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(ESPN)   Stop me if you've heard this one before: A major corporation that does not pay its workers is now looking to profit from one of the worst sports injuries we've seen this century   (espn.go.com ) divider line
    More: Followup, Darren Rovell, University of Louisville, injuries, Shapiro, tipsters, Ed O'Bannon, Kevin Ware  
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5709 clicks; posted to Sports » on 05 Apr 2013 at 6:20 PM (3 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-04-05 05:10:45 PM  
Terrible PR all around.  They ought to be donating the profits to a scholorship fund or something.
 
2013-04-05 05:28:05 PM  
FTA:  "If the university is benefiting in any way by commercially exploiting a student-athlete, it is a right of publicity violation," said Rob Carey, a partner of Hagens Berman Sobol and Shapiro and co-lead counsel on the case.

So no more NCAA then, right?
 
2013-04-05 05:48:07 PM  
i am going to go out there and say that the luger guy who caught the dead between two support poles during the olympics was the worst this century so far. but this kid was certainly the most traumatic.

I think everyone is just being nice and telling him he will be playing again in a year. He was not a starter, a sophmore.. his leg blew up.. I certainly hope he wasn't dreaming of a huge paycheck from the NBA.
 
2013-04-05 06:22:15 PM  
Before this goes down the rabbit hole, lets clarify:

1. The school waived its royalties from the beginning.
2. Adidas agreed to donate Louisville's portion of sales to the school's general scholarship fund.
3. Even another portion of the sales was intended for charity.
4. Lots of people here want these to show Kevin support, but can't now because some opportunistic asshole decided to attach his agenda to it.

There's an argument to be had on paying players, and that's fine. This is not that argument.

Now continue with your witch hunt.
 
2013-04-05 06:28:56 PM  

imapirate: Before this goes down the rabbit hole, lets clarify:

1. The school waived its royalties from the beginning.
2. Adidas agreed to donate Louisville's portion of sales to the school's general scholarship fund.
3. Even another portion of the sales was intended for charity.
4. Lots of people here want these to show Kevin support, but can't now because some opportunistic asshole decided to attach his agenda to it.

There's an argument to be had on paying players, and that's fine. This is not that argument.

Now continue with your witch hunt.


You said what I was going to say, but far, FAR better.

//I go cry myself to sleep now that my life is officially devoid of purpose.
 
2013-04-05 06:32:59 PM  

downstairs: Terrible PR all around.  They ought to be donating the profits to Kevin Ware.


FTFY
 
2013-04-05 06:41:05 PM  

imapirate: Before this goes down the rabbit hole, lets clarify:

1. The school waived its royalties from the beginning.
2. Adidas agreed to donate Louisville's portion of sales to the school's general scholarship fund.
3. Even another portion of the sales was intended for charity.
4. Lots of people here want these to show Kevin support, but can't now because some opportunistic asshole decided to attach his agenda to it.

There's an argument to be had on paying players, and that's fine. This is not that argument.

Now continue with your witch hunt.



I was just mad they priced a farking t-shirt at $25.  But now I feel bad for hating.
 
2013-04-05 06:59:17 PM  
Sure..because a college education that many go into substantial debt for isnt compensation, right?
 
2013-04-05 07:06:00 PM  
Who doesn't pay their workers?
(besides Drew Curtis)
 
2013-04-05 07:08:17 PM  
FTA: The school admitted that the shirt was indeed meant to honor Ware and said it was not profiting off the shirt because it had waived the typical licensing royalty that the school collects. For its part, Adidas said in a statement that the shirt was created as a request to the team and the school.

"We are happy to support Louisville fans who wish to honor a player and rally around the team during the most important moments of their season," the statement said. "The shirt was intended as a respectful tribute and because of that, a portion of every sale will go to the university's scholarship fund."

 So, they're not profiting from the shirt, but proceeds are going to the school's scholarship fund.  Who ends up with the money in the scholarship fund, FFS?  Penn State?
 
2013-04-05 07:16:41 PM  

Babwa Wawa: FTA: The school admitted that the shirt was indeed meant to honor Ware and said it was not profiting off the shirt because it had waived the typical licensing royalty that the school collects. For its part, Adidas said in a statement that the shirt was created as a request to the team and the school.

"We are happy to support Louisville fans who wish to honor a player and rally around the team during the most important moments of their season," the statement said. "The shirt was intended as a respectful tribute and because of that, a portion of every sale will go to the university's scholarship fund."
 So, they're not profiting from the shirt, but proceeds are going to the school's scholarship fund.  Who ends up with the money in the scholarship fund, FFS?  Penn State?


Any student who would qualify. Same as if you or I donated to the school.
 
2013-04-05 07:22:11 PM  

imapirate: 2. Adidas agreed to donate Louisville's portion of sales to the school's general scholarship fund.
3. Even another portion of the sales was intended for charity.



$0.01 is technically a portion. Needed to be 100% of all proceeds, with Adidas writing off the cost as charitable donations.
 
2013-04-05 07:29:58 PM  
Cerebral P. Knievel


Care to re-post that in English?
 
2013-04-05 07:33:05 PM  
In my opinion scholarship athletes are being paid. They are getting upwards of $40,000 a year in education.

This, however, seems like something different. Somehow, it doesn't seem fair to be able to sell these t-shirts.
 
2013-04-05 07:41:59 PM  
Look, no one gets wound up about things before knowing the facts like the Internet, it's true, but don't tell me that Louisville wasn't going to profit from these shirts at some point. Louisville profits off these kids in two dozen different ways. They sells shirts/jerseys/hats with players numbers (no names of course but certain numbers will be prominently featured year to year), they sell their likenesses to EA for video games, they put their pictures on tickets, flyers, mailers, posters, etc etc.

When Louisville beat Duke and someone in the sports marketing department realized they should get a #5 shirt going, despite what they may say now I doubt anyone gave a thought to whether they should profit from this, because they do it every day. You think Kentucky started donating profits from the sale of Nerlens Noel's jersey when he went down with an ACL in February? Only when people started saying crazy things like "This kid may never play competitively again, and Rick Pitino could yank his scholarship if he wanted to" did things get all awkward and suddenly there were proceeds going here and there.
 
2013-04-05 07:42:22 PM  

Lost Thought 00: imapirate: 2. Adidas agreed to donate Louisville's portion of sales to the school's general scholarship fund.
3. Even another portion of the sales was intended for charity.


$0.01 is technically a portion. Needed to be 100% of all proceeds, with Adidas writing off the cost as charitable donations.


And I agree. The asshole on ESPN argued the school is profiting, when they are not and never intended to. Attack Adidas all day, but leave UofL out of it since it was meant as a genuine gesture of support.

Too late though, that asshole already ruined it.
 
2013-04-05 07:44:29 PM  

jayhawk88: Look, no one gets wound up about things before knowing the facts like the Internet, it's true, but don't tell me that Louisville wasn't going to profit from these shirts at some point. Louisville profits off these kids in two dozen different ways. They sells shirts/jerseys/hats with players numbers (no names of course but certain numbers will be prominently featured year to year), they sell their likenesses to EA for video games, they put their pictures on tickets, flyers, mailers, posters, etc etc.

When Louisville beat Duke and someone in the sports marketing department realized they should get a #5 shirt going, despite what they may say now I doubt anyone gave a thought to whether they should profit from this, because they do it every day. You think Kentucky started donating profits from the sale of Nerlens Noel's jersey when he went down with an ACL in February? Only when people started saying crazy things like "This kid may never play competitively again, and Rick Pitino could yank his scholarship if he wanted to" did things get all awkward and suddenly there were proceeds going here and there.


Or you know, that isn't true in the least but don't let that stop you.

And show me a school who doesn't license with EA, etc. This is completely different.
 
2013-04-05 07:54:53 PM  
They were on about this on the radio this afternoon... That Kevin Ware is referenced on the shirt, NCAA rules say it's promoting the kid and screws his eligibility.  Whether he gets any coin or not.  He has to have a lawyer send a cease and desist to the school and Adidas to at least show he's not profiting and not pleased that someone else is.  Is it time to update the NCAA compensation rules yet?  Which is what the lawyer that pointed this out, is actually fighting for.
 
2013-04-05 07:54:55 PM  

imapirate: Or you know, that isn't true in the least but don't let that stop you.

And show me a school who doesn't license with EA, etc. This is completely different.


I'm not trying single out Louisville, of course all (major) schools do this. Though the video game is admittedly a bad example, since EA probably licenses with the NCAA and not the individual schools.

But the point remains: These schools profit off these kids every day. Unless Louisville not profiting was specifically announced as the shirt was made available, you're going to have a hard time convincing me this wasn't just a CYA move by the university.
 
2013-04-05 08:05:05 PM  
I'd like to contend that this isn't even close to the worst sports injury we've seen in recent times.  One of the most grotesque, sure, but it's not like he'll be in a wheelchair for the rest of his life or anything.
 
2013-04-05 08:06:51 PM  

jayhawk88: But the point remains: These schools profit off these kids every day. Unless Louisville not profiting was specifically announced as the shirt was made available, you're going to have a hard time convincing me this wasn't just a CYA move by the university.


I'd be an idiot to argue otherwise. Louisville is far and away the most profitable athletic department in America.

As far as convincing someone of their genuineness, I guess you'll just have to go with your gut. But I can tell you as an alumni association member, the backlash from the boosters over the school turning a profit on this kid's injury would be outrageous.

FWIW, I actually don't support the players getting paid. They are paid in the form of higher education. But like I said, that's a separate argument. It's a tragic injury and the school was simply looking for a way for fans to support him. I fully expect an NCAA investigation though - they have to do something to keep them busy other than Auburn throwing cash at players like there's no tomorrow.

http://deadspin.com/louisville-claims-it-didnt-profit-from-sale-of-k ev in-w-470072665
 
2013-04-05 08:07:04 PM  

Lost Thought 00: imapirate: 2. Adidas agreed to donate Louisville's portion of sales to the school's general scholarship fund.
3. Even another portion of the sales was intended for charity.


$0.01 is technically a portion. Needed to be 100% of all proceeds, with Adidas writing off the cost as charitable donations.


Absolutely. Anybody know what portion of the proceeds Addidas is donating? Also, if this kid can never play ball again, is Louisville going to support him by giving him some sort of full ride scholarship so he can finish his education, or at least a 4 year total opportunity?
 
2013-04-05 08:12:48 PM  
I'm not saying they don't support him, but, I am skeptical about how much they actually do.

It would be nice to see a scholarship fund set up for kids injured playing the sport their scholarship is in. A golfer getting hurt playing intermural rugby, for example, wouldn't qualify.
 
2013-04-05 08:24:44 PM  

iron_city_ap: I'm not saying they don't support him, but, I am skeptical about how much they actually do.

It would be nice to see a scholarship fund set up for kids injured playing the sport their scholarship is in. A golfer getting hurt playing intermural rugby, for example, wouldn't qualify.


I'm sure, but UofL is probably not going to cover ALL medical bills.  So it would be nice for them to setup a fund where some of these profits can go.  You know to help the family pay for this crazy accident.  If he is back on the court next year and is productive (like the Vikes A.P.) it will be a miracle.   I don't think he'll be able to start any true strength rehab for at least 8 mos.
 
2013-04-05 08:35:25 PM  

ScouserDuck: Sure..because a college education that many go into substantial debt for isnt compensation, right?


Especially because most of these athletes wouldn't have a prayer of getting into these schools without sports.

On the other hand....

thebiglead.fantasysportsven.netdna-cdn.com
made a very compelling satirical argument
 
2013-04-05 09:18:43 PM  
One of these days, I'ma gonna start my own University. I'ma gonna call it Pro Sports University. And it'll have a full curriculum.

We'll teach how to not get screwed by agents, teams, friends and posses. We'll teach life skills like how to save your money, how to say "NO" and mean it, and how to hire a cab (or limousine)  when you're too drunk to drive.

We'll teach all the skills other universities neglect, like dealing with fans, how to write a legible autograph on a round ball, and how to explain to your wife why she has to get a penicillin shot for your kidney infection (stolen from Jim Bouton).

We will only accept student-athletes (except for aspiring agents), and instead of only offering scholarships, we'll allow our clients pawns boardpieces novitiate capitalists to license their images, numbers, likenesses and athletic deeds so they can profit too!

If the NCAA doesn't like it, I'll start TWO universities.

/Pro Sports University: Where EVERYBODY profits
 
2013-04-05 09:27:52 PM  

PaulieattheTap: iron_city_ap: I'm not saying they don't support him, but, I am skeptical about how much they actually do.

It would be nice to see a scholarship fund set up for kids injured playing the sport their scholarship is in. A golfer getting hurt playing intermural rugby, for example, wouldn't qualify.

I'm sure, but UofL is probably not going to cover ALL medical bills.  So it would be nice for them to setup a fund where some of these profits can go.  You know to help the family pay for this crazy accident.  If he is back on the court next year and is productive (like the Vikes A.P.) it will be a miracle.   I don't think he'll be able to start any true strength rehab for at least 8 mos.


I completely agree. That was Theisman-esque caliber. I seriously doubt he'll ever be able to be competitive again. Possibly if UofL somehow works it out for him to sit out a season to completely recover, its possible, but I just see people dropping the ball on him where it counts the most. I'd be happy to he wrong.
 
2013-04-05 09:39:21 PM  
Why should college students be paid?

If my health insurance is considered income, your full ride to an accredited college should be too.

And let's not forget, you get far, far more perks than just that.

Let's just keep it amateur, ok?  If you want to fix a problem with college ball, address the one and done nonsense.
 
2013-04-05 10:15:49 PM  

NaziKamikaze: Why should college students be paid?

If my health insurance is considered income, your full ride to an accredited college should be too.

And let's not forget, you get far, far more perks than just that.

Let's just keep it amateur, ok?  If you want to fix a problem with college ball, address the one and done nonsense.


But that's the problem the only thing in the equation that's amateur is how the kids are treated.  Yea they get a free ride for the education, and a bunch of non financial benefits,  but the schools make it all back huge, the NCAA makes plenty off them too... TV, merchandising, EA games, and so on...
 
2013-04-05 10:19:23 PM  

iron_city_ap: PaulieattheTap: iron_city_ap: I'm not saying they don't support him, but, I am skeptical about how much they actually do.

It would be nice to see a scholarship fund set up for kids injured playing the sport their scholarship is in. A golfer getting hurt playing intermural rugby, for example, wouldn't qualify.

I'm sure, but UofL is probably not going to cover ALL medical bills.  So it would be nice for them to setup a fund where some of these profits can go.  You know to help the family pay for this crazy accident.  If he is back on the court next year and is productive (like the Vikes A.P.) it will be a miracle.   I don't think he'll be able to start any true strength rehab for at least 8 mos.

I completely agree. That was Theisman-esque caliber. I seriously doubt he'll ever be able to be competitive again. Possibly if UofL somehow works it out for him to sit out a season to completely recover, its possible, but I just see people dropping the ball on him where it counts the most. I'd be happy to he wrong.


Gruesome? Sure. But it is not that bad. If there was ligament/tendon damage, and I have not heard that there was, it is just a nasty break. These happen in soccer all the time (don't go looking for videos and pictures if you don't want to see them) Players are back on the pitch 8-12 months later. This is not in any way career threatening, nor will it be a miracle when he returns.

/You can 2-6 months if he has tendon/ligament damage. Still not career threatening.
 
2013-04-05 10:30:13 PM  

NaziKamikaze: Why should college students be paid?

If my health insurance is considered income, your full ride to an accredited college should be too.

And let's not forget, you get far, far more perks than just that.

Let's just keep it amateur, ok?  If you want to fix a problem with college ball, address the one and done nonsense.


One and done can ONLY be fixed by the NBA - the NCAA has no power whatsoever.


Now, the problem with Ware is:

But, Ware will likely be personally responsible for any health care expenses stemming from the injury after he leaves the university. Injuries or conditions sustained during playing for a college that could have long-term implications are not covered by a university's or NCAA's medical insurance, http://www.nytimes.com/2013/04/05/sports/ncaabasketball/broken-leg-ren ews-focus-on-college-athletes-health-insurance.html?_r=0&pagewanted=al l">the Times reported.

Link: http://www.wjla.com/articles/2013/04/university-athlete-insurance-cov e rage-kevin-ware-injury-sparks-debate-87121.html#ixzz2Pe4vR31v
I'm sure Louisville is going to cover his scholarship, but he's going to have medical costs that could potentially bankrupt his family.

As I've said before, the optimal solution is to allow athletes to sign endorsement deals; it allows players in revenue sports to receive compensation without running into Title IX, and brings dirty money in other situations above the table.

There is a fundamental disconnect between the profits being realized by revenue sports and the compensation to the players.  The institutions know that the scholarships are overvalued, because they do everything they're allowed (and often things they're not) to minimize the difficulty of academics to make sure they can recruit the most talented players regardless of their athletic skill.  They recruit top players knowing some of these players are not college material, and that the best players - the players most likely to help them win and succeed financially - will not stick around to complete their education.  Couple all of this with increased restrictions on what the athletes are able to do compared to normal college students, particularly limits on legal representation.  And the minute anything goes wrong, like in the case of Michael McAdoo, the university will throw them under the bus without a second thought.

The system is fundamentally broken, and people getting on their high horse and saying the players should be happy with the "compensation" they receive and we shouldn't change the system is a big part of the problem.  College sports is now as arms race, and like it or not the players are viewed as resources first and people second, and in the history of labor in this country that dysfunction AWLAYS leads to major reform.

/and I'm certain it's going to start with an attempt to unionize college athletes, and I wish them all the luck in the world
 
2013-04-05 10:30:18 PM  

GleeUnit: FTA:  "If the university is benefiting in any way by commercially exploiting a student-athlete, it is a right of publicity violation," said Rob Carey, a partner of Hagens Berman Sobol and Shapiro and co-lead counsel on the case.

So no more NCAA then, right?


Brilliantly succinct.
 
2013-04-05 10:52:36 PM  

lennavan: I was just mad they priced a farking t-shirt at $25.  But now I feel bad for hating.


$25? Outrageous! How can one survive if you're practically giving them away?
Link
 
2013-04-05 11:03:19 PM  

imapirate: Before this goes down the rabbit hole, lets clarify:

1. The school waived its royalties from the beginning.
2. Adidas agreed to donate Louisville's portion of sales to the school's general scholarship fund.
3. Even another portion of the sales was intended for charity.
4. Lots of people here want these to show Kevin support, but can't now because some opportunistic asshole decided to attach his agenda to it.

There's an argument to be had on paying players, and that's fine. This is not that argument.

Now continue with your witch hunt.


//THIS
 
2013-04-05 11:06:04 PM  
I do not think the students should be paid. They are already getting a scholarship of sorts. Payment is there. They get paid when they land a job after working their arses off in school. That's the reward for hard work.
 
2013-04-05 11:11:01 PM  
Different sport, but the point still stands:
 
2013-04-05 11:16:32 PM  

Beware_Me: Different sport, but the point still stands:


Let's try this again:
i.imgur.com
 
2013-04-05 11:20:54 PM  
Also Friday, Klein told ESPN the school will give away 1,000 "big heads" of Ware to students who will be in the student section at Saturday's national semifinal against Wichita State.

The $2,500 price for the heads, cleared by the school's compliance department, was donated by a foundation led by New York Knicks forward Amar'e Stoudemire that aims to make lives better for at-risk youth.


Now this is a good idea in light of last week's investigation into athlete charities.  Because what do at risk youth need more than big heads?  Not that they actually get the big heads, but they can see them on tv maybe.
 
2013-04-05 11:45:46 PM  
Ed O'Bannon! Holy crap haven't heard that name in a while... IIRC, small forward, lefty, played for UCLA... pretty good college player, never made it in the pros.
 
2013-04-06 12:09:21 AM  

sno man: NaziKamikaze: Why should college students be paid?

If my health insurance is considered income, your full ride to an accredited college should be too.

And let's not forget, you get far, far more perks than just that.

Let's just keep it amateur, ok?  If you want to fix a problem with college ball, address the one and done nonsense.

But that's the problem the only thing in the equation that's amateur is how the kids are treated.  Yea they get a free ride for the education, and a bunch of non financial benefits,  but the schools make it all back huge, the NCAA makes plenty off them too... TV, merchandising, EA games, and so on...


The education is bullshiat argument. First off if the kids are from poor or near poor families there is plenty of need and race based student aid. Second, the scholarship does not cover things like transportation to visit home, nor does it include transportation so the family can see them play, or clothing, or laundry money, or buying a pizza.

Second, what type of a education do you think they actually have access to? When Duke at Miami this year it was on a Wednesday night. Durham is 800 miles away. You think they were prepared for class that week? Or look at any team that reaches the Sweet Sixteen. The players miss at least Wednesday, Thursday and Friday two weeks in a row? And we aren't even beginning to discuss how the players are directed towards worthless majors.

Finally, you know why that guy at Rutgers was able to abuse his players like that? Because they have no leverage, they couldn't transfer without the coach's approval.

But I don't think Athletes should get paid because you'd then have to pay all the overprivileged crew and LAX players as well. But it's simple, let the boosters give money directly to the students. It solves every problem.
 
2013-04-06 12:40:51 AM  

imapirate: Before this goes down the rabbit hole, lets clarify:

1. The school waived its royalties from the beginning.
2. Adidas agreed to donate Louisville's portion of sales to the school's general scholarship fund.
3. Even another portion of the sales was intended for charity.
4. Lots of people here want these to show Kevin support, but can't now because some opportunistic asshole decided to attach his agenda to it.

There's an argument to be had on paying players, and that's fine. This is not that argument.

Now continue with your witch hunt.


Donating money to the school's general scholarship fund directly helps the school recruit new students (and possibly athletes). It's a little self-serving.

Without any details about this charity, I will withhold judgement on that portion.

What I don't see is anything about the money going to help Kevin and his family. That would seem to be a fairly obvious thing to do with these funds.
 
2013-04-06 01:10:00 AM  

Yes please: Also Friday, Klein told ESPN the school will give away 1,000 "big heads" of Ware to students who will be in the student section at Saturday's national semifinal against Wichita State.

The $2,500 price for the heads, cleared by the school's compliance department, was donated by a foundation led by New York Knicks forward Amar'e Stoudemire that aims to make lives better for at-risk youth.

Now this is a good idea in light of last week's investigation into athlete charities.  Because what do at risk youth need more than big heads?  Not that they actually get the big heads, but they can see them on tv maybe.


So Amar'e wrote them an extra check, and they'll probably get way more than $2500 worth of good PR.  What's the problem here?
 
2013-04-06 02:11:22 AM  
Not the worst I've seen, by far. (Not Safe for Lunch)

i306.photobucket.com
 
2013-04-06 02:50:36 AM  

tallguywithglasseson: O'Bannon


Nor did his brother Charles but they were both drafted. I remember believing  (can't remember which one) Ed or Charles would be a good bench player, but when you are drafted by the crap teams, it could ruin one's career.
 
2013-04-06 02:56:07 AM  
All you people saying "oh they get a free education they are getting paid"--you guys know the NCAA went to court to argue the exact opposite, right? They invented the phrase "student athlete" and denied that a scholarship was income so that they didn't have to pay workers' comp benefits to injured athletes.

I hope Ed O'Bannon bankrupts the NCAA right out of existence.
 
mjg
2013-04-06 04:01:09 AM  

downstairs: Terrible PR all around.




classictvhistory.files.wordpress.com
 
2013-04-06 04:22:15 AM  
I wasn't aware that Kevin Ware held exclusive rights to the number five. Her p-a-derp
 
2013-04-06 05:12:40 AM  

bigtotoro: These happen in soccer all the time (don't go looking for videos and pictures if you don't want to see them)


A plant leg may take some torque, but those injuries often happen because of lateral pressure resulting from a slide or tackle or some such. Really, unless the same thing happens again, a soccer player will be fine because he plays on a soft surface.

A basketball player spends much of his time jumping 15+ inches from and to a completely hard surface. The kind of break he suffered is in some ways worse than a torn ACL for the sport in which he participates.
 
2013-04-06 06:30:19 AM  

lennavan: But now I feel bad for hating.


Well, don't. There is plenty to hate about this situation.

FTFA: ...a portion of every sale will go to the university's scholarship fund.

Wow. It's like if Coca-Cola had a promotion stating that a portion of the proceeds would go towards breast cancer research, and then they took that money and used it to purchase their own product from themselves at retail price and then sent it to a few breast cancer victims.

This is bullsh*t.

You know who needs a scholarship? Those student athletes who aren't able to play anymore due to on-the-field injuries. California is the only state with a law requiring that students on athletic scholarships be kept on after a sports-career-ending injury, but this law doesn't take effect until next academic year, and will only apply to the four (possibly five) schools receiving more than $100 million in TV revenue.

imapirate: 1. The school waived its royalties from the beginning.


But claimed the scholarship money. They're still getting it.

imapirate: 2. Adidas agreed to donate Louisville's portion of sales to the school's general scholarship fund.


But Adidas kept their own profits.

imapirate: 3. Even another portion of the sales was intended for charity.


Not seeing that from the article. What other charity are you referring to?

imapirate: 4. Lots of people here want these to show Kevin support, but can't now because some opportunistic asshole decided to attach his agenda to it.


www.supportourribbons.com



However, you can make the point that it would be highly illegal to donate money to him or his family, and doing so could mean he wouldn't be allowed to play ball in a NCAA school anymore, and would likely lose his scholarship (assuming he can still play), and you'd be right.
 
2013-04-06 06:51:37 AM  

NaziKamikaze: If my health insurance is considered income, your full ride to an accredited college should be too.


Okay, let's see how much a full ride to a NCAA school with a better-than-average athletic program is actually worth, according to the people that set the prices. Let's take Louisville.

Tuition:

Per Hour
Full-Time (12)
Per Semester
Resident $395.00 $4,733.00
Non-Resident $957.00 $11,475.00

Let's use the Non-Resident amount, even though most college athletes choose their school based on what the athletic program offers - if they just wanted a free education, most could go to school in their own state. (Kevin Ware is originally from New York but went to high school in Georgia. Also, Ware originally signed a national letter-of-intent with Tennessee before being granted a release, and had narrowed his choices to Louisville and Georgia before joining the Cardinals.)

Add in fees...


Wait, we already have.
At its April 23, 2001 meeting, the University of Louisville Board of Trustees approved consolidating, or "bundling," tuition and mandatory student fees into a single rate.

Room & Board:

Let's go with the most expensive apartment on campus, a single with a private bath:

3,745 Deluxe Single

Let's pretend it doesn't have a kitchen, and pay the highest price for a meal plan (same link as above):

$1460

So we have $11,475 + $3745 + $1460 = $16,680 x 2 = $33,360 per year. And that's if they were getting the best of everything, which they clearly do not.

$33,360 / 52 weeks / 40 hrs. = $16.04 /hr.

That's it. At absolute best, they're making the equivalent of a $16/hr job, essentially what the guy operating the scoreboard makes.

If Ware had went with Georgia, he would have paid in-state tuition, which, including fees and books (not including "expenses", since student athletes are not allowed to receive any money to pay for "expenses") would be $19,660 / 52 / 40 = $9.45 /hr, not much above minimum wage. Essentially, what the guy selling hot dogs at the game is making.

Don't even think about making the argument that a student athlete puts less than the equivalent of 40 hrs a week for 52 weeks into mandatory activities such as practice, games, classes, travel, and studying. You would look silly.

F*ck that argument about being compensated with a "free ride" to an accredited institution. That's sh*t pay considering the hundreds of millions they bring in..
 
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