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(Arizona Star)   Dementia called costliest illness after pancakes, clean cheese, and picnic apes says Socko the Happy-Turtle   (azstarnet.com) divider line 51
    More: Misc, United States, illness, Alzheimer's Association, RAND Corp., variable cost, direct costs, out-of-pocket expenses, heart disease  
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1684 clicks; posted to Main » on 05 Apr 2013 at 1:30 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-04-05 01:32:04 AM  
Well, this vice president hasn't been that costly, compared to the last one.
 
2013-04-05 01:34:16 AM  
Vice president G.W. Bush?

/We all know Dick Cheney was the real President.
//The crazed man behind the curtain who made 80 billion dollars on his two wars to fire that CIA agent.
 
2013-04-05 01:35:18 AM  
President Reagan raked leaves out of his pool that the SS Men would continuously put back in for hours of dementia fun.
 
2013-04-05 01:35:52 AM  
The way this headline started Mad Libbing I was expecting some hot demented chicks since I already clicked.

Dementia doesn't work that way, but it does farking suck.
 
2013-04-05 01:36:10 AM  
media.theonion.com
 
2013-04-05 01:43:43 AM  
I still giggle every time at "We Want Hen Fap"
 
2013-04-05 01:44:42 AM  
euthanasia should be a right. sign up on the back of your license while your brain still works.
 
2013-04-05 01:47:42 AM  

KrispyKritter: euthanasia should be a right. sign up on the back of your license while your brain still works.


I had a depressing conversation this week with an elderly neighbor. She's 93, completely there mentally, and she was begging me for death. Really farking sad.
 
2013-04-05 01:49:19 AM  
Naturally it's costly, because they forget where they've put their money, and will often give away all their resources to anyone claiming to be Brian Boitano.
 
2013-04-05 01:50:48 AM  
media.moronail.net
 
2013-04-05 01:53:39 AM  
At this point, might I plug the advantages of having an advanced directive, or living will?

You need to make your wishes known FAR BEFOREHAND, and have them documented in a way that your children, and powers of attorney will know them. Otherwise, someone who is perfectly willing to dump you in a nursing home and maybe see you once a year, while you're kept alive by a feeding tube and a nutrient paste, while your brain turns to a sponge and your body breaks down in the most horrific and painful fashion you can imagine, and anything you once were has died a long time ago.

I'm 27. I've seen so much in the past 9 years of doing what I do that at my age, I have an Advanced Directive in the hands of people I trust.

KrispyKritter: euthanasia should be a right. sign up on the back of your license while your brain still works.


I've told my parents that were I diagnosed with Huntington's Disease or Alzheimer's, I would take my own life rather than end up dependant on a nursing home and some underpaid, probably abusive CNA to wipe my ass when I start talking about the Snow that fell in Memphis in 1987, or when I become a prisoner in my own body.
 
2013-04-05 01:54:52 AM  
I'm actually looking forward to dementia

maybe I can finally get those flashbacks I paid good money for 20 years ago

weeeeeee.......
 
2013-04-05 01:56:44 AM  

hardinparamedic: I've told my parents that were I diagnosed with Huntington's Disease or Alzheimer's, I would take my own life rather than end up dependant on a nursing home and some underpaid, probably abusive CNA to wipe my ass when I start talking about the Snow that fell in Memphis in 1987, or when I become a prisoner in my own body.


My dad said the same thing years ago when my grandma died with Alzheimer's. He's pretty forgetful these days. I hope he forgot he said that.
 
2013-04-05 01:57:00 AM  
I've asked several people to shove me under a bus if I become senile. I don't want to be like that. I had a dog get old and lose her memory and not recognise the family. Senile as they come. We put her down when she started getting upset we were in the house because we were all strangers to her. That was mercy. But why can't we sign up in advance for the same kind of mercy? If I can't remember my family, I'm done, stick a fork in me already.
 
2013-04-05 01:59:15 AM  

KrispyKritter: euthanasia should be a right


I you mean suicide, assisted suicide, or advanced directives in case of mental incapacitance then I agree.

If you actually mean that I (or you) should have the right to euthanize people whenever I (or you) decide it's "in their best interest", then that's a little weird.
 
2013-04-05 02:00:27 AM  
FYI- if you care for someone with dementia and you have to change them, do it from the side.
Because much like a newborn, they will pee on you.  It's a good think I hadn't already showered this morning so I could laugh at the situation.  Still much better than cleaning up #2.  MUCH.

/hadn't seen that photo before.  "hen fap"?  I'm definitely stealing that.
 
2013-04-05 02:01:23 AM  

farkingismybusiness: My dad said the same thing years ago when my grandma died with Alzheimer's. He's pretty forgetful these days. I hope he forgot he said that


In probably the only way I can describe it, that's the only blessing when it comes to Alzheimers. When I was working my way through EMT school, I was a CNA and part of my assignment was a married couple who both had it. The wife died first, I can't remember if it was a UTI or something else, but the husband stopped talking afterwords, and would cry all the time. This went on for about a year, and then, one day, he just stopped crying. When I asked him if he missed his wife, he answered "Who was that?"
 
2013-04-05 02:04:35 AM  
Dementia probably costs a lot, because people with dementia forget they already paid the bill in the first place.
 
2013-04-05 02:04:48 AM  
So why not euthanize? Are you even a person anymore if you have no conception of your own humanity? I know I wouldn't want myself or my loved ones to live in an advanced state of dementia. Now, of course, that's if one is a total incapacitated vegetable, not just a bit off in the head.
 
2013-04-05 02:06:47 AM  

kazikian: So why not euthanize? Are you even a person anymore if you have no conception of your own humanity? I know I wouldn't want myself or my loved ones to live in an advanced state of dementia. Now, of course, that's if one is a total incapacitated vegetable, not just a bit off in the head.


Long Answer: Because history has proven that having that power leads to unthinkable abuses and uses for it.
Short Answer: Because you're killing someone incapable of giving consent to euthanasia.

The best thing you can do is hope that the families get educated by a physician who has the patient's best interests in mind, and then refuse the placement of an NG or PEG Tube to feed them when they stop eating, and refuse IV fluids or medicine. Comfort measures only.
 
2013-04-05 02:14:10 AM  
My mom has dementia, so I am most definitely NOT getting a kick out of this thread.
 
2013-04-05 02:15:18 AM  
The cost isn't just momentary wise, it's the emotional strain it puts on a family.

When you have a family member whose dementia causes them to be abusive in someway, it's hard to feel pity or sympathy after a while when you've had to deal with it for years.

After a while all you see is the way they act now, and forget how they were before.

The family member in my case, used to be a decent person, now all he does is act like a two year old on his worse days and treat us like the enemy when it comes to taking meds.

/am tired
 
2013-04-05 02:26:51 AM  

farkingismybusiness: hardinparamedic: I've told my parents that were I diagnosed with Huntington's Disease or Alzheimer's, I would take my own life rather than end up dependant on a nursing home and some underpaid, probably abusive CNA to wipe my ass when I start talking about the Snow that fell in Memphis in 1987, or when I become a prisoner in my own body.

My dad said the same thing years ago when my grandma died with Alzheimer's. He's pretty forgetful these days. I hope he forgot he said that.


The last few years of my grandpa's life, he worried that his mind was going.  It wasn't.  Sure, he'd slowed down a bit but he wasn't showing any purple monkey dishwasher signs.  Short term and long term memory was sharp.  We'd have long conversations, catching up on events since my last visit.  I told him if he's worried about it at 86, he really doesn't need to worry about it.  I think the odds are on my side.  The men in my family tend to die in their 80s and 90s with sharp minds and full heads of hair.
 
2013-04-05 02:27:09 AM  

hardinparamedic: farkingismybusiness: My dad said the same thing years ago when my grandma died with Alzheimer's. He's pretty forgetful these days. I hope he forgot he said that

In probably the only way I can describe it, that's the only blessing when it comes to Alzheimers. When I was working my way through EMT school, I was a CNA and part of my assignment was a married couple who both had it. The wife died first, I can't remember if it was a UTI or something else, but the husband stopped talking afterwords, and would cry all the time. This went on for about a year, and then, one day, he just stopped crying. When I asked him if he missed his wife, he answered "Who was that?"


I cared for my adoptive mom since i was a kid. She had early onset, well, kinda. She was born in 1915, adoptive dad 1934. They got me in 68. 80's onwards was hard, but in the 90s ( 1990's ) she started having conversations with a wall, and talking to her dead kids, and to doctors and nurses and even movers that were just not there. It got hard. One morning, the old man was pounding on my apt saying mom had fallen. This was about 0430. She was trapped between the comode and the wall in their bathroom. She was gone. Heartbeat, breathing etc good, but her eyes were non responsive. We have awesome paramedics and firefighters her, and we live close. They extracted her, ambulance/hospital/icu/hospice. She was in permanent vag state. The ct scans showed this was not her first stroke, but yes, it was the big one and she was not going to get better. And the old man had fallen apart. SHarp as a tack but he lost it. I waited on pulling the plug ( in this case stop forced feeding ) until I had contacted her surviving girls and had them make it out her from ny and md . I stopped it after they left, on the worse day possible- the day before their anniversary, it would have been their 30th.  2 weeks after the stroke incident . Old man never forgave me for killing her, and he went into a ward at the va hospital for a few months as he became basically catatonic.
And then- one day, he got out.I drove him home. He was semi autistic acting at that point, but he was able to function. He was still mad at me, but he started throwing her things away.
Theres a lot more, but I have already Tolstoiéd this big time. Dementia sucks
 
2013-04-05 02:28:31 AM  

strangeluck: The cost isn't just momentary wise, it's the emotional strain it puts on a family.

When you have a family member whose dementia causes them to be abusive in someway, it's hard to feel pity or sympathy after a while when you've had to deal with it for years.

After a while all you see is the way they act now, and forget how they were before.

The family member in my case, used to be a decent person, now all he does is act like a two year old on his worse days and treat us like the enemy when it comes to taking meds.

/am tired


bfolder.ru
 
2013-04-05 02:30:41 AM  
Oh, I dont regret pulling the plug, I regret not having the chance to make her fresh asparagus and salmon for lunch after they got back from church. She was so looking forward to that the night before.
 
2013-04-05 02:33:53 AM  
Knock knock.
Who's there?
Opens refrigerator door. Stares blankly. Walks into pantry looking for deceased parents who died 40 years ago.
 
2013-04-05 02:40:25 AM  
Reminds me of a hardcore song from my youth.  Neglect - The LSS [Life Support System] [LIHC/NYHC] [HQ] - YouTube

/God's here with me. God's on my side.
 
2013-04-05 03:07:05 AM  
I see what Subby did there.

/Still one of my all time Onion favorites
 
2013-04-05 03:42:45 AM  
If Dementia is going to be an issue, we'll need more smogberry trees.
 
2013-04-05 04:40:31 AM  
If I get alzheimers or huntingtons or anything like that I want my family to keep me safe and alive so I can fight death to the bitter end.
We only got this one life and I'll cling to it until it drags me screaming out of the gene-pool.
 
2013-04-05 06:47:42 AM  
As a guy dealing with his dad sliding fast down the Alzheimers/dementia slope, im not getting a kick, or any pancakes, out of this.
 
2013-04-05 07:20:30 AM  

alienated: She was in permanent vag state.


...wat?
 
2013-04-05 07:35:17 AM  
I've said this before but i'll say it again ( cause it's appropriate )

My youngest daughter volunteered to go to jail to help me end my life. We were having the conversation about it being illegal to help someone end their life and she said, without hesitation "oh I'd go to jail for you mum". That was when I knew everyone around me knew my wishes :)
 
2013-04-05 07:36:34 AM  

jtown: farkingismybusiness: hardinparamedic: I've told my parents that were I diagnosed with Huntington's Disease or Alzheimer's, I would take my own life rather than end up dependant on a nursing home and some underpaid, probably abusive CNA to wipe my ass when I start talking about the Snow that fell in Memphis in 1987, or when I become a prisoner in my own body.

My dad said the same thing years ago when my grandma died with Alzheimer's. He's pretty forgetful these days. I hope he forgot he said that.

The last few years of my grandpa's life, he worried that his mind was going.  It wasn't.  Sure, he'd slowed down a bit but he wasn't showing any purple monkey dishwasher signs.  Short term and long term memory was sharp.  We'd have long conversations, catching up on events since my last visit.  I told him if he's worried about it at 86, he really doesn't need to worry about it.  I think the odds are on my side.  The men in my family tend to die in their 80s and 90s with sharp minds and full heads of hair.


good to hear - My gramps was the same way, unfortunately he died of ALS. There is no way in hell i'm going out like that. Talk about a prisoner in your own body....

\save one for yourself.
 
2013-04-05 07:39:27 AM  

strangeluck: The cost isn't just momentary wise, it's the emotional strain it puts on a family.

When you have a family member whose dementia causes them to be abusive in someway, it's hard to feel pity or sympathy after a while when you've had to deal with it for years.

After a while all you see is the way they act now, and forget how they were before.

The family member in my case, used to be a decent person, now all he does is act like a two year old on his worse days and treat us like the enemy when it comes to taking meds.

/am tired


That sounds like my life with my son who has autism and dd. So I get a lifetime of it, then some. Costs of autism will surpass the costs of dementia if they haven't already.

/I win
 
2013-04-05 07:42:53 AM  
Came for pics of Socko and got serious discussion instead?! Sigh...
 
2013-04-05 08:00:21 AM  
Too much money to be made keeping people alive. Euthanasa will never be accepted.
 
2013-04-05 08:31:52 AM  
Keep making jokes subby, but one day you too will know my pain, and smile its black-toothed grin...
 
2013-04-05 08:47:54 AM  

Loaf's Tray: Keep making jokes subby, but one day you too will know my pain, and smile its black-toothed grin...


I will make sure to stay an inch or two out of kick distance...
 
2013-04-05 09:03:09 AM  
My Mother has caught the bug too.

Funny how when the rest of the family found out there's not much money or how much a farking burden 24 hours a day to take care of her ... poof ... can't find them with a search warrant.

I've given up my life so this old woman who used to be my Mother can eat and take a shower now and then.

My advise for caregivers ... make sure you pay yourself a fair wage (adjust your tax withholding at your other job) from any funds they have, as long as it says you can in the power of attorney.

My attorney made sure I did this because you know what ,,, soon any money will be gone, I'll be exhausted, divorced and broke .. this way at least I'll have a little cash set aside for me to take a vacation when it's over.
 
2013-04-05 09:21:45 AM  
It cost $60,550 a year for the care for my mom. That's not including doctor visits or her meds. The meds alone, with insurance, are anywhere from $150 to $500 a month.

/she is only 64
//started showing symptoms at 59...
 
2013-04-05 09:41:27 AM  
Funny headline, subby.   I wonder how funny you'll think it'll be when you have a to care for a parent who is as helpless as a two year old.
 
2013-04-05 09:47:52 AM  

alienated: hardinparamedic: farkingismybusiness: My dad said the same thing years ago when my grandma died with Alzheimer's. He's pretty forgetful these days. I hope he forgot he said that

In probably the only way I can describe it, that's the only blessing when it comes to Alzheimers. When I was working my way through EMT school, I was a CNA and part of my assignment was a married couple who both had it. The wife died first, I can't remember if it was a UTI or something else, but the husband stopped talking afterwords, and would cry all the time. This went on for about a year, and then, one day, he just stopped crying. When I asked him if he missed his wife, he answered "Who was that?"

I cared for my adoptive mom since i was a kid. She had early onset, well, kinda. She was born in 1915, adoptive dad 1934. They got me in 68. 80's onwards was hard, but in the 90s ( 1990's ) she started having conversations with a wall, and talking to her dead kids, and to doctors and nurses and even movers that were just not there. It got hard. One morning, the old man was pounding on my apt saying mom had fallen. This was about 0430. She was trapped between the comode and the wall in their bathroom. She was gone. Heartbeat, breathing etc good, but her eyes were non responsive. We have awesome paramedics and firefighters her, and we live close. They extracted her, ambulance/hospital/icu/hospice. She was in permanent vag state. The ct scans showed this was not her first stroke, but yes, it was the big one and she was not going to get better. And the old man had fallen apart. SHarp as a tack but he lost it. I waited on pulling the plug ( in this case stop forced feeding ) until I had contacted her surviving girls and had them make it out her from ny and md . I stopped it after they left, on the worse day possible- the day before their anniversary, it would have been their 30th.  2 weeks after the stroke incident . Old man never forgave me for killing her, and he went into a ward at the va hospi ...


Jesus jumping CHRIST man. I'm so sorry.
 
2013-04-05 10:56:59 AM  

SteveFU: It cost $60,550 a year for the care for my mom. That's not including doctor visits or her meds. The meds alone, with insurance, are anywhere from $150 to $500 a month.

/she is only 64
//started showing symptoms at 59...


Wow! So sorry for your family. Maybe the Obama Administration will man up before the end of his term and do something to help your family.


/That is want we were hoping but so far have been left worse off financially.:(
//Most painful is we are 3rd generation liberal Democrats
///Leaving cynical
 
2013-04-05 11:37:41 AM  
You know who had the solution for problems like this?
 
2013-04-05 11:38:50 AM  
My mom just got diagnosed with this, too.  Not getting a kick.

At this point, more worried about my dad's health than hers.  She's cared for in a home.  He's ripped apart by worry and guilt.

Dementia sucks.
 
2013-04-05 12:32:51 PM  
My dad had dementia, spent the last nine months of his life in assisted living before dying in January.  It was a relief.

If it happens to me, I'll have the rum and the Valium ready.  My husband plans the same thing.
 
2013-04-05 12:46:27 PM  
www.mindset.co.za
 
2013-04-05 02:43:13 PM  

SteveFU: It cost $60,550 a year for the care for my mom. That's not including doctor visits or her meds. The meds alone, with insurance, are anywhere from $150 to $500 a month.

/she is only 64
//started showing symptoms at 59...


My wife of 33 years was diagnosed with early onset three years ago at age 53. Fortunately she can still take care of herself but we all know there is a very tough road ahead. Keep hoping for a cure.
 
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