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(Yahoo)   All your bitcoin are belong to somebody else   (finance.yahoo.com) divider line 66
    More: Obvious, hacking attacks, Best & Co.  
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4893 clicks; posted to Geek » on 04 Apr 2013 at 9:10 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



66 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2013-04-04 09:13:40 AM
A "hacking attack?"  Really?  Come over here so I can strangle the stupid out of you.  A DDOS != hacking.
 
2013-04-04 09:16:13 AM
lol

No, it's not a ponzi scheme.

Just give an exchange all your bitcoins and they'll give you interest back!

Or just steal it all for themselves, considering there is no legal recourse for the theft of a currency that is not real.
 
2013-04-04 09:16:24 AM
Now I can only afford ONE oz/week
 
2013-04-04 09:20:58 AM
Was Bitcoin set up by L Ron Hubbard? Just seems like his kind of thing.
 
2013-04-04 09:22:15 AM

wejash: Was Bitcoin set up by L Ron Hubbard? Just seems like his kind of thing.


He could only aspire to such a brilliant scam.
 
2013-04-04 09:28:50 AM
That's fine, I have a huge stack of Flooz and Beenz that I can use instead.
 
2013-04-04 09:50:11 AM
Until bitcoins are valued at zero (or "imaginary") they will continue to be over-valued.
 
2013-04-04 09:57:31 AM
What's the exchange rate from bitcoins to quatloos?
 
2013-04-04 10:00:19 AM
When you decentralise the production, anyone can manipulate the market. YAY FREEDOM!
 
2013-04-04 10:03:15 AM
Well, it sounds like no bitcoins were stolen as a result of this "hacking attack" - it's just a scheme to destabilize the system to drop the price and buy up the bitcoins at a cheaper price.

That said, this scheme will be around for a while, only because it offers some people a way to access goods and services that would otherwise be tracked by law enforcement agents around the world using traditional currency systems. It's basically just a money laundering system for the people who make the most use out of it, outside of a few "information should be free" type crusaders.
 
2013-04-04 10:37:39 AM

doctorguilty: What's the exchange rate from bitcoins to quatloos?


I don't know, but 1 bitcoin is 10000000 satoshis
 
2013-04-04 10:38:19 AM

fluffy2097: lol

No, it's not a ponzi scheme.


Nah, if it were an actual ponzi scheme the price fluctuations could probably be more accurately predicted and it would be less susceptible to DDOSes.
 
2013-04-04 10:39:12 AM
BitCoins? Freaking fake currency. I'll stick with all this paper and scrap metal in my pockets thanks. That's real currency.
 
2013-04-04 10:41:41 AM
Gee, bitcoins are only worth $130 each now. I wonder, is that an indictment of the dollar or a paen to the bitcoin?
 
2013-04-04 10:58:07 AM
I mined about 90 bitcoins way back near the start. Uninstalled and deleted everything because I decided it was stupid and they would never be worth anything.


I need a drink.
 
2013-04-04 11:12:16 AM

fluffy2097: wejash: Was Bitcoin set up by L Ron Hubbard? Just seems like his kind of thing.

He could only aspire to such a brilliant scam.


Until Bitcoin literally manipulates the IRS into declaring them a tax exempt religion, all other scam artists must continue looking up to L Ron Hubbard.
 
2013-04-04 11:14:48 AM
only a matter of time...
 
2013-04-04 11:30:05 AM

you have pee hands: fluffy2097: wejash: Was Bitcoin set up by L Ron Hubbard? Just seems like his kind of thing.

He could only aspire to such a brilliant scam.

Until Bitcoin literally manipulates the IRS into declaring them a tax exempt religion, all other scam artists must continue looking up to L Ron Hubbard.


Bitcoin isn't recognized as money. It's Tax exempt.

You can only buy drugs, child porn, and webhosting with it, but it IS tax exempt, The same way your collection of wooden nickles is.
 
2013-04-04 11:38:17 AM
I understand some of the philosophical ideas behind Bitcoin, but in light of news like this, it's really, really hard for me to take it seriously.
 
2013-04-04 11:39:07 AM
Phew...Quatloos are still safe......

i15.photobucket.com

When in doubt, go with the blue chips..

www.technovelgy.com
And the drill thralls wearing tin foil bikinis
 
2013-04-04 11:43:17 AM
THREAD CLOSED DUE TO LACK OF INTEREST
 
2013-04-04 11:54:53 AM

fluffy2097: You can only buy drugs, child porn, and webhosting with it, but it IS tax exempt, The same way your collection of wooden nickles is.


If I made $10k selling wooden nickels, I'd have to declare that, right?  I wouldn't be taxed as long as I could keep my transactions denominated in wooden nickels, but as soon as I tried to cash out for anything else I'm in trouble if they notice.  Maybe a MMO gold farmer could answer if they weren't all in 3rd world sweatshops.
 
2013-04-04 12:06:37 PM

you have pee hands: If I made $10k selling wooden nickels, I'd have to declare that, right? I wouldn't be taxed as long as I could keep my transactions denominated in wooden nickels, but as soon as I tried to cash out for anything else I'm in trouble if they notice. Maybe a MMO gold farmer could answer if they weren't all in 3rd world sweatshops.


Yes, because dollars are real money.

You don't pay taxes on a painting valued at a million dollars, and if you trade that painting for a child sex slave, you don't have to declare it because real money was never involved.

Now just replace painting with bitcoin.
 
2013-04-04 12:15:05 PM
Bitcoins lose 20% due to hacking attack, drop from $147.......??!!

Back up to the $130s?  Are the hedge funds buying?
 
2013-04-04 12:31:41 PM
fluffy2097:Yes, because dollars are real money.

You don't pay taxes on a painting valued at a million dollars, and if you trade that painting for a child sex slave, you don't have to declare it because real money was never involved.

Now just replace painting with bitcoin.


Actually now that I look at bitcoin denominated transactions for goods/services aren't exempt, though as long as they're relatively small they'll probably go unnoticed like most bartering does.
 
2013-04-04 12:40:41 PM

fluffy2097: Yes, because dollars are real money.


Dollars are real money, and for all the crying and pants pissing people like you do over inflation zomg, the US dollar off the gold standard with nothing but the full faith and credit of the US has never fluctuated like this stupid bitcoin.
 
2013-04-04 12:44:39 PM

fluffy2097: you have pee hands: fluffy2097: wejash: Was Bitcoin set up by L Ron Hubbard? Just seems like his kind of thing.

He could only aspire to such a brilliant scam.

Until Bitcoin literally manipulates the IRS into declaring them a tax exempt religion, all other scam artists must continue looking up to L Ron Hubbard.

Bitcoin isn't recognized as money. It's Tax exempt.

You can only buy drugs, child porn, and webhosting with it, but it IS tax exempt, The same way your collection of wooden nickles is.


It's considered a capital investment. If you buy in with $100,000 in bitcoin and cash out at $190,000, you have $90k in capital gains to report.

You can also buy electronics with zero markup, and anything you can trade for from anyone willing to sell.
 
2013-04-04 12:45:43 PM

cefm: Until bitcoins are valued at zero (or "imaginary") they will continue to be over-valued.


Put your money where your mouth is. Buy a bunch of shorts on the market and laugh your ass to the bank if you're right.
 
2013-04-04 12:46:29 PM

Smackledorfer: fluffy2097: Yes, because dollars are real money.

Dollars are real money, and for all the crying and pants pissing people like you do over inflation zomg, the US dollar off the gold standard with nothing but the full faith and credit of the US has never fluctuated like this stupid bitcoin.


Anything that can be traded as a medium of exchange is money.
 
2013-04-04 12:49:35 PM

jfarkinB: I understand some of the philosophical ideas behind Bitcoin, but in light of news like this, it's really, really hard for me to take it seriously.


So if a bank robbery happened, you'd stop taking the US dollar seriously, too?
 
2013-04-04 12:56:11 PM
FTFA:  "Another bitcoin associated company Instawallet - an online storage service - was hacked earlier this week and its service was suspended indefinitely.
"Our database was fraudulently accessed, due to the very nature of Instawallet it is impossible to reopen the service as-is," it said on its website.
"

In other words, we didn't bother to hire a competent DBA, or listen to them when they said the database needed to be backed up properly.   We went with the "just back everything up to tape, which worked on my laptop and desktop, so it should work on a busy, multi-user, database system, right?  RIGHT!!!  By the way fire the DBA, it's too much of a hassle to hear them complain about no backups, what do you think the TAPE DRIVES are for?!!!!!"

/ too many IT people believe this
// too many IT managers believe this
 
2013-04-04 01:04:30 PM

Flash_NYC: FTFA:  "Another bitcoin associated company Instawallet - an online storage service - was hacked earlier this week and its service was suspended indefinitely.
"Our database was fraudulently accessed, due to the very nature of Instawallet it is impossible to reopen the service as-is," it said on its website."

In other words, we didn't bother to hire a competent DBA, or listen to them when they said the database needed to be backed up properly.   We went with the "just back everything up to tape, which worked on my laptop and desktop, so it should work on a busy, multi-user, database system, right?  RIGHT!!!  By the way fire the DBA, it's too much of a hassle to hear them complain about no backups, what do you think the TAPE DRIVES are for?!!!!!"

/ too many IT people believe this
// too many IT managers believe this


That is a corporate way of thinking.

This was a small operation. There was no hack. There was no DB crash. Admin took the money and ran, and there's no legal recourse. He's set for life on ordering experimental research chemicals from third world countries.
 
2013-04-04 01:07:50 PM

iawai: jfarkinB: I understand some of the philosophical ideas behind Bitcoin, but in light of news like this, it's really, really hard for me to take it seriously.

So if a bank robbery happened, you'd stop taking the US dollar seriously, too?


If a single bank robbery meant that all my dollars lost 20% of their value overnight, yes, yes, I would.
 
2013-04-04 01:13:30 PM

Ned Stark: I mined about 90 bitcoins way back near the start. Uninstalled and deleted everything because I decided it was stupid and they would never be worth anything.

I need a drink.


At least you didn't spend 10,000 bitcoins to get a pizza delivered from Papa Johns.
 
2013-04-04 01:36:12 PM

iawai: Smackledorfer: fluffy2097: Yes, because dollars are real money.

Dollars are real money, and for all the crying and pants pissing people like you do over inflation zomg, the US dollar off the gold standard with nothing but the full faith and credit of the US has never fluctuated like this stupid bitcoin.

Anything that can be traded as a medium of exchange is money.


So then world of warcraft gold is just as real a currency as the US dollar.  Some goods and services are exchanged for wow gold, and you can buy it with the dollar.

And what would make something NOT-currency?

That is a very useful definition you have there, and oh so relevant to my post.
 
2013-04-04 01:38:21 PM
Not that i trust the banks much, but i trust the FDIC more than a bunch of libertarian crypto nerds.
 
2013-04-04 01:51:23 PM

iawai: You can also buy electronics with zero markup, and anything you can trade for from anyone willing to sell.


Yes, because noone likes to generate any sort of profit on the things they sell.

/time = money.
 
2013-04-04 01:59:37 PM

jfarkinB: iawai: jfarkinB: I understand some of the philosophical ideas behind Bitcoin, but in light of news like this, it's really, really hard for me to take it seriously.

So if a bank robbery happened, you'd stop taking the US dollar seriously, too?

If a single bank robbery meant that all my dollars lost 20% of their value overnight, yes, yes, I would.


A bank robbery of that magnitude would dwarf anything Auric Goldfinger ever came up with.
 
2013-04-04 02:03:44 PM

jfarkinB: iawai: jfarkinB: I understand some of the philosophical ideas behind Bitcoin, but in light of news like this, it's really, really hard for me to take it seriously.

So if a bank robbery happened, you'd stop taking the US dollar seriously, too?

If a single bank robbery meant that all my dollars lost 20% of their value overnight, yes, yes, I would.


Have you seen the rate of inflation over the past 10 years? If the dollar had only lost 20% of its value, we'd be in decent shape.
 
2013-04-04 02:15:18 PM

MadSkillz: iawai: You can also buy electronics with zero markup, and anything you can trade for from anyone willing to sell.

Yes, because noone likes to generate any sort of profit on the things they sell.

/time = money.


It's a bitcoin enthusiast trying to generate name recognition and interest in the bitcoin. He had $500,000 worth of sales in one of his first months in business by offering this loss-leader.

He, as a particular actor on the market, preferred to profit psychologically and with the intangibles in his business rather than in US dollars.

My point was only that there are non-black-market uses for bitcoin, and they are growing. A property management company in Memphis, TN has announced they will accept bitcoin for rent. Bitmit.net (NSFW) is trying to emulate the ebay model.
 
2013-04-04 02:58:46 PM
There was another topic here that got me interested in bitcoin.  So I started looking around, trying to find who accepts it.
Basically... Nobody.
Mining gives you free money!
Actually, it'll cost more in electricity and wear and tear on the computer than you'll ever recover.
But no taxes on income!  Well, if you are going to hide money in bitcoin, you can hide cash in a safe.

So what is it good for?  It's a ghetto stock market.  You buy low, sell high.  Ride the waves.

It's a game.  It's what I used to do in World of Warcraft on the auction site.  Just don't be the guy holding all the cool stuff pre-patch.  You find yourself with a lot of useless crap.

I also didn't like that there was a 10 page explanation I ran across about whether it was legal or not.
 
2013-04-04 03:00:12 PM

fluffy2097: This was a small operation. There was no hack. There was no DB crash. Admin took the money and ran, and there's no legal recourse. He's set for life on ordering experimental research chemicals from third world countries.


Ding ding ding ding ding ding
 
2013-04-04 03:31:56 PM
img199.imageshack.us
 
2013-04-04 03:35:40 PM

untaken_name: jfarkinB: iawai: jfarkinB: I understand some of the philosophical ideas behind Bitcoin, but in light of news like this, it's really, really hard for me to take it seriously.

So if a bank robbery happened, you'd stop taking the US dollar seriously, too?

If a single bank robbery meant that all my dollars lost 20% of their value overnight, yes, yes, I would.

Have you seen the rate of inflation over the past 10 years? If the dollar had only lost 20% of its value, we'd be in decent shape.


Nice change of goal post.

10 years is roughly 730000% of "overnight."

Also, how would we be in decent shape if the rate of inflation was lower?  Do you think that the main reason the economy crashed in 2008 is because there was too much currency and not enough people defaulting on loans or something?
 
2013-04-04 03:39:14 PM
Store bitcoins on a thumb drive and then stick it up your butt.  Then you can only get raped on them by actually being raped.
 
2013-04-04 04:54:37 PM

Ned Stark: I mined about 90 bitcoins way back near the start. Uninstalled and deleted everything because I decided it was stupid and they would never be worth anything.


I need a drink.


Never check the  price of a stock you've sold.
 
2013-04-04 05:05:52 PM
Just for fun, I downloaded a Bitcoin client and started it up to get a Bitcoin address yesterday.  It immediately started "syncing" and 24 hours later it's only 88% done.  The counter suggests it's going through every transaction since the first Bitcoin was created.

Perhaps this is supposed to dampen demand, as the mining process is supposed to dampen supply.
 
2013-04-04 05:26:17 PM

BarkingUnicorn: Just for fun, I downloaded a Bitcoin client and started it up to get a Bitcoin address yesterday.  It immediately started "syncing" and 24 hours later it's only 88% done.  The counter suggests it's going through every transaction since the first Bitcoin was created.

Perhaps this is supposed to dampen demand, as the mining process is supposed to dampen supply.


Can you explain what "mining" means?  Serious question (for you or anyone).  In layman's terms.
 
2013-04-04 05:30:33 PM

BarkingUnicorn: Just for fun, I downloaded a Bitcoin client and started it up to get a Bitcoin address yesterday.  It immediately started "syncing" and 24 hours later it's only 88% done.  The counter suggests it's going through every transaction since the first Bitcoin was created.

Perhaps this is supposed to dampen demand, as the mining process is supposed to dampen supply.


I could have been making free money all this time and noone said anything?
 
2013-04-04 05:56:14 PM
its a tit for tat type of thing... but.. what the hell is tat, where do i get it, and how do i trade it for the other thing?
 
2013-04-04 06:12:00 PM

downstairs: BarkingUnicorn: Just for fun, I downloaded a Bitcoin client and started it up to get a Bitcoin address yesterday.  It immediately started "syncing" and 24 hours later it's only 88% done.  The counter suggests it's going through every transaction since the first Bitcoin was created.

Perhaps this is supposed to dampen demand, as the mining process is supposed to dampen supply.

Can you explain what "mining" means?  Serious question (for you or anyone).  In layman's terms.


"Mining, or generating, is the process of adding transaction records to Bitcoin's public ledger of past transactions." In exchange for doing this work, you get a transaction record along the lines of "Bitcoin created MMDDYY at HHMMSS, assigned to you."

So, it's like SETI, (Search for Extra-Terrestrial Intelligence) a network of independent computers each processing parts of a large data set for a common goal, only you get paid.

It's called "mining" because mining is a tough, slow way to accumulate wealth (in the old West prospector romances, at least).  The Bitcoin mining protocol is deliberately resource-intensive, aimed at keeping the rate of Bitcoin creation at about four per day.  Your desktop PC will never make you rich in Bitcoins.  "Mining appliances" of formidable specs are sold to serious miners.  The ones I've seen cost up to $3000 so that gives me a feeling the ROI may be a handful of thousands per year.
 
2013-04-04 06:29:28 PM
I just read a thread on reddit about a guy who took out a $30,000 loan, invested it all in bitcoins, and has a couple hundred grand a few months later.
 
2013-04-04 06:45:00 PM

fluffy2097: Bitcoin isn't recognized as money. It's Tax exempt.


I don't know what the law is where you live, but there's nothing in US tax law to suggest that it only applies when transaction amounts are denominated in US Dollars.

If I sell you  drugs web development services and you give me 10 Bitcoins in exchange for it, then according to the IRS I've received 10 Bitcoins' worth of income and should be taxed on it.

/if they somehow find out about our transaction.
 
2013-04-04 06:46:45 PM

Smackledorfer: the US dollar off the gold standard with nothing but the full faith and credit of the US has never fluctuated like this stupid bitcoin.


It's almost as if currencies controlled by a strong central authority are more stable.
 
2013-04-04 06:47:44 PM

iawai: cefm: Until bitcoins are valued at zero (or "imaginary") they will continue to be over-valued.

Put your money where your mouth is. Buy a bunch of shorts on the market and laugh your ass to the bank if you're right.


Well, that's the thing--you can't short Bitcoins yet, or I'd completely agree with you that the haters can either place their bets or STFU. And I'm one of the haters, at least for now.

And why can't you short Bitcoins? Because shorting (or equivalent transactions that mean either one party or another is going to get paid after a specified period of time) require trusted third-party intermediaries. Those don't exist in the Bitcoin world. And why not? Because potential third parties don't trust Bitcoin users, either.

You and I could hammer out a nice, legally binding arrangement that would work out to a short sale, if we wanted to pay some  open-minded lawyers to write the contract and serve as an escrow agent. (And unless we were talking about multiple tens of thousands of dollars, that would probably eat up all the expected profit right there.) But I'd want to be damn sure I knew exactly who you were, whether you were good for it, where I could serve you with a lawsuit if you tried to welch, and so forth. And you'd want to know the same thing about me. But anonymity (such as it is) with Bitcoins is half the point with its current user-base.

And we'd both need to be absolutely, 100% confident that our escrow wouldn't decide to screw us both for shiats and giggles, or out of sheer incompetence, or because they got raided, or what have you. As of a whole 48 hours ago, the closest things there were to a Bitcoin-denominated financial infrastructure were way too shady, opaque, ill-suited, or new to be trustworthy.

It's a vicious circle. Hey, eventually someday Bitcoins or a successor e-currency will get past that tipping point. But it ain't there yet, and when you can ONLY reliably make money betting that something will increase in value, that's a recipe for a bubble.
 
2013-04-04 07:01:20 PM

poot_rootbeer: fluffy2097: Bitcoin isn't recognized as money. It's Tax exempt.

I don't know what the law is where you live, but there's nothing in US tax law to suggest that it only applies when transaction amounts are denominated in US Dollars.

If I sell you  drugs web development services and you give me 10 Bitcoins in exchange for it, then according to the IRS I've received 10 Bitcoins' worth of income and should be taxed on it.

/if they somehow find out about our transaction.


Yep.  Various barter exchanges have run into this problem for decades.  The IRS will tax the "fair market value" of the roof you received in exchange for your car repair services.  No different with Bitcoins.
 
2013-04-04 07:09:11 PM

Popcorn Johnny: I just read a thread on reddit about a guy who took out a $30,000 loan, invested it all in bitcoins, and has a couple hundred grand a few months later.


It takes time to establish trust in the Bitcoin community.  Until you have a lot of people trusting you, you can't spend much of your Bitcoins.  You start with zero trust because you're nothing but a PGP-encrypted number that nobody knows anything about.

The more I read the Bitcoin wiki, the less I am inclined to jump through all the hoops and navigate all the hazards.  That's why financial education is bad for the economy and isn't taught in high schools.  The more you know, the less you want any part of it.
 
2013-04-04 07:15:31 PM

Popcorn Johnny: I just read a thread on reddit about a guy who took out a $30,000 loan, invested it all in bitcoins, and has a couple hundred grand a few months later.


He doesn't have a couple hundred grand until he actually manages to sell them.  And human nature being what it is, people like that usually get greedy and continue to "let it ride."

Now, if he was smart, he would sell off 300 bitcoins today so that he can at least break even and pay off his loans.  Then the rest of the economy could crash to zero, and he would still come out ahead.

Or, he can keep getting greedy and go "double or nothing."
 
2013-04-04 10:18:40 PM

schrodinger: He doesn't have a couple hundred grand until he actually manages to sell them


That is why people want banks in on the act. There is no easy out to cash to pay your bills with.

Of course, getting a bank involved defeats the purpose of bitcoin which is to avoid banks.
 
2013-04-04 10:31:33 PM
Buying normal goods with Bitcoins is easy!  (Yes, that is correct, there are at least five separate transaction fees to get through the process)i.imgur.com
 
2013-04-04 11:11:36 PM

fluffy2097: schrodinger: He doesn't have a couple hundred grand until he actually manages to sell them

That is why people want banks in on the act. There is no easy out to cash to pay your bills with.

Of course, getting a bank involved defeats the purpose of bitcoin which is to avoid banks.


Yep.  Paypal partnered with FirstBank to offer debit cards.  Now PP is collecting SSNs and other ID info it missed earlier to comply with "new banking laws", and reporting transaction volumes of more than $25K/year to the IRS.

Rumor has it that Bitcoin exchange BitInstant has partnered with a French bank and will start offering debit cards, bank transfers, etc., "any day now."  But if you see an offer for a Bitcoin debit card now, it's a scam.
 
2013-04-05 03:46:34 AM
Dollars have been working great for me.

/old skool, I know.
 
2013-04-06 01:30:22 AM

schrodinger: Nice change of goal post.

10 years is roughly 730000% of "overnight."

Also, how would we be in decent shape if the rate of inflation was lower?  Do you think that the main reason the economy crashed in 2008 is because there was too much currency and not enough people defaulting on loans or something?


The actual printing happens "overnight". The amount over 10 years is far more than 20%. Each printing adds 10-17% to the money supply, causing the value of existing dollars to drop by that amount immediately. This happens several times per year. Moving the goalpost? Hah. You wish. How would we be in decent shape if inflation were lower? Are you retarded? Loss of purchasing power is bad, you dolt. We would be better off with more purchasing power. Was that a serious question?
 
2013-04-06 10:45:52 AM

untaken_name: The actual printing happens "overnight". The amount over 10 years is far more than 20%. Each printing adds 10-17% to the money supply, causing the value of existing dollars to drop by that amount immediately. This happens several times per year.


Ah. That explains why, several times a year, you wake up to discover that everything in the grocery store costs 10-17% more than it did the previous night.

No, actually, you usually wake up after you discover that everything in the grocery store has gone up 10-17%. Because overnight 10-17% drops in the value of the US$ still aren't actually happening in the waking world.
 
2013-04-07 08:19:26 PM

jfarkinB: untaken_name: The actual printing happens "overnight". The amount over 10 years is far more than 20%. Each printing adds 10-17% to the money supply, causing the value of existing dollars to drop by that amount immediately. This happens several times per year.

Ah. That explains why, several times a year, you wake up to discover that everything in the grocery store costs 10-17% more than it did the previous night.

No, actually, you usually wake up after you discover that everything in the grocery store has gone up 10-17%. Because overnight 10-17% drops in the value of the US$ still aren't actually happening in the waking world.


Well, since it takes 18 months to hit, that must mean it never has any effect, nor that the effect was caused in a short period of time. Lucky, that. Oh wait, it has NO EFFECT upon the end result. I guess things don't cost more this year than they did last year, eh? Keep telling yourself that. When you're buying a loaf of bread with a wheelbarrow full of dollars, remind yourself that it doesn't happen in the waking world.
 
2013-04-08 12:27:47 AM

untaken_name: Well, since it takes 18 months to hit, that must mean it never has any effect, nor that the effect was caused in a short period of time.


Does the rate of inflation happen slowly enough for people to adapt?  Because if it does, then what's the problem?

Lucky, that. Oh wait, it has NO EFFECT upon the end result. I guess things don't cost more this year than they did last year, eh?

Do you read the newspaper?  Have you been reading about the energy crisis?  The oil crisis?  The fact that droughts have been decimating our farm economy?  There's a lot more to price increases to simple inflation.  And funny how the libertarians whining about prices going up are also dead set against efficiency standards and any attempt to curb global warming.

When you're buying a loaf of bread with a wheelbarrow full of dollars, remind yourself that it doesn't happen in the waking world

But when the bitcoin ponzi scheme crashes and people end up losing 99.9% of their initial investment, that's going to be awesome, right?
 
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