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(Gawker)   Gawker issues a brutal takedown of the entitled, butthurt, college-rejected high schooler who got her open letter published by the Wall Street Journal   (gawker.com) divider line 351
    More: Followup, Wall Street Journal, Amy Chua, it gets better, Ronald McDonald House Charities, Pacific Islanders, SAT Scores, colleges  
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32837 clicks; posted to Main » on 03 Apr 2013 at 3:01 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-04-03 03:30:58 PM
Holy shiat, that is one entitled little fark of a person. I think she will find that the people that got into their college of choice were just being themselves, they are just better human beings than her. Sure I spent a ridiculous amount of time stoned off my ass in HS, but I also managed to be a straight A student, work a full time job and get kick ass test scores because that is who I am. Hell, even during college I was able to discover myself and switch from a pre-med program to an evolutionary biology major based on who I am.

Her problem is that she feels that being upper middle class should be all she needs, not effort. fark her and her ilk.
 
2013-04-03 03:31:02 PM
Let's see. When I was in high school...

I was a peer leader, an eagle scout, an all-state athlete, an all-state musician, a mathlete, a volunteer, an AP student, class salutatorian, tutor, and had a job. I had 12 hour school days thanks to my extra-curriculars, plus 4-6 hours of homework per night. I ended up graduating with enough college credit to classify as a Junior after one semester. I also received full academic scholarships to my top 2 universities. I bled, sweat and cried my way through. If only I had come out in high school, I could have gotten some minority support, but silly me waited until college to do that. Otherwise I was just a middle class, white boy. I worked my damn ass off. This princess needs a reality check. The "participation trophies" end at some point.
 
2013-04-03 03:31:19 PM

Mike Chewbacca: Amusement: [s17.postimg.org image 304x175]


What high school career counselors won't tell you is this, you CAN get college credit.  College Level Examine Program offers over 33 examines to get college credit and it costs less than community (comedy) college.

http://clep.collegeboard.org/

While other students are trying to get into "their" college you've already got college credits.  The real stink is you can start taking CLEP examines when your 16 years old.

This sh*t is real and I CLEPed college humanities, Freshman English and other non-important stupid arse classes that cost thousands at the big "U".

English isn't that unimportant. You should have paid closer attention.


You sound like someone who has a liberal arts degree.
 
2013-04-03 03:32:08 PM

Mike Chewbacca: Amusement: [s17.postimg.org image 304x175]


What high school career counselors won't tell you is this, you CAN get college credit.  College Level Examine Program offers over 33 examines to get college credit and it costs less than community (comedy) college.

http://clep.collegeboard.org/

While other students are trying to get into "their" college you've already got college credits.  The real stink is you can start taking CLEP examines when your 16 years old.

This sh*t is real and I CLEPed college humanities, Freshman English and other non-important stupid arse classes that cost thousands at the big "U".

English isn't that unimportant. You should have paid closer attention.





should of

I can't believe I have to point that out.
 
2013-04-03 03:32:50 PM

Warthog: Mike Chewbacca: Eh, I see the letter-writer's very bitter point. In this day and age, kids HAVE to go to college or they're almost guaranteed a life of near-poverty. Going to college is the new normal, but colleges still think normal students have no place in their special snowflake universities.

It isn't that they think normal students have no place, it's that they can fill their schools with high-achieving kids.   That's because 90% of modern suburban children are checking off boxes towards their college applications from the time they are in diapers.  Literally.  I live in one of the snobbiest 'progressive' enclaves outside of California -- North Arlington, VA.  You may or may not be shocked to hear the discussions the parents of North Arlington regularly have about the academic rigor of their HALF-DAY PRE-SCHOOL programs. Or the politics of which pre-school teacher they are going to be assigned.

Because how the kid does in half-day will impact how they do in full day.  Which will impact what Kindergarten they go to and how they do there.  And that impacts the next level.  On and on ad nauseum, until you have kids in Huntington learning centers for enrichment activities on their summer break instead of riding bikes around the neighborhood.

It's all because internet-addicted parents, who in many cases were part of the early trophy generation themselves, are deathly afraid that if they leave their kids with unstructured time they'll turn out like the author of this letter.   And this letter will only give them new-found confirmation that they are failures if they don't schedule every free hour of their kids' days.  If their kid doesn't get into Harvard, they don't get a parenting trophy.  And they want a parenting trophy.

It's like a giant circle of over-educated parent derp.  But the result is the colleges get more over-schooled applicants than they need, and the less talented (on paper) end up with tougher choices on where to go to college.


You are absolutely right. I have some friends who are from the DC area and now living in Seattle. They are seriously considering putting their child in private grade school starting in Kindergarten because it'll shoehorn him right into private high school and then an Ivy League university. Their son is 4. They realize private grade school is a joke, but because the private grade schools all feed into the private high schools, they feel now is the time to act to ensure their son's place at an Ivy League university.

Meanwhile, the 85% of us who aren't able to pay for private school fight over the scraps. The girl who wrote the letter is a totally normal high school student. She should expect to go to a middle class university and graduate tens of thousands of dollars in debt.
 
2013-04-03 03:32:56 PM
dbug.kicks-ass.net
 
2013-04-03 03:33:11 PM

Amusement: [s17.postimg.org image 304x175]


What high school career counselors won't tell you is this, you CAN get college credit.  College Level Examine Program offers over 33 examines to get college credit and it costs less than community (comedy) college.

http://clep.collegeboard.org/

While other students are trying to get into "their" college you've already got college credits.  The real stink is you can start taking CLEP examines when your 16 years old.

This sh*t is real and I CLEPed college humanities, Freshman English and other non-important stupid arse classes that cost thousands at the big "U".


I'd also add AP courses.  I got lucky, and went to the high school that classes.map{ |class| class.gsub('Honors', 'AP')} despite it being the mediocre high school, and walked into my first day of classes as a sophomore with 43 credits.

/And then I failed to understand the meaning of the word prerequisite, messed around doing all my non-major courses for 2 years, and was forced to do 80+-hour weeks junior and senior years taking 4 400-level EECS courses.
//Mind you, the good high school was nationally ranked, effectively closed for Yom Kippur because it was about 80% Jewish, and had a "+.5 to GPA" note at every major state school and Ivy because it was that hard.
///And the bad school was designed around student riots when they built it.
 
2013-04-03 03:33:32 PM

victrin: Let's see. When I was in high school...

I was a peer leader, an eagle scout, an all-state athlete, an all-state musician, a mathlete, a volunteer, an AP student, class salutatorian, tutor, and had a job. I had 12 hour school days thanks to my extra-curriculars, plus 4-6 hours of homework per night. I ended up graduating with enough college credit to classify as a Junior after one semester. I also received full academic scholarships to my top 2 universities. I bled, sweat and cried my way through. If only I had come out in high school, I could have gotten some minority support, but silly me waited until college to do that. Otherwise I was just a middle class, white boy. I worked my damn ass off. This princess needs a reality check. The "participation trophies" end at some point.


No they don't they just become achievements on the XBox.
 
2013-04-03 03:35:02 PM

jvl: So I finally read the piece by the kid in the Journal.

That was funny, not whiny. It was almost Fark-good.


That was the whiniest complaint that ever whined.
 
2013-04-03 03:35:08 PM

namegoeshere: Wow what a biatch.


I still stand by "lazy biatch"
 
2013-04-03 03:35:14 PM
....had I known two years ago what I know now, I would have gladly worn a headdress to school. Show me to any closet, and I would've happily come out of it. "Diversity!" I offer about as much diversity as a saltine cracker. If it were up to me, I would've been any of the diversities: Navajo, Pacific Islander, anything. Sen. Elizabeth Warren, I salute you and your 1/32 Cherokee heritage.

Sweetheart, you're a legacy.  That's better than any of those lucky minority things... and you were born into it just like those lucky minorities.

Oh well, I guess you can cry into your trust fund.
 
2013-04-03 03:36:17 PM
You basically need a pulse and a bank account to get into state school so she should be fine.
 
2013-04-03 03:36:29 PM

Lollipop165: or played at Carnegie Hall.


Well, I actually have done that (the acoustics are excellent), but honestly I think those schools admitted me because I wrote bizarre essays and had decent enough grades.  I've always just kind of assumed they thought, "this guy is so weird, it just might work!"

Instead of "founding a fake charity" I volunteered at a summer camp for autistic children.  Not because I was even thinking about college at the time--just because I've always suspected I was mildly autistic and felt like I could relate as a camp counselor.  I was able to throw that in the mix.

My high school also paired all the seniors with individual counselors, and I remember giving my counselor some big BS lecture about how I was going to save the world and shiat.  She totally ate it up.  I'm thinking the combo of all that stuff was more than enough to dilute my mediocre SAT scores and sub-4.0GPA.

Plus, while selective schools, none of them were Ivy-League selective; I doubt I would have been admitted to anything more selective than UChicago.
 
2013-04-03 03:37:07 PM

mjohnson71: Mike Chewbacca: Amusement: [s17.postimg.org image 304x175]


What high school career counselors won't tell you is this, you CAN get college credit.  College Level Examine Program offers over 33 examines to get college credit and it costs less than community (comedy) college.

http://clep.collegeboard.org/

While other students are trying to get into "their" college you've already got college credits.  The real stink is you can start taking CLEP examines when your 16 years old.

This sh*t is real and I CLEPed college humanities, Freshman English and other non-important stupid arse classes that cost thousands at the big "U".

English isn't that unimportant. You should have paid closer attention.

You sound like someone who has a liberal arts degree.


I'll take that as a compliment. Liberal arts degrees may be useless for getting a job, but those folks know how to write.

And Amusement writes like a 15-year-old.

gunther_bumpass: should of

I can't believe I have to point that out.


*snicker*
 
2013-04-03 03:37:26 PM
I had a less-than-stellar high school career. When I was accepted to a no-name college with a small scholarship, my guidance counselor said, "How'd you manage that?"

I signed up for a research project one of my psych professors was doing during my junior year (just for the hell of it). I ended up writing some of the resulting papers with him in conjunction with another professor from Harvard. It was published and even now appears in a psych textbook. I presented it to the APA at a conference at the end of my senior year. I graduated with honors in psychology.

That was 20 years ago. I now work in technology as a network administrator.

Lesson 1: It doesn't matter where you go, it's what you do while you're there.
Lesson 2: That might not even matter in the long run.
 
2013-04-03 03:37:41 PM

Mike Chewbacca: EvilRacistNaziFascist: Fano: What about her racist dig at all them undeserving minorities?

Her complaint about universities making a mindless fetish of "diversity" was quite accurate, and the most sensible thing she said in the entire letter.

She also made a valid point about having to find some way to interact with adversity. She's a normal teenager living a bland life, and she doesn't have the resources to fly to another country to see how awful the world really can be.


She didn't have to fly to Africa. In every major city, there's a big brothers or big sisters program. She could volunteer at a soup kitchen. She could go do charity work for a retirement home.

She didn't even bother looking AT ALL. I'm positive had she run the idea of tutoring an underprivileged inner city kid past her folks, they would have helped her.

And she didn't have any hobbies at all? Shoot, the hobbies I had aside from sports weren't that interesting either, but I'm creative enough to be able to make it SOUND like something awesome.

Gah. Entitlement.
 
2013-04-03 03:38:26 PM
The kid did make a few points... though poorly:

Parents are to some extent responsible for their offspring's success.  Kids don't have rights until they're 18 because they lack the proper decision making capacity before then.  Parents: don't let your kid be this kid.

Also, money can buy your way into college.  If you don't have the wherewithal to "volunteer" in Africa (aka take an international vacation and glean credit from it), or happen to look for work between 2008 and now when jobs are at a premium (so you never found a job in which to excel or pay your gas money for "volunteering"), you are not starting from a good point to get into some of the high-brow places.

However, if she showed no interest in extended academics and her parents washed their hands of her, I can have a trifle of sympathy.  But writing that letter was stupid.
 
2013-04-03 03:39:03 PM
Dear whiney-ass biatch:

Please tell us who you are, not who you aren't and then maybe you won't come across as a whiney-ass biatch.

/feel free to move the hyphen one word to the right if it pleases you.
 
2013-04-03 03:39:55 PM

Amusement: This sh*t is real and I CLEPed college humanities, Freshman English and other non-important stupid arse classes that cost thousands at the big "U".


Sounds like reasons not to accept you as a profit center, er, I mean prospective student.

Anyhow... The school wants to get what they're shown, but if it's a fake extrovert that collapses into deep depression because they're really an introvert who's been "faking it till they make it." This isn't a knock against introverts, it's a knock against the schools preparing lemmings extroverts to follow the crowd.

/Anyhow, if you're gonna be yourself
//Be awesome.
 
2013-04-03 03:39:58 PM
Her brother had no trouble getting into the school of his choice
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MdM7vNOgGPM
 
2013-04-03 03:40:36 PM
I think it's satire.
 
2013-04-03 03:40:38 PM

Mike Chewbacca: Amusement: [s17.postimg.org image 304x175]


What high school career counselors won't tell you is this, you CAN get college credit.  College Level Examine Program offers over 33 examines to get college credit and it costs less than community (comedy) college.

http://clep.collegeboard.org/

While other students are trying to get into "their" college you've already got college credits.  The real stink is you can start taking CLEP examines when your 16 years old.

This sh*t is real and I CLEPed college humanities, Freshman English and other non-important stupid arse classes that cost thousands at the big "U".

English isn't that unimportant. You should have paid closer attention.


English isn't unimportant, double negatives.  English is important.  Pay closer attention.

Engrish has been very good for me.
 
2013-04-03 03:40:59 PM
I'd like to know what exactly made her "dream college" so appealing to her.  They seem to have such differing priorities.

If she's female, white, privileged, has middling grades and test scores and doesn't want to work hard, then there are plenty of 3rd tier state colleges and little private school start-ups that would love to have her.
 
2013-04-03 03:41:03 PM
At this rate, she probably won't even get into Vassar.
 
2013-04-03 03:41:14 PM
I didn't get into my first choice, either. I read the rejection letter, said, "Shiat! That sucks!", got over it, and went to my second choice.

Kids these days...
 
2013-04-03 03:41:30 PM
Meh... No extra-curricular activities, played hockey (badly) for two years, mediocre grades, and mediocre SAT scores for me.

Did two years at a Community College, transfered to a State school (Go UMass!), lived and worked a variety of shiat jobs in Ireland for 5 years, spent 3 years as a chef, 4 years as a travel agent and currently work for myself as a designer and teach photography at the same Community College I attended all those years ago.

What college you go to isn't that big of a deal, little girl... Stop whining and go to a state school. Maybe grow up a little bit, too.
 
2013-04-03 03:41:45 PM

Half Right: I don't get all the hate and outrage about this letter. I thought it was funny. If anything the Gawker response author seems to be the bitter, angry, self-important one.


You have no idea what any of those words mean.
 
2013-04-03 03:42:28 PM
I went in the Army. I got the MOS of my choice and choice of first assignment. Oh, how the guys who only got to choose Combat Arms were envious of me. There I was, strutting about the base with my E-2 and crew chief wings.

But I studied for the ASVAB. I learned my letters A, S, V and B. I knew the Army wouldn't accept me if I cut off a finger or thumb so I tried to avoid doing just that. My research also told me I needed a pulse just to get looked at by the recruiters, I made sure my heart was beating just before I went in there.

All this paid off for me. I got Observation Helicopter Repairer and Hawaii but it wasn't the Hawaii with the condos and boats(*). They must have just redone the place and brought the 25th ID in.

Hard work, a good score, a steady pulse and nine out of ten fingers and thumbs. That's what did it for me.

(*) That might have been the Fort Ord poster.
 
2013-04-03 03:42:40 PM
Like any serious publication would deign to accept open letters?
 
2013-04-03 03:43:10 PM

factoryconnection: Her listed of supposed "required" attributes were a mere one varsity letter higher than my resume coming out of HS.  I had this odd sense at that age that I had to apply myself to stand out.  Thank you, parents for lighting a fire under me.

If her rich parents never made her get off her ass and be anything more than a FB surfer, then yeah they get plenty of blame, too.  They do have nice taste in home design, I'll give them that.


I don't blame them much.  A bit, but not much.  The kid is clearly an spoiled little biatch who couldn't get in to her school of choice because she apparently -- going by her mocking of the SATs -- had weak test scores and no interest in anything other than being a spoiled little biatch.

"Yeah, that black kid had better SAT scores and a 4.0 and raised his sister on his own after his mom died by working two jobs, but Harvard just let him in because of affirmative action!  It's not fair!"
 
2013-04-03 03:43:27 PM

WinoRhino: Lesson 1: It doesn't matter where you go, it's what you do while you're there.


I agree with this.  I have classmates in college that did everything from flunk out to become profoundly successful in various fields.  I'm still a work in progress, but I thought I got a fantastic education.  I think it was mainly because I sought out interesting professors, subjects outside of my "comfort zone," and other such things.  I imagine someone could do that at any school, really--there are good professors everywhere if you know where to look.
 
2013-04-03 03:43:42 PM
This is what I take away from this...

I don't think anyone could possibly be so shortsighted to think that colleges litterally are ONLY interrested in "being yourself" when referring to possible applicants.  Purhaps they will tell you that in an interview...  But they don't mean for you to just shirk ever piece of resonsibility that would make them accept your application..  That's the opening to her argument.  Then she goes on to cite that, since that's all she needed to do, she did nothing more.  Now it's all the gays and minority's faults for taking a place in colleges she feels she deserves.

Considering how completely absurd that sounds, I'm guessing this is either a hoax, or some sort of satire.  I know th WSJ is supposed to be above such types of stories.  But April 1st did just go by.
 
2013-04-03 03:44:18 PM

cman: Woman applies for college
College rejects woman
Woman biatches about being rejected
Everyone sits and points and laughs

This seems like an old story by now


Ah, but you forget the step, "Woman's complaint have bigot dog-whistles in them, so WSJ picks it up and runs with it."
 
2013-04-03 03:44:46 PM

Dion Fortune: What's this obsession with getting into extra-selective schools?  If you get good grades you can get into public State U and it'll be much cheaper.  You'll use the same textbooks and learn the same crap, and the school will offer you more scholarships and financial aid.  Learn skills that are actually in demand or benefit society and you'll always have a job.


But, then I cant get into Tappa Kegga Bru, since they dont have a chapter at State.
 
2013-04-03 03:45:08 PM

wildcardjack: Amusement: This sh*t is real and I CLEPed college humanities, Freshman English and other non-important stupid arse classes that cost thousands at the big "U".

Sounds like reasons not to accept you as a profit center, er, I mean prospective student.

Anyhow... The school wants to get what they're shown, but if it's a fake extrovert that collapses into deep depression because they're really an introvert who's been "faking it till they make it." This isn't a knock against introverts, it's a knock against the schools preparing lemmings extroverts to follow the crowd.

/Anyhow, if you're gonna be yourself
//Be awesome.


///Fark Yah!
 
2013-04-03 03:46:11 PM
MikeChewbacca there are actually some pretty good public schools in Seattle -- if your friends can afford 16 years of private they should be able to afford one of those neighborhoods. Or is the idea that their son's life will be destroyed if he doesn't get into an Ivy?

I thought the writer was trying to be funny and self-deprecating; I'd take her over the trolls at Gawker any day. And in a way I do get what she means -- one thing that was clear in the application process, even 15 years ago, was in addition to looking for good academics, colleges were also looking for what boiled down to interesting stories, often involving overcome some dramatic trauma or unusual background history. But when you're eighteen, a lot of your life is more about what's happened to you than what you could potentially accomplish. I get that they don't want the entire campus to be a monoculture, but at the same time I think they lose sight of the fact that you didn't have control over a lot of it.

/Got into my first choice, which was not an Ivy.
 
2013-04-03 03:46:16 PM

Warthog: mrlewish: Interesting how we rate ourselves on what job we do or what school we went to.

All concerned sides are full of whiny self entitles biatches.

To treat you like a human being I don't have to give a damn what school you went to, or what fancy job titles you have, or who you are or who you know.

Fourth Tier Public College typing detected.


Does it really matter?  Lets just say this.  If all the lawyers on Earth disappeared, life would go on for the rest of us after a "WTF just happened" disturbance. If all the farmers on Earth disappeared we would all be truly be farked. Guess who society values more.
 
2013-04-03 03:47:09 PM
Whiners whining about whiners.

I know what we can do. Lets kick it up a notch.
 
kab
2013-04-03 03:47:16 PM
The colleges that turned you down did you a favor.  At least now, your unemployment won't be saddled with tens of thousands of non-dismissable debt.
 
2013-04-03 03:47:46 PM

Harry Freakstorm: I went in the Army. I got the MOS of my choice and choice of first assignment. Oh, how the guys who only got to choose Combat Arms were envious of me. There I was, strutting about the base with my E-2 and crew chief wings.

But I studied for the ASVAB. I learned my letters A, S, V and B. I knew the Army wouldn't accept me if I cut off a finger or thumb so I tried to avoid doing just that. My research also told me I needed a pulse just to get looked at by the recruiters, I made sure my heart was beating just before I went in there.

All this paid off for me. I got Observation Helicopter Repairer and Hawaii but it wasn't the Hawaii with the condos and boats(*). They must have just redone the place and brought the 25th ID in.

Hard work, a good score, a steady pulse and nine out of ten fingers and thumbs. That's what did it for me.

(*) That might have been the Fort Ord poster.


WTF is a MOS?
 
2013-04-03 03:47:46 PM

reklamfox: I had no extracurricular activities and never took my SATs and I still got into a respectable college. You know why? I did the smart thing and went to a community college the first 2 yrs. Having a college degree before applying to a larger university makes you look good without having to pump your application with a bunch of BS. No SAT required.


I basically did high school in junior college (algebra, history, etc) and transferred to a great university. I remember spending something like $500 a semester (including books). Two years at the university racked up some loans though, I dont know how kids do it these days. My guess is that, like online dating, online college will eventually win out as the smart, efficient and cheaper way to do things. I used to work at a brick and mortar university - I cashed out my retirement because I don't think they'll be around in 30 years.
 
2013-04-03 03:49:03 PM

StrangeQ: Kingly Weevil: I didn't get into the graduate program I wanted because I didn't have enough research experience.

Which we all know is code for, "He doesn't have any interesting ancestors."

Clearly.

Can't tell if you're being serious or not...but that will in fact keep you from getting into grad school.  And it might make you a little bitter, especially when the last of the undergrad research funding was spent on the girl barely holding a C average because we need more female science majors, aptitude be damned!


Only the first bit was serious.  I thought their criticism was a bit weak, since they didn't specify what type of research, and I do research verification as a profession, currently.

Their main complaint seemed to be, "Why did someone with grades as good as yours, and who absolutely aced the GRE, not go straight to graduate school?"

Apparently the correct answer is NOT, "Because I wanted a couch not made of plywood and milk cartons."

Either way, it's all for the best. The prof who I would've worked with (She was an alternate choice) has research focused on children. And I hate children. So I'll try again next year.
 
2013-04-03 03:49:23 PM
Schools lie.  Do well enough on your SATS and nothing else matters.  Those other things they ask for are pure window dressing/used to make a determination on admission right before the coin flip.   back when a perfect SAT was a 1600 no school in the world is seriously gonna turn away anyone with a 1450+ no matter what thier transcript looked like, short of a felony or two on thier permanent record.

Hell when I applied to law school, my academic undergrad record could charitably be called "checkered".  Yes I had managed many semesters of striaght A's but I also had not one but two seperate "academic dismissals" from different colleges (I was both lazy and likely  battling undiagnosed depression in those years, plus I had no real conception of what I wanted to do with my life...at one point pursuing an EE despite the fact that I am severely "discalculate" (like dyslexia with numbers)

OTOH I scored a 173 out of a possible 180 on my LSATS (99th percentile).  Not only was I inivited to apply to a flood of law schools, but I wasn;t rejected from any school I applied to, even a top ten school I didn;t end up going to (U-Penn) because another school offered me a bigger scholarship than they did
 
2013-04-03 03:49:59 PM
My advice: If your local community college is decent, do a year or two knocking off basic graduation requirements. Take your basic English and Math, kick serious ass and then transfer over to the university that would have bounced you as a Freshman. Just be sure that your credits will transfer over.

You'll also probably save money in the long run.

When you can't get into the front door, wait a while for the crowd to die down and try going in the back.
 
2013-04-03 03:50:14 PM
What ?!?! Negative fallout from raising your child in this BS PC everything is good, everyone wins, and thinking bad thoughts about someone is bullying society. It is about time kids realize that the world is NOT fair, you can do EVERYTHING CORRECTLY and STILL LOSE. Stop swaddling your crotch fruit in bubble wrap and let them understand loss a little. Competitive games like dodgeball, and other sports highlight the skills needed to lose gracefully, and hopefully somewhere you master the skill to win in the same manner.
 
2013-04-03 03:50:16 PM

RenownedCurator: MikeChewbacca there are actually some pretty good public schools in Seattle -- if your friends can afford 16 years of private they should be able to afford one of those neighborhoods. Or is the idea that their son's life will be destroyed if he doesn't get into an Ivy?

I thought the writer was trying to be funny and self-deprecating; I'd take her over the trolls at Gawker any day. And in a way I do get what she means -- one thing that was clear in the application process, even 15 years ago, was in addition to looking for good academics, colleges were also looking for what boiled down to interesting stories, often involving overcome some dramatic trauma or unusual background history. But when you're eighteen, a lot of your life is more about what's happened to you than what you could potentially accomplish. I get that they don't want the entire campus to be a monoculture, but at the same time I think they lose sight of the fact that you didn't have control over a lot of it.

/Got into my first choice, which was not an Ivy.


My friends know that the easiest way for their son to excel in education is to start him off at a private school in kindergarten. They know he won't be destroyed if he goes the public school route, but they want him to have every chance at success. They realize it's ridiculous to send a 5 year old to private kindergarten, but it's just harder to get into private high school if you didn't go to private grade school.

And yes, colleges are looking for interesting stories. Unfortunately, most teenagers have lived boring lives. I enjoyed her letter and thought it was funny and tongue-in-cheek. Kids today are under such pressure to excel in every way possible. We make fun of their parents for being helicopter parent soccer moms, but when a kid DOESN'T have a helicopter parent, then she's apparently an entitled lazy biatch.
 
2013-04-03 03:50:43 PM
Surely this has to be a troll.

"I'm not that smart, have  noinitiative, hobbies or interests, I don't take part in school activities and by the way I've openly got a chip on my shoulder about minorities and homosexuals, yet can you believe top universities across the nation weren't falling over themselves to offer me a place"
 
2013-04-03 03:50:50 PM

GiantRex: I went to engineering school, where being able to write a coherent essay of any sort is usually good enough to get you admitted.


To the Honors Program.
 
2013-04-03 03:51:03 PM
Funny.  I wasn't lied to.  I was told I probably wouldn't get in to MIT, so I should also apply to my state U.  I had a classic profile of not living up to my potential.  My grades and ACT meant an easy automatic acceptance at state and almost no shot at my "dream" schools. And of course, that's exactly what happened. I was also accepted at neighboring state U. Anyway, that saved me a lot of money when I dropped out 4 years later and just a few credits shy of a degree in the wrong field.
 
2013-04-03 03:51:04 PM
2.bp.blogspot.com
 
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