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(Gawker)   Gawker issues a brutal takedown of the entitled, butthurt, college-rejected high schooler who got her open letter published by the Wall Street Journal   (gawker.com) divider line 351
    More: Followup, Wall Street Journal, Amy Chua, it gets better, Ronald McDonald House Charities, Pacific Islanders, SAT Scores, colleges  
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32837 clicks; posted to Main » on 03 Apr 2013 at 3:01 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-04-03 08:39:47 PM

ajt167: T.rex: I just read the gal's original article.  Its clearly intentionally self-effacing and humorous.   And just look at all these people she successfully trolled.  Plus, she got published. Well done.

Seconded. How are we the only ones that got this?


It wasn't really that funny, for one thing; Poe's Law, for another; and also there are way too many people out there who actually think and act like her. She didn't exaggerate by much. There are a lot of kids out there who are clueless as to why they're not getting into top-tier schools with straight A's but subpar SATs and nothing else on their transcripts; who don't "get" why they need to do extracurricular activities; and who genuinely think that minorities are taking "their" spaces in "their" colleges.

These are the ones who go to community colleges, btw, and negotiate with the instructors about finals--"Can it be 25 questions, multiple-choice, take-home? How many days late can it be and still get full credit? Are we expected to actually participate in class?"--or like the kids (and they were kids) in my law school who took a week off in the middle of bar prep to take a trip to Vegas because they were so stressed (and then didn't pass the bar, gee, who could have seen that one coming).

There have always been lazy, entitled, clueless students who expect to just go to college because they're so special; but it's gotten worse recently. This girl may have thought she was joking, but really she wasn't.
 
2013-04-03 08:39:52 PM
College is largely useless bullshiat.

/i would know, i have a master's
//found her op-ed amusing
 
2013-04-03 08:44:19 PM

Half Right: I don't get all the hate and outrage about this letter. I thought it was funny. If anything the Gawker response author seems to be the bitter, angry, self-important one.


Maybe you have Aspergers?
 
2013-04-03 08:47:53 PM
Fark all those azzhats/morans at Gawker.

If it wasn't for peoples desire to read snark about others they would be out of business.
 
2013-04-03 09:00:44 PM

ambassador_ahab: Latinwolf: Clearly, the blame must be placed on affirmative action, and anyone who values diversity. Minorities, gays, etc

I bet Harvard is 100% black gay people.  I bet there's not a single white person on the whole campus.


They had to short dick every cannibal on the Congo, but they motivated them.
 
2013-04-03 09:05:17 PM

FlyingJ: "You'd better wise up, Suzy WWWWeeeeeeeiiissssss"
[24.media.tumblr.com image 598x442]


I probably laughed at this much harder than I should have.
 
2013-04-03 09:05:22 PM

detroitdoesntsuckthatbad: CheatCommando: GiantRex: I went to engineering school, where being able to write a coherent essay of any sort is usually good enough to get you admitted.

To the Honors Program.

Electrical Engineer here - you talk good.


I went to university in Vancouver. One of the Engineering entrance requirements was an "English Proficiency" test. I was nervous about taking it, as I don't English very good. I walked into the examination room and sat down. I looked to my left: rows of ESL students. I looked to my right: more ESL students. I looked up at the examiner. He gave me a knowing smile.

Needless to say, I passed with flying colours.
 
2013-04-03 09:38:04 PM
Hopefully her parents are mocked pretty hard for this, as well.
 
2013-04-03 09:44:40 PM

WhippingBoy: I don't English very good


Better than 99% of the people on Fark.
 
2013-04-03 10:20:04 PM
I kinda feel like if it were a guy who wrote this, he'd be getting a lot of pats on the back from the bitter, affirmative-action hating, aspey engineering student demographic.  But it's a girl, so she's just a biatch.
 
2013-04-03 10:25:01 PM
I'm stunned by how many Farkers have been successfully trolled by the WSJ and a high-school girl. This is clearly facetious - Sweetie Pie will be matriculating exactly where she wants to come fall.

No, my friends, this is just the latest salvo in the conservatards' Great War On Thinking For Yourself. "Colleges Are Bad. They Harm Our Babies. Won't Somebody PLEASE Think of the Children?" The rhetoric will inevitably begin to contain phrases such as "elitist intellectuals and progressives". Once they've successfully established their message that it's uncool to be able to think critically, then, and ONLY then, will Sarah Palin be cleared to run for President.
 
2013-04-03 10:35:16 PM

swingbozo: Amusement:
What high school career counselors won't tell you is this, you CAN get college credit.  College Level Examine Program offers over 33 examines to get college credit and it costs less than community (comedy) college.

http://clep.collegeboard.org/

While other students are trying to get into "their" college you've already got college credits.  The real stink is you can start taking CLEP examines when your 16 years old.

This sh*t is real and I CLEPed college humanities, Freshman English and other non-important stupid arse classes that cost thousands at the big "U".

Nice mail order degree you have there, Batman. If you are trying to promote this approach you should have someone with an edumacation write your posts.


You may have had a valid point if CLEP was an mail order degree.
 
2013-04-03 10:38:10 PM

Mike Chewbacca: EvilRacistNaziFascist: Fano: What about her racist dig at all them undeserving minorities?

Her complaint about universities making a mindless fetish of "diversity" was quite accurate, and the most sensible thing she said in the entire letter.

She also made a valid point about having to find some way to interact with adversity. She's a normal teenager living a bland life, and she doesn't have the resources to fly to another country to see how awful the world really can be.


If her dad was just diagnosed with MS recently, family vacations wouldn't be priority at this time nor would driving their child around to extracurricular activities.
 
2013-04-03 10:39:37 PM

ElStreak: Amusement: Knowledge is a terrible thing to waste.

How would you know?


Thanks for the witty comment.
 
2013-04-03 10:47:15 PM
SHE SHOULD HAVE THE SAME OPPORTUNITY TO FINANCIALLY CRIPPLE HERSELF AND DROP OUT AS THOSE THAT HAVE THE MINIMUM SKILLS TO SUCCEED IN COLLEGE!!!11ELEVENTY!!!
 
2013-04-03 11:13:16 PM

the money is in the banana stand: AdmirableSnackbar: the money is in the banana stand: IRQ12: AdmirableSnackbar: Christian Bale: Like me, millions of high-school seniors with sour grapes are asking themselves this week how they failed to get into the colleges of their dreams. It's simple: For years, they-we-were lied to.

Her point isn't that colleges should have accepted her, it's that they mislead students on what they're looking for.

And she's wrong.  She wasn't lied to, she just didn't understand what they meant.  Fark that, it's not that she didn't understand, it's that she didn't even try to understand.

...and understand one of the simplest concepts in high school:   You join clubs and sports and do charity because it looks good to schools.  Even the druggies that show up to meet up with friends know that shiat, but like her they choose not to.  The only difference is that this person is the perfect example of our entitled, spoiled rotten youth in this country.

THAT is the problem right there. By and large kids are not a part of those activities because they want to be, or contribute to them in any meaningful way but simply because it looks good to schools or they are told they are required to. The motivation behind school is the wrong kind of motivation. Students should be motivated to learn and understand the material. Teachers, should be motivated to teach those materials so that the students learn and understand that material. That isn't the case. Students are motivated to get into a good college. Teachers are motivated by salary bonuses. (I understand I am stereotyping and there are those whom are righteous, but I believe them to be the minority).

Teachers get bonuses?  I'll be nice and say that it doesn't sound like you know what you're talking about.

Yes they do. In the state of Texas, teachers receive a bonus if the school is recognized as Exemplary through outstanding scores on the State Assesment test. It is a SIZEABLE number which has caused a lot of controversy and a lot of pe ...


Don't worry, he's just parroting the old narrative that ZOMG NONE OF THE TEACHERS CAN FEED THEMSELVES.
 
2013-04-03 11:17:17 PM
I wrote a Letter to the Editor when I was 14 or so against the death penalty.  Someone actually called my house and started screaming at me how Jesus wanted us to have it and how stupid I was, as I'm standing in shock with the phone to my ear and in a towel (just got out of the shower).

It's all well and good if you put yourself out there that you should expect the f--king crazies and people in general to take you down, especially in this age.  And in this age, that'll stick to you.  It'll show up on Google four years from now.  I heard rants like this from friends in high school who went to their second or third choice schools, and over four years grew the f--k up (most of them anyway).  The better ones maned up, worked their asses off, and transferred to their dream school.  But that doesn't mean there wasn't plenty of grumbling senior year too, and living in Michigan pre-Supreme Court Affirmative Action case there was *plenty*.  (I'm still in favor of economic affirmative action more than racial, but debate for another stupid day).

But maybe an editor at the WSJ could have some f--king discretion. You know, her f--king sister.

Not saying this kid didn't have the rebuttal coming - but 18 or not she's a f--king kid.  As a society, can't we just shake our heads and move on to let her figure this out?

/oh wait, Gawker.
//never f--king mind
///both parties here suck equally I guess, but I'll throw most of my hatred toward the sister-editor.
 
2013-04-03 11:25:28 PM

GAT_00: Harvard realized this long ago: if you only take the best, the suicide rate is prohibitively high. So take some average students with good extracurriculars who also have the balls to apply to Harvard with anything below a 4.0. They'll happily take average grades, and some of them perform very well in college environments.

Of course, this is less true these days I think because nobody really curves.


I went to a public (working to middle class, generally) math-science high school where they did grade on a pretty harsh curve (RELATIVELY speaking, I had far harsher ones in college).

Our counselor there had nice packets printed to put in our college applications to explain that we had a) fewer AP courses (because we did research projects for 1/4th of the year each year, couldn't cover all the BS although I still got Physics and Calc AB in), b) not all 4.0s even though we were a pretty damn select group and c) a rundown of what classes we all took (including 300 level college statistics).  She also made sure to keep track of where we were applying, and if she didn't know the admissions people there knew our tiny (72 per class) school she'd call them and give them a heads up.

We had a few folks on a frequent clip every year get into Harvard or MIT.  I didn't bother applying, but 2 kids a few years ahead of me got in and cobbled together full rides from scholarships.

Anyway, our counselor kind of kicked ass for going the extra mile for us.
 
2013-04-03 11:30:22 PM
That girl has just what I'm looking for. I'd like to offer her a position on my staff.

/Girl: My staff; get on it.
 
2013-04-03 11:37:40 PM

Archfeld: What ?!?! Negative fallout from raising your child in this BS PC everything is good, everyone wins, and thinking bad thoughts about someone is bullying society. It is about time kids realize that the world is NOT fair, you can do EVERYTHING CORRECTLY and STILL LOSE. Stop swaddling your crotch fruit in bubble wrap and let them understand loss a little. Competitive games like dodgeball, and other sports highlight the skills needed to lose gracefully, and hopefully somewhere you master the skill to win in the same manner.


And this is important - don't try to teach those skills. Tacit learning is something not just teachers, but parents, have totally fallen down on. Insist on certain activities, and don't allow any questioning.
 
2013-04-03 11:39:29 PM

i upped my meds-up yours: Archfeld: What ?!?! Negative fallout from raising your child in this BS PC everything is good, everyone wins, and thinking bad thoughts about someone is bullying society. It is about time kids realize that the world is NOT fair, you can do EVERYTHING CORRECTLY and STILL LOSE. Stop swaddling your crotch fruit in bubble wrap and let them understand loss a little. Competitive games like dodgeball, and other sports highlight the skills needed to lose gracefully, and hopefully somewhere you master the skill to win in the same manner.

And this is important - don't try to teach those skills. Tacit learning is something not just teachers, but parents, have totally fallen down on. Insist on certain activities, and don't allow any questioning.


As long as you don't mind being put in some shady retirement home after you retire, sure.
 
2013-04-03 11:42:05 PM

olddinosaur: Pretty typical, and sadly all too common:

Kid grows up in a wishy--washy, feel--good environment, where they will give you the grades if you smile, show up regularly, and hold the "right" opinions.  You get rewarded whether you perform or not.

Kid never has to perform, never has to produce---and there is no real penalty for ever coming up short.  Kid never learns the sting of failure, never has to try harder to succeed.

Kid grows up thinking success is a rubber stamp:  Right school, good job, plenty of money, a "right" to an easy life, irrespective of performance.

Kid gets rejected by a premium school because kid is just average at best----kid gets all butthurt, Awwwwwwwwwww. . . . . . . .

All I can say is, wait till you get out in that cold cruel world, kid; you are going to get your ass handed to you on a silver platter.


The lesson is not just that "being yourself isn't enough." It's that sometimes, <i>all you can do isn't enough.</i> Some of us, even the dedicated ones with lots to offer, are just going to have to go thru life pulling someone else's truck.
 
2013-04-03 11:44:39 PM

Mitrovarr: I don't really blame her for being mad, but the problem isn't with the school. The schools she was applying to were all for high achievers, and she isn't one. Honestly, she shouldn't have gotten in. She shouldn't have even wanted to apply.

The problem everyone's ignoring is that it is becoming increasingly necessary to go to places like that whether you want to or not, because society in the US is getting increasingly grim for anyone normal. The job prospects and pay rate for someone with a normal degree from an average school are going continuously downhill. It's becoming increasingly necessary to do something special just to reach the middle class - either go to a high-ranked college, or graduate school, or do something else to distinguish yourself. And that's really hard for people without special talents to handle. Yet, what's the alternative? To get washed into the service sector so you can spend your entire life pointlessly pushing the boulder of your student loans up a hill of their interest rate?

So yeah, the problem isn't that we're telling everyone they're exceptional. The problem is that if you aren't exceptional, you're screwed.


It's a demand issue. We don't need most of the people we have. They're either going to have to become different people or go off and starve someplace. The market is more important than any one of us. In fact, it's more important than millions of us.
 
2013-04-03 11:46:30 PM

meyerkev: Carn: I went to public high school, got good grades (3.95 or something), AP, SAT, lots of extracurricular stuff (not only because I knew it would look good for college, but I liked all the stuff I did) and I got into every school I applied including Notre Dame and Northwestern (Go U!).   I only got to go to Northwestern because they have truly fantastic financial aid and half my tuition was paid by a grant from the school and we didn't have to pay it back.  Not a chance in hell we could have afforded it otherwise.  Oh and I didn't do any charity or start any fake companies or whatever and I spent a fair amount of time with the assistant principal and had me a few suspensions.

Not any more.  My sister applied last year, got in, and didn't get anything (despite looking very poor on paper).  We had some friends get in a few years back and they were sending out little booklets to all the acceptees saying things like: "Take out a second mortgage" and "Ask for your inheritance early"


That's really sad to hear. My Dad grew up pretty poor in Chicago, and Northwestern gave him a full ride through undergrad and, along with the National Health Service Corps, put him through med school. Making good education affordable is such a huge factor in social mobility, and when school is getting so much more expensive...
 
2013-04-04 12:06:54 AM

i upped my meds-up yours: It's a demand issue. We don't need most of the people we have. They're either going to have to become different people or go off and starve someplace. The market is more important than any one of us. In fact, it's more important than millions of us.


I think the ultimate problem is, we don't need many of the people we have - not in any capacity. Automation has reduced the number of workers we need (or everyone needs to work less) and there isn't a field left that can absorb the glut of overtrained people we have. The 'catch' fields that can expand indefinitely are usually service jobs that get little respect and no money, so they don't count. We really need to do something about this before it results in enough societal unrest to capsize either the government or the economy.
 
2013-04-04 12:10:34 AM
The mistake we've made, I think, is treating our children as people who matter. No one matters until they know what it means not to matter. That means being reminded that they don't matter, and won't matter, until they give society what it asks of them.
 
2013-04-04 12:15:34 AM

cptjeff: meyerkev: Carn: I went to public high school, got good grades (3.95 or something), AP, SAT, lots of extracurricular stuff (not only because I knew it would look good for college, but I liked all the stuff I did) and I got into every school I applied including Notre Dame and Northwestern (Go U!).   I only got to go to Northwestern because they have truly fantastic financial aid and half my tuition was paid by a grant from the school and we didn't have to pay it back.  Not a chance in hell we could have afforded it otherwise.  Oh and I didn't do any charity or start any fake companies or whatever and I spent a fair amount of time with the assistant principal and had me a few suspensions.

Not any more.  My sister applied last year, got in, and didn't get anything (despite looking very poor on paper).  We had some friends get in a few years back and they were sending out little booklets to all the acceptees saying things like: "Take out a second mortgage" and "Ask for your inheritance early"

That's really sad to hear. My Dad grew up pretty poor in Chicago, and Northwestern gave him a full ride through undergrad and, along with the National Health Service Corps, put him through med school. Making good education affordable is such a huge factor in social mobility, and when school is getting so much more expensive...


My Dad grew up poor in Detroit, and got a full ride for tuition to University of Michigan.  Still had to work like crazy to pay for food and rent, but he made it through.

A kid in his situation nowadays would more than likely never get that chance in the first place.  And even if you're completely on your own and with no support whatsoever from your parents, even if you're estranged from them, their income gets worked into what aid you're gonna get.  So right off the bat good luck propelling kids taking care of themselves into being able to get a good education without scrambling to find private scholarships.
 
2013-04-04 12:21:18 AM

StreetlightInTheGhetto: cptjeff: meyerkev: Carn: I went to public high school, got good grades (3.95 or something), AP, SAT, lots of extracurricular stuff (not only because I knew it would look good for college, but I liked all the stuff I did) and I got into every school I applied including Notre Dame and Northwestern (Go U!).   I only got to go to Northwestern because they have truly fantastic financial aid and half my tuition was paid by a grant from the school and we didn't have to pay it back.  Not a chance in hell we could have afforded it otherwise.  Oh and I didn't do any charity or start any fake companies or whatever and I spent a fair amount of time with the assistant principal and had me a few suspensions.

Not any more.  My sister applied last year, got in, and didn't get anything (despite looking very poor on paper).  We had some friends get in a few years back and they were sending out little booklets to all the acceptees saying things like: "Take out a second mortgage" and "Ask for your inheritance early"

That's really sad to hear. My Dad grew up pretty poor in Chicago, and Northwestern gave him a full ride through undergrad and, along with the National Health Service Corps, put him through med school. Making good education affordable is such a huge factor in social mobility, and when school is getting so much more expensive...

My Dad grew up poor in Detroit, and got a full ride for tuition to University of Michigan.  Still had to work like crazy to pay for food and rent, but he made it through.

A kid in his situation nowadays would more than likely never get that chance in the first place.  And even if you're completely on your own and with no support whatsoever from your parents, even if you're estranged from them, their income gets worked into what aid you're gonna get.  So right off the bat good luck propelling kids taking care of themselves into being able to get a good education without scrambling to find private scholarships.


Life sucks. Doesn't mean you get shiat for it.
 
2013-04-04 12:26:12 AM

Mitrovarr: i upped my meds-up yours: It's a demand issue. We don't need most of the people we have. They're either going to have to become different people or go off and starve someplace. The market is more important than any one of us. In fact, it's more important than millions of us.

I think the ultimate problem is, we don't need many of the people we have - not in any capacity. Automation has reduced the number of workers we need (or everyone needs to work less) and there isn't a field left that can absorb the glut of overtrained people we have. The 'catch' fields that can expand indefinitely are usually service jobs that get little respect and no money, so they don't count. We really need to do something about this before it results in enough societal unrest to capsize either the government or the economy.


I believe we're in too deep. Probably nothing can be done until our economy capsizes. I don't think capsizing the government will do much. We're going to need to see so many people starving that we can't do shiat about it.
 
2013-04-04 12:44:19 AM

Christian Bale: Like me, millions of high-school seniors with sour grapes are asking themselves this week how they failed to get into the colleges of their dreams. It's simple: For years, they-we-were lied to.

Her point isn't that colleges should have accepted her, it's that they mislead students on what they're looking for.


Except, they didn't. No college, when asked "what do I have to do get accepted at your school?" told her, "just be yourself" and then ended there. Those words may have appeared somewhere in their answer, but that was the only thing she took away from the experience.

She wasn't lied to. She paid as much attention to what they were saying as she apparently did to her schoolwork, test scores, and general process of growing up and doing something responsible with her life.
 
2013-04-04 12:50:00 AM

Yogimus: That's really sad to hear. My Dad grew up pretty poor in Chicago, and Northwestern gave him a full ride through undergrad and, along with the National Health Service Corps, put him through med school. Making good education affordable is such a huge factor in social mobility, and when school is getting so much more expensive...

My Dad grew up poor in Detroit, and got a full ride for tuition to University of Michigan. Still had to work like crazy to pay for food and rent, but he made it through.

A kid in his situation nowadays would more than likely never get that chance in the first place. And even if you're completely on your own and with no support whatsoever from your parents, even if you're estranged from them, their income gets worked into what aid you're gonna get. So right off the bat good luck propelling kids taking care of themselves into being able to get a good education without scrambling to find private scholarships.

Life sucks. Doesn't mean you get shiat for it.


Boy, did you miss the point on that one.
 
2013-04-04 12:56:02 AM
Here is why colleges have these entrance boards... they don't want to set their students up for failure. First, it makes them look bad. Second, it does NO favors to the student to enroll in a college where she can't keep up. She will accrue debt, and drop out after getting drunk, used as a cum dumpster by some "nice guy", gaining 20+ lb, falling into a depression, and sleeping in her dorm room instead of going to classes.

Colleges care about your extra curricular activities, because it shows you can handle the stress that comes with time management. Colleges care about volunteerism, because they know that it takes personal commitment to stick with something that has no immediate benefit. Her letter showed a lack of maturity that proved the admission board correct. College resources are finite, she doesn't "deserve" a god damned thing, and got exactly that.
 
2013-04-04 12:58:04 AM
I am a dynamic figure, often seen scaling walls and crushing ice. I have been known to remodel train stations on my lunch breaks, making them more efficient in the area of heat retention. I translate ethnic slurs for Cuban refugees, I write award-winning operas, I manage time efficiently. Occasionally, I tread water for three days in a row.

I woo women with my sensuous and godlike trombone playing, I can pilot bicycles up severe inclines with unflagging speed, and I cook Thirty Minute Brownies in twenty minutes. I am an expert in stucco, a veteran in love, and an outlaw in Peru.

Using only a hoe and a large glass of water, I once single-handedly defended a small village in the Amazon Basin from a horde of ferocious army ants. I play bluegrass cello, I was scouted by the Mets. I am the subject of numerous documentaries. When I'm bored, I build large suspension bridges in my yard. I enjoy urban hang gliding. On Wednesdays, after school, I repair electrical appliances free of charge.

I am an abstract artist, a concrete analyst, and a ruthless bookie. Critics worldwide swoon over my original line of corduroy evening wear. I don't perspire. I am a private citizen, yet I receive fan mail. I have been caller number nine and won the weekend passes. Last summer I toured New Jersey with a traveling centrifugal-force demonstration. I bat .400. My deft floral arrangements have earned me fame in international botany circles. Children trust me.

I can hurl tennis rackets at small moving objects with deadly accuracy. I once read Paradise Lost, Moby Dick, and David Copperfield in one day and still had time to refurbish an entire dining room that evening. I know the exact location of every food item in the supermarket. I have performed covert operations for the CIA. I sleep once a week; when I do sleep, I sleep in a chair. While on vacation in Canada, I successfully negotiated with a group of terrorists who had seized a small bakery. The laws of physics do not apply to me.

I balance, I weave, I dodge, I frolic, and my bills are all paid. On weekends, to let off steam, I participate in full-contact origami. Years ago I discovered the meaning of life but forgot to write it down. I have made extraordinary four-course meals using only a Mouli and a toaster oven. I breed prizewinning clams. I have won bullfights in San Juan, cliff-diving competitions in Sri Lanka, and spelling bees at the Kremlin. I have played Hamlet, I have performed open-heart surgery, and I have spoken with Elvis.

But I have not yet gone to college.
 
2013-04-04 01:00:50 AM

Yogimus: Colleges care about your extra curricular activities, because it shows you can handle the stress that comes with time management. Colleges care about volunteerism, because they know that it takes personal commitment to stick with something that has no immediate benefit.


Excellent point. College really doesn't give a shiat that you are a well-rounded individual who cares about the less fortunate. They want to know that you will accept stress and not question it - not to the point of, say, the army, but it's the bottom line.
 
2013-04-04 01:34:08 AM

Harry Freakstorm: Gabrielmot


abhorrent1: Poor girl. Probably can't even be a stripper.

can't wait to see *that* rejection letter...

She's gonna do porn and it's going to really bad porn.


Porn is like scotch. Even when it's bad it's still pretty good.
 
2013-04-04 01:37:24 AM

victrin: Let's see. When I was in high school...

I was a peer leader, an eagle scout, an all-state athlete, an all-state musician, a mathlete, a volunteer, an AP student, class salutatorian, tutor, and had a job. I had 12 hour school days thanks to my extra-curriculars, plus 4-6 hours of homework per night. I ended up graduating with enough college credit to classify as a Junior after one semester. I also received full academic scholarships to my top 2 universities. I bled, sweat and cried my way through. If only I had come out in high school, I could have gotten some minority support, but silly me waited until college to do that. Otherwise I was just a middle class, white boy. I worked my damn ass off. This princess needs a reality check. The "participation trophies" end at some point.


Huh. I spent my youth getting high, playing Dungeons and Dragons and masturbating, now I make 6 figures building web apps.
 
2013-04-04 01:39:13 AM
<i>And</i> I still get high and masturbate! I'd probably play D&D too, if I knew any dungeonmasters.
 
2013-04-04 06:38:56 AM

Mike Chewbacca: Eh, I see the letter-writer's very bitter point. In this day and age, kids HAVE to go to college or they're almost guaranteed a life of near-poverty. Going to college is the new normal, but colleges still think normal students have no place in their special snowflake universities.


I think that is starting to change.  Tuition hikes exceeding inflation is economically unsustainable; meanwhile, it's harder to outsource blue collar jobs like trucker or electrican than whatever career that communications degree got little Johnny into...
 
2013-04-04 07:44:07 AM
FTFA:
"
I bet if I'd had great SAT scores, they would have accepted me.


I bet that too. That is a safe bet. I bet if you had performed well on your driving exam, you would have a driver's license right now. I bet if you hadn't burned down that barn, that barn would still be standing. All reasonable assumptions."


Wow... go Gawker.
 
2013-04-04 07:57:11 AM

frizzo: I am a dynamic figure, often seen scaling walls and crushing ice. I have been known to remodel train stations on my lunch breaks, making them more efficient in the area of heat retention. I translate ethnic slurs for Cuban refugees, I write award-winning operas, I manage time efficiently. Occasionally, I tread water for three days in a row.

I woo women with my sensuous and godlike trombone playing, I can pilot bicycles up severe inclines with unflagging speed, and I cook Thirty Minute Brownies in twenty minutes. I am an expert in stucco, a veteran in love, and an outlaw in Peru.

Using only a hoe and a large glass of water, I once single-handedly defended a small village in the Amazon Basin from a horde of ferocious army ants. I play bluegrass cello, I was scouted by the Mets. I am the subject of numerous documentaries. When I'm bored, I build large suspension bridges in my yard. I enjoy urban hang gliding. On Wednesdays, after school, I repair electrical appliances free of charge.

I am an abstract artist, a concrete analyst, and a ruthless bookie. Critics worldwide swoon over my original line of corduroy evening wear. I don't perspire. I am a private citizen, yet I receive fan mail. I have been caller number nine and won the weekend passes. Last summer I toured New Jersey with a traveling centrifugal-force demonstration. I bat .400. My deft floral arrangements have earned me fame in international botany circles. Children trust me.

I can hurl tennis rackets at small moving objects with deadly accuracy. I once read Paradise Lost, Moby Dick, and David Copperfield in one day and still had time to refurbish an entire dining room that evening. I know the exact location of every food item in the supermarket. I have performed covert operations for the CIA. I sleep once a week; when I do sleep, I sleep in a chair. While on vacation in Canada, I successfully negotiated with a group of terrorists who had seized a small bakery. The laws of physics do not apply to me.

I bal ...


Stay thirsty my friends.
 
2013-04-04 08:59:53 AM
Suzy Lee Weiss:  "I was just 'being myself'".

Well, I guess 'yourself' isn't very good, it it?

\the world needs ditchdiggers, too
\\and whores to service them
 
2013-04-04 09:02:25 AM
LouDobbsawaaay
I kinda feel like if it were a guy who wrote this, he'd be getting a lot of pats on the back from the bitter, affirmative-action hating, aspey engineering student demographic.  But it's a girl, so she's just a biatch.


I know. it's like your post. If someone else wrote it I wouldn't even notice it but it's you so I think "what an asshole"
 
2013-04-04 09:07:31 AM

super_grass: Don't worry, he's just parroting the old narrative that ZOMG NONE OF THE TEACHERS CAN FEED THEMSELVES.


Not at all, I was refuting  the money is in the banana stand's notion that teachers don't care about their students and only care about bonuses.  Well, in most states teachers do not get bonuses and right now they are lucky if they get their supposedly guaranteed annual pay raise. the money is in the banana stand could have specified that he was talking solely about Texas and he might not have come across like such a jackass.

Then again, your douchebag knee-jerk response has made him look fairly rational and intelligent.  If that was your goal, then well done!
 
2013-04-04 10:47:32 AM
Goddamn, what a stupid, narcissistic coont.
I reserve that word for emergencies, so you know it's serious.
 
2013-04-04 11:11:41 AM

ElStreak: mrlewish: Warthog: mrlewish: Interesting how we rate ourselves on what job we do or what school we went to.

All concerned sides are full of whiny self entitles biatches.

To treat you like a human being I don't have to give a damn what school you went to, or what fancy job titles you have, or who you are or who you know.

Fourth Tier Public College typing detected.

Does it really matter?  Lets just say this.  If all the lawyers on Earth disappeared, life would go on for the rest of us after a "WTF just happened" disturbance. If all the farmers on Earth disappeared we would all be truly be farked. Guess who society values more.

Farming is hard work, but it's not actually hard. If all the farmers disappeared tomorrow, we could have passable farmers trained up to take their places in 6-8 weeks.


No. You're wrong.
 
2013-04-04 11:21:55 AM

Artisan Sandwich: No. You're wrong.


No, you're wrong. Wow, debating is easy!

Would you perhaps care to elaborate on why you (mistakenly) think I'm wrong? I'd be interested to hear your reasons.
 
2013-04-04 11:33:41 AM

GAT_00: FloydA: ambassador_ahab:   This tells me there must have been something else defective about her application.

Its author.

Since the WSJ is on her side, I expect she acted like a privileged little biatch and demanded admittance.


I don't know that WSJ is really on her side. I suspect they published her letter so the internet could deliver the beat down for them.
 
2013-04-04 01:09:04 PM
It's tough to really say much that hasn't been said.

My undergrad openly admits they have lower requirements for minority students- the stats that got me a $3000 scholarship as a white guy would have gotten me a full ride ($8500 tuition, plus room, board and books) as a minority.

I am very egalitarian when it comes to scores, hiring, whatever. I want the best. If the police department is hiring, I want the 10 best cops. I don't care if they're all white guys, all black women, or whatever. I want the best.

Anything less is a disservice to society as a whole.
 
2013-04-04 02:13:42 PM
The passage to adulthood has become too cheaply earned. It used to be that you didn't get to call yourself an adult unless you let the world break you first. Those who got stronger in the broken places could go on. Those who did not heal, or did not heal fast enough, were expendable, and nobody cared. Most of today's 20somethings would have been on the fringes of society then.
 
2013-04-04 05:32:35 PM

optional: College is largely useless unless it's bullshiat.


FTFY. College ought to prepare one for reality, and reality involves believing large amounts of bullshiat.
 
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