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(Journal News)   Millions of underground bugs with orange legs, red eyes, and clear wings with orange veins, that have been sucking fluids from tree roots, are about to burst from the earth in the biggest inundation of Magicicada septendecim since Brood X   (lohud.com) divider line 68
    More: Spiffy, Magicicada septendecim, Cicadas, broods, tree root, Hudson Valley, names of large numbers, entomology, Rockland County  
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14172 clicks; posted to Main » on 06 Apr 2013 at 9:17 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-04-06 03:31:16 AM
bugguide.net
 
2013-04-06 04:09:59 AM
Zerg Cicada rush!
 
2013-04-06 04:38:36 AM
In case you were curious but didn't know why the number of years in their life-cycle rigidly attaches to one of two prime numbers:

(From wiki)

Inevitably, some of the numbers that occur in nature are prime. There are, however, relatively few examples of numbers that appear in nature because they are prime.

One example of the use of prime numbers in nature is as an evolutionary strategy used by cicadas of the genus Magicicada.[38] These insects spend most of their lives as grubs underground. They only pupate and then emerge from their burrows after 13 or 17 years, at which point they fly about, breed, and then die after a few weeks at most. The logic for this is believed to be that the prime number intervals between emergences make it very difficult for predators to evolve that could specialize as predators on Magicicadas.[39] If Magicicadas appeared at a non-prime number intervals, say every 12 years, then predators appearing every 2, 3, 4, 6, or 12 years would be sure to meet them. Over a 200-year period, average predator populations during hypothetical outbreaks of 14- and 15-year cicadas would be up to 2% higher than during outbreaks of 13- and 17-year cicadas.[40] Though small, this advantage appears to have been enough to drive natural selection in favour of a prime-numbered life-cycle for these insects.
 
2013-04-06 07:42:57 AM

MurphyMurphy: In case you were curious but didn't know why the number of years in their life-cycle rigidly attaches to one of two prime numbers:

(From wiki)

Inevitably, some of the numbers that occur in nature are prime. There are, however, relatively few examples of numbers that appear in nature because they are prime.

One example of the use of prime numbers in nature is as an evolutionary strategy used by cicadas of the genus Magicicada.[38] These insects spend most of their lives as grubs underground. They only pupate and then emerge from their burrows after 13 or 17 years, at which point they fly about, breed, and then die after a few weeks at most. The logic for this is believed to be that the prime number intervals between emergences make it very difficult for predators to evolve that could specialize as predators on Magicicadas.[39] If Magicicadas appeared at a non-prime number intervals, say every 12 years, then predators appearing every 2, 3, 4, 6, or 12 years would be sure to meet them. Over a 200-year period, average predator populations during hypothetical outbreaks of 14- and 15-year cicadas would be up to 2% higher than during outbreaks of 13- and 17-year cicadas.[40] Though small, this advantage appears to have been enough to drive natural selection in favour of a prime-numbered life-cycle for these insects.


What an abysmal failure at explaining why it's a prime number though. Why not 14 or 18 years? Neither of those are prime and yet they would seem to be more advantageous by the logic offered than 13 or 17.

I seem to remember a huge chorus of cicadas every year when I was a kid. They're not all of the 17 year variety. Wikipedia says there are over 2500 different species of cicadas.

Sometimes I'd put on some music and go outside and I could swear they were responding to it and playing along. "A rare and different tune" indeed. Even when I wasn't listening to music outdoors the cicadas provided their own chorus. Quite often I would find their shells sticking to trees. They shed their exoskeletons and leave them behind.

Quite fascinating little creatures. I should have been an entomologist. I think bugs are amazing..
media.npr.org
 
2013-04-06 09:06:30 AM
Anyone that grew up in the Midwest can still hear these guys on an August night. They haunt your dreams.
 
2013-04-06 09:19:54 AM
I love that sound.
 
2013-04-06 09:21:36 AM
That sound can get real farking annoying when its so loud. Le sigh.
 
2013-04-06 09:22:42 AM
static.comicvine.com

Ready for E-Day
 
2013-04-06 09:24:48 AM
If they only show up every 13-17 years, why are they in the background of EVERY anime that takes place in Japan?
 
2013-04-06 09:29:46 AM
img442.imageshack.us
 
2013-04-06 09:35:09 AM
They go good in Captain Crunch cereal. Ask my sisters.
 
2013-04-06 09:35:25 AM
i wonder what they taste like covered in chocolate? (Not that I'd ever try one.)
 
2013-04-06 09:37:45 AM
 "Millions of cicadas soon to emerge from ground for brief lives"

17 years sounds like anything but brief for a freaking insect.  Or, when they are underground are they some sort of undead creatures?
 
2013-04-06 09:38:25 AM
Judging from how my dog chows down on cicadas every chance he gets, they're apparently delicious.  Or at least non-toxic, he isn't exactly a picky eater.
 
2013-04-06 09:38:33 AM
Dogs and Cats love to eat them.  Maybe they're delicious?
 
2013-04-06 09:41:03 AM
ChicagoKev  Delicious, eh?

Seconds!  My heavens, every 17 years I'm beaten by mere seconds!
 
2013-04-06 09:46:38 AM

Generation_D: Anyone that grew up in the Midwest can still hear these guys on an August night. They haunt your dreams.


I live in Ontario and had a friend visiting me from the west coast one August. At one point he was like "what's that sound?!" I didn't know what kind of bug, but I learned then that they apparently don't have them where he was from. Growing up, I was always told they were "crickets rubbing their legs together."
I don't think I learned what they actually were until I started using the internet.
 
2013-04-06 09:48:23 AM

MurphyMurphy: In case you were curious but didn't know why the number of years in their life-cycle rigidly attaches to one of two prime numbers:

I was told there would be no math.
 
2013-04-06 09:48:40 AM
Nothing like going to sleep one day and waking up to find out someone put a parking lot on top of you.
 
2013-04-06 09:48:55 AM
I remember the Brood XIII emergence here in Chicago back in 2007, and it was really impressive.  I got out of the city and into the country as often as I could just to enjoy the sound.

Fun fact:  Different cycle broods (such as a 13 or 17) will overlap their territories, but two broods of the same length will not have overlapping territories.  Or at least, that is what someone told me back in 2007.
 
2013-04-06 09:49:52 AM
Nature's prime snack food.
 
2013-04-06 09:50:28 AM

Happy Hours: I seem to remember a huge chorus of cicadas every year when I was a kid.


So do I, except for the "seem to" part; replace that with "do".
 
2013-04-06 09:54:27 AM

Happy Hours: What an abysmal failure at explaining why it's a prime number though. Why not 14 or 18 years? Neither of those are prime and yet they would seem to be more advantageous by the logic offered than 13 or 17.


With 14 or 18 year periods, cicadas might find the adult segment of their life cycle in-phase with high population points of predators with 2-year population oscillations on a fairly regular basis.
 
2013-04-06 09:54:40 AM

ms_lara_croft: i wonder what they taste like covered in chocolate? (Not that I'd ever try one.)


Back in 2004 my sister mentioned that some restaurant in Indiana was serving them as an appetizer, and it turns out one of her friends who is allergic to shellfish tried them and had an allergic reaction. Sooooo if they are offered to you, bring the benadryl I guess.
 
2013-04-06 09:55:13 AM

Generation_D: Anyone that grew up in the Midwest can still hear these guys on an August night. They haunt your dreams.


Those are the green-eyed annual cicadas, which are loud enough. The 17-year variety emerges en masse in the spring, and the roar can be just about deafening. In the Chicago area, the last time we had them was in 2007.

/remembers the 1990 and 1973 outbreaks
//off my lawn
 
2013-04-06 09:55:16 AM
Just in time for National Frog Month!
 
2013-04-06 09:58:32 AM
Gonna be noisy on my farm this summer.


/love that "noise"
 
2013-04-06 10:01:14 AM
I don't know what they taste like, but they make awesome bait.  Try it.
 
2013-04-06 10:01:29 AM

MythDragon: If they only show up every 13-17 years, why are they in the background of EVERY anime that takes place in Japan?


In Japan, they are such fans of the US that anime is actually filmed in the Midwest instead of on-location.

But really, cicadas aren't all prime-number, but they ARE all crazy-loud.  Especially when you have a lot of trees that are full of 'em.
 
2013-04-06 10:04:59 AM
Ia ia ia Cthulu!
 
2013-04-06 10:06:08 AM
I thought they came out last year in Tennessee?
*It was horrible...but I did save on dog food*
 
2013-04-06 10:12:08 AM

ladyfortuna: ms_lara_croft: i wonder what they taste like covered in chocolate? (Not that I'd ever try one.)

Back in 2004 my sister mentioned that some restaurant in Indiana was serving them as an appetizer, and it turns out one of her friends who is allergic to shellfish tried them and had an allergic reaction. Sooooo if they are offered to you, bring the benadryl I guess.


I'm not allergic to shellfish so I could pull this off. I hear ants taste like lemons because of the formic acid. Who knows what cicadas will taste like?

Why am I suddenly thinking of Monty Python and crunchy frogs?
 
2013-04-06 10:18:26 AM
http://amzn.to/ZmzG6j

Sorry...couldn't resist.
 
2013-04-06 10:18:33 AM
Sounds like this is a good year for fishing.
 
2013-04-06 10:28:44 AM

ms_lara_croft: i wonder what they taste like covered in chocolate? (Not that I'd ever try one.)


Ever have crispy m&ms? That's what. When the other brood of 17 year cicadas appeared in 2004, my friend had a cicada eating party, and that was dessert. Not bad actually!

I thought the last round of them was hilarious and fascinating, so I hope to see them in my neighborhood.
 
2013-04-06 10:30:30 AM

Thisbymaster: Sounds like this is a good year for fishing.


With all the free food  why would I even go near a hook?
 
2013-04-06 10:45:54 AM

UDel_Kitty: ms_lara_croft: i wonder what they taste like covered in chocolate? (Not that I'd ever try one.)

Ever have crispy m&ms? That's what. When the other brood of 17 year cicadas appeared in 2004, my friend had a cicada eating party, and that was dessert. Not bad actually!

I thought the last round of them was hilarious and fascinating, so I hope to see them in my neighborhood.


Now I have to try them. They're starting to sound very good.

The last round they were so loud at my ex's aunt's house I couldn't hear the music over their noise. They spent 17 years underground only to diddle a bit and drown in the pool. LOL
 
2013-04-06 10:50:12 AM

Fubegra: Generation_D: Anyone that grew up in the Midwest can still hear these guys on an August night. They haunt your dreams.

Those are the green-eyed annual cicadas, which are loud enough. The 17-year variety emerges en masse in the spring, and the roar can be just about deafening. In the Chicago area, the last time we had them was in 2007.

/remembers the 1990 and 1973 outbreaks
//off my lawn


My mom worked in Oak Lawn in 1990 and we lived in the area. I remember being petrified to go outside because it got to the point where you couldn't walk without stepping on a bunch of them. I remember my dad taking me and my brother to go pick up mom from work and while my brother was happily stomping around on them I was crying and tip toeing (I was 7, he was 4). Dad got mad, grabbed my hand and made me walk faster crushing them. One fell out of a tree and went past my face and I lost it. While they were bad by our house, they were worse in Oak Lawn. We pulled up and Dad wanted me to get out and get mom. I refused and my brother volunteered and got to stomp on more bugs.

I can still hear and feel the crunching. To this day they terrify me. Which is dumb because they don't really do anything but they are gross. And make my skin crawl.

Gross story, bro?
 
2013-04-06 11:01:05 AM
Come to think of it, in 1973 it was pretty easy to find one on the ground and crunch it with bike tires. The cat thought it was mighty conquering them too. One did land in my sister's hair though. The only time the noise was drowned out by something louder.

Big dumb loud crunchy bugs with melodic hissing wings by the hundred or thousand in every tree in town. The noise pulses louder and louder to where its almost louder than shouting, and then it suddenly drops back off to nearly nothing. Then in a few seconds it gets going again.

You guys that didn't get this growing up really missed out.
 
2013-04-06 11:07:48 AM
This will smell like shiat when this is all over. Literally, like shiat.
 
2013-04-06 11:08:58 AM

Louisiana_Sitar_Club: "Millions of cicadas soon to emerge from ground for brief lives"

17 years sounds like anything but brief for a freaking insect.  Or, when they are underground are they some sort of undead creatures?


Undead is a pretty good word for it.
 
2013-04-06 11:09:22 AM
media.npr.orgOrange I glad to see you?
 
2013-04-06 11:10:43 AM

Generation_D: The noise pulses louder and louder to where its almost louder than shouting, and then it suddenly drops back off to nearly nothing. Then in a few seconds it gets going again.

You guys that didn't get this growing up really missed out.


Just your description of the sound reminds me of summers when i was a kid, messing around in the woods all the time.

Can almost feel the lazy hot air and the sun filtering through the leaves.
 
2013-04-06 11:14:54 AM
This is my first summer on the east coast since the 1990 emergence.  This isn't going to be fun, is it
 
2013-04-06 11:16:43 AM
Sharpened my shooting eye with a BB gun on cicadas.  Part of the challenge was finding them in the trees up high.  Harmless critters, but a definite summer song I'll always remember.
 
2013-04-06 11:27:20 AM

Generation_D: Come to think of it, in 1973 it was pretty easy to find one on the ground and crunch it with bike tires. The cat thought it was mighty conquering them too. One did land in my sister's hair though. The only time the noise was drowned out by something louder.

Big dumb loud crunchy bugs with melodic hissing wings by the hundred or thousand in every tree in town. The noise pulses louder and louder to where its almost louder than shouting, and then it suddenly drops back off to nearly nothing. Then in a few seconds it gets going again.

You guys that didn't get this growing up really missed out.


You should be a writer, or at least post here more often. A+
 
2013-04-06 11:34:22 AM
Two broods ago (Brood IX?) I was given extra credit in high school Biology for eating one of those crunchy little suckers in front of the class.

Stuck it in a pita pocket with fried green peppers and onions.

Tasted like sand in an eggshell.
 
2013-04-06 11:48:01 AM

ms_lara_croft: ladyfortuna: ms_lara_croft: i wonder what they taste like covered in chocolate? (Not that I'd ever try one.)

Back in 2004 my sister mentioned that some restaurant in Indiana was serving them as an appetizer, and it turns out one of her friends who is allergic to shellfish tried them and had an allergic reaction. Sooooo if they are offered to you, bring the benadryl I guess.

I'm not allergic to shellfish so I could pull this off. I hear ants taste like lemons because of the formic acid. Who knows what cicadas will taste like?



I wouldn't necessarily assume that they have whatever it is that causes shellfish allergies, I meant that more as a general 'hey you could find out you're allergic to them'. Lemon ants would be interesting though.
 
2013-04-06 11:58:34 AM

Evil Mackerel: Nothing like going to sleep one day and waking up to find out someone put a parking lot on top of you.



A certain king of England would like to have a (belated) word with you.
 
2013-04-06 12:12:41 PM
Aw krap! Now we get to hear all about how tasty they are and have to put up with TV spots on ways to cook the noisy little buggers.

I liked it better when no one knew they could be eaten and they were just a bug that made a lot of racket in the woods.
 
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