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(Yahoo)   NASA's new mega-rocket could lead to to Skylab 2. Deep Space One to be scheduled for the 2021 spring lineup   (news.yahoo.com) divider line 26
    More: Cool, Skylab, NASA, space stations, SLS, rockets, NASA budget, Lagrange, Apollo program  
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2435 clicks; posted to Geek » on 04 Apr 2013 at 10:25 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-04-04 10:29:05 AM
Hm...I wonder... does a Saturn V style massively huge single rocket design work in Kerbal Space Program?
 
2013-04-04 10:36:42 AM
Great. Now we just need a Sealab in 2021, and all will be well.

\Pod 6 is jerks.
 
2013-04-04 10:36:56 AM
I've seen Skylab 2. It's on display in the Air & Space museum.
 
2013-04-04 10:53:24 AM

Larva Lump: I've seen Skylab 2. It's on display in the Air & Space museum.


Actually that would have been called Skylab B if flown. Skylab 2 was the designation of the first manned mission to Skylab. The unmanned launch of the station was Skylab 1. To confuse things further, the manned mission patches were designed with the misunderstanding that the first manned mission was Skylab 1, so Skylab 2 crew wore a Skylab 1 patch, Skylab 3 crew wore a Skylab 2 patch, and Skylab 4 crew wore a Skylab 3 patch.
 
2013-04-04 11:01:17 AM

Grither: Hm...I wonder... does a Saturn V style massively huge single rocket design work in Kerbal Space Program?


Yes. Just add 1000 struts and you'll be good.
 
2013-04-04 11:28:38 AM
If the Shuttle's solid-rocket boosters had ever lived up to their specifications, NASA could have been building habs out of Shuttle main tanks for decades.
 
2013-04-04 11:40:29 AM

Grither: Hm...I wonder... does a Saturn V style massively huge single rocket design work in Kerbal Space Program?


IIRC, yes, it does.  I love watching people launch entire space stations in one shot using massive rockets and craptons of struts.
 
2013-04-04 11:51:29 AM
 
2013-04-04 11:52:50 AM
Oops. There already WAS a DS1, subby.
Launched in '98, first in-space test of ion propulsion.

Link

Maybe you're thinking of Babylon 1?
 
2013-04-04 12:04:23 PM

Grither: Hm...I wonder... does a Saturn V style massively huge single rocket design work in Kerbal Space Program?


Kinda... there's no direct equivalent to the first stage engines of the Saturn V. I always forget to put struts inside the cell... sometimes the centre stage flies up thru the middle of my ship.
 
2013-04-04 12:10:09 PM
1000 Ways to Dye: Oops. There already WAS a DS1,subby.
Launched in '98, first in-space test of ion propulsion.


Came to say this.  Any idea on the current status on DS1?  I know they say it was 'retired', but it's still gotta be out there somewhere.  Maybe it's just not under thrust anymore?  So, what velocity did it manage to boost up to, anyway?
 
2013-04-04 12:21:13 PM
I got a mega-rocket in my pocket.
 
2013-04-04 12:30:51 PM
*Yawn* Call me when they launch DS:9 and we can get to banging some Bajorans
 
2013-04-04 12:31:19 PM
I remember a rumor a few years ago that NASA had literally lost the capabilities of making those super rockets.   That blueprints had been thrown out, scientist died/retired, new engies couldn't read the old blueprints since they were in CAD.   Essentially, that is why we had to outsource to russia, we could no longer produce the specific rockets we needed for the heavy payload missions.

I guess now we can.
 
2013-04-04 12:55:48 PM
Nem Wan

Larva Lump: I've seen Skylab 2. It's on display in the Air & Space museum.

Actually that would have been called Skylab B if flown. Skylab 2 was the designation of the first manned mission to Skylab. The unmanned launch of the station was Skylab 1. To confuse things further, the manned mission patches were designed with the misunderstanding that the first manned mission was Skylab 1, so Skylab 2 crew wore a Skylab 1 patch, Skylab 3 crew wore a Skylab 2 patch, and Skylab 4 crew wore a Skylab 3 patch.


This is true. Then there was the change in the Shuttle mission designations. Gah! Do we really want these bureaucrats pointing the way?

// Floor Polish!
// Desert Topping!
// Baseball Season!
// Shoot me now!
 
2013-04-04 01:00:23 PM

bromah: I remember a rumor a few years ago that NASA had literally lost the capabilities of making those super rockets. That blueprints had been thrown out, scientist died/retired, new engies couldn't read the old blueprints since they were in CAD. Essentially, that is why we had to outsource to russia, we could no longer produce the specific rockets we needed for the heavy payload missions.

I guess now we can.


<not sure if serious.jpg>

WTF?
 
2013-04-04 02:02:20 PM
Man the stink in there after the propellant had been used up would be very bad.

Oh you mean that it would just be an empty shell?

Stuffed full of food and bags for used shiat?

OK then.

Used shiat? Well if shiat comes out of the human orifice and goes into the bag, is it used or is it fresh. So if it was used, would that be if it floated around for a few hours before it got caught and then bagged as used shiat.

Religious terrorists(republican congress) will make sure that Man does not puncture gods realm by killing any funding that actually gets it off the ground, while paying lots of NASA welfare money to certain States.

Low Earth orbit? Is OK. Past geosynchronous orbit? Hell fire raining down on Earth.

If the Devil would be the one to have hell fire, then that means that god is the devil.... Mind Blown!!

Wasted 30 years with the pickup truck shuttle, so fark all those that stand in the way of the preservation of human life beyond the Earth.
Tasty, Tasty, human life.
 
2013-04-04 02:11:46 PM

sheep snorter: Man the stink in there after the propellant had been used up would be very bad.

Oh you mean that it would just be an empty shell?

Stuffed full of food and bags for used shiat?

OK then.

Used shiat? Well if shiat comes out of the human orifice and goes into the bag, is it used or is it fresh. So if it was used, would that be if it floated around for a few hours before it got caught and then bagged as used shiat.

Religious terrorists(republican congress) will make sure that Man does not puncture gods realm by killing any funding that actually gets it off the ground, while paying lots of NASA welfare money to certain States.

Low Earth orbit? Is OK. Past geosynchronous orbit? Hell fire raining down on Earth.

If the Devil would be the one to have hell fire, then that means that god is the devil.... Mind Blown!!

Wasted 30 years with the pickup truck shuttle, so fark all those that stand in the way of the preservation of human life beyond the Earth.
Tasty, Tasty, human life.


I think you may have snorted one too many sheep there pal.
 
2013-04-04 02:21:50 PM

bromah: I remember a rumor a few years ago that NASA had literally lost the capabilities of making those super rockets.   That blueprints had been thrown out, scientist died/retired, new engies couldn't read the old blueprints since they were in CAD.   Essentially, that is why we had to outsource to russia, we could no longer produce the specific rockets we needed for the heavy payload missions.

I guess now we can.


Not exactly true, we after all still have Saturn V's around. We also have a good idea how the Saturn V worked after all because we're still using the same tech more or less if on a smaller scale. So the idea we couldn't build a new heavy lift rocket without knowing anything about the Saturn V is odd. It would be more work, but not impossible. That being said, since we do have Saturn V engines/Saturn V's around we looked at them to figure out how we could apply that tech to SLS by examining them.

Not to mention most rockets like the Soyuz, Saturn V, Atlas V use essentially the same fuel. Kerosene. So again, its not at all like the Saturn V is some lost technology.
 
2013-04-04 02:25:20 PM

Druid5: Great. Now we just need a Sealab in 2021, and all will be well.

\Pod 6 is jerks.


Well, Aquarius is still around

. Now we just need to wait till 2021.
 
2013-04-04 02:29:43 PM

Nicholas D. Wolfwood: 1000 Ways to Dye: Oops. There already WAS a DS1,subby.
Launched in '98, first in-space test of ion propulsion.

Came to say this.  Any idea on the current status on DS1?  I know they say it was 'retired', but it's still gotta be out there somewhere.  Maybe it's just not under thrust anymore?  So, what velocity did it manage to boost up to, anyway?


Let me Wiki that for you.

Deep Space 1 succeeded in its primary and secondary objectives including flybys of the asteroid Braille and of Comet Borrelly, returning valuable science data and images. DS1's ion engines were shut down on 18 December 2001 at approximately 20:00:00 UTC, signaling the end of the mission. However, on-board communications remain active in case the craft is needed in the future. It remains within the Solar System, orbiting the Sun.
 
2013-04-04 02:45:00 PM

bromah: I remember a rumor a few years ago that NASA had literally lost the capabilities of making those super rockets.   That blueprints had been thrown out, scientist died/retired, new engies couldn't read the old blueprints since they were in CAD.   Essentially, that is why we had to outsource to russia, we could no longer produce the specific rockets we needed for the heavy payload missions.

I guess now we can.


You do of course realize the hand drafting is still taught at most engineering schools. It also doesn't matter what format the drawings are in as the standards are the same.

I learned to draft in Generic CAD on a monochrome monitor and now annoy all the other engineers the same age as I am by being faster than they are when it comes to any 2D drafting package or hand drawing. They keep trying to use the tools for everything whereas I rarely use any built in functions. I learned all the 'tricks' because they were the only way to create the drawings I needed when I learned to draft.
 
2013-04-04 03:41:15 PM

bbfreak: Druid5: Great. Now we just need a Sealab in 2021, and all will be well.

\Pod 6 is jerks.

Well, Aquarius is still around. Now we just need to wait till 2021.


Marduk wants more Stimutacs.
 
2013-04-04 05:19:54 PM

bbfreak: bromah: I remember a rumor a few years ago that NASA had literally lost the capabilities of making those super rockets.   That blueprints had been thrown out, scientist died/retired, new engies couldn't read the old blueprints since they were in CAD.   Essentially, that is why we had to outsource to russia, we could no longer produce the specific rockets we needed for the heavy payload missions.

I guess now we can.

Not exactly true, we after all still have Saturn V's around. We also have a good idea how the Saturn V worked after all because we're still using the same tech more or less if on a smaller scale. So the idea we couldn't build a new heavy lift rocket without knowing anything about the Saturn V is odd. It would be more work, but not impossible. That being said, since we do have Saturn V engines/Saturn V's around we looked at them to figure out how we could apply that tech to SLS by examining them.

Not to mention most rockets like the Soyuz, Saturn V, Atlas V use essentially the same fuel. Kerosene. So again, its not at all like the Saturn V is some lost technology.


and mostly more to the point is that these things are made by a bunch of companies and assembeled and intigrated. So you got a master assembly drawing, and a billion drawings and details of all the little bits that were made by many differnt contractors many decades ago, many of which are no longer in operation and the engineers involved are lost or dead.

one could certainly backwards engineer all the lost bits of information, but at that point, its cheaper and easier just to start over from scratch.

one of the most critical sections of the satV was the control and guidence ring. it was huge, expensive, and the hieght of its technology at the time.

And every thing it did, the phone im typing this on can do and more so, withen reason.

with all that said.. I DO like the idea of reclaiming the rocket sections that make it up intact as building material. its a no brainer when you get down to it.
I loved the space shuttle when growing up, but as I got older and wiser, it became quite appaernt to me that further developing the appolo command modules, and its looking like we are heading back in that direction. and the space shuttle should have been a compliment to that tech, not a replacement.
 
2013-04-04 07:44:08 PM
 
2013-04-05 12:13:45 AM
Can we have a Space Island One up there?
 
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