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(AutoBlog)   Notes from drivers education class in 1969   (autoblog.com) divider line 51
    More: Spiffy, Michigan Secretary of State, manual transmission, road tests, time capsule  
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9804 clicks; posted to Main » on 04 Apr 2013 at 7:40 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-04-04 04:09:46 AM
When I took Driver's Ed in 1980, we had a couple of hours of actual driving. One of our teacher's favorite routes was to drive the local cruising strip, showing us the proper way to drive the circuit and turn around safely. Probably the most useful thing.

The funny part was on Saturday night when everybody out cruising made their U-Turn in the same shopping center, exiting the parking lot at the traffic light to avoid crossing traffic.
 
2013-04-04 04:52:39 AM
They still teach driver's ed? I thought they just handed out licenses with facebook accounts.

FTFA: Paula admits that kids today have got a tougher task ahead of them than did her generation. "When we were kids, we didn't have the distraction of texting and cell phones."

Uh, no - back then we knew better than to text and drive. Not that we could text, but we also knew knew better anyway.

Cars are actually much easier to drive. Power steering is standard and has been for a long time. Can you even get a new car without power steering? Mirrors on both sides of the car are also standard. Way back when, they only had them on the drivers side.

And as far as getting into an accident, which would you rather be in? A 2013 Whatevermobile or a 1975 Bargemobile or a 1950 Yachtmobile?

Seatbelts used to be unheard of and then they were an option. Safety glass didn't exist in the old days. You'll still get hurt if your head goes through the windshield on a modern car, but without safety glass you can pretty much guarantee that you'll die just from the cuts to your neck.
 
2013-04-04 05:29:00 AM

Happy Hours: Not that we could text, but we also knew knew better anyway.


"In my day we knew better than to use our hologram glasses while driving. I mean, they didn't exist, but we knew better."
 
2013-04-04 06:05:17 AM

kingoomieiii: Happy Hours: Not that we could text, but we also knew knew better anyway.

"In my day we knew better than to use our hologram glasses while driving. I mean, they didn't exist, but we knew better."


Hologram glasses might be useful but to dumb it down, we knew better than to read and write while piloting a several thousand pound vehicle down the road.

Well, most of us did anyway. Those of us who didn't tended to crash.
 
2013-04-04 07:52:12 AM
My driver's ed class doubled as a sales gimmick for the local GM dealer. He lent the cars (or maybe leased them?) to the county. So we learned to drive on emissions-control-choked, underpowered late '70s Buicks, Chevies and Oldsmobiles with power everything. Then I took my test in a Toyota pickup with a five-speed manual. The test consisted of an easy written exam, and a drive around the block with a state trooper followed by angle parking. He passed me even though I stalled it out about five times trying to get back onto the highway.

We couldn't afford driver's ed at my high school, so we had to drive to a bigger town 10 miles away to get it. The classes were in a trailer, and the driving course was laid out in part of the school parking lot.

The license was typewritten on paper. No lamination, no picture. My younger brother used to borrow mine to buy beer.
 
2013-04-04 07:54:12 AM
s17.postimg.org

Best way to remember a four stroke is it is the same as the end of a good date: suck, squeeze, explode, spit
 
2013-04-04 07:54:18 AM
When my driver's ed class went out for our first drive, the baseball coach who was teaching the class panicked as a student rolled up to a stop sign on a wet street and locked the brakes with his passenger pedal.  The car slid right through the stop sign and into an oncoming vehicle.  First time out.
 
2013-04-04 07:54:57 AM
we had used cars that usally didn't run when we got them and had to fix them to drve, today crotchdropings get new cars and call AAA if they get a flat
 
2013-04-04 07:57:22 AM

mbillips: I took my test in a Toyota pickup with a five-speed manual.


Absolutely nothing wrong with this.  Kudos to you.

I think it ought to be mandatory that everyone learn to drive a manual transmission.  In fact, I think your driving test should be in a 70's F-150 with 3-speed on the column because if you can drive that, you can drive about anything.
 
2013-04-04 07:57:44 AM
My drivers ed consisted mostly of screwing around and quick trips to Taco Bell. Of course driving around here is more akin to thunderdome then anything. My driving test consisted of seeing if we could drive around the block without crashing. No parallel parking, no reverse, just drive around the block. Of course some people still fail, nothing like watching someone side-swipe a chain-link fence trying to exit the dmv parking lot.
 
2013-04-04 08:03:11 AM
I could write a book on the lessons learned in my old driving school.
He was old gnarly Navy vet who ran the class with a mixture of factoids and get your head out arse commentary.

"All I needed to know in life and business , I learned in sixteen weeks of drivers ed."

1. Beware of surroundings
2. Stay in control and in your lane
3. Leave room for the other guys mistakes
4. Look ahead and not just what is in front of you.
5. A squirrel is life isn't worth more than your life or the driver (women & kids) behind you. No swerving or panic braking for rodents.
6. Sometimes it's better to sit in back and just observe.
 
2013-04-04 08:03:57 AM
It failed to cover the proper use of the middle finger while driving.
 
2013-04-04 08:06:08 AM

tennessee.hillbilly: I think it ought to be mandatory that everyone learn to drive a manual transmission.


I really wish I had learned. An ex tried to teach me a few years ago but he freaked out every time I stalled or rode the clutch too hard until it just wasn't worth the hassle. Which is pretty much how I felt about the entire relationship after a short time.
 
2013-04-04 08:08:21 AM
I'm calling shenanigans. These notes are too neat, and they're colored-in. Who colors their notes?
 
2013-04-04 08:12:38 AM

Dr.Mxyzptlk.: I could write a book on the lessons learned in my old driving school.
He was old gnarly Navy vet who ran the class with a mixture of factoids and get your head out arse commentary.

"All I needed to know in life and business , I learned in sixteen weeks of drivers ed."

1. Beware of surroundings
2. Stay in control and in your lane
3. Leave room for the other guys mistakes
4. Look ahead and not just what is in front of you.
5. A squirrel is life isn't worth more than your life or the driver (women & kids) behind you. No swerving or panic braking for rodents.
6. Sometimes it's better to sit in back and just observe.


I learned that early on, after seeing an article in the paper about an accident where someone was killed trying to avoid running over a skunk, and ended up in the trees on the Merritt Parkway in CT.

No matter what's in front of me now, I just grab the wheel as tight as I can, bowl over it and hope for the best. So far, so good.
 
2013-04-04 08:18:30 AM
My Driver's Ed in the mid-70s consisted of driving the instructors car up to Ft Devens so he could go into the PX and get his smokes.
 
2013-04-04 08:20:48 AM

tennessee.hillbilly: mbillips: I took my test in a Toyota pickup with a five-speed manual.

Absolutely nothing wrong with this.  Kudos to you.

I think it ought to be mandatory that everyone learn to drive a manual transmission.  In fact, I think your driving test should be in a 70's F-150 with 3-speed on the column because if you can drive that, you can drive about anything.


My son finally got his license (at 19, wtf is wrong with kids?)  He took it in the school's cars (automatics) and his mom's car is an auto.  We have two manual transmission vehicles, and he REALLY likes to drive the truck.  "It feels like I'm more in control, more connected to driving".  *sniff*  I think he'll turn out OK.
 
2013-04-04 08:32:06 AM

tennessee.hillbilly: mbillips: I took my test in a Toyota pickup with a five-speed manual.

Absolutely nothing wrong with this.  Kudos to you.

I think it ought to be mandatory that everyone learn to drive a manual transmission.  In fact, I think your driving test should be in a 70's F-150 with 3-speed on the column because if you can drive that, you can drive about anything.


In the 70's the Rangers were the full size line.
 
2013-04-04 08:35:45 AM

Dr.Mxyzptlk.: 5. A squirrel is life isn't worth more than your life or the driver (women & kids) behind you. No swerving or panic braking for rodents.


One of my female friends in high school wrapped her car around a tree when she tried to avoid hitting a cat on a rainy day.  She was going the speed limit, 50MPH, a cat darted out in front of her and she panicked.  Wrapped her Camry around a huge eucalyptus, she broke a ton of bones, was black and blue for months.  Ended her swimming career, she was damn fast too.  All for a cat.
 
2013-04-04 08:45:20 AM
FTFA: I had a written test at the Michigan Secretary of State office, but no driving test, and then I had a learner's permit for a few months before I got my real license. Chicken soup.

Chicken soup?

I think I might start saying that after random sentences and see how long it takes until someone accuses me of having a stroke.  Pecan pie.
 
2013-04-04 08:51:10 AM

Smarshmallow: I'm calling shenanigans. These notes are too neat, and they're colored-in. Who colors their notes?


OCD sufferers.
 
ZAZ [TotalFark]
2013-04-04 08:54:55 AM
These notes are too neat, and they're colored-in. Who colors their notes?

The note-taker was a teenage girl.
 
2013-04-04 08:58:45 AM
Grew up on a farm, learned to drive tractors around 8, trucks at 11 - when I was finally big enough push in the clutch and see over the steering wheel simultaneously.  2Ton farm trucks which, back in the 60s, had no power steering or brakes, a steering wheel about 2 feet in diameter with a suicide knob for assistance.  Turn signals were optional equipment.  The first time I ever drove an automatic was when, at age 14, my Grandfather took me to the State Police post in the county seat for a road test with one of the officers.  Mr. Officer commented that my left foot seemed to be looking for something to do and I allowed as how I had never driven an automatic before.  We drove around the town a bit and he figured out that I knew all the driving laws (which were in a pamphlet I had been given by Granddad about a week before my test); then we stopped at the local barbershop where he asked one of the guys there if we could borrow his pickup.  We took another lap around town in a vehicle that I was completely at ease driving, Mr. Officer figured out I knew how to handle a vehicle, we went back to the barbershop and swapped for Granddad's car, drove back to the cop shop and got me a brand new shiny cardboard license with no photo (they hadn't yet been made part of the license in that state) and I got to drive Granddad back out to the farm.  I doubt kids would get by so easily today.  On the other hand, we still had to learn hand signals for turning and stopping.  Yeah - drivers were just as remiss using them as they are using turn signals these days.
 
2013-04-04 09:02:08 AM

samiam00: FTFA: I had a written test at the Michigan Secretary of State office, but no driving test, and then I had a learner's permit for a few months before I got my real license. Chicken soup.

Chicken soup?

I think I might start saying that after random sentences and see how long it takes until someone accuses me of having a stroke.  Pecan pie.


Funniest thing I've read in a while.. literally did the "snort laugh"!
 
2013-04-04 09:07:20 AM
My DE car was a Dodge Colt 4-speed manual.  Ugly little tin can.  The rich kid in our group drove himself to drivers ed everyday in the brand new Burt Reynolds Trans Am that his doctor daddy bought him.  The instructor never mentioned anything about him driving illegally like that.

/Not that I'm bitter..
 
2013-04-04 09:08:33 AM

tennessee.hillbilly: mbillips: I took my test in a Toyota pickup with a five-speed manual.

Absolutely nothing wrong with this.  Kudos to you.

I think it ought to be mandatory that everyone learn to drive a manual transmission.  In fact, I think your driving test should be in a 70's F-150 with 3-speed on the column because if you can drive that, you can drive about anything.


When I was learning to drive my dad had a late 70s Ford van with the three speed on the column. You're right - after learning to drive that thing anything else was pretty easy.
 
2013-04-04 09:12:12 AM

ZAZ: These notes are too neat, and they're colored-in. Who colors their notes?

The note-taker was a teenage girl.


Couldn't be, I dont see any hearts over any lower-case i.
 
2013-04-04 09:14:48 AM

Korzine: My drivers ed consisted mostly of screwing around and quick trips to Taco Bell. Of course driving around here is more akin to thunderdome then anything. My driving test consisted of seeing if we could drive around the block without crashing. No parallel parking, no reverse, just drive around the block. Of course some people still fail, nothing like watching someone side-swipe a chain-link fence trying to exit the dmv parking lot.


My drivers ed consisted of at least 28 hours of actual driving (legal minimum was 25 iirc), all (legal) forms of parking, driving backwards, getting started on an incline, highway, country roads, city driving, situational awareness, written test to see if you knew the traffic laws and after that you still needed to do an exam with some government employee who graded you on your actual driving. It wasn't unheard of to hear about people failing the first or second time.

/All that at 35 euro an hour + 200 for the final exam
 
2013-04-04 09:35:48 AM
But Damon still says that there has been a "revolution" in the industry in terms of how good instructors train now. What he really sees lacking in the 1969 notes is, "...Anything to do with defensive driving, vision techniques and situational awareness."

Yeah, we didn't take any of that.  There's some non-essential "Advanced Driving" courses that teach that, but here we get taught "stop at red".  It's basically that.

"And what was included was very outdated, like proper following distance (it's based on time, not car lengths)."

Based on time is superior.  Car lengths is a time estimate by distance.  Following distance is the time for reaction + braking.  We abstract this to car lengths, but I've discussed time quite a bit when talking to my state representative about red light cameras.  Somewhere I calculated out a formula for how long the yellow should be, based on what Progressive Insurance provides (they claim more than a 7mph drop per 1 second is "hard braking" and thus indicates dangerous, reckless driving that increases risks and is compensated for by increased insurance premiums--check out Progressive Snapshot PAYD) and on the standard (but excessive) assumption of a 2 second reaction time (note:  I think it's excessive, but I react before situations occur--it's a bug, I'm ~1/3 second precog).

Car lengths work off the ability to estimate distance, which is terrible for some people (me).  But I can easily model the dynamics of the cars and all scenarios of braking of both bodies in my head.
 
2013-04-04 09:36:32 AM

tennessee.hillbilly: mbillips: I took my test in a Toyota pickup with a five-speed manual.

Absolutely nothing wrong with this.  Kudos to you.

I think it ought to be mandatory that everyone learn to drive a manual transmission.  In fact, I think your driving test should be in a 70's F-150 with 3-speed on the column because if you can drive that, you can drive about anything.


I learned how to drive stick in my dad's '78 Chevy Custom Deluxe, three on the tree. That thing was a beast. When I bought my first pickup many years later, I intentionally sought out one with a standard transmission because it really made me feel like I was operating a piece of machinery.

/CSB
 
2013-04-04 09:36:43 AM

miss diminutive: tennessee.hillbilly: I think it ought to be mandatory that everyone learn to drive a manual transmission.

I really wish I had learned. An ex tried to teach me a few years ago but he freaked out every time I stalled or rode the clutch too hard until it just wasn't worth the hassle. Which is pretty much how I felt about the entire relationship after a short time.


I hate people like that.

I taught a friend's kid how to drive my 5-speed Mini and the first thing I did when he got the car started was tell him to dump the clutch. The car died and he asked why I did that and I told him, "That's the worst thing that can happen today. Now you've already done it, nobody's hurt, nothing is broken, and you don't have to be worried about it any more. Let's drive."

Cheesy, I know, but he was doing pretty well after a couple of hours.
 
2013-04-04 09:38:47 AM

haywatchthis: we had used cars that usally didn't run when we got them and had to fix them to drve, today crotchdropings get new cars and call AAA if they get a flat


Yeah I called AAA on my last flat.  It was bitter cold -10C and I was standing balanced on the tire iron, jumping up and down, bouncing on the lug... which wouldn't break.

AAA tow truck showed up with a bigger tire iron and broke the bolt.  I need to buy a meter long breaker bar or a portable impact wrench.
 
2013-04-04 09:39:47 AM

Koodz: I taught a friend's kid how to drive my 5-speed Mini and the first thing I did when he got the car started was tell him to dump the clutch. The car died and he asked why I did that and I told him, "That's the worst thing that can happen today. Now you've already done it, nobody's hurt, nothing is broken, and you don't have to be worried about it any more. Let's drive."


HAH!  You are me.  I did that with my son, teaching him to drive a standard.  I also said "get the car rolling, Now without pressing the clutch, press the brake as hard as you can".  Car stalled.  "That's the other thing you'll do.  Now lets go"
 
2013-04-04 09:52:57 AM

Hack Patooey: Koodz: I taught a friend's kid how to drive my 5-speed Mini and the first thing I did when he got the car started was tell him to dump the clutch. The car died and he asked why I did that and I told him, "That's the worst thing that can happen today. Now you've already done it, nobody's hurt, nothing is broken, and you don't have to be worried about it any more. Let's drive."

HAH!  You are me.  I did that with my son, teaching him to drive a standard.  I also said "get the car rolling, Now without pressing the clutch, press the brake as hard as you can".  Car stalled.  "That's the other thing you'll do.  Now lets go"


I learned to fly with a 77 year old instructor who flew cargo planes to Burma in WW2 and hasn't been afraid of anything since. If he could let me 19 year old me slam a Piper into a runway from 8 feet up without so much of a gasp I figure I can face whatever a 15 year old in a car can dish out with equanimity too.

(Yes, I do know you can't recover from a stall at 8', but I'd have at least screamed fark or something.)
 
2013-04-04 09:58:46 AM

DiamondDave: It failed to cover the proper correct use of the middle finger while driving.


FTFY: Used correctly, there's nothing proper about it.
 
2013-04-04 10:09:23 AM
                                                 i812.photobucket.com
        Drivers Ed. was right after lunch and these films usually caused epic chain reaction vomiting.
 
2013-04-04 10:19:15 AM
I remember drivers ed.

Took it with 2 other kids I knew on the Speech and Debate squad. The head coach of the Phys Ed. dept was the guy with the extra break pedal. One time while driving it started raining, hard. So hard you could not see through the windscreen with the wipers on full. The kid behind the wheel, Jeff, locked up, hard. It took all the coach had in pounding on Jeff's arms to get his hands off the wheel for the coach to gain control and move the car off the road.

Pretty scary.
 
2013-04-04 10:19:35 AM

DerAppie: Korzine: My drivers ed consisted mostly of screwing around and quick trips to Taco Bell. Of course driving around here is more akin to thunderdome then anything. My driving test consisted of seeing if we could drive around the block without crashing. No parallel parking, no reverse, just drive around the block. Of course some people still fail, nothing like watching someone side-swipe a chain-link fence trying to exit the dmv parking lot.

My drivers ed consisted of at least 28 hours of actual driving (legal minimum was 25 iirc), all (legal) forms of parking, driving backwards, getting started on an incline, highway, country roads, city driving, situational awareness, written test to see if you knew the traffic laws and after that you still needed to do an exam with some government employee who graded you on your actual driving. It wasn't unheard of to hear about people failing the first or second time.

/All that at 35 euro an hour + 200 for the final exam


Legally, the state didn't even require anyone to take drivers ed when I got my license (I think this has probably changed since then though). As long as you could pass the written test (which basically consisted of being able to identify a stop sign without the word stop being written in the middle), the eye exam, and the short driving section you were golden. Which is why the class mostly consisted of screwing around. The only reason I took it at all was because the insurance discount I got from going through drivers ed would cover the cost of the class in 6-8 months and then it was pure savings on from there. I can't remember how much my license cost, but even today it's only like $25 for the exam/license.

I've actually had insurance sales people at companies like Geico groan when I tell them where I live when getting an insurance quote.
 
2013-04-04 11:19:25 AM
I learned how to drive stick by buying one. I got a used mustang that was a 5 speed. Had never driven manual before so I had to learn fast. You pick it up pretty quick after you stall out in the middle of an intersection a few times. Then I had to practice on hills and stuff until I got it down. For some odd reason, my clutch kit gave out around 60,000 miles.


Owned 6 cars. Last 4 have been manual. I love it. Except for high traffic. If I lived in a gridlock area (farking DC) I'd want an automatic.
 
2013-04-04 11:41:38 AM
That's about when I took driver's ed (and also the in-car driver's training). Being the student I was, I have no notes to share.

The best part, other than changing seats in the car so we'd all get a chance behind the wheel, was the trailer full of simulators. Since I needed, even then, to be better than everyone else, I joined the group who pulled down the clutch pedal to increase the difficulty or something.
Even though my first car was an automatic, I've pretty much driven a stick all my life, but they're getting harder to find.

/CSB
 
2013-04-04 11:42:52 AM
She recently shared this time capsule of driving ephemera with her car-nut son Jake, who in turn scanned all 30 pages, and posted the gallery on Reddit where it is currently still in the process of blowing up.

Kids these days, what with their exploding photo albums and what not.
 
2013-04-04 01:18:19 PM
Took DE in the mid 70s. I had learned the start/stop part of manual transmission in our long rural driveway starting at about 14, so I had that down when it came time to hit the road at 16. Our driver's ed teacher was one of the shop teachers, who spent most of his time admiring himself in his suction-cupped on rear view mirror. He had the 2nd brake pedal, but I never saw him use it.

The cars were donated by the local Pontiac dealer - Grand Prixs. Oh, and there was one VW Beetle that was the manual transmission trainer. Most people got one day on it. We didn't get it at all since it was in the shop having its clutch replaced at the time (apparently a frequent occurrence!). Typical driving day was for the teacher's errands. Dry cleaner's, sports venue box office, his house, and once to the gun shop. Of course it was the 70s. Now, they aren't allowed to leave the school district. Wussies.

/csb
 
2013-04-04 01:47:55 PM

d-fens99: In the 70's the Rangers were the full size line.


The Ranger was a trim level of the F150 (like XLT or Platinum or King Ranch today). I had a '77. I think the Ranger name was at the one-level-above-stripped level. It had manual windows, mirrors, and locks, and a bench seat, but also power steering, power brakes, A/C, and a radio.

/And a 460 coupled to a C6
//And 4:10 rear end
///Could tow a house right off its foundations
 
2013-04-04 03:15:14 PM

mbillips: My driver's ed class doubled as a sales gimmick for the local GM dealer. He lent the cars (or maybe leased them?) to the county. So we learned to drive on emissions-control-choked, underpowered late '70s Buicks, Chevies and Oldsmobiles with power everything. Then I took my test in a Toyota pickup with a five-speed manual. The test consisted of an easy written exam, and a drive around the block with a state trooper followed by angle parking. He passed me even though I stalled it out about five times trying to get back onto the highway.

We couldn't afford driver's ed at my high school, so we had to drive to a bigger town 10 miles away to get it. The classes were in a trailer, and the driving course was laid out in part of the school parking lot.

The license was typewritten on paper. No lamination, no picture. My younger brother used to borrow mine to buy beer.


My dad used his older bro's license to drive 18 wheelers at the young age of 16.

Our dr ed class drove a new Ford sedan every year from the local dealer.  Funny thing is I drove illegally during dr ed, I didn't have my permit yet and the teach didn't ask to see it.  I guess it runs in the family.
 
2013-04-04 03:26:42 PM
Just another reminder that schools used to be really good in this country.

This girl was one hell of a note taker also.
 
2013-04-04 03:33:48 PM

UtopianDevil: tennessee.hillbilly: mbillips: I took my test in a Toyota pickup with a five-speed manual.

Absolutely nothing wrong with this.  Kudos to you.

I think it ought to be mandatory that everyone learn to drive a manual transmission.  In fact, I think your driving test should be in a 70's F-150 with 3-speed on the column because if you can drive that, you can drive about anything.

When I was learning to drive my dad had a late 70s Ford van with the three speed on the column. You're right - after learning to drive that thing anything else was pretty easy.


Looxuries. The first car I got to drive on a regular basis as "mine," was a 1953 Plymouth four-door with three-on-the-tree, manual steering, unassisted hydraulic brakes (drums on all four corners), that was approximately the size of a milking shed. It was actually not that hard to drive or shift, but parking was a monster. 7.5 turns lock to lock on the steering wheel. No turn signals or seatbelts.
 
2013-04-04 04:34:12 PM
I took driver's ed in 1969 myself. Our instructors were two of our high school teachers, one from the art department, the other our solitary foreign language teacher. They had no formal training in teaching driver's ed so they relied heavily on films, simulators, worksheets & personal experience. We'd go out at least twice a week with one teacher and three students to practice. The teacher's side of the car didn't have a steering wheel, but did have brake and gas pedals.

I can't recall the model of car we drove, though.
 
2013-04-04 04:35:54 PM

kwame: When my driver's ed class went out for our first drive, the baseball coach who was teaching the class panicked as a student rolled up to a stop sign on a wet street and locked the brakes with his passenger pedal.  The car slid right through the stop sign and into an oncoming vehicle.  First time out.


One of the kids in my car (mid-'80s Cavalier) the first day went to make her first right-hand turn at a stop sign, and everything went fine until she didn't straighten out the wheel. Thump, right into the curb. The teacher/wrestling coach ordered us not to laugh at her and said something along the lines of "that could be you", but the rest of us knew it couldn't, and we were right.
 
2013-04-04 05:31:14 PM
I took DE in the mid 70s. Our school district's deal must have been with the local Plymouth shop; you either drove a Satellite (slower than the speed of light) or a Fury. Before they'd let you go out in the cars, you had to rack up an hour or so in the simulator (yes, really. Fake steering wheel, pedals and a badly-synced movie). They didn't have any manual box cars, but the sim had a manual mode. The "clutch" was far more forgiving than that on a real car.

My kids went through the current, no where near as comprehensive, HS DE. I made them take this too: http://streetsurvival.org/
They wound up taking it 2x (sliding around a soapy skid pad is *fun*).
 
2013-04-04 06:25:50 PM
I'm skeptical. Did they have pink pens/pencils in 1969 for women to write with?

Anyway, I learned to drive in 2002 on a1989 Nissan Sentra sedan with about 200k kms on it. I loved that little car. Auto trans, manual windows and doors. Real basic get-around-car but I loved it. After I passed, i got to drive my parents 1996 Caravan. that wasn't too bad either, except around 2005 it just plain didn't warm up/blow warm air in the winter. Was the thermostat probably.
 
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