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(Gawker)   Gawker issues a brutal takedown of the entitled, butthurt, college-rejected high schooler who got her open letter published by the Wall Street Journal   (gawker.com) divider line 351
    More: Followup, Wall Street Journal, Amy Chua, it gets better, Ronald McDonald House Charities, Pacific Islanders, SAT Scores, colleges  
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32851 clicks; posted to Main » on 03 Apr 2013 at 3:01 PM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-04-03 04:33:19 PM  
If you want to go to Harvard, okay, whatever.
But most schools you apply at want a decent SAT or ACT grade and your money.
 
2013-04-03 04:33:24 PM  
What a jappy little biatch.
 
2013-04-03 04:33:31 PM  

reklamfox: I had no extracurricular activities and never took my SATs and I still got into a respectable college. You know why? I did the smart thing and went to a community college the first 2 yrs. Having a college degree before applying to a larger university makes you look good without having to pump your application with a bunch of BS. No SAT required.


Only in America would they have the temerity to call the piece of paper you got in two years from a community college a "degree". In the thinking world, we call that a "two-year diploma".
 
2013-04-03 04:34:23 PM  

Christian Bale: Like me, millions of high-school seniors with sour grapes are asking themselves this week how they failed to get into the colleges of their dreams. It's simple: For years, they-we-were lied to.

Her point isn't that colleges should have accepted her, it's that they mislead students on what they're looking for.


And she's wrong.  She wasn't lied to, she just didn't understand what they meant.  Fark that, it's not that she didn't understand, it's that she didn't even try to understand.
 
2013-04-03 04:36:55 PM  
1/10. She can't even troll. Her best bet is going to be going out and getting knocked up by some dude so she can get by through life on some dudes child support checks.

Being yourself isn't a skill. Dumbass.
 
2013-04-03 04:38:24 PM  

nickeyx: Half Right: I don't get all the hate and outrage about this letter. I thought it was funny. If anything the Gawker response author seems to be the bitter, angry, self-important one.

I don't understand why people are so farking butthurt over this. It's satire, not reality.

We get it, you worked hard to get where you are. What the fark makes you so special? We all work hard, get over yourself, you're not special snowflake.

/Starting to wonder who the real snowflakes are in this situation.


Yeah, WSJ doesn't really do satire. Or at least not well.

Also, when the "satire" comes from the privileged class, it's not really satire anymore.
 
2013-04-03 04:39:39 PM  

Amusement: [s17.postimg.org image 304x175]


What high school career counselors won't tell you is this, you CAN get college credit.  College Level Examine Program offers over 33 examines to get college credit and it costs less than community (comedy) college.

http://clep.collegeboard.org/

While other students are trying to get into "their" college you've already got college credits.  The real stink is you can start taking CLEP examines when your 16 years old.

This sh*t is real and I CLEPed college humanities, Freshman English and other non-important stupid arse classes that cost thousands at the big "U".


You know how I know you didn't take Freshman English?
 
2013-04-03 04:39:45 PM  
Abrasive and condescending.  She didn't become that way all on her own.  Did she?   Good thing she was turned down.  The sense of entitlement is nauseating.
 
2013-04-03 04:40:09 PM  
There is nothing funnier than seeing reality smack these bubble-wrapped snowflakes right between the eyes.

...or sadder.
 
2013-04-03 04:40:50 PM  
She insulted the gays and the minorities with high school wit.  Of course Gawker would shiat all over her.

She'll get into a school now with a scholarship because she was published in the WSJ and got attention.
 
2013-04-03 04:40:57 PM  

factoryconnection: zobear: She tried nothing and now she's fresh out of ideas.

/I deal with kids like her almost every single day.

Literal LOL.


Consider the phrase stolen.

seems to me she was trying to get into her dream school simply to work on her MRS any ways... so... no great loss
 
2013-04-03 04:42:04 PM  

mesmer242: On the other hand, I saw a forum post elsewhere recently by a mom who was upset because she didn't know that the top kids in her son's high school class were fudging the GPA weighting by doing the state mandated health class at the local community college instead of at the high school


that is odd... i took the state mandated health class at the community college (since i as going full time senior year) and it was significantly harder to get a good grade than the highschool class. highschool was basically pass-fail if you showed up and partcipated with something like 10% reliant on the state physical fitness exam (which itself was a joke, you had to arm hang for 20 seconds, do 10 pushups, etc to get the full 10 points)

the community college course i took had a textbook, 2 written exams and did a baseline fitness test at the begining and end of each semester, you were graded 30% on the text book stuff (things like labeling all the muscle groups, explaining respitory functions, etc) and you had to show significant improvement (like 20%) on a whole serious of exercises. it was way more intense
 
2013-04-03 04:43:32 PM  

Cerebral Knievel: Consider the phrase stolen.


Yeah--from the Simpson's.  Or any of a dozen movies.
 
2013-04-03 04:44:48 PM  

AdmirableSnackbar: Christian Bale: Like me, millions of high-school seniors with sour grapes are asking themselves this week how they failed to get into the colleges of their dreams. It's simple: For years, they-we-were lied to.

Her point isn't that colleges should have accepted her, it's that they mislead students on what they're looking for.

And she's wrong.  She wasn't lied to, she just didn't understand what they meant.  Fark that, it's not that she didn't understand, it's that she didn't even try to understand.


...and understand one of the simplest concepts in high school:  You join clubs and sports and do charity because it looks good to schools.  Even the druggies that show up to meet up with friends know that shiat, but like her they choose not to.  The only difference is that this person is the perfect example of our entitled, spoiled rotten youth in this country.
 
2013-04-03 04:48:31 PM  

Magorn: Schools lie.  Do well enough on your SATS and nothing else matters.  Those other things they ask for are pure window dressing/used to make a determination on admission right before the coin flip.   back when a perfect SAT was a 1600 no school in the world is seriously gonna turn away anyone with a 1450+ no matter what thier transcript looked like, short of a felony or two on thier permanent record.

Hell when I applied to law school, my academic undergrad record could charitably be called "checkered".  Yes I had managed many semesters of striaght A's but I also had not one but two seperate "academic dismissals" from different colleges (I was both lazy and likely  battling undiagnosed depression in those years, plus I had no real conception of what I wanted to do with my life...at one point pursuing an EE despite the fact that I am severely "discalculate" (like dyslexia with numbers)

OTOH I scored a 173 out of a possible 180 on my LSATS (99th percentile).  Not only was I inivited to apply to a flood of law schools, but I wasn;t rejected from any school I applied to, even a top ten school I didn;t end up going to (U-Penn) because another school offered me a bigger scholarship than they did


Depends on how long ago and what tier of schools you're talking about - I can tell you from personal experience that you could definitely get rejected from Harvard with a 1600 even ~10 years ago, and it's only gotten more competitive since then.

I'm of both minds with regards to this article - on the one hand, she does come off a bit whiny and entitled; on the other, that doesn't necessarily mean that her overall point is invalid. It's gotten impossible to be 'good' at something without going to a crazy degree with it- whereas 'good at math' used to mean 'straight A's, maybe in some sort of math club, all the teachers thought you're really smart', now in order to be competitive you need to have straight A's + have won state math competitions + go to math camp + win math research competitions.

The charity thing is another big one - they really do need to sit freshmen down in high school and explicitly say 'if you don't do some amount of charity / volunteer work your college resume is going to look terrible'. The problem is that it's not something that every parent is going to necessarily assume, so you get two groups of kids - one group whose parents know how to play the resume-building game and get pushed into all that stuff, and another group who don't think that stuff is important and just want their kids to focus on school work, which quite honestly isn't enough anymore.

The issue is, these aren't all lessons that a high school student by default should magically be able to have pulled out of thin air - the stupid people graduating law school at 25 and then complaining that there are no jobs I have less patience for, because they're adults and should know better. But unless either the parents or the school gives kids this kind of information, I don't really have that much blame for a 15 year old not realizing that they have to play the system in order to get to where they want to be - that's a lesson that you need to learn, but may not necessarily have had to learn by that time.
 
2013-04-03 04:49:25 PM  
The education system from the roots up is rotten. Students are enrolling in SAT Prep classes and are more concerned with fluffing their GPA on paper and sufficing AP Exams for College Credits and being part of committees or activities that look good on paper rather than education itself. They are pushed to the point where they will do almost anything to look good on paper so they can get into the college of their dreams, in order to get a degree from there which, in turn looks good on paper so hopefully they get the job they are looking for so they can live a half-way decent life-style. You have the top echelon of students who by-and-large cheat to get ahead, just like your top athletes.

Schools? They are just as corrupt. They cook attendance records and test scores in hopes of getting funding and a bump to their paychecks. They can't risk their students doing poorly on tests since it is detrimental to their income and livelihood.

College? Hah! The so-called "core-curriculum" is more or less a litmus test created because their PREVIOUS litmus test's are not sufficient or efficient enough (SAT/ACT, TAKS/STAR or the state equivalents), and simply a way for schools to pump people for more money.

We do not try to teach concepts and make sure students are learning and retaining. It is all about the short-term. Once that pathetic fraudulent journey is completed, then you start a whole nother fraudulent journey in the corporate world. I think it would be HIGHLY telling and interesting if the same exams given in high school were given at the start of college, immediately after college, and then 5 & 10 years later. If after 10 years students are only retaining certain concepts, why the fark do we continue to really try to teach other things? Students should be required to show a MASTERY of something before moving onto the next thing. We cannot do this in our society however because so many people would be butt-hurt their snowflakes were "held back".

I took Calculus BC my Junior year of HS and got a 4 on my AP test, and a 98 in school. I guarantee you I couldn't do a 1/10th of those same problems that were easy for me then. Why? I wasn't really learning things for long-term retention, but for the short term. I was learning those concepts and principals well enough to receive high marks and then move onto the next thing. Rarely, if ever at the outset of a class do they have a test to benchmark students and how they have retained information, so what happens? They end up teaching the same shiat using the same methods and maybe you might learn a few more things in the process, but mostly it is rehashed or different content altogether.
 
2013-04-03 04:50:15 PM  

Mike Chewbacca: Eh, I see the letter-writer's very bitter point. In this day and age, kids HAVE to go to college or they're almost guaranteed a life of near-poverty. Going to college is the new normal, but colleges still think normal students have no place in their special snowflake universities.


or you could just go to a technical school and learn the trade depending on what you want to do. I wasted 4 years at film school, when i could have taken an avid 16 week course and learned the same thing but in a real world environment. I would have saved a ton of cash and be making well over six figures by now, but hey, i went to college cause i felt i had to for the reasons you listed
 
2013-04-03 04:51:05 PM  
I, too, read the original article. Gawker pretty much nailed it. Maybe all the people, both here and on the WSJ comment board, who thought it was a "funny satire" can let the rest of us in on the joke.
 
2013-04-03 04:51:24 PM  
Wow.  Just...wow.

I read most of the comments here and I'll add my CSB (though I don't expect many to read it)

I graduated HS with a 2.8 GPA, no extracurricular activities to speak of, and I worked two -time jobs (after school and on the weekends).  Never took the SATs.

My HS student advisor laughed hard (no joke) when I asked half-way through my senior year what colleges I had a chance at being accepted into when I graduated.  So I just accepted the idea I was never going to college.

I've always had a love for science and had a nice A+ going in my General Physics science class, so while I didn't need the extra credit, I wrote a paper on rotating and non-rotating black holes, examining the Schwarzschild, Kerr and Kerr-Newman solutions to Einstien's equations and put forth my opinion that a true Schwarzschild non-rotating blackhole could not exist in nature.  It was just a fun way to waste some time and learn about something that interested me.

I didn't know that my teacher had passed my paper on to a few local college professors he knew and within a few weeks, I had college recruiters stopping my parents' house or asking us to meet them at a restraunt for dinner, then asking if I had made plans for after high school.   It confused the hell out of me and my folks at first but after the first sit-down, we learned why they were interested.

I accepted an offer to one of the colleges that my folks could afford but still was fairly well known.  A friend of mine who had a killer SAT score, was in numerous after-school programs and was enrolled into various AP classes applied to the same college but was not accepted.  Kind of ruined our friendship when he found out I was accepted and he wasn't. (and yes, I did graduate from that college)

This young woman (I won't use the term lady) either failed to pay attention to what is required for getting into an ivy league college or believed that her privilaged life would be give her an automatic acceptance into her dream college.  Perhaps she should also realize that if you want to attend that dream college, get that dream job, or have that dream life then a lot of hard work needs to be done ahead of time.  This is a good wakeup call for little Ms. Princess.
 
2013-04-03 04:52:15 PM  
'Be yourself' only works for people who aren't worthless.
 
2013-04-03 04:52:30 PM  

Dion Fortune: What's this obsession with getting into extra-selective schools?  If you get good grades you can get into public State U and it'll be much cheaper.  You'll use the same textbooks and learn the same crap, and the school will offer you more scholarships and financial aid.  Learn skills that are actually in demand or benefit society and you'll always have a job.


Top notch community college typing detected.
 
2013-04-03 04:52:45 PM  

mrlewish: Warthog: mrlewish: Interesting how we rate ourselves on what job we do or what school we went to.

All concerned sides are full of whiny self entitles biatches.

To treat you like a human being I don't have to give a damn what school you went to, or what fancy job titles you have, or who you are or who you know.

Fourth Tier Public College typing detected.

Does it really matter?  Lets just say this.  If all the lawyers on Earth disappeared, life would go on for the rest of us after a "WTF just happened" disturbance. If all the farmers on Earth disappeared we would all be truly be farked. Guess who society values more.


Farming is hard work, but it's not actually hard. If all the farmers disappeared tomorrow, we could have passable farmers trained up to take their places in 6-8 weeks.
 
2013-04-03 04:54:53 PM  

Bschott007: Wow.  Just...wow.

I read most of the comments here and I'll add my CSB (though I don't expect many to read it)

I graduated HS with a 2.8 GPA, no extracurricular activities to speak of, and I worked two -time jobs (after school and on the weekends).  Never took the SATs.

My HS student advisor laughed hard (no joke) when I asked half-way through my senior year what colleges I had a chance at being accepted into when I graduated.  So I just accepted the idea I was never going to college.

I've always had a love for science and had a nice A+ going in my General Physics science class, so while I didn't need the extra credit, I wrote a paper on rotating and non-rotating black holes, examining the Schwarzschild, Kerr and Kerr-Newman solutions to Einstien's equations and put forth my opinion that a true Schwarzschild non-rotating blackhole could not exist in nature.  It was just a fun way to waste some time and learn about something that interested me.

I didn't know that my teacher had passed my paper on to a few local college professors he knew and within a few weeks, I had college recruiters stopping my parents' house or asking us to meet them at a restraunt for dinner, then asking if I had made plans for after high school.   It confused the hell out of me and my folks at first but after the first sit-down, we learned why they were interested.

I accepted an offer to one of the colleges that my folks could afford but still was fairly well known.  A friend of mine who had a killer SAT score, was in numerous after-school programs and was enrolled into various AP classes applied to the same college but was not accepted.  Kind of ruined our friendship when he found out I was accepted and he wasn't. (and yes, I did graduate from that college)

This young woman (I won't use the term lady) either failed to pay attention to what is required for getting into an ivy league college or believed that her privilaged life would be give her an automatic acceptance into her dream coll ...


I cried through the whole movie.
 
2013-04-03 04:57:01 PM  
Funny, when I was a junior in high-school, I knew EXACTLY what it took to get into my dream college.
 
2013-04-03 04:57:28 PM  

tlchwi02: PiffMan420: My advice: If your local community college is decent, do a year or two knocking off basic graduation requirements. Take your basic English and Math, kick serious ass and then transfer over to the university that would have bounced you as a Freshman. Just be sure that your credits will transfer over

i'd take that a step further- skip at least your senior year of highschool and go to community college. i'm not sure about every state, but NY allows you to do it. I got SUNY credits, only had to be on campus for at most a few hours a day (rather than slowly churning through a normal highschool day) and got excellent core courses taken care of that let me jump into the interesting stuff quicker and allowed me to graduate early (thus saving quite a bit of money) the only odd thing was that i had to take a physical fitness course at the college to satisfy the NYS requirement for highschool physical education.


Washington State has that program too. My husband did it when he was in high school. I am pretty certain that its the ideal way to go since college is expensive and the state covers it if you're a capable high school student. I finished my BA in WA after I moved here at 21 and I was in college with 18 year olds who finished almost their entire associate's degree in their last two years of high school. We have the #2 community college in the country in the suburbs near us, so if its still worth the effort, I'd send my [hypothetical] kids there. My husband was allowed to participate in high school sports and activities, but his education was much more appropriate to his career interests (at the time, he was planning to go into automotive stuff and he attended the Community-Technical college because they had no "auto shop" classes beyond the introduction class.)

I wouldn't force my kids into college though if they weren't cut out for it. My husband is moving to a masters degree program in 2014, because his interests have changed since he was 17. I think there is no good reason to shuffle the kids into college as a compulsory activity. My husband would have probably pursued a really useless degree if his parents were more adamant about him being a college graduate. Though, my in-laws suffer from education apathy, and my brother in law barely graduated high school and makes far less than he could if he'd actually cultivated a career rather than a series of dead end jobs. I think he's smart enough, but his ambition and drive were probably given to someone else. At least my mother in law makes enough to supplement his lifestyle and make things easy for his family.
 
2013-04-03 04:58:38 PM  

IRQ12: AdmirableSnackbar: Christian Bale: Like me, millions of high-school seniors with sour grapes are asking themselves this week how they failed to get into the colleges of their dreams. It's simple: For years, they-we-were lied to.

Her point isn't that colleges should have accepted her, it's that they mislead students on what they're looking for.

And she's wrong.  She wasn't lied to, she just didn't understand what they meant.  Fark that, it's not that she didn't understand, it's that she didn't even try to understand.

...and understand one of the simplest concepts in high school:   You join clubs and sports and do charity because it looks good to schools.  Even the druggies that show up to meet up with friends know that shiat, but like her they choose not to.  The only difference is that this person is the perfect example of our entitled, spoiled rotten youth in this country.


Fark that, too.  I did all of those things, and not just because it looks good to schools.  I did them because they interested me.  At my private, elitist high school we were urged (forced, technically, since it was necessary for graduation) to do charity work to make us realize just how bad other people had it - and it worked, too.  But the time to try new things and see new perspectives is when you're young because a) it instills curiosity and a sense of adventure that you keep with you for life, and b) even if it doesn't stick with you, you've got decades to stick yourself in a rut and never experience anything outside of your comfort zone.

Oddly enough, my one regret from high school (other than not partying more, I spent too much time buying into the DARE bullshiat until my senior year) was that I wasn't involved more in the theatre program.  I was on the crew for a play my senior year to fulfill my performance art credit and had a farking blast.  I wished I had known it would be that much fun because it would have given me yet another enjoyable thing to do with my time and would have gladly sacrificed a portion of whatever video game time I had.

This girl couldn't be bothered to push herself at all academically, socially, athletically, or artistically and is now whining about the results of her lack of effort and blaming minorities and gays.  Why am I supposed to feel anything but pity or scorn for her?
 
2013-04-03 04:59:24 PM  
Suck it up.
Go to a community college, do your high school part 2 classes (english, math, history, etc.) and transfer the units.
It's cheaper that way AND easier to transfer to the college of your choice!
Maybe not Harvard, but UCSB took me after not taking me as a freshman.
Then I majored in surfing and partying, then changed my major and went to a more serious school and graduated.
 
2013-04-03 05:00:15 PM  

IRQ12: AdmirableSnackbar: Christian Bale: Like me, millions of high-school seniors with sour grapes are asking themselves this week how they failed to get into the colleges of their dreams. It's simple: For years, they-we-were lied to.

Her point isn't that colleges should have accepted her, it's that they mislead students on what they're looking for.

And she's wrong.  She wasn't lied to, she just didn't understand what they meant.  Fark that, it's not that she didn't understand, it's that she didn't even try to understand.

...and understand one of the simplest concepts in high school:   You join clubs and sports and do charity because it looks good to schools.  Even the druggies that show up to meet up with friends know that shiat, but like her they choose not to.  The only difference is that this person is the perfect example of our entitled, spoiled rotten youth in this country.


THAT is the problem right there. By and large kids are not a part of those activities because they want to be, or contribute to them in any meaningful way but simply because it looks good to schools or they are told they are required to. The motivation behind school is the wrong kind of motivation. Students should be motivated to learn and understand the material. Teachers, should be motivated to teach those materials so that the students learn and understand that material. That isn't the case. Students are motivated to get into a good college. Teachers are motivated by salary bonuses. (I understand I am stereotyping and there are those whom are righteous, but I believe them to be the minority).
 
2013-04-03 05:01:00 PM  

babygoat: HotWingConspiracy: Going to college can lead you to sweet gigs "taking down" high schoolers and pretending it's work or somehow noteworthy.

Anybody who gets paid to make fun of high schoolers has already lapped you in the game of life.


Yeah running a glorified blog and shiatting on high school kids has always been just out of reach for me.
 
2013-04-03 05:02:20 PM  
Ahhh, to be young and have someone else to blame for all of your failures...
 
2013-04-03 05:03:52 PM  

Bschott007: I've always had a love for science and had a nice A+ going in my General Physics science class, so while I didn't need the extra credit, I wrote a paper on rotating and non-rotating black holes


Cool.  I wrote about general relativity on my college applications ... I'm sure it helped.

My brother took the same route you did, writing a paper on the Schroedinger equation.  Only got him onto the wait list at his first choice school, though.

I can't emphasize how important it is to demonstrate to colleges that you actually learn things on your own outside of school, out of intrinsic interest.
 
2013-04-03 05:05:01 PM  

the money is in the banana stand: IRQ12: AdmirableSnackbar: Christian Bale: Like me, millions of high-school seniors with sour grapes are asking themselves this week how they failed to get into the colleges of their dreams. It's simple: For years, they-we-were lied to.

Her point isn't that colleges should have accepted her, it's that they mislead students on what they're looking for.

And she's wrong.  She wasn't lied to, she just didn't understand what they meant.  Fark that, it's not that she didn't understand, it's that she didn't even try to understand.

...and understand one of the simplest concepts in high school:   You join clubs and sports and do charity because it looks good to schools.  Even the druggies that show up to meet up with friends know that shiat, but like her they choose not to.  The only difference is that this person is the perfect example of our entitled, spoiled rotten youth in this country.

THAT is the problem right there. By and large kids are not a part of those activities because they want to be, or contribute to them in any meaningful way but simply because it looks good to schools or they are told they are required to. The motivation behind school is the wrong kind of motivation. Students should be motivated to learn and understand the material. Teachers, should be motivated to teach those materials so that the students learn and understand that material. That isn't the case. Students are motivated to get into a good college. Teachers are motivated by salary bonuses. (I understand I am stereotyping and there are those whom are righteous, but I believe them to be the minority).


Teachers get bonuses?  I'll be nice and say that it doesn't sound like you know what you're talking about.
 
2013-04-03 05:08:33 PM  

ElStreak: Amusement: [s17.postimg.org image 304x175]


What high school career counselors won't tell you is this, you CAN get college credit.  College Level Examine Program offers over 33 examines to get college credit and it costs less than community (comedy) college.

http://clep.collegeboard.org/

While other students are trying to get into "their" college you've already got college credits.  The real stink is you can start taking CLEP examines when your 16 years old.

This sh*t is real and I CLEPed college humanities, Freshman English and other non-important stupid arse classes that cost thousands at the big "U".

You know how I know you didn't take Freshman English?


Knowledge is a terrible thing to waste.
 
2013-04-03 05:09:49 PM  

AdmirableSnackbar: Teachers get bonuses?  I'll be nice and say that it doesn't sound like you know what you're talking about.


The teachers around here haven't even gotten cost-of-living raises for years, let alone bonuses.  There's been a pay freeze since the economy crashed.
 
2013-04-03 05:11:24 PM  

puddleonfire: It's cheaper


this should be one of the most important considerations for a high school kid about to go to college.  it will ruin your first years out of college, and those are the hardest for you professionally.  once you put in 5+ years professionally, no one cares what school you went to.  and for those 5 years, it would be nice not to have 100K+ in loans.
 
2013-04-03 05:12:58 PM  

Timmy the Tumor: Ahhh, to be young and have someone else to blame for all of your failures...


Well, she certainly sounded republican in her letter.
 
2013-04-03 05:13:02 PM  

Ambitwistor: I can't emphasize how important it is to demonstrate to colleges that you actually learn things on your own outside of school


I mean outside of school requirements; could be something outside of school, or could be extra credit or honors projects in school.  Something that distinguishes you from the herd.  Great, you got an A in math.  So did 100,000 other students.  What makes you notable?
 
2013-04-03 05:15:07 PM  

Ambitwistor: Bschott007: I've always had a love for science and had a nice A+ going in my General Physics science class, so while I didn't need the extra credit, I wrote a paper on rotating and non-rotating black holes

Cool.  I wrote about general relativity on my college applications ... I'm sure it helped.

My brother took the same route you did, writing a paper on the Schroedinger equation.  Only got him onto the wait list at his first choice school, though.

I can't emphasize how important it is to demonstrate to colleges that you actually learn things on your own outside of school, out of intrinsic interest.


That's pretty cool about what you did on your applications.

Actually, what you said about proving what you know over just having an impressive transcript is what the recruiters mentioned at the sit-downs with my family.
 
2013-04-03 05:15:17 PM  

ImpatientlyUnsympathetic: We have the #2 community college in the country in the suburbs near us, so if its still worth the effort, I'd send my [hypothetical] kids there. My husband was allowed to participate in high school sports and activities, but his education was much more appropriate to his career interests


i'd also point out if you don't go to a large affluent highschool, it offers you a lot more interesting opportunities than highschool. We did have a handful of AP classes in my school, but we had a pitiful group of choices for classes. if you weren't into art or music, there really wasn't anything but the core courses required by the state for graduation. at the community college i got to take econ, western civ, american and english literature (counted as "english" for the states criteria but wasn't writing form essays all day long to pass the standardized tests) psychology, geology etc. So it gave me the chance to poke around with some college level classes and get a feel for what interested me before i got to the 4 year school that cost exponentially more (and i got to skip the entry level stuff when i got there anyway, so win-win)
 
2013-04-03 05:16:40 PM  

First thing I thought of:

"Ladies First"  by Shel Silverstein
Pamela Purse yelled, "Ladies first,"
Pushing in front of the ice cream line.
Pamela Purse yelled, "Ladies first,"
Grabbing the ketchup at dinnertime.
Climbing on the morning bus
She'd shove right by all of us
And there'd be a tiff or a fight or a fuss
When Pamela Purse yelled, "Ladies first."

Pamela Purse screamed, "Ladies first,"
When we went off on our jungle trip.
Pamela Purse said her thirst was worse
And guzzled our water, every sip.
[con't]...
 
2013-04-03 05:21:41 PM  
"Be yourself" is good advice for most people.

However, for some people, the best advice may be to try being someone else.
 
2013-04-03 05:25:49 PM  

tlchwi02: ImpatientlyUnsympathetic: We have the #2 community college in the country in the suburbs near us, so if its still worth the effort, I'd send my [hypothetical] kids there. My husband was allowed to participate in high school sports and activities, but his education was much more appropriate to his career interests

i'd also point out if you don't go to a large affluent highschool, it offers you a lot more interesting opportunities than highschool. We did have a handful of AP classes in my school, but we had a pitiful group of choices for classes. if you weren't into art or music, there really wasn't anything but the core courses required by the state for graduation. at the community college i got to take econ, western civ, american and english literature (counted as "english" for the states criteria but wasn't writing form essays all day long to pass the standardized tests) psychology, geology etc. So it gave me the chance to poke around with some college level classes and get a feel for what interested me before i got to the 4 year school that cost exponentially more (and i got to skip the entry level stuff when i got there anyway, so win-win)


My husband went to an affluent school (near Microsoft) but it still didn't have anything beyond "Intro" classes to keep him engaged. He loves history, writes well, is extremely athletic and very capable with a set of tools, but being locked up in a school for 6+ hours a day was torture to him, so sending him to community/technical college was ideal. It cut out the bullshiat. I also think that, based on the former schoolmates of his that I've met, probably kept him off the Stuff White People Like: Illicit Substances. Some real stoner/tweeker stuff went on in the bored rich kid school. At least he wasn't exposed to boredom like the rest.

/Seriously, if he's bored, I have a problem.
//No, his parents never doped him up on ADD/ADHD drugs.
///They found a better learning environment for him instead. Strangely, it was like parenting, only effective, without hand-wringing!
 
2013-04-03 05:28:34 PM  
I had good grades, Merit scholarship, a few extracurricular activities, part time job in the summer. Got waitlisted by an Ivy League, ended up going to a slightly lower ranking school on almost full scholarship. I think my alma mater wanted geographical diversity from their students and I happened to live in the South at the time of application (although I'd only been there a few years).

A name brand school carries some weight when your resume is in a giant pile. My undergrad uni is fairly well-known. I'm pretty sure it helped me get into a good Master's program and increased my desirability in applicant pools for jobs.
 
2013-04-03 05:30:49 PM  

Bschott007: Wow.  Just...wow.

I read most of the comments here and I'll add my CSB (though I don't expect many to read it)

I graduated HS with a 2.8 GPA, no extracurricular activities to speak of, and I worked two -time jobs (after school and on the weekends).  Never took the SATs.

My HS student advisor laughed hard (no joke) when I asked half-way through my senior year what colleges I had a chance at being accepted into when I graduated.  So I just accepted the idea I was never going to college.

I've always had a love for science and had a nice A+ going in my General Physics science class, so while I didn't need the extra credit, I wrote a paper on rotating and non-rotating black holes, examining the Schwarzschild, Kerr and Kerr-Newman solutions to Einstien's equations and put forth my opinion that a true Schwarzschild non-rotating blackhole could not exist in nature.  It was just a fun way to waste some time and learn about something that interested me.

I didn't know that my teacher had passed my paper on to a few local college professors he knew and within a few weeks, I had college recruiters stopping my parents' house or asking us to meet them at a restraunt for dinner, then asking if I had made plans for after high school.   It confused the hell out of me and my folks at first but after the first sit-down, we learned why they were interested.

I accepted an offer to one of the colleges that my folks could afford but still was fairly well known.  A friend of mine who had a killer SAT score, was in numerous after-school programs and was enrolled into various AP classes applied to the same college but was not accepted.  Kind of ruined our friendship when he found out I was accepted and he wasn't. (and yes, I did graduate from that college)

This young woman (I won't use the term lady) either failed to pay attention to what is required for getting into an ivy league college or believed that her privilaged life would be give her an automatic acceptance into her dream college.  Perhaps she should also realize that if you want to attend that dream college, get that dream job, or have that dream life then a lot of hard work needs to be done ahead of time.  This is a good wakeup call for little Ms. Princess.


Wasn't this Good Will Hunting?
 
2013-04-03 05:33:02 PM  

Amusement: Knowledge is a terrible thing to waste.


How would you know?
 
2013-04-03 05:34:10 PM  
Yeah, like I'm giving Gawker a click.
Which real website did they lift the article off of?
 
2013-04-03 05:35:26 PM  

Christian Bale: Like me, millions of high-school seniors with sour grapes are asking themselves this week how they failed to get into the colleges of their dreams. It's simple: For years, they-we-were lied to.

Her point isn't that colleges should have accepted her, it's that they mislead students on what they're looking for.


Yes, because School admission forms and guidelines are just the words "HAVE FUN YOLO" on them.

Schools tell people what they want, and it's no secret the more plusses you have, the better. So do scholarships, jobs, internships, placements etc. People choose to hear what they want to hear and we have an entire generation convincing each other of the dream of you can spend your entire life doing what you enjoy casually as a full-time job, get paid well and live the dream. The alternative is them believing that they have to do a job sometimes because it's a job, whether the love it or just are okay with it, and that involves sacrifice, delayed gratification and work. Guess which reality most people are choosing to believe.

I have an entire crop of friends who are currently deciding between Animation, Fine Art, Fashion Design, Video Game Design, Theatre and every other dream job program scam out there. They're all convinced they can make their casual hobby their breadwinning career, even as all the ones older than them are getting out of school and realizing there's no job waiting for them. It's depressing as hell, because their facebook walls are plastered with inspirational quote about how they can make a living doing whatever they want, and it's the big bad mean adults and education system lying to them.

tl;dr - kids, when faced with a grim reality and a sugar-coated lie, will decide the lie is real.
 
2013-04-03 05:38:54 PM  
All I had to do was be myself to get my various degrees, including a Ph.D.  Myself being the son of parents with the willingness to pay a significant portion of their income to put me through decent schools.  The same parents who never spoke of what they deserved by virtue of wanting.  The same parents who showed, not told, me how to live well.

I was fortunate enough to have good parents.  If this girl wants to blame someone other than herself for her lot in life perhaps she should explore how she came to be herself - if being herself isn't enough to impress.

Breeding is entirely too easy.  That's why stupid people do it so much.  (Disclaimer: I was an accident)
 
MFK
2013-04-03 05:39:26 PM  
wow.... the comments on the original WSJ op-ed are just insane - saying how she should view it as a good thing because Ivy League schools are BAD! What in the actual fark is going on where conservatives are shiatting on the best schools because they are some how "librul elitist". and when did the WSJ start catering to people who believe that shiat? I can guarantee that the a pretty sizable chunk of the people who read the WSJ for market information have a Harvard MBA on their wall so what gives?
 
2013-04-03 05:39:29 PM  
IDK if they still do this but in Colorado they had a grid based on your ACT score and you high school GPA. You would find you GPA on one side then the ACT score on the other and on the grid it would have a corresponding code. The code detailed the state schools that had to accept you if you fell above a certain point on the grid. I pretty much new I wanted to go to the University of Colorado and since I was above the grid I new I would get in. Seems like maybe she should have applied to some state schools.
 
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