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(Salon)   This Is Why We Hate Corporations | Season #156 | Episode #26,813   (salon.com) divider line 8
    More: PSA, Family Dollar  
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4581 clicks; posted to Business » on 04 Apr 2013 at 8:52 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-04-04 09:56:42 AM
2 votes:
It's not a criminal conviction, so there is no standard of proof.

By the same token, you'll never know why you weren't hired, so you have no evidence to sue.

The entire concept of the database is a stupid terrible idea made by lazy people.  If you want to check someone's past employers before hiring, do so.  You need to actually devote some time and effort to it though.  Simply running someone's name through a database with zero controls or credibility is stupid, lazy and likely inaccurate.  But hey, HR has never been known for anything else.
2013-04-04 10:51:50 AM
1 votes:
This seems like it would come perilously close to collusion, but this is America in the 21st century, which means no corporation will ever be found to violate the law.
2013-04-04 10:38:18 AM
1 votes:

Debeo Summa Credo: Likewise, this list informs potential employers about previous thefts, giving them better information to make their own hiring decisions, which again is their right.



And you can be entered on the list for mere suspicion.  You give someone, who may have nothing but a work grudge against your for some reason, the power to significantly impact your life.  This is the reason companies are not supposed to give much beyond "yeah, they worked here" to questioning HR departments (in fact, this is policy where I work).  How "bad" a person may have been at their last job is subjective and situational.

CSB - an employee at my wife's job had her job dissolved during a restructuring and was laid off (she was given the choice actually - new job within the new structure or take a severance).  While searching for another job, she went through several interviews and each business was interested in hiring her but for some seemingly strange reason, they didn't make an offer.  She started wondering what was wrong - she gave great interviews and they all expressed a sincere interest in hiring her and told her as much.  At the third rejection the HR person was good enough to call her (outside of their policy) and told her that her previous job was giving her a very negative reference.  It turns out the HR departments were calling and getting hold of someone who had some kind of petty conflict with her.  Needless to say, she sued (they settled) and they canned the chick who was answering the phone when the HR departments called.

And the thing is, she could have successfully sued even if the negative references were justified.
2013-04-04 09:59:32 AM
1 votes:
The big database for this practice is run by LexisNexis (the credit report and journal article people) and goes by the name of Esteem.
It's surprisingly hard to google.
2013-04-04 09:55:51 AM
1 votes:
Just another way that these big box chains screw and demean employees. Having worked at a few places like this in my day, they really do a damn good job.

Csb

Knew a really good guy who was promoted into management. He was by far the best manager there at the store I worked at. Stand up guy, real straight shooter and did his job well. Too well, as it turned out. They accused him of stealing some kid's toys off the loading dock and, since he had no way to prove his innocence and since we lived in an At-will state, he was canned. Not like he was making his future there, but it was  a good cushion while he prepped for a better career. He ended up working on road construction crews. They also fired every other employee with more than four or five years of experience within a year of my quitting on trumped up theft charges. Because they made too much money. My favorite was a co-worker who they fired because he used a coupon to get a half off 20oz of pop. They said the coupon was for customers only. fark retail forever and ever and ever.

/Not Target
//Big Box Toy Chain
///Bunch of typical Corporate Scumbags
////CSB
2013-04-04 09:47:45 AM
1 votes:

BizarreMan: I can see how Target could prevent you from working at any other Target.  But Target blacklisting you from working at WalMart?  I find that improbable.


Target can't stop WalMart from hiring them, but likely doesn't have to:  If Walmart queries the database and find out that an applicant was fired for suspected theft they are probably likely to pass that applicant over.  It's basically de facto blacklisting even though there is no forma agreement.

While this seems shady, I wonder how many of these cases would have been found out if the HR people looked up references?  I assume they do this for "efficiency" and to avoid having the HR people on both sides have a conversation that may come up in a lawsuit later.
2013-04-04 09:17:33 AM
1 votes:
So those CEOs who through crooked action nearly bankrupted the company and then ran off with 50 million dollars are also blacklisted right?
2013-04-04 08:46:18 AM
1 votes:

cman: Isnt that illegal?

IIRC its against anti-trust laws to blacklist people in a profession.


Holy cow.  I wonder if there are any more details on this and how accurate it is.  I would think it is pretty much the same thing as bad-mouthing a former employee when a potential employer calls for reference.

No matter what, if this is true, it gives a great deal of power to people with the ability to enter names into that system.  And it sounds to crazy to be real....but it wouldn't surprise me.
 
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