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(Marketwatch)   Get ready for the next bull market   (marketwatch.com) divider line 31
    More: Obvious, bear markets, countries by natural gas production, Chesapeake Energy, short position, American Resource Boom Letter  
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1605 clicks; posted to Business » on 06 Apr 2013 at 11:20 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-04-06 11:26:50 AM
Don't you mean " Great ready..."?
 
2013-04-06 11:29:50 AM
All right, things are going to get better!
 
2013-04-06 12:09:03 PM
It's always a bull market...when shorts get squeezed, that is
 
2013-04-06 12:41:48 PM
Does this mean that the poor and middle class are going to get a bigger share of the pot? No. Just the opposite? Well then I just don't give a fark about the market then. Call me back when this helps me and other people who aren't insanely wealthy.
 
2013-04-06 01:28:40 PM

DarkSoulNoHope: Does this mean that the poor and middle class are going to get a bigger share of the pot? No. Just the opposite? Well then I just don't give a fark about the market then. Call me back when this helps me and other people who aren't insanely wealthy.


When the market crashed in 2009 I took some of my savings and opened an IRA through Scottrade. Bought some obvious things that weren't going to go anywhere in the long run. GE, Ford, Bank of America. Put $2000 in it. It's worth almost $60,000 today and I've only put another $10,000 or so of my own money into it. My 401k through work is also worth several times what I've actually put into it despite tanking between '08 and early last year.

But you just keep whining about rich people. That'll probably accomplish a lot too.
 
2013-04-06 01:48:37 PM

skozlaw: DarkSoulNoHope: Does this mean that the poor and middle class are going to get a bigger share of the pot? No. Just the opposite? Well then I just don't give a fark about the market then. Call me back when this helps me and other people who aren't insanely wealthy.

When the market crashed in 2009 I took some of my savings and opened an IRA through Scottrade. Bought some obvious things that weren't going to go anywhere in the long run. GE, Ford, Bank of America. Put $2000 in it. It's worth almost $60,000 today and I've only put another $10,000 or so of my own money into it. My 401k through work is also worth several times what I've actually put into it despite tanking between '08 and early last year.

But you just keep whining about rich people. That'll probably accomplish a lot too.


Ford was a great bet, congrats to you, I hope you just keep getting richer and richer. It's good for everyone when someone succeeds. Keep up the good work!!!!
 
2013-04-06 02:15:58 PM

skozlaw: DarkSoulNoHope: Does this mean that the poor and middle class are going to get a bigger share of the pot? No. Just the opposite? Well then I just don't give a fark about the market then. Call me back when this helps me and other people who aren't insanely wealthy.

When the market crashed in 2009 I took some of my savings and opened an IRA through Scottrade. Bought some obvious things that weren't going to go anywhere in the long run. GE, Ford, Bank of America. Put $2000 in it. It's worth almost $60,000 today and I've only put another $10,000 or so of my own money into it. My 401k through work is also worth several times what I've actually put into it despite tanking between '08 and early last year.

But you just keep whining about rich people. That'll probably accomplish a lot too.


I just started my 401k in late 2007, so the crash was great for me. It was like a Blue Light special on Blue Chips.
 
2013-04-06 02:24:22 PM
Also, if you were well diversified, I don't see how someone could have lost their retirement savings in the crash. If you aren't at retirement age, so long as you don't sell like a dumbass you just hold the good stuff and buy more at the low prices. If you are at retirement age, you shouldn't be heavily invested in volatile stocks anyway, and the precious metals in your portfolio should have actually helped you over the last few years.
 
2013-04-06 02:31:57 PM
Right now the market is looking pretty strong.  The stocks that are really up are the defensive ones, not the growth stocks.  People are getting back in the market, but they're being very cautious about it, which is not what happens in a bubble.  In a bubble, everyone is certain that the market is going higher.  Right now, many analysts are predicting doom and gloom, which is a good time to buy if the fundamentals are improving, which they are.
 
2013-04-06 02:58:58 PM

Incontinent_dog_and_monkey_rodeo: Right now the market is looking pretty strong.  The stocks that are really up are the defensive ones, not the growth stocks.  People are getting back in the market, but they're being very cautious about it, which is not what happens in a bubble.  In a bubble, everyone is certain that the market is going higher.  Right now, many analysts are predicting doom and gloom, which is a good time to buy if the fundamentals are improving, which they are.


Yeah, I'm struggling with that myself.  On the one hand it's up 90% in 4 years so you feel like pulling back, but the market was oversold in 2009.  It still doesn't feel like a bubble because there is still so much fear of equities.

I'll feel like it's a bubble when the people telling me to buy stocks in 2000, houses in 2005, and gold in 2012 are telling me to buy stocks.
 
2013-04-06 03:11:25 PM

skozlaw: DarkSoulNoHope: Does this mean that the poor and middle class are going to get a bigger share of the pot? No. Just the opposite? Well then I just don't give a fark about the market then. Call me back when this helps me and other people who aren't insanely wealthy.

When the market crashed in 2009 I took some of my savings and opened an IRA through Scottrade. Bought some obvious things that weren't going to go anywhere in the long run. GE, Ford, Bank of America. Put $2000 in it. It's worth almost $60,000 today and I've only put another $10,000 or so of my own money into it. My 401k through work is also worth several times what I've actually put into it despite tanking between '08 and early last year.

But you just keep whining about rich people. That'll probably accomplish a lot too.


I am *so* glad you got wealthier with investing in: A company that makes huge profits but uses creative accounting schemes to pay no taxes and get large tax refunds, a company that only up until recently learned to stop making substandard cars (would have been bankrupt too if the auto industry bailout didn't save their shipping services, since those services rely on the other American companies to stay in business by shipping volume), and a company that along with Chase Bank, Wachovia, and a few other actors nearly destroyed the United States economy if it wasn't for a taxpayer bailout that has done nothing but benefit the executives who gave themselves a pat on the back bonus and holding on to those taxpayer funds which they don't lend out (the intent of the taxpayer bailout was to get banks to lend again, that never happened, multimillion dollar bonuses are all that occurred by those executive decisions).
 
2013-04-06 03:14:58 PM

DarkSoulNoHope: skozlaw: DarkSoulNoHope: Does this mean that the poor and middle class are going to get a bigger share of the pot? No. Just the opposite? Well then I just don't give a fark about the market then. Call me back when this helps me and other people who aren't insanely wealthy.

When the market crashed in 2009 I took some of my savings and opened an IRA through Scottrade. Bought some obvious things that weren't going to go anywhere in the long run. GE, Ford, Bank of America. Put $2000 in it. It's worth almost $60,000 today and I've only put another $10,000 or so of my own money into it. My 401k through work is also worth several times what I've actually put into it despite tanking between '08 and early last year.

But you just keep whining about rich people. That'll probably accomplish a lot too.

I am *so* glad you got wealthier with investing in: A company that makes huge profits but uses creative accounting schemes to pay no taxes and get large tax refunds, a company that only up until recently learned to stop making substandard cars (would have been bankrupt too if the auto industry bailout didn't save their shipping services, since those services rely on the other American companies to stay in business by shipping volume), and a company that along with Chase Bank, Wachovia, and a few other actors nearly destroyed the United States economy if it wasn't for a taxpayer bailout that has done nothing but benefit the executives who gave themselves a pat on the back bonus and holding on to those taxpayer funds which they don't lend out (the intent of the taxpayer bailout was to get banks to lend again, that never happened, multimillion dollar bonuses are all that occurred by those executive decisions).


Why do you hate capitalism?
 
2013-04-06 03:31:21 PM

DarkSoulNoHope: I am *so* glad you got wealthier with investing in: A company that makes huge profits but uses creative accounting schemes to pay no taxes and get large tax refunds, a company that only up until recently learned to stop making substandard cars (would have been bankrupt too if the auto industry bailout didn't save their shipping services, since those services rely on the other American companies to stay in business by shipping volume), and a company that along with Chase Bank, Wachovia, and a few other actors nearly destroyed the United States economy if it wasn't for a taxpayer bailout that has done nothing but benefit the executives who gave themselves a pat on the back bonus and holding on to those taxpayer funds which they don't lend out (the intent of the taxpayer bailout was to get banks to lend again, that never happened, multimillion dollar bonuses are all that occurred by those executive decisions).


I clicked your profile and all of a sudden your senseless and endless whining made a lot more sense...
 
2013-04-06 03:45:17 PM

skozlaw: DarkSoulNoHope: I am *so* glad you got wealthier with investing in: A company that makes huge profits but uses creative accounting schemes to pay no taxes and get large tax refunds, a company that only up until recently learned to stop making substandard cars (would have been bankrupt too if the auto industry bailout didn't save their shipping services, since those services rely on the other American companies to stay in business by shipping volume), and a company that along with Chase Bank, Wachovia, and a few other actors nearly destroyed the United States economy if it wasn't for a taxpayer bailout that has done nothing but benefit the executives who gave themselves a pat on the back bonus and holding on to those taxpayer funds which they don't lend out (the intent of the taxpayer bailout was to get banks to lend again, that never happened, multimillion dollar bonuses are all that occurred by those executive decisions).

I clicked your profile and all of a sudden your senseless and endless whining made a lot more sense...


That's still not a valid response to the factual points that I made.

But also, what did you expect from a person with a screen name of "DarkSoulNoHope"? Tulips and fluffy bunnies?! :-D
 
2013-04-06 06:52:33 PM
In January I wrote three articles titled , and . The main points of the articles were that 2013 could be a lot like 2011...

Um, ok.
 
2013-04-06 06:54:36 PM

DarkSoulNoHope: That's still not a valid response to the factual points that I made.


images1.wikia.nocookie.net

DarkSoulNoHope: But also, what did you expect from a person with a screen name of "DarkSoulNoHope"? Tulips and fluffy bunnies?! :-D


There's a difference between cynicism and stupidity. Also, nobody honest and intelligent thinks that the market isn't unfairly biased toward the wealthy, but that's life. If you didn't shoot out of a silver-lined vagina onto a pile of woven, golden hay you're missing a lot more opportunities than just those that benefit investors.

Doesn't mean you can't participate and succeed anyway. I don't expect to ever become wealthy with my investing, but I'm not going to sit idly by and let myself get poorer either when a modest profit can be made with a few simple, common-sense investments and a little extra effort.
 
2013-04-06 09:52:10 PM

skozlaw: DarkSoulNoHope: That's still not a valid response to the factual points that I made.

[images1.wikia.nocookie.net image 210x210]

DarkSoulNoHope: But also, what did you expect from a person with a screen name of "DarkSoulNoHope"? Tulips and fluffy bunnies?! :-D

There's a difference between cynicism and stupidity. Also, nobody honest and intelligent thinks that the market isn't unfairly biased toward the wealthy, but that's life. If you didn't shoot out of a silver-lined vagina onto a pile of woven, golden hay you're missing a lot more opportunities than just those that benefit investors.

Doesn't mean you can't participate and succeed anyway. I don't expect to ever become wealthy with my investing, but I'm not going to sit idly by and let myself get poorer either when a modest profit can be made with a few simple, common-sense investments and a little extra effort.


Yeah, but you're still going to brag about it like an arsehole and still ignore the fact that you're profiting off of immoral companies that use taxpayer money, *YOURS AND MINE* (and everyone else's), in order to get those high stock prices you so proudly have on your portfolio.  I would be perfectly fine with those companies profiting if they did it through good business practices, and not relying on publicizing the business risk through usage of taxpayer funds after becoming "too big to fail" (after many mergers and acquisitions) while privatizing their profits. I am also *glad* that you brag to me about "simple, common-sense investments" when the companies you picked could have no longer existed today, had the US Government let those companies go down in flames and not bailed them out with taxpayer funds.
 
2013-04-06 10:22:16 PM

skozlaw: Also, nobody honest and intelligent thinks that the market isn't unfairly biased toward the wealthy, but that's life.


Why is that life?

I mean, I just don't get people looking at a completely man made system (poorly made, at that), and go "eh, that's just the way it is" instead of "how do we fix this?"

Or, right, because the gamed system is benefiting them.  Why fix it?
 
2013-04-07 12:03:55 AM

sendtodave: skozlaw: Also, nobody honest and intelligent thinks that the market isn't unfairly biased toward the wealthy, but that's life.

Why is that life?

I mean, I just don't get people looking at a completely man made system (poorly made, at that), and go "eh, that's just the way it is" instead of "how do we fix this?"

Or, right, because the gamed system is benefiting them.  Why fix it?


Ok, what if a person does want to "fix it".  What do you suggest?
 
2013-04-07 02:08:44 AM
Incontinent_dog_and_monkey_rodeo:

Ok, what if a person does want to "fix it".  What do you suggest?

Distributism, basic income, salary ratio caps (e.g. CEO can only make 20x the janitor's pay). A right to housing. Not going to happen, because you would have to take land from the rich, but it's a nice dream.

While we're discussing the market, some may call it "investing" but I call it "speculating". You can make money playing poker, too, if you're good at it. That as a society we consider this form of gambling to be praiseworthy but other forms shameful says a lot. That we all know the game is rigged and take this as assurance is not really a good thing. I remember reading about the Albania financial crisis - it was a massive pyramid scheme, but people invested because they assumed there was some sort of illegal business behind it.

We KNOW that our financial system rests on illegal business (not just HSBC's money laundering for the cartels, but massive title fraud via "robosigning", etc.), so I guess we're better off than the Albanians...
 
2013-04-07 03:05:58 AM
media.screened.com
 
2013-04-07 06:45:23 AM
DarkSoulNoHope: .....Yeah, but you're still going to brag about it like an arsehole and still ignore the fact that you're profiting off of immoral companies that use taxpayer money, *YOURS AND MINE* (and everyone else's), in order to get those high stock prices you so proudly have on your portfolio.  I would be perfectly fine with those companies profiting if they did it through good business practices, and not relying on publicizing the business risk through usage of taxpayer funds after becoming "too big to fail" (after many mergers and acquisitions) while privatizing their profits. I am also *glad* that you brag to me about "simple, common-sense investments" when the companies you picked could have no longer existed today, had the US Government let those companies go down in flames and not bailed them out with taxpayer funds.

Perhaps you are not aware.  There are ETFs and Mutual Funds that focus specifically on socially responsible companies and emerging technologies.  Not every investment needs to be made in the traditional blue chips and banks.

A good writeup is here.

You may not be able to beat the corporate giants at the investing game, but this is one way you can deliver your little cut.
 
2013-04-07 08:32:21 AM

Atomic Spunk: DarkSoulNoHope: skozlaw: DarkSoulNoHope: Does this mean that the poor and middle class are going to get a bigger share of the pot? No. Just the opposite? Well then I just don't give a fark about the market then. Call me back when this helps me and other people who aren't insanely wealthy.

When the market crashed in 2009 I took some of my savings and opened an IRA through Scottrade. Bought some obvious things that weren't going to go anywhere in the long run. GE, Ford, Bank of America. Put $2000 in it. It's worth almost $60,000 today and I've only put another $10,000 or so of my own money into it. My 401k through work is also worth several times what I've actually put into it despite tanking between '08 and early last year.

But you just keep whining about rich people. That'll probably accomplish a lot too.

I am *so* glad you got wealthier with investing in: A company that makes huge profits but uses creative accounting schemes to pay no taxes and get large tax refunds, a company that only up until recently learned to stop making substandard cars (would have been bankrupt too if the auto industry bailout didn't save their shipping services, since those services rely on the other American companies to stay in business by shipping volume), and a company that along with Chase Bank, Wachovia, and a few other actors nearly destroyed the United States economy if it wasn't for a taxpayer bailout that has done nothing but benefit the executives who gave themselves a pat on the back bonus and holding on to those taxpayer funds which they don't lend out (the intent of the taxpayer bailout was to get banks to lend again, that never happened, multimillion dollar bonuses are all that occurred by those executive decisions).

Why do you hate capitalism?


Everyone seems to be ignoring the fact that it takes money to make money which I thought was dark souls main point. Not everyone has $1,000 they can risk losing let alone $10,000, and chances are they don't understand the principles of investment either.
 
2013-04-07 10:25:47 AM
i.imgur.com
 
2013-04-07 11:30:19 AM

Incontinent_dog_and_monkey_rodeo: sendtodave: skozlaw: Also, nobody honest and intelligent thinks that the market isn't unfairly biased toward the wealthy, but that's life.

Why is that life?

I mean, I just don't get people looking at a completely man made system (poorly made, at that), and go "eh, that's just the way it is" instead of "how do we fix this?"

Or, right, because the gamed system is benefiting them.  Why fix it?

Ok, what if a person does want to "fix it".  What do you suggest?


A person could get together with a bunch of like minded persons, and use money and/or social pressure to either get current leaders to work towards fixing the system, or to elect those that will.

Aw, who am I kidding, democracy is a joke.
 
2013-04-07 11:59:29 AM
just get ready.  that's all.
 
2013-04-07 05:02:49 PM

DarkSoulNoHope: skozlaw: DarkSoulNoHope: Does this mean that the poor and middle class are going to get a bigger share of the pot? No. Just the opposite? Well then I just don't give a fark about the market then. Call me back when this helps me and other people who aren't insanely wealthy.

When the market crashed in 2009 I took some of my savings and opened an IRA through Scottrade. Bought some obvious things that weren't going to go anywhere in the long run. GE, Ford, Bank of America. Put $2000 in it. It's worth almost $60,000 today and I've only put another $10,000 or so of my own money into it. My 401k through work is also worth several times what I've actually put into it despite tanking between '08 and early last year.

But you just keep whining about rich people. That'll probably accomplish a lot too.

I am *so* glad you got wealthier with investing in: A company that makes huge profits but uses creative accounting schemes to pay no taxes and get large tax refunds, a company that only up until recently learned to stop making substandard cars (would have been bankrupt too if the auto industry bailout didn't save their shipping services, since those services rely on the other American companies to stay in business by shipping volume), and a company that along with Chase Bank, Wachovia, and a few other actors nearly destroyed the United States economy if it wasn't for a taxpayer bailout that has done nothing but benefit the executives who gave themselves a pat on the back bonus and holding on to those taxpayer funds which they don't lend out (the intent of the taxpayer bailout was to get banks to lend again, that never happened, multimillion dollar bonuses are all that occurred by those executive decisions).


Funny, I understood that the main reason why Ford didn't get a bailout was because it had enough cash on hand and iron-clad guarantees of credit that it could ride out the collapse of the market for short-term credit, which is what ultimately took GM and Chrysler down. (Ford had in 2006 or '07 mortgaged everything including the Big Blue Oval to secure that lifeline, which made all the difference when everything shiat the bed toward the end of the Bush regime.)

Never really heard of Ford being the other automakers' go-to outfit for transportation services, but I guess it's possible. Can't find anything to that effect on Google, but it's Sunday and I don't feel like trying very hard.
 
2013-04-07 07:21:45 PM

jjwars1: Atomic Spunk: DarkSoulNoHope: skozlaw: DarkSoulNoHope: Does this mean that the poor and middle class are going to get a bigger share of the pot? No. Just the opposite? Well then I just don't give a fark about the market then. Call me back when this helps me and other people who aren't insanely wealthy.

When the market crashed in 2009 I took some of my savings and opened an IRA through Scottrade. Bought some obvious things that weren't going to go anywhere in the long run. GE, Ford, Bank of America. Put $2000 in it. It's worth almost $60,000 today and I've only put another $10,000 or so of my own money into it. My 401k through work is also worth several times what I've actually put into it despite tanking between '08 and early last year.

But you just keep whining about rich people. That'll probably accomplish a lot too.

I am *so* glad you got wealthier with investing in: A company that makes huge profits but uses creative accounting schemes to pay no taxes and get large tax refunds, a company that only up until recently learned to stop making substandard cars (would have been bankrupt too if the auto industry bailout didn't save their shipping services, since those services rely on the other American companies to stay in business by shipping volume), and a company that along with Chase Bank, Wachovia, and a few other actors nearly destroyed the United States economy if it wasn't for a taxpayer bailout that has done nothing but benefit the executives who gave themselves a pat on the back bonus and holding on to those taxpayer funds which they don't lend out (the intent of the taxpayer bailout was to get banks to lend again, that never happened, multimillion dollar bonuses are all that occurred by those executive decisions).

Why do you hate capitalism?

Everyone seems to be ignoring the fact that it takes money to make money which I thought was dark souls main point. Not everyone has $1,000 they can risk losing let alone $10,000, and chances are they don't understand the principles of investment either.


It was my main point. Added onto the fact of layoffs and income stagnation makes investing and even day to day living quite difficult.
 
2013-04-07 10:45:42 PM
DarkSoulNoHope: ...the intent of the taxpayer bailout was to get banks to lend again...

Ummm... no. The intent of the bailout was to continue the fiction that the banks were meeting the reserve requirements. I know... it was presented to the public as a means to get banks to loan again, but, guess what? They were lying.
 
2013-04-08 12:15:59 PM

skozlaw: DarkSoulNoHope: Does this mean that the poor and middle class are going to get a bigger share of the pot? No. Just the opposite? Well then I just don't give a fark about the market then. Call me back when this helps me and other people who aren't insanely wealthy.

When the market crashed in 2009 I took some of my savings and opened an IRA through Scottrade. Bought some obvious things that weren't going to go anywhere in the long run. GE, Ford, Bank of America. Put $2000 in it. It's worth almost $60,000 today and I've only put another $10,000 or so of my own money into it. My 401k through work is also worth several times what I've actually put into it despite tanking between '08 and early last year.

But you just keep whining about rich people. That'll probably accomplish a lot too.


So you say you took $12,000 in cash, and saw a 46% gain every single year for  3 1/2 years?  Using large-cap stocks?  And you think you can repeat that, even if it were true, which it ain't?
 
2013-04-09 03:05:38 PM

El Pachuco: skozlaw: DarkSoulNoHope: Does this mean that the poor and middle class are going to get a bigger share of the pot? No. Just the opposite? Well then I just don't give a fark about the market then. Call me back when this helps me and other people who aren't insanely wealthy.

When the market crashed in 2009 I took some of my savings and opened an IRA through Scottrade. Bought some obvious things that weren't going to go anywhere in the long run. GE, Ford, Bank of America. Put $2000 in it. It's worth almost $60,000 today and I've only put another $10,000 or so of my own money into it. My 401k through work is also worth several times what I've actually put into it despite tanking between '08 and early last year.

But you just keep whining about rich people. That'll probably accomplish a lot too.

So you say you took $12,000 in cash, and saw a 46% gain every single year for  3 1/2 years?  Using large-cap stocks?  And you think you can repeat that, even if it were true, which it ain't?


I'll admit it sounds...somewhat unbelievable.  But if it is true, better start selling!
 
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