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(LA Times)   Majority of Americans: "Legalize it"   (latimes.com) divider line 244
    More: Interesting, Americans, marijuana legalization, coastal states, Pew Research Center  
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10468 clicks; posted to Main » on 04 Apr 2013 at 10:01 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-04-05 10:17:09 AM

drayno76: My last company literally informed me of the new random drug testing policy over beers


Don't work for somewhere that drug tests you.  Or move to where I live in Ontario, Canada they don't test anyone here except pilots.  Which makes sense...why would you test a damn regular office cube dweller...and yes I know many states do.  Those states lack freedom.
 
2013-04-05 10:22:08 AM

cman: I wouldnt mind buying a pack of joints at the corner store


Imagine the Liggett version of joints.
 
gja [TotalFark]
2013-04-05 10:25:00 AM

FirstNationalBastard: Weed and Hookers should be legal.

End of story.


Please run for a national office. I will run your PR campaign.
 
2013-04-05 10:34:00 AM

icam: cman: I wouldnt mind buying a pack of joints at the corner store

Imagine the Liggett version equivalent of joints.


FTFM
 
2013-04-05 10:44:30 AM
I just want to say, at the bar last night the smoking area was 50% people smoking cigs and about 50% people smoking pipes or joints. It's nice living in a place where no one gives a fark.

/Denver
 
2013-04-05 10:47:07 AM

Thunderpipes: Majority of Americans... "We don't want Obamacare".


Citation needed.
 
2013-04-05 10:54:37 AM

Amos Quito: Who has executive control over the DOJ and the DEA?

[www.postchronicle.com image 300x286]

All he has to do is stop the enforcement on the Federal level. The rest will fall into place.

He is no longer defending DOMA, yet he refuses to back off on marijuana.

Why?


Because he's a politician, duh!
 
2013-04-05 11:03:35 AM

randomjsa: I'm sorry, does it matter when the majority of Americans have an opinion legislation? We now have two issues, marijuana legalization and gay marriage, that you might get majority support for but if we follow the logic of ObamaCare... Popular opinion is to be absolutely damned. I bring this up because this is legislation the LA Times supports.

So you're going to have to decide... Either the American people are infantile and don't know what's best for them, and must have legislation forced on them that they don't want... Or they know what they are talking about. You can't say "the majority matters until it says something liberals don't like then F the majority"


Yeah! In some states, slavery would still pass popular vote muster. And yet there's the federal government telling them that's illegal. The farking nerve. Hegemony is here, America! Wake up sheeple!
 
2013-04-05 11:06:08 AM

evaned: tallguywithglasseson: A notable political split exists on the issue, with conservative Republicans heavily against legalization,

I never understood this. You'd think that federal drug reform would be a conservative's wet dream: small government, state's rights, decr... wait, what's that? Conservative Republicans aren't actually conservative?

Oh. Now I get it.


Actually a whole lot of conservatives support it...  I am not sure where the article is getting this.  It might be a case of pollsters assuming that any republican that would be for legalization must be a moderate by definition, which is not true...
 
2013-04-05 11:10:24 AM
I want a refund on the failed war on drugs.
 
2013-04-05 11:52:46 AM

Thunderpipes: Majority of Americans... "We don't want Obamacare".


Majority of Americans ... "We want everything contained in Obamacare, just don't call it Obamacare because the GOP have tarnished the name Obamacare".
 
2013-04-05 12:04:40 PM

basemetal: Philbb: basemetal: Yeah, maybe the majority when you count the big cities, but when you get to individual states, bible belt states, better think again.

"Support for legalization is strikingly uniform among states, with the percentage virtually the same in the states that have decriminalized, legalized or allowed medical use and in the 26 where marijuana remains fully illegal. There is little variation among various regions of the country either -- a sharp contrast with other cultural issues, on which coastal states tend to be more liberal and the South more conservative. "

You underestimate the power of the churches in the bible belt to demonize something, drive that thought home to their members, organize and influence voters and legislators.  Hell, all they have to do around here is say Obama was for it.


Dear gods, this.

I will be EXTREMELY pleasantly surprised if--without full-on no-local-option federal legalisation--if the Sweet Leaf becomes legal in my state in my lifetime, if only because fully HALF my state (which, ironically, is probably most positively known FOR its spirits industry) is in a state where Prohibition has functionally never ended...thanks to a VERY powerful Southern Baptist political lobby combined with the fact that cops and bootleggers have actively lobbied to keep alcohol illegal.

The one thing I can see that would make legalisation easy (outside of Louisville and Lexington and Covington) would be economic benefits from cannabineries (there really isn't a term for "local grow shop and sales for non-medical reasons" for cannabis like we refer to a "winery" as a wine production and sales shop or "brewery" for beer or "tobacconist" for tobacco, so I'm inventing one :D) and marijuana farming; the strategy IS helping to at least legalise industrial hemp, and is pretty much the ONLY thing that's succeeded in making certain Appalachian counties wet or moist.

(Re the latter--a LOT of counties that were long-term hard-line dry counties along I-75 in particular have gone wet recently...because, as it turned out, they realised they were haemorrhaging tax revenue to Jellico, TN AND because most of the major casual dining chains (like your TGI Friday's, your Ruby Tuesday's, your Red Robin, and the like) were flat-out refusing to set up shop there unless alcohol sales were allowed.  It should be noted that pretty much the entire economic basis of these areas is coal, a Southern Baptist university that has been threatened with the loss of its secular accreditation due to its discriminatory policies against LGBT students, and "pass-through" traffic along I-75 and US 25E to tourist areas further south and/or east (particularly tourist traffic making its way to the Great Smoky Mountains or the twice-yearly traffic to and from Bristol Motor Speedway).  In this case, the possibility of jobs and tax revenue won out over the temperance leagues...now only HALF the state is dry rather than two-thirds. :D)

/also wishes they'd hurry the fark up and legalise it
//will be pleasantly surprised if I can buy American Spirit Green in my lifetime, lol
 
2013-04-05 12:15:53 PM

Red_Fox: drayno76: My last company literally informed me of the new random drug testing policy over beers

Don't work for somewhere that drug tests you.  Or move to where I live in Ontario, Canada they don't test anyone here except pilots.  Which makes sense...why would you test a damn regular office cube dweller...and yes I know many states do.  Those states lack freedom.


If a private company wants to test their employees, then that is freedom. Freedom goes both ways, if you want to smoke weed fine. If you want to smoke weed and work at a company where the owner doesn't want employees to smoke weed then you are free to attempt find other employment.
 
2013-04-05 12:27:19 PM

Incontinent_dog_and_monkey_rodeo: MrEricSir: The drug dealers are going to keep fighting against legalization; they're not going to let the government put them out of business.

Expect a lot of FUD about Philip Morris making joints, or Monsanto creating a "roundup ready" GMO version of pot. In other words, "I can't handle free market competition."

The biggest drug dealers are Merck and Pfizer.


No kidding.  About 5 years ago I got about 7 prescription drugs laid on my by my doctor to help me with 'pre' conditions.  I was prediabetic, prehyptertensive, etc, etc.  I steadily gained a ton of weight.  Accidentally stopped taking one of the BP meds when he added a second one and I thought it was to replace the first.  Turns out the BP med he had me on for the disease I didn't even have yet cuts your metabolism by 30%.  Wow, that sure as shiat is what you want to do when you're overweight...

Also turned out that after a long term study, the drug didn't produce longer lifespans or fewer bp related 'events'.  So all it did was slow you down and make you fat.

Stopped taking the lot of them, lost a ton of weight, the 'pre' conditions went away. and I will never, ever, ever take a prescription drug unless its to save my life or avert an immediate life threating situation.

Biggest problem we'll have with pot is the inertia in the system.  Lots of private prisons holding people on drug related cases.  Tons of DA's, police etc that have enforcing drug laws as their primary job.  Its a lot like government in general...its twice as big as it needs to be but if we cut it to the size required, unemployment would make the economy unsustainable.  Its not that private industry would take this stuff up, there isn't any profit in it except for the investigations, prosecutions and jailing.

So between the alcohol, tobacco, pharmaceuticals, law enforcement and private prisons, thats a stupid amount of money and influence to overcome.

Best bet is to move to a state thats legalized it or has a liberal medical policy and let it become a red state problem, let them spend their money and prisons on it.
 
2013-04-05 12:40:51 PM

Rev.K: Get Marc Emery the f*ck out of the American jail he should never have gone to in the first place.


I agree the crime ME committed (shipping seeds to the USA) should not be against the law, but it is and he knew it was and he claimed it was in defense of his principles that he committed the crime, .: he can do the time.

/Marc Emery is a douchebag
//His "political" stance is purely financially motivated and the Canadian legalization effort is better for his absence
 
2013-04-05 12:54:37 PM

tarhammer: Incontinent_dog_and_monkey_rodeo: MrEricSir: The drug dealers are going to keep fighting against legalization; they're not going to let the government put them out of business.
...
Best bet is to move to a state thats legalized it or ...


So long as the federal government funds the programs, even if you live in a state where it is legal, your tax dollars will help fund the programs in the states where it isn't.
 
2013-04-05 12:56:55 PM

king_nacho: Most studies point to two factors, use of a drug like alcohol or tobacco, then on to cannabis, then on to something else. That migration is probably caused by some genetic predisposition, and the drugs are just the person trying to make it to the next high.


This assumes the user is "trying to make it to the next high. "

One thing your progression is missing is the effects of a culture of prohibition. By sending our children in to the hands of drug dealers to experiment with marijuana they become inculcated to a prohibition culture. 6 months in and all those lies their schools, governments, and possibly parents told them about marijuana become glaringly false and the line from their dealer that "nobody gets addicted to meth the first time" might just become believable. Remove the prohibitions on marijuana and you remove the social gateway effect when kids only have to get their older brother to go to 7-11 for them instead of socializing with junkies.
 
2013-04-05 01:47:33 PM

InmanRoshi: Thunderpipes: Majority of Americans... "We don't want Obamacare".

Majority of Americans ... "We want everything contained in Obamacare, just don't call it Obamacare because the GOP have tarnished the name Obamacare".


We don't want Obamacare, that's why we elected Obama...

TWICE.
 
2013-04-05 01:57:48 PM
As someone who is in his final days of work because of a change in policy to now fire for MEDICAL cannabis use, this change in America's public attitude is long overdue.  I can't wait for America to end this War on Plants, and get over the stigma of "lazy potheads" and all that other crap coming from tea-bag repubs.  I have worked for eight Governors in nine different Administrations, two Fortune 500 companies among many others, and am considered anything but lazy!  So if anyone needs someone in New Mexico who has over $30 billion in direct hand-on financial experience - not just number counting but direct hands on experience in cash, Treasury and Investments Management, I have proved my "worth" many times over!   Otherwise, I just sit back and manage personal portfolios, do art, and take care of a dying father for a while.  Looking forward to my next adventure!
 
2013-04-05 03:16:49 PM

Rogue Surf: As someone who is in his final days of work because of a change in policy to now fire for MEDICAL cannabis use, this change in America's public attitude is long overdue.


That seriously sucks. Best of luck.
 
2013-04-05 04:18:35 PM

tallguywithglasseson: First time in 4 decades plus of polling...

Also

By an overwhelming margin, 72% to 23%, respondents said the federal government's efforts against marijuana "cost more than they are worth."
Similarly, by nearly 2-to-1, respondents said the federal government should not enforce its anti-marijuana laws in states that allow use of the drug.

Wonder who the foot draggers will be...

The poll suggests a shift in federal law may be slow. A notable political split exists on the issue, with conservative Republicans heavily against legalization, while majorities of Democrats, independents and liberal and moderate Republicans back it. Conservatives have strong sway among Republicans in the House.

This was somewhat surprising:

Support for legalization is strikingly uniform among states, with the percentage virtually the same in the states that have decriminalized, legalized or allowed medical use and in the 26 where marijuana remains fully illegal. There is little variation among various regions of the country either -- a sharp contrast with other cultural issues, on which coastal states tend to be more liberal and the South more conservative.


Well, shockingly, policy is not decided by numbers.

Deal with it and grow up.
 
2013-04-05 04:58:57 PM

Raharu: InmanRoshi: Thunderpipes: Majority of Americans... "We don't want Obamacare".

Majority of Americans ... "We want everything contained in Obamacare, just don't call it Obamacare because the GOP have tarnished the name Obamacare".

We don't want Obamacare, that's why we elected Obama...

TWICE.



www.brobible.com

We elected Obama twice because we didn't want fish for dinner.


/And no one offered us lasagna.
 
2013-04-05 08:39:35 PM

Rueened: Well, shockingly, policy is not decided by numbers.

Deal with it and grow up.


Didn't say it was... do you struggle with black-and-white thinking?

But a public opinion shift of that magnitude in that period of time is notable, and can have noticeable effects on public policy.
e.g., marijuana has already been legalized for recreational use at the state level - who would have thought that even 10 years ago?

And speaking of shifting public opinions driving policy,
http://go.bloomberg.com/political-capital/2013-04-04/nelson-backs-ga y- marriage-six-democratic-senators-left-silent/

//telling people to grow up is not very grown up
 
2013-04-06 04:04:05 AM

tallguywithglasseson: Rueened: Well, shockingly, policy is not decided by numbers.

Deal with it and grow up.

Didn't say it was... do you struggle with black-and-white thinking?


Do you struggle with living in the real world, and with everyday responsibilities?

But a public opinion shift of that magnitude in that period of time is notable, and can have noticeable effects on public policy.
e.g., marijuana has already been legalized for recreational use at the state level - who would have thought that even 10 years ago?


Put down the bong, Sparky, it's time to put some pants on and try to find a job.
 
2013-04-06 04:20:56 AM

Rueened: Put down the bong, Sparky, it's time to put some pants on and try to find a job.


First of all, how farking corny and old do you have to be to use the word "sparky"? Anyways, what the hell does that have to do with his point? Are you incapable of understanding that this issue fairs better when a majority of Americans support it? Are you that stupid? Have you not been paying attention to the shift in marijuana laws in the last 10-15 years?
 
2013-04-06 04:22:41 AM
God damn it, this is the second time you successfully trolled me. I know that because I figured it out last time by clicking your profile and seeing that you were from "Sunnyvale Trailer Park" in Novia Scotia. Ya farkin pothead, why you gotta troll!?

/gonna get drunk and eat chicken fingers
 
2013-04-06 10:31:31 AM

Rueened: Do you struggle with living in the real world, and with everyday responsibilities?


I suppose everyone struggles to some extent, but I'd say far less than most.

Rueened: Put down the bong, Sparky, it's time to put some pants on and try to find a job.


I don't like pot, don't smoke it, nor do I take any drugs.

Doesn't change the fact that public opinion on marijuana is shifting rapidly.

That's what's happening - in the real world. Are you struggling with that?
 
2013-04-06 11:00:29 AM

tallguywithglasseson: I don't like pot, don't smoke it, nor do I take any drugs.


Really? None at all? That's... fascinating.

Doesn't change the fact that public opinion on marijuana is shifting rapidly.


Doesn't change the fact that it's wrong.

That's what's happening - in the real world. Are you struggling with that?

This isn't about numbers, or opinion polls (or opinion for that matter). It's not a popularity contest.

It's about right and wrong.

And you are the one struggling to understand that.
 
2013-04-06 11:08:24 AM

king_nacho: Baryogenesis: king_nacho: Weaver95: Ima4nic8or:
Yes.  Ask those meth heads if their drug problems started with weed.  Almost universally the answer will be yes.

could you point to some sort of independent study that confirms this fantasy of yours?

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1360-0443.2007.01906.x/ ab stract;jsessionid=C6ECA7225E192FC194E91B5425C6A53D.d03t04

http://www.nature.com/npp/journal/v32/n3/full/1301127a.html

here are two peer reviewed studies

That Nature paper is interesting. If I'm reading it right it says thc exposure makes later opiate use more intense/addicting. It doesnt show thc use leads to opiate use, rather there is an increased susceptiblity to its effects once use begins.

The "gateway" hypothesis, as I've seen it used, says pot makes people more likely to *start* using harder drugs. Is there a statistically significant increase in the use of harder drugs after a person uses pot? Is that increase *caused* by pot or is there some hidden variable?

Absolutely, I'm not sure you'll every find a study method that can truly prove or disprove the gateway hypothesis without first defining those hidden variables. The obvious choices of course being genetics and environment, and environment could be the catalyst for starting cannabis use in the first place.

My guess is that genetics are the root cause, then the exposure to some drug (caffeine, alcohol, cannabis, adderall) starts the ball rolling.

I'm not suggesting that the gateway theory be used to keep the drug illegal, I'm simply suggesting you cannot downplay the reality that some people just can't handle their vices, regardless of vice. If we go down the path of opening up the market for commercial marijuana sales, then we have to be prepared for all the side effects that come with it. If marijuana is legal for recreational use, then what, is it treated like tobacco? Can i just light up a joint in the car? What if I smoke in the car with my kid in the car? Can I smoke it anywhe ...


I think society at large is dealing with it already, and all it does is give gangs $$$$. Take away one of their biggest sources of revenue and they'll be effectively neutered.

Also I'd rather have some kids bribe their older brother to get regulated pot at a dispensery then to find a drug dealer that probably also sells coke, heroin, and meth.

Regulate it like alcohol (not tobacco): no driving, not on public property, etc.

I know you're worried about pot, but you want to know what's legal and far more addictive: Oxycotin, Benzos, and gambling. I work at a Mental Health and Addictions hospital and we are having a horrible time with pill addicts and problem gamblers.

Our methadone clinics are full of pill addicts, not people addicted to meth and heroin. Problem Gamblers have the highest suicide rate of ANY addictive substance. Yet BOTH are legal.

/Pot is addictive too, but getting people off it is much easier
//No one under the age of 20 should smoke pot OR if you have a family history of Schizophrenia
 
2013-04-06 11:18:37 AM

Rueened: It's about right and wrong.

And you are the one struggling to understand that.


I don't see marijuana use as a moral issue (like most Americans).

Public opinion does affect policy makers, most recently demonstrated with gay marriage (down from 6 to 4 Democratic Senators who haven't declared support, just from yesterday). Public opinion isn't insignificant on this issue either, demonstrated not only by medical marijuana legalization at state-level but also for recreational use.

So you're wrong about that, and you're wrong about me being a user (not to mention your ad-hominems being pointless even if they were right).

If you have some moral object to people smoking pot (whether or not you're capable of articulating it better than "it's wrong")... that's your problem. And you're welcome to it.
But if you don't see policy is changing on the issue, you've got your head up your ass. Enjoy.
 
2013-04-06 11:37:05 AM

tallguywithglasseson: But if you don't see policy is changing on the issue, you've got your head up your ass. Enjoy.


Nice try at misrepresenting me, but you fail.

I can see what's going on perfectly well, and I know that public opinion is changing.

I just don't agree with it, that's all.
 
2013-04-06 02:51:26 PM

Rueened: tallguywithglasseson: But if you don't see policy is changing on the issue, you've got your head up your ass. Enjoy.

Nice try at misrepresenting me, but you fail.

I can see what's going on perfectly well, and I know that public opinion is changing.

I just don't agree with it, that's all.


So you're the one who's wrong.
 
2013-04-06 03:07:35 PM
 
2013-04-06 10:35:34 PM

tallguywithglasseson: Support for legalization is strikingly uniform among states, with the percentage virtually the same in the states that have decriminalized, legalized or allowed medical use and in the 26 where marijuana remains fully illegal. There is little variation among various regions of the country either -- a sharp contrast with other cultural issues, on which coastal states tend to be more liberal and the South more conservative.


Probably because we've all seen Rolling Kansas.  Merle "Okie from Muskogee" Haggard has basically said the song that made him famous was ironic satire; pretty damn plausible given the city's got a year-round renfaire.  Willie Nelson pretty much lives both.
 
2013-04-06 10:42:15 PM

Sgygus: Two states have legalized cannabis but only because there was a direct public vote on the issue.


Oregon shot it down.  But in that case, you know, good for Oregon.  Keep in mind, I say this because there's nothing to do in that state that doesn't involve getting farked up now, the state's dealing with some mind-blowing cost of living, homelessness, hunger, poverty and unemployment issues.  It's basically Hazzard County with birkenstocks, crap weather and fir trees.  Or Idaho with better roads but worse drivers.  Dealer's choice, same thing.

/ Recovering Oregonian
 
2013-04-06 11:41:26 PM

Amos Quito: Who has executive control over the DOJ and the DEA?

[www.postchronicle.com image 300x286]

All he has to do is stop the enforcement on the Federal level. The rest will fall into place.

He is no longer defending DOMA, yet he refuses to back off on marijuana.

Why?


Do you even Google?
 
2013-04-06 11:43:38 PM

Snarcoleptic_Hoosier: Honestly, I'd have thought an agriculture state would be the first to give a giant middle finger to the government. Pot grows everywhere and costs almost nothing to keep alive. For the price, farmers would adore planting it.


Heck, go through Kansas and the flat parts of Oklahoma, and you see some obviously tended and rather tall pot plants occasionally mixed in with the sunflowers and corn.  Plus it's not uncommon to just see it growing wild.
 
2013-04-06 11:51:52 PM
Mister Peejay: I was prescribed that stuff a long while back.  All it did was make me throw up and voluntarily watch football.

Yeah, I was stranded at my family's place in Oregon when I had to have a shattered tooth removed and the surgeon prescribed me a rather large dose and a big-ass bottle of that.  I somehow settled on football until my mom came into the room and reminded me that she is paying for NHL Center Ice pretty much because she knew I liked hockey.  So watched like, four or five games straight, then spent what I later learned to be 3 hours staring into space standing in the yard.  That shiat farks me up something bizarro.

It didn't do anything for the pain resulting from having tender flesh sliced apart and then sewed back together into a kind of mangulated oozing zone of swollen despair, so I only ever took the one.

Yeah, didn't do anything for me on that front, either.  Except I just didn't care.  About that, or really, about much of anything else.  That oxycodone was basically a giant case of the farkits in a bottle.  That and I knew I was acting strangely, fully cognizant of it, but couldn't do anything about it.  Nothing worked right outside my head.  I'm just not a fan of dissassociative shiat in general, I feel like I'm going to hurt myself and not care when I'm prescribed that.

Honestly, I'd have much rather just taken a couple BC packets and smoked pot until I couldn't feel my head anymore.  I would have been more together.  Or asleep.  One of the two.
 
2013-04-07 02:10:08 AM

Baloo Uriza: Snarcoleptic_Hoosier: Honestly, I'd have thought an agriculture state would be the first to give a giant middle finger to the government. Pot grows everywhere and costs almost nothing to keep alive. For the price, farmers would adore planting it.

Heck, go through Kansas and the flat parts of Oklahoma, and you see some obviously tended and rather tall pot plants occasionally mixed in with the sunflowers and corn.  Plus it's not uncommon to just see it growing wild.


That's hemp gone feral.  If you don't know, you can't smoke that stuff and get high, the THC content is too low.
 
2013-04-07 02:20:45 AM

AeAe: Baloo Uriza: Snarcoleptic_Hoosier: Honestly, I'd have thought an agriculture state would be the first to give a giant middle finger to the government. Pot grows everywhere and costs almost nothing to keep alive. For the price, farmers would adore planting it.

Heck, go through Kansas and the flat parts of Oklahoma, and you see some obviously tended and rather tall pot plants occasionally mixed in with the sunflowers and corn.  Plus it's not uncommon to just see it growing wild.

That's hemp gone feral.  If you don't know, you can't smoke that stuff and get high, the THC content is too low.


Just depends on how much patience you have.  Got a big enough shake box with a screen, it'll still happen.
 
2013-04-07 09:05:30 AM
Baloo Uriza:

Yeah, didn't do anything for me on that front, either.  Except I just didn't care.  About that, or really, about much of anything else.

That's an apt description.  But, I'm already rather good at ignoring physical discomfort to the point where I don't even get hungry anymore - if I don't eat, I don't even notice until I start blacking out from low blood sugar.  So why take the pill?

That and I knew I was acting strangely, fully cognizant of it, but couldn't do anything about it.  Nothing worked right outside my head.  I'm just not a fan of dissassociative shiat in general, I feel like I'm going to hurt myself and not care when I'm prescribed that.

That's how I feel if I get drunk.  I notice my face is numb and I can't see straight or speak clearly or exhibit basic motor control skills... but I'm always fully aware of it, locked inside a body that just doesn't want to work right and getting slightly frustrated about it.  So I don't drink that much.

That's why I found the description of an ether high in Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas to be quite amusing, because that's just what ethanol is like to me.
 
2013-04-07 12:55:16 PM

Red_Fox: drayno76: My last company literally informed me of the new random drug testing policy over beers

Don't work for somewhere that drug tests you.  Or move to where I live in Ontario, Canada they don't test anyone here except pilots.  Which makes sense...why would you test a damn regular office cube dweller...and yes I know many states do.  Those states lack freedom.


Or for immigration purposes.

/That was a long month...
 
2013-04-07 12:57:47 PM

Rueened: Well, shockingly, policy is not decided by numbers.


Not directly.
However, policy is decided by people in the government, who are either elected or appointed by those who are elected, and who gets elected is decided by the number of people who vote for which candidate, which in turn is decided by how the voter feels on various issues and on the candidate's position on them.

So, indirectly... yes, here in the United States and other democratic republics, policy is decided by the numbers.
 
2013-04-08 09:06:31 PM

king_nacho: Red_Fox: drayno76: My last company literally informed me of the new random drug testing policy over beers

Don't work for somewhere that drug tests you.  Or move to where I live in Ontario, Canada they don't test anyone here except pilots.  Which makes sense...why would you test a damn regular office cube dweller...and yes I know many states do.  Those states lack freedom.

If a private company wants to test their employees, then that is freedom. Freedom goes both ways, if you want to smoke weed fine. If you want to smoke weed and work at a company where the owner doesn't want employees to smoke weed then you are free to attempt find other employment.


What if I want to work at a company that wont hire red-meat eaters? Does freedom work that way too? Lifestyle choices vs. performance
 
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