solo artist, and I stress the word artist. This is "Sussudio", a great, great song, a personal favorite.

10/10

I can't believe how many people just don't get it.

Seriously.  Those people better be joking.

If they're not joking, I'm done with them professionally.

They're making me feel the need to return some videotapes.


HOW COULD SOMEONE NOT IMMEDIATELY IDENTIFY THAT PARAGRAPH

>:-|  y'all motherfarkers need jesus
 
2013-04-06 03:09:35 PM  
I saw Genesis play in 2007, 31 years after Gabriel's successful solo album and 26 years after Collins successful solo album.

I think they're really through this time because Phil Collins has nerve damage and can't play without the sticks being tied to his hands. He could just sing but his ability to come up with drum riffs was part of their sound.   I don't know how you do that without being able to play any more.  He's no Beethoven.

I don't think that Peter Gabriel will ever agree to play with them again because, as Mike Rutherford and Tony Banks have said, he can't work in a group setting.
 
2013-04-06 03:15:53 PM  
Jeez, doodz, some of uus haven't seen American Psycho yet, chill.

/I deserve the ridicule
 
2013-04-06 03:36:10 PM  

gameshowhost: robsul82: FirstNationalBastard: robsul82: FirstNationalBastard: BKITU: shifty lookin bleeder: I've been a big Genesis fan ever since the release of their 1980 album, Duke. Before that, I really didn't understand any of their work. Too artsy, too intellectual. It was on Duke where Phil Collins' presence became more apparent. I think Invisible Touch was the group's undisputed masterpiece. It's an epic meditation on intangibility. At the same time, it deepens and enriches the meaning of the preceding three albums. Listen to the brilliant ensemble playing of Banks, Collins and Rutherford. You can practically hear every nuance of every instrument. In terms of lyrical craftsmanship, the sheer songwriting, this album hits a new peak of professionalism. Take the lyrics to "Land of Confusion". In this song, Phil Collins addresses the problems of abusive political authority. "In Too Deep" is the most moving pop song of the 1980s, about monogamy and commitment. The song is extremely uplifting. Their lyrics are as positive and affirmative as, uh, anything I've heard in rock. Phil Collins' solo career seems to be more commercial and therefore more satisfying, in a narrower way. Especially songs like "In the Air Tonight" and, uh, "Against All Odds". Sabrina, don't just stare at it, eat it. But I also think Phil Collins works best within the confines of the group, than as a solo artist, and I stress the word artist. This is "Sussudio", a great, great song, a personal favorite.

10/10

I can't believe how many people just don't get it.

Seriously.  Those people better be joking.

If they're not joking, I'm done with them professionally.

They're making me feel the need to return some videotapes.

HOW COULD SOMEONE NOT IMMEDIATELY IDENTIFY THAT PARAGRAPH

>:-|  y'all motherfarkers need jesus


Clearly, no fans of Huey Lewis and the News either.

Of course, their early work was a little too new wave for my tastes, but when Sports came out in '83, I think they really came into their own, commercially and artistically. The whole album has a clear, crisp sound, and a new sheen of consummate professionalism that really gives the songs a big boost. He's been compared to elvis Costello, but I think Huey has a much more bitter, cynical sense of humor.
 
2013-04-06 03:42:04 PM  
No White Zombie?
 
2013-04-06 03:48:46 PM  
Jenny Lewis

Who??
 
2013-04-06 03:51:15 PM  

elvisaintdead: gameshowhost: robsul82: FirstNationalBastard: robsul82: FirstNationalBastard: BKITU: shifty lookin bleeder: I've been a big Genesis fan ever since the release of their 1980 album, Duke. Before that, I really didn't understand any of their work. Too artsy, too intellectual. It was on Duke where Phil Collins' presence became more apparent. I think Invisible Touch was the group's undisputed masterpiece. It's an epic meditation on intangibility. At the same time, it deepens and enriches the meaning of the preceding three albums. Listen to the brilliant ensemble playing of Banks, Collins and Rutherford. You can practically hear every nuance of every instrument. In terms of lyrical craftsmanship, the sheer songwriting, this album hits a new peak of professionalism. Take the lyrics to "Land of Confusion". In this song, Phil Collins addresses the problems of abusive political authority. "In Too Deep" is the most moving pop song of the 1980s, about monogamy and commitment. The song is extremely uplifting. Their lyrics are as positive and affirmative as, uh, anything I've heard in rock. Phil Collins' solo career seems to be more commercial and therefore more satisfying, in a narrower way. Especially songs like "In the Air Tonight" and, uh, "Against All Odds". Sabrina, don't just stare at it, eat it. But I also think Phil Collins works best within the confines of the group, than as a solo artist, and I stress the word artist. This is "Sussudio", a great, great song, a personal favorite.

10/10

I can't believe how many people just don't get it.

Seriously.  Those people better be joking.

If they're not joking, I'm done with them professionally.

They're making me feel the need to return some videotapes.

HOW COULD SOMEONE NOT IMMEDIATELY IDENTIFY THAT PARAGRAPH

>:-|  y'all motherfarkers need jesus

Clearly, no fans of Huey Lewis and the News either.

Of course, their early work was a little too new wave for my tastes, but when Sports came out in '83, I think they really commercially and artistically. The whole album has a clear, crisp sound, and a new sheen of consummate professionalism that really gives the songs a big boost. He's been compared to elvis Costello, but I think Huey has a much more bitter, cynical sense of humor.


In '87, Huey released this, Fore!, their most accomplished album. I think their undisputed masterpiece is "Hip to Be Square," a song so catchy, most people probably don't listen to the lyrics. But they should, because it's not just about the pleasures of conformity, and the importance of trends, it's also a personal statement about the band itself!"
 
2013-04-06 04:04:09 PM  
Sting with the Police? Angry, sarcastic, quarrelsome, egotistical genius creating amazing music.


Sting without The Police? Happy, living a wholly fulfilling life which he shares (along with ridiculously lengthy sexual experiences) with his soul mate and is considered by those who know him to be one of the nicest guys you'll ever meet. But his music SUUUCKS. It's tepid and boring. He actually managed to find and destroy the last vestiges of edginess in smooth jazz FFS.

He makes David Sanborn look like GG Allin
 
2013-04-06 04:05:48 PM  
Feels like they were somehow left out of the article:

www.tuneupmedia.com

Kim and Frank went on to make some seriously good music, but the Pixies were incredible.
 
2013-04-06 04:07:52 PM  
I like Phil Collins' Genesis. I Can't Dance was a great album.
 
2013-04-06 04:10:37 PM  
I was really hoping Fergie's solo work would end her career AND Black Eyed Peas'.
 
2013-04-06 04:11:08 PM  

FirstNationalBastard: BKITU: shifty lookin bleeder: I've been a big Genesis fan ever since the release of their 1980 album, Duke. Before that, I really didn't understand any of their work. Too artsy, too intellectual. It was on Duke where Phil Collins' presence became more apparent. I think Invisible Touch was the group's undisputed masterpiece. It's an epic meditation on intangibility. At the same time, it deepens and enriches the meaning of the preceding three albums. Listen to the brilliant ensemble playing of Banks, Collins and Rutherford. You can practically hear every nuance of every instrument. In terms of lyrical craftsmanship, the sheer songwriting, this album hits a new peak of professionalism. Take the lyrics to "Land of Confusion". In this song, Phil Collins addresses the problems of abusive political authority. "In Too Deep" is the most moving pop song of the 1980s, about monogamy and commitment. The song is extremely uplifting. Their lyrics are as positive and affirmative as, uh, anything I've heard in rock. Phil Collins' solo career seems to be more commercial and therefore more satisfying, in a narrower way. Especially songs like "In the Air Tonight" and, uh, "Against All Odds". Sabrina, don't just stare at it, eat it. But I also think Phil Collins works best within the confines of the group, than as a solo artist, and I stress the word artist. This is "Sussudio", a great, great song, a personal favorite.

10/10

I can't believe how many people just don't get it.


It's Saturday.  Amateur hour at FARK.
 
2013-04-06 04:12:40 PM  

LesserEvil: Feels like they were somehow left out of the article:

[www.tuneupmedia.com image 640x320]

Kim and Frank went on to make some seriously good music, but the Pixies were incredible.


I don't know if either of their solo stuff would qualify as a cause for the split.  (Also, by the time of the split they were putting out crap...compared to Pilgrim/S.R./Doolittle, anyway.)

That said, screw it, throw 'em in there.  Anytime of the day is a good time for Pixies.
 
2013-04-06 04:13:45 PM  
I'll give an honorable mention to Little Feat.  Lowell George released a solo album, went on tour, and then died.  The band basically collapsed after that until they made a foolish "comeback" with a couple of pretty uninspired albums in the 90's.
 
2013-04-06 04:19:55 PM  

Lorelle: Jenny Lewis

Who??


the production of The Wizard was doomed when she sought out a music career.
 
2013-04-06 04:20:57 PM  

ScaryBottles: No White Zombie?


Or Styx? Or that other band?
 
2013-04-06 04:31:37 PM  

"Face Value" was Phil Collins's BEST album hands down. It wasn't TOO whiny/syrupy (like all his albums after 1985), the sound was awesome, and the lyrics were rightfully bitter. Right now, he has farked up hearing and I think his neck or back is farked up too. He just released a book about the Alamo, and his daughter is an actress. As much as I would LOVE to see him and Peter reunite Genesis, I ain't holdin my breath. Peter is too stubborn and Phil, well, see my last statements.


As for Genesis, I admire the troll from earlier. I really do. But, "Duke" is one of THE best post-Peter Genesis albums.


and enough with the "Phil destroyed Genesis" arguments I keep hearing. Look, Peters stuff with Genesis was one thing, and Phil was another. IMHO, BOTH of them did a great job. I can appreciate the artsy-fartsy aspect of Peter and the Pop stuff from Phil. And the "Invisible touch" album (despite a couple of decent tracks like "The Brazillian") should die in a fire.


And the less said about the Ray Wilson era, the better. He was easy on the eyes, but "Calling All Stations" is damn near worse than "Invisible touch"


/Why yes, I am a Genesis fan :P

 
2013-04-06 04:35:49 PM  

shifty lookin bleeder: I've been a big Genesis fan ever since the release of their 1980 album, Duke....


I just  knew someone would come along and drop that. Well done.

Also, that article made me think of Natalie Merchant for first time in ages. I don't think I can differentiate one of her songs from the sounds of my A/C unit running. She's that f*cking bland.
 
2013-04-06 04:53:35 PM  
This thread makes me want to return some videotapes.
 
2013-04-06 05:07:27 PM  

TommyymmoT: They left out Gwen Steffani, and No Doubt.


Yeah, lets just pretend that they did, their new album is terrible if youre a No Doubt fan.

/its probably ok if youre a Gwen Steffani fan.
 
2013-04-06 05:28:13 PM  
On of the members?
 
2013-04-06 05:31:12 PM  

shifty lookin bleeder: I think Invisible Touch was the group's undisputed masterpiece.


No, that would be "Supper's Ready."
 
2013-04-06 05:32:00 PM  

shifty lookin bleeder: I've been a big Genesis fan ever since the release of their 1980 album, Duke. Before that, I really didn't understand any of their work. Too artsy, too intellectual. It was on Duke where Phil Collins' presence became more apparent. I think Invisible Touch was the group's undisputed masterpiece. It's an epic meditation on intangibility. At the same time, it deepens and enriches the meaning of the preceding three albums. Listen to the brilliant ensemble playing of Banks, Collins and Rutherford. You can practically hear every nuance of every instrument. In terms of lyrical craftsmanship, the sheer songwriting, this album hits a new peak of professionalism. Take the lyrics to "Land of Confusion". In this song, Phil Collins addresses the problems of abusive political authority. "In Too Deep" is the most moving pop song of the 1980s, about monogamy and commitment. The song is extremely uplifting. Their lyrics are as positive and affirmative as, uh, anything I've heard in rock. Phil Collins' solo career seems to be more commercial and therefore more satisfying, in a narrower way. Especially songs like "In the Air Tonight" and, uh, "Against All Odds". Sabrina, don't just stare at it, eat it. But I also think Phil Collins works best within the confines of the group, than as a solo artist, and I stress the word artist. This is "Sussudio", a great, great song, a personal favorite.


What Sussudio may look like:
www.pixeljoint.com
/hot as Jesus with a laser gun
 
2013-04-06 05:35:06 PM  

Cyno01: /its probably ok if youre a Gwen Steffani fan.


Gwen Steafni, ha! You know who was great? Whitney Houston. Did you know that Whitney Houston's debut LP, called simply "Whitney Houston" had 4 number one singles on it? Did you know that, Cyno01? It's hard to choose a favorite among so many great tracks, but "The Greatest Love of All" is one of the best, most powerful songs ever written about self-preservation, dignity. Its universal message crosses all boundaries and instills one with the hope that it's not too late to better ourselves. Since it's impossible in this world we live in to empathize with others, we can always empathize with ourselves. It's an important message, crucial really. And it's beautifully stated on the album.
 
2013-04-06 05:46:17 PM  
Not that they were very great, but Paramore also broke up On account of their lead singer leaving
 
2013-04-06 05:48:20 PM  
Didn't Nirvana break up when Curt Cobain decided to go solo?
 
2013-04-06 05:52:38 PM  

Uzzah: Cyno01: /its probably ok if youre a Gwen Steffani fan.

Gwen Steafni, ha! You know who was great? Whitney Houston. Did you know that Whitney Houston's debut LP, called simply "Whitney Houston" had 4 number one singles on it? Did you know that, Cyno01? It's hard to choose a favorite among so many great tracks, but "The Greatest Love of All" is one of the best, most powerful songs ever written about self-preservation, dignity. Its universal message crosses all boundaries and instills one with the hope that it's not too late to better ourselves. Since it's impossible in this world we live in to empathize with others, we can always empathize with ourselves. It's an important message, crucial really. And it's beautifully stated on the album.


Uh... ok?
 
2013-04-06 05:55:51 PM  

Cyno01: Uh... ok?


It's not just you.
 
2013-04-06 05:59:20 PM  

Homegrown: Not that they were very great, but Paramore also broke up On account of their lead singer leaving


The two brothers left. The new lineup has an album coming out this year
 
2013-04-06 06:01:27 PM  

FirstNationalBastard: I can't believe how many people just don't get it.


The score was me complimenting the ability to hook people on something that should have been obvious.
 
2013-04-06 06:04:07 PM  
I grew up listening to Genesis, and I still do. When I got to be a teenager, I had no interest in the 80s pop stuff at all, and grew to really love the PG and Steve Hackett years. There isn't a song of theirs that I don't know by heart now, and Trespass through Lamb stay on pretty heavy rotation in my playlists.

That said, the first 5 or 6 years of Phil were awesome. A Trick of the Tail and Wind & Wuthering are fantastic, ATTWT has about 28 minutes of awesomeness, Duke is awesome, and Abacab is completely underrated as a prog record. All of side A is cool as hell, but "Dodo/Lurker" is where I would have loved to have seen them pivot from. Unfortunately, Genesis and Invisible Touch became poppy, and We Can't Dance is a record only menopausal WASPs could enjoy. Calling All Stations was a travesty, and had only one good song.
 
2013-04-06 06:07:23 PM  
i didn't even know some of those people had been in bands prior to their solo albums.  i had no idea billy idol was part of a band at one time.
 
2013-04-06 06:17:49 PM  

Uzzah: "The Greatest Love of All" is one of the best, most powerful songs ever written about self-preservation, dignity. Its universal message crosses all boundaries and instills one with the hope that it's not too late to better ourselves. Since it's impossible in this world we live in to empathize with others, we can always empathize with ourselves. It's an important message, crucial really. And it's beautifully stated on the album.


I thought that song was just about masturbation?
 
2013-04-06 06:27:38 PM  

Uzzah: Cyno01: /its probably ok if youre a Gwen Steffani fan.

Gwen Steafni, ha! You know who was great? Whitney Houston. Did you know that Whitney Houston's debut LP, called simply "Whitney Houston" had 4 number one singles on it? Did you know that, Cyno01? It's hard to choose a favorite among so many great tracks, but "The Greatest Love of All" is one of the best, most powerful songs ever written about self-preservation, dignity. Its universal message crosses all boundaries and instills one with the hope that it's not too late to better ourselves. Since it's impossible in this world we live in to empathize with others, we can always empathize with ourselves. It's an important message, crucial really. And it's beautifully stated on the album.


Yeah Cyno01! Panda jerk!
 
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