If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Gawker)   Gawker issues a brutal takedown of the entitled, butthurt, college-rejected high schooler who got her open letter published by the Wall Street Journal   (gawker.com) divider line 352
    More: Followup, Wall Street Journal, Amy Chua, it gets better, Ronald McDonald House Charities, Pacific Islanders, SAT Scores, colleges  
•       •       •

32829 clicks; posted to Main » on 03 Apr 2013 at 3:01 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



352 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

Archived thread
 
2013-04-03 10:43:16 AM
Meh.  All I did in High School was go to Phish concerts and get high.  But because I was into music, I studied piano very seriously, and I even (shock) practiced, because I wanted to get better.  And so I got better and had various nice accomplishments to tell colleges about.  My grades were acceptable, but not great, and neither were my SAT scores.

But I got into every single school I applied to, including: University of Chicago, NYU, Northwestern, and most importantly, my 1st choice and alma mater: Oberiln.  Oddly, none of those schools cared that I wasn't top of my class, nor did they care that my SAT score was like 1000 (they used a 1600 scale back in my day.)  This tells me there must have been something else defective about her application.
 
2013-04-03 11:06:09 AM

ambassador_ahab:   This tells me there must have been something else defective about her application.


Its author.
 
2013-04-03 11:07:15 AM

FloydA: Its author.


Lulz.  Yeah, prolly that.
 
2013-04-03 11:08:52 AM
Wow, what a class act this chick is.  Nice sarcasm on the part of Gawker, though.
 
2013-04-03 11:08:57 AM
Good LORD, that is one seriously whiny-ass biatch.
 
2013-04-03 11:11:35 AM

FloydA: ambassador_ahab:   This tells me there must have been something else defective about her application.

Its author.


Since the WSJ is on her side, I expect she acted like a privileged little biatch and demanded admittance.
 
2013-04-03 11:15:54 AM

GAT_00: I expect she acted like a privileged little biatch and demanded admittance.


She should have tried the "I kind of suck and you probably shouldn't admit me, but just in case..."

A friend did that and he got into Stanford, and now he works for Google.
 
2013-04-03 11:18:31 AM
I work with great college students on a daily basis. And the person who wrote that drivel is not one, and will probably never be one.
 
2013-04-03 11:27:52 AM

GAT_00: FloydA: ambassador_ahab:   This tells me there must have been something else defective about her application.

Its author.

Since the WSJ is on her side, I expect she acted like a privileged little biatch and demanded admittance.


Well she is white and some minorities were accepted before her so obviously this is the fault of the liberal east coast elitist mindset that prevails amongst our nations institutions of higher learning

/also biatch be tripping
 
2013-04-03 11:49:13 AM
Herbert A. Millington Chair - Search Committee
[CENSORED], Whitson University
College Hill, MA 34109

Dear Professor Millington,

Thank you for your letter of March 16. After careful consideration, I regret to inform you that I am unable to accept your refusal to offer me an assistant professor position in your department.

This year I have been particularly fortunate in receiving an unusually large number of rejection letters. With such a varied and promising field of candidates, it is impossible for me to accept all refusals.

Despite Whitson's outstanding qualifications and previous experience in rejecting applicants, I find that your rejection does not meet my needs at this time. Therefore, I will assume the position of assistant professor in your department this August. I look forward to seeing you then.

Best of luck in rejecting future applicants.

Sincerely,

Chris L. Jensen
 
2013-04-03 12:02:59 PM
Woman applies for college
College rejects woman
Woman biatches about being rejected
Everyone sits and points and laughs

This seems like an old story by now
 
2013-04-03 12:23:48 PM
C U Next Tuesday
 
2013-04-03 01:52:31 PM

ambassador_ahab: GAT_00: I expect she acted like a privileged little biatch and demanded admittance.

She should have tried the "I kind of suck and you probably shouldn't admit me, but just in case..."



I did that for a couple of grad programs and got admission letters from places I couldn't afford.
Sucks to be me I guess.
 
2013-04-03 01:58:54 PM
I didn't get into the graduate program I wanted because I didn't have enough research experience.

Which we all know is code for, "He doesn't have any interesting ancestors."

Clearly.
 
2013-04-03 01:59:31 PM

unlikely: ambassador_ahab: GAT_00: I expect she acted like a privileged little biatch and demanded admittance.

She should have tried the "I kind of suck and you probably shouldn't admit me, but just in case..."


I did that for a couple of grad programs and got admission letters from places I couldn't afford.
Sucks to be me I guess.


Harvard realized this long ago: if you only take the best, the suicide rate is prohibitively high.  So take some average students with good extracurriculars who also have the balls to apply to Harvard with anything below a 4.0.  They'll happily take average grades, and some of them perform very well in college environments.

Of course, this is less true these days I think because nobody really curves.
 
2013-04-03 02:00:32 PM
I went to engineering school, where being able to write a coherent essay of any sort is usually good enough to get you admitted.
 
2013-04-03 02:01:18 PM
I had a grand total of one extra-curricular and I took some AP tests.  And I'm a white male from an upper middle class family.  If I can get into any college I want I'm sure anyone can.
 
2013-04-03 02:01:55 PM

scottydoesntknow: Herbert A. Millington Chair - Search Committee
[CENSORED], Whitson University
College Hill, MA 34109

Dear Professor Millington,

Thank you for your letter of March 16. After careful consideration, I regret to inform you that I am unable to accept your refusal to offer me an assistant professor position in your department.

This year I have been particularly fortunate in receiving an unusually large number of rejection letters. With such a varied and promising field of candidates, it is impossible for me to accept all refusals.

Despite Whitson's outstanding qualifications and previous experience in rejecting applicants, I find that your rejection does not meet my needs at this time. Therefore, I will assume the position of assistant professor in your department this August. I look forward to seeing you then.

Best of luck in rejecting future applicants.

Sincerely,

Chris L. Jensen


I'm going to adapt this for my next job rejection
 
2013-04-03 02:12:13 PM

ambassador_ahab: Meh.  All I did in High School was go to Phish concerts and get high.  But because I was into music, I studied piano very seriously, and I even (shock) practiced, because I wanted to get better.  And so I got better and had various nice accomplishments to tell colleges about.  My grades were acceptable, but not great, and neither were my SAT scores.

But I got into every single school I applied to, including: University of Chicago, NYU, Northwestern, and most importantly, my 1st choice and alma mater: Oberiln.  Oddly, none of those schools cared that I wasn't top of my class, nor did they care that my SAT score was like 1000 (they used a 1600 scale back in my day.)  This tells me there must have been something else defective about her application.


WTF? Whose dick did you suck to get into these schools?

A decent piano player and a 1000 SAT will not get you into any of these schools. Unless you went to Julliard or played at Carnegie Hall. Hell, even then you would have had a hard time.
 
2013-04-03 02:15:12 PM

GAT_00: unlikely: ambassador_ahab: GAT_00: I expect she acted like a privileged little biatch and demanded admittance.

She should have tried the "I kind of suck and you probably shouldn't admit me, but just in case..."


I did that for a couple of grad programs and got admission letters from places I couldn't afford.
Sucks to be me I guess.

Harvard realized this long ago: if you only take the best, the suicide rate is prohibitively high.  So take some average students with good extracurriculars who also have the balls to apply to Harvard with anything below a 4.0.  They'll happily take average grades, and some of them perform very well in college environments.

Of course, this is less true these days I think because nobody really curves.


The one that blew my mind was when my "open application" to Oxford got me offers from Trinity and Queen's. I didn't apply to Harvard... probably should have, in retrospect. :-)
 
2013-04-03 02:20:19 PM

GAT_00: unlikely: ambassador_ahab: GAT_00: I expect she acted like a privileged little biatch and demanded admittance.

She should have tried the "I kind of suck and you probably shouldn't admit me, but just in case..."


I did that for a couple of grad programs and got admission letters from places I couldn't afford.
Sucks to be me I guess.

Harvard realized this long ago: if you only take the best, the suicide rate is prohibitively high.  So take some average students with good extracurriculars who also have the balls to apply to Harvard with anything below a 4.0.  They'll happily take average grades, and some of them perform very well in college environments.

Of course, this is less true these days I think because nobody really curves.


I would kill myself if I went to Harvard, too.
 
2013-04-03 02:27:45 PM
Her listed of supposed "required" attributes were a mere one varsity letter higher than my resume coming out of HS.  I had this odd sense at that age that I had to apply myself to stand out.  Thank you, parents for lighting a fire under me.

If her rich parents never made her get off her ass and be anything more than a FB surfer, then yeah they get plenty of blame, too.  They do have nice taste in home design, I'll give them that.
 
2013-04-03 02:36:56 PM
Oh goddammit. Shut the f*ck up.
 
2013-04-03 02:37:43 PM
Because everyone knows that if you don't have anything difficult going on in your own life, you should just hop on a plane so you're able to talk about what other people have to deal with.

What a lovely girl she must be.
 
2013-04-03 02:44:27 PM
She tried nothing and now she's fresh out of ideas.

/I deal with kids like her almost every single day.
 
2013-04-03 02:54:14 PM

zobear: She tried nothing and now she's fresh out of ideas.

/I deal with kids like her almost every single day.


Literal LOL.
 
2013-04-03 02:54:25 PM
To those claiming that I am bitter-you bet I am! An underachieving selfish teenager making excuses for her own failures? That too! To those of you disgusted by this, shocked that I take for granted the wonderful gifts I have been afforded, I say shhhh-"The Real Housewives" is on.

yikes, it just gets worse.
 
2013-04-03 03:03:38 PM

NuttierThanEver: GAT_00: FloydA: ambassador_ahab:   This tells me there must have been something else defective about her application.

Its author.

Since the WSJ is on her side, I expect she acted like a privileged little biatch and demanded admittance.

Well she is white and some minorities were accepted before her so obviously this is the fault of the liberal east coast elitist mindset that prevails amongst our nations institutions of higher learning

/also biatch be tripping


I thought it was "biatch be getting truculent"
 
2013-04-03 03:04:20 PM
Colleges tell you, "Just be yourself." That is great advice, as long as yourself has nine extracurriculars, six leadership positions, three varsity sports, killer SAT scores and two moms. Then by all means, be yourself!

If she had left that part out, Gawker would have left her alone.
 
2013-04-03 03:04:24 PM
So they hired her as a writer then?
 
2013-04-03 03:04:34 PM
justdwl.net

//Applies to both.
 
jvl
2013-04-03 03:04:46 PM
So I finally read the piece by the kid in the Journal.

That was funny, not whiny. It was almost Fark-good.
 
2013-04-03 03:06:42 PM
I vote for the girl in the Journal.  She was hilarious.
 
2013-04-03 03:07:01 PM
Who the hell is she quoting when she says people advised her to "be yourself" in order to get into a college? Did the WSJ publish her letter just so we could make fun of her? Either way, it's hilarious.
 
2013-04-03 03:07:02 PM
I don't get all the hate and outrage about this letter. I thought it was funny. If anything the Gawker response author seems to be the bitter, angry, self-important one.
 
2013-04-03 03:07:04 PM
REPEAT much?

I just finished reading this the first time....
 
2013-04-03 03:07:46 PM
I'd hit it
 
2013-04-03 03:08:41 PM
I had no extracurricular activities and never took my SATs and I still got into a respectable college. You know why? I did the smart thing and went to a community college the first 2 yrs. Having a college degree before applying to a larger university makes you look good without having to pump your application with a bunch of BS. No SAT required.
 
2013-04-03 03:09:21 PM
My gpa was so bad in HS the college advisor laughed her ass off when I asked what my options were. I did pretty well on my SATs but to this day I imagine someone with the same name as I died during the admission process and they accidentally accepted me.
 
2013-04-03 03:09:47 PM
Poor girl. Probably can't even be a stripper.
 
2013-04-03 03:11:07 PM
You're a white girl from a privileged background. You didn't have outstanding grades, test scores, didn't have accomplishments in extra-curricular activities or elsewhere outside of school.

And now you didn't get into your first choice dream college. Probably got right into all kinds of good schools, but not the elite college of your dreams.
Clearly, the blame must be placed on affirmative action, and anyone who values diversity. Minorities, gays, etc...  too bad you aren't any of those things. I'm sure your attitude and work ethic would have carried you much further if you had those "advantages", you know, they just give those people things for nothing.

And of course it gets published in the WSJ. Reads like pretty much every other argument against affirmative action or diversity considerations. Scalia will probably cite it in his opinion on  Schuette v. Coalition to Defend Affirmative Action. Hoping it will be in the dissent... but probably won't be.
 
2013-04-03 03:11:08 PM
Wow what a biatch.
 
2013-04-03 03:11:33 PM
The WSJ article reads more like what a WSJ writer believes modern college admissions are composed of, and how they think "kids today" would respond to it.

"Strawman farking straw chicken," I believe it's called.
 
2013-04-03 03:11:45 PM
FTFA:In fact, the one notorious aspect of college admissions that virtually no one ever praises openly-the preferential treatment given to legacy applicants who are admitted to schools because of familial connections-Suzy Lee Weiss doesn't touch in herWall Street Journal piece.


Perhaps her sister Bari Weiss, a former Wall Street Journal editorial features editor, talked her out of it.


Beautiful.  Someone buy the author a beer.
 
2013-04-03 03:12:14 PM

abhorrent1: Poor girl. Probably can't even be a stripper.


Unclear.  We need pics to evaluate this.  Surely they exist, given what a raging attention whore she seems to be.
 
2013-04-03 03:12:42 PM

abhorrent1: Poor girl. Probably can't even be a stripper.


Dammit. Someone ate the pic.

wac.450f.edgecastcdn.net
 
2013-04-03 03:13:25 PM
I see a future Republican candidate for Presidency in this youngin.

whiny, envious, entitled, anti charity, anti minorities, anti gay and self serving.
 
2013-04-03 03:13:28 PM
"Just be yourself" is just another way of saying "don't lie."

"Like me, millions of high-school seniors with sour grapes are asking themselves this week how they failed to get into the colleges of their dreams. It's simple: "

Yes, very simple: none of you gave a shiat about getting into the college of your dreams until a day or two before the applications were due.
 
2013-04-03 03:13:39 PM

jvl: So I finally read the piece by the kid in the Journal.

That was funny, not whiny. It was almost Fark-good.


You're being generous.
 
2013-04-03 03:13:48 PM
Interesting how we rate ourselves on what job we do or what school we went to.

All concerned sides are full of whiny self entitles biatches.

To treat you like a human being I don't have to give a damn what school you went to, or what fancy job titles you have, or who you are or who you know.
 
2013-04-03 03:14:04 PM
Back in the day you could get into a lot of good schools with a SAT of just over 1000 (different max), with ok school grades, like a B avg. It also wasn't almost 40K a year for good frickin state schools.
 
2013-04-03 03:14:48 PM
I knew a guy in high school who wrote a letter like this in the local paper after getting rejected from UC Berkeley.  He then got a letter of acceptance from UC Berkeley.
 
2013-04-03 03:14:49 PM

The Muthaship: Colleges tell you, "Just be yourself." That is great advice, as long as yourself has nine extracurriculars, six leadership positions, three varsity sports, killer SAT scores and two moms. Then by all means, be yourself!

If she had left that part out, Gawker would have left her alone.


What about her racist dig at all them undeserving minorities?
 
2013-04-03 03:15:06 PM
The advice of "just be yourself" is good advice. It works. In her case, she was herself - a lazy, self-absorbed, brat. And the school clearly decided that isn't the kind of person they want.

This whole thing reinforces my faith in education. Idiots get pushed aside, intelligent people get ahead. You don't want to work hard, fine, do not expect to go far.
 
2013-04-03 03:15:06 PM
Response to Gawker:

Dear Gawker,

You're Gawker.

In your face,
NV
 
2013-04-03 03:15:06 PM
>Perhaps her sister Wall Street Journal editorial features editor, talked her out of it.
 
2013-04-03 03:15:32 PM

abhorrent1: abhorrent1: Poor girl. Probably can't even be a stripper.

Dammit. Someone ate the pic.

[wac.450f.edgecastcdn.net image 538x289]


She looks entitled.
 
2013-04-03 03:15:37 PM

mrlewish: Interesting how we rate ourselves on what job we do or what school we went to.

All concerned sides are full of whiny self entitles biatches.

To treat you like a human being I don't have to give a damn what school you went to, or what fancy job titles you have, or who you are or who you know.


Fourth Tier Public College typing detected.
 
2013-04-03 03:15:42 PM
Gawker is reproducing Fark threads?   I want my royalties!
 
2013-04-03 03:17:02 PM
So, you whiny little narcissistic biatch, go to your safety school for two years, actually do something besides get drunk and fark the hockey team, and transfer in to your first choice.

Or did you suicide your first choice because you were unable to conceive of  a world in which your precious little snowflake self be rejected.

This, THIS is what happens when you give too many participation trophies.
 
2013-04-03 03:17:03 PM
What a horrible person.
 
2013-04-03 03:17:10 PM

Fano: What about her racist dig at all them undeserving minorities?


That ain't the axe Gawker likes to grind.
 
2013-04-03 03:17:21 PM
I bet if I'd had great SAT scores, they would have accepted me.

I never would have thought colleges and universities would tend to accept students with great SAT scores.

Her letter really opened my eyes.

Of course, they're rolling, but still.
 
2013-04-03 03:17:32 PM
What do you expect from the Whiner Street Journal?  I'm surprised they didn't make her put in a line that "and corporate taxes are too high".
 
2013-04-03 03:17:36 PM

FloydA: ambassador_ahab:   This tells me there must have been something else defective about her application.

Its author.


Yeah...at first it's sounds like she's "being herself".  Thing is "being a whiny biatch" is not "being yourself"...unless it's your default behavior.
 
2013-04-03 03:17:45 PM
Eh, I see the letter-writer's very bitter point. In this day and age, kids HAVE to go to college or they're almost guaranteed a life of near-poverty. Going to college is the new normal, but colleges still think normal students have no place in their special snowflake universities.
 
2013-04-03 03:17:54 PM
Maybe she could get a job trolling Fark.

This country needs more pageviews if it the economy is ever gonna recover.
 
2013-04-03 03:18:47 PM
Wall Street Journal 'Humor'......
3.bp.blogspot.com
 
2013-04-03 03:18:56 PM
I just read the gal's original article.  Its clearly intentionally self-effacing and humorous.   And just look at all these people she successfully trolled.  Plus, she got published. Well done.
 
2013-04-03 03:19:22 PM

lennavan: "Just be yourself" is just another way of saying "don't lie."

"Like me, millions of high-school seniors with sour grapes are asking themselves this week how they failed to get into the colleges of their dreams. It's simple: "

Yes, very simple: none of you gave a shiat about getting into the college of your dreams until a day or two before the applications were due.


Bingo.  This is a perfect example of what happens when a student coasts comfortably through high school with the assumption that "Why, of course I'll get into whichever college I want.  It's pretty much a foregone conclusion!"
 
2013-04-03 03:19:27 PM

Cluckity: Maybe she could get a job trolling Fark.

This country needs more pageviews if the economy is ever gonna recover.


FTFM. Forgive my typos. I never had the opportunity to go to the college of my dreams.
 
2013-04-03 03:19:47 PM
Her letter is hilarious. I like the cut of her jib.
 
2013-04-03 03:19:48 PM

GAT_00: FloydA: ambassador_ahab:   This tells me there must have been something else defective about her application.

Its author.

Since the WSJ is on her side, I expect she acted like a privileged little biatch and demanded admittance.


She sounds like a typical loser Republican, blaming everyone else for their faults. No wonder the WSJ supports her.
 
2013-04-03 03:20:13 PM

Fano: What about her racist dig at all them undeserving minorities?


Her complaint about universities making a mindless fetish of "diversity" was quite accurate, and the most sensible thing she said in the entire letter.
 
2013-04-03 03:20:40 PM

abhorrent1: Poor girl. Probably can't even be a stripper.


can't wait to see *that* rejection letter...
 
2013-04-03 03:21:42 PM

EvilRacistNaziFascist: Fano: What about her racist dig at all them undeserving minorities?

Her complaint about universities making a mindless fetish of "diversity" was quite accurate, and the most sensible thing she said in the entire letter.


Hey, you white people be dumb.
 
2013-04-03 03:21:58 PM
Cry moar noob, your tears are delicious.
 
2013-04-03 03:22:00 PM

SuperNinjaToad: I see a future Republican candidate for Presidency in this youngin.

whiny, envious, entitled, anti charity, anti minorities, anti gay and self serving.


Since she's Jewish, you're spot on in your assessment(s) except for one major part...she'll run as a far left Democrat.
 
2013-04-03 03:22:32 PM

T.rex: I just read the gal's original article.  Its clearly intentionally self-effacing and humorous.   And just look at all these people she successfully trolled.  Plus, she got published. Well done.


Yeah, I got the same vibe.  Well played, Suzy Lee Weiss.
 
2013-04-03 03:22:34 PM
4.bp.blogspot.com
 
2013-04-03 03:22:44 PM
Gabrielmot


abhorrent1:
Poor girl. Probably can't even be a stripper.

can't wait to see *that* rejection letter...

She's gonna do porn and it's going to really bad porn.
 
2013-04-03 03:22:52 PM

Kingly Weevil: I didn't get into the graduate program I wanted because I didn't have enough research experience.

Which we all know is code for, "He doesn't have any interesting ancestors."

Clearly.


Can't tell if you're being serious or not...but that will in fact keep you from getting into grad school.  And it might make you a little bitter, especially when the last of the undergrad research funding was spent on the girl barely holding a C average because we need more female science majors, aptitude be damned!
 
2013-04-03 03:23:16 PM

EvilRacistNaziFascist: Fano: What about her racist dig at all them undeserving minorities?

Her complaint about universities making a mindless fetish of "diversity" was quite accurate, and the most sensible thing she said in the entire letter.


She also made a valid point about having to find some way to interact with adversity. She's a normal teenager living a bland life, and she doesn't have the resources to fly to another country to see how awful the world really can be.
 
2013-04-03 03:23:54 PM
You could also say she sounds like a dem, expecting everyone to support her.
 
2013-04-03 03:24:05 PM
You're boring and you squandered the early best years of your life doing nothing of relevance.

So by being yourself college's were able to discern that you would be bringing your lazy-arse whitebread mindset of doing the bare-minimum to their campus.

Surprisingly, they didn't want you.  They wanted interesting people.  People who did things.  People who had done something they had been proud of rather than just show up.  People who gave a shiat about something other than just getting in.
 
2013-04-03 03:24:22 PM
FTFA: I bet if I'd had great SAT scores, they would have accepted me.

25.media.tumblr.com
 
2013-04-03 03:24:56 PM

Gabrielmot: abhorrent1: Poor girl. Probably can't even be a stripper.

can't wait to see *that* rejection letter...


Gabrielmot: abhorrent1: Poor girl. Probably can't even be a stripper.

can't wait to see *that* rejection letter...


Dear Suzy,

No.  Not even on the first shift.

(sad trombone)
 
2013-04-03 03:25:19 PM
s17.postimg.org


What high school career counselors won't tell you is this, you CAN get college credit.  College Level Examine Program offers over 33 examines to get college credit and it costs less than community (comedy) college.

http://clep.collegeboard.org/

While other students are trying to get into "their" college you've already got college credits.  The real stink is you can start taking CLEP examines when your 16 years old.

This sh*t is real and I CLEPed college humanities, Freshman English and other non-important stupid arse classes that cost thousands at the big "U".
 
2013-04-03 03:25:47 PM
What's this obsession with getting into extra-selective schools?  If you get good grades you can get into public State U and it'll be much cheaper.  You'll use the same textbooks and learn the same crap, and the school will offer you more scholarships and financial aid.  Learn skills that are actually in demand or benefit society and you'll always have a job.
 
2013-04-03 03:25:50 PM

Mike Chewbacca: EvilRacistNaziFascist: Fano: What about her racist dig at all them undeserving minorities?

Her complaint about universities making a mindless fetish of "diversity" was quite accurate, and the most sensible thing she said in the entire letter.

She also made a valid point about having to find some way to interact with adversity. She's a normal teenager living a bland life, and she doesn't have the resources to fly to another country to see how awful the world really can be.


If only there were some people living in less than ideal circumstances here in the US whom she could assist in some way...
 
2013-04-03 03:26:05 PM

scottydoesntknow: Herbert A. Millington Chair - Search Committee
[CENSORED], Whitson University
College Hill, MA 34109

Dear Professor Millington,

Thank you for your letter of March 16. After careful consideration, I regret to inform you that I am unable to accept your refusal to offer me an assistant professor position in your department.

This year I have been particularly fortunate in receiving an unusually large number of rejection letters. With such a varied and promising field of candidates, it is impossible for me to accept all refusals.

Despite Whitson's outstanding qualifications and previous experience in rejecting applicants, I find that your rejection does not meet my needs at this time. Therefore, I will assume the position of assistant professor in your department this August. I look forward to seeing you then.

Best of luck in rejecting future applicants.

Sincerely,

Chris L. Jensen


I'm going to amend this and send it out the next time I get an automatic email telling me I didn't get the job.
 
2013-04-03 03:26:38 PM

Mike Chewbacca: Eh, I see the letter-writer's very bitter point. In this day and age, kids HAVE to go to college or they're almost guaranteed a life of near-poverty. Going to college is the new normal, but colleges still think normal students have no place in their special snowflake universities.


It isn't that they think normal students have no place, it's that they can fill their schools with high-achieving kids.   That's because 90% of modern suburban children are checking off boxes towards their college applications from the time they are in diapers.  Literally.  I live in one of the snobbiest 'progressive' enclaves outside of California -- North Arlington, VA.  You may or may not be shocked to hear the discussions the parents of North Arlington regularly have about the academic rigor of their HALF-DAY PRE-SCHOOL programs. Or the politics of which pre-school teacher they are going to be assigned.

Because how the kid does in half-day will impact how they do in full day.  Which will impact what Kindergarten they go to and how they do there.  And that impacts the next level.  On and on ad nauseum, until you have kids in Huntington learning centers for enrichment activities on their summer break instead of riding bikes around the neighborhood.

It's all because internet-addicted parents, who in many cases were part of the early trophy generation themselves, are deathly afraid that if they leave their kids with unstructured time they'll turn out like the author of this letter.   And this letter will only give them new-found confirmation that they are failures if they don't schedule every free hour of their kids' days.  If their kid doesn't get into Harvard, they don't get a parenting trophy.  And they want a parenting trophy.

It's like a giant circle of over-educated parent derp.  But the result is the colleges get more over-schooled applicants than they need, and the less talented (on paper) end up with tougher choices on where to go to college.
 
2013-04-03 03:26:46 PM
25.media.tumblr.com
 
2013-04-03 03:27:45 PM

Mike Chewbacca: Eh, I see the letter-writer's very bitter point. In this day and age, kids HAVE to go to college or they're almost guaranteed a life of near-poverty. Going to college is the new normal, but colleges still think normal students have no place in their special snowflake universities.


I'm just waiting for the college cost bubble to burst.
 
2013-04-03 03:27:48 PM
How exactly does society benefit from an uneducated populace due to pointless competition?
 
2013-04-03 03:27:55 PM

Amusement: [s17.postimg.org image 304x175]


What high school career counselors won't tell you is this, you CAN get college credit.  College Level Examine Program offers over 33 examines to get college credit and it costs less than community (comedy) college.

http://clep.collegeboard.org/

While other students are trying to get into "their" college you've already got college credits.  The real stink is you can start taking CLEP examines when your 16 years old.

This sh*t is real and I CLEPed college humanities, Freshman English and other non-important stupid arse classes that cost thousands at the big "U".


English isn't that unimportant. You should have paid closer attention.
 
2013-04-03 03:29:29 PM
Colleges tell you, "Just be yourself." That is great advice, as long as yourself has nine extracurriculars, six leadership positions, three varsity sports, killer SAT scores and two moms. Then by all means, be yourself!

Suzy, it sounds like yourself isn't good enough.  What this statement really means is to just be yourself because you won't be happy or successful trying to be someone else.

Similarly, we tell dorky, nice guys to just be yourself to attract women because we know it will get them a good fit.   It won't get them Kate Upton no matter how many lame date requests you send her on Youtube of you just being yourself.  "You" just aren't good enough.

That's life.
 
2013-04-03 03:30:07 PM
I feel bad for people who are told to follow their dreams, then have stupid dreams that aren't worth following.
 
2013-04-03 03:30:18 PM
It's just as well she wasn't accepted. Otherwise we'd have another Alexandra Wallace on campus.
 
2013-04-03 03:30:31 PM
My wife is an admissions counselor for a very good school which I will refrain from naming.

The stories she comes home with are nothing short of comedy gold.

Insane parents making threats when their kids with 100 SAT scores don't get in, kids admitting their parents wrote their application essays, a kid who listed smoking weed as an after school activity,  and my all time favorite "Does your university do hair?" (the girl thought all universities had beauty schools)
 
2013-04-03 03:30:58 PM
Holy shiat, that is one entitled little fark of a person. I think she will find that the people that got into their college of choice were just being themselves, they are just better human beings than her. Sure I spent a ridiculous amount of time stoned off my ass in HS, but I also managed to be a straight A student, work a full time job and get kick ass test scores because that is who I am. Hell, even during college I was able to discover myself and switch from a pre-med program to an evolutionary biology major based on who I am.

Her problem is that she feels that being upper middle class should be all she needs, not effort. fark her and her ilk.
 
2013-04-03 03:31:02 PM
Let's see. When I was in high school...

I was a peer leader, an eagle scout, an all-state athlete, an all-state musician, a mathlete, a volunteer, an AP student, class salutatorian, tutor, and had a job. I had 12 hour school days thanks to my extra-curriculars, plus 4-6 hours of homework per night. I ended up graduating with enough college credit to classify as a Junior after one semester. I also received full academic scholarships to my top 2 universities. I bled, sweat and cried my way through. If only I had come out in high school, I could have gotten some minority support, but silly me waited until college to do that. Otherwise I was just a middle class, white boy. I worked my damn ass off. This princess needs a reality check. The "participation trophies" end at some point.
 
2013-04-03 03:31:19 PM

Mike Chewbacca: Amusement: [s17.postimg.org image 304x175]


What high school career counselors won't tell you is this, you CAN get college credit.  College Level Examine Program offers over 33 examines to get college credit and it costs less than community (comedy) college.

http://clep.collegeboard.org/

While other students are trying to get into "their" college you've already got college credits.  The real stink is you can start taking CLEP examines when your 16 years old.

This sh*t is real and I CLEPed college humanities, Freshman English and other non-important stupid arse classes that cost thousands at the big "U".

English isn't that unimportant. You should have paid closer attention.


You sound like someone who has a liberal arts degree.
 
2013-04-03 03:32:08 PM

Mike Chewbacca: Amusement: [s17.postimg.org image 304x175]


What high school career counselors won't tell you is this, you CAN get college credit.  College Level Examine Program offers over 33 examines to get college credit and it costs less than community (comedy) college.

http://clep.collegeboard.org/

While other students are trying to get into "their" college you've already got college credits.  The real stink is you can start taking CLEP examines when your 16 years old.

This sh*t is real and I CLEPed college humanities, Freshman English and other non-important stupid arse classes that cost thousands at the big "U".

English isn't that unimportant. You should have paid closer attention.





should of

I can't believe I have to point that out.
 
2013-04-03 03:32:50 PM

Warthog: Mike Chewbacca: Eh, I see the letter-writer's very bitter point. In this day and age, kids HAVE to go to college or they're almost guaranteed a life of near-poverty. Going to college is the new normal, but colleges still think normal students have no place in their special snowflake universities.

It isn't that they think normal students have no place, it's that they can fill their schools with high-achieving kids.   That's because 90% of modern suburban children are checking off boxes towards their college applications from the time they are in diapers.  Literally.  I live in one of the snobbiest 'progressive' enclaves outside of California -- North Arlington, VA.  You may or may not be shocked to hear the discussions the parents of North Arlington regularly have about the academic rigor of their HALF-DAY PRE-SCHOOL programs. Or the politics of which pre-school teacher they are going to be assigned.

Because how the kid does in half-day will impact how they do in full day.  Which will impact what Kindergarten they go to and how they do there.  And that impacts the next level.  On and on ad nauseum, until you have kids in Huntington learning centers for enrichment activities on their summer break instead of riding bikes around the neighborhood.

It's all because internet-addicted parents, who in many cases were part of the early trophy generation themselves, are deathly afraid that if they leave their kids with unstructured time they'll turn out like the author of this letter.   And this letter will only give them new-found confirmation that they are failures if they don't schedule every free hour of their kids' days.  If their kid doesn't get into Harvard, they don't get a parenting trophy.  And they want a parenting trophy.

It's like a giant circle of over-educated parent derp.  But the result is the colleges get more over-schooled applicants than they need, and the less talented (on paper) end up with tougher choices on where to go to college.


You are absolutely right. I have some friends who are from the DC area and now living in Seattle. They are seriously considering putting their child in private grade school starting in Kindergarten because it'll shoehorn him right into private high school and then an Ivy League university. Their son is 4. They realize private grade school is a joke, but because the private grade schools all feed into the private high schools, they feel now is the time to act to ensure their son's place at an Ivy League university.

Meanwhile, the 85% of us who aren't able to pay for private school fight over the scraps. The girl who wrote the letter is a totally normal high school student. She should expect to go to a middle class university and graduate tens of thousands of dollars in debt.
 
2013-04-03 03:32:56 PM
dbug.kicks-ass.net
 
2013-04-03 03:33:11 PM

Amusement: [s17.postimg.org image 304x175]


What high school career counselors won't tell you is this, you CAN get college credit.  College Level Examine Program offers over 33 examines to get college credit and it costs less than community (comedy) college.

http://clep.collegeboard.org/

While other students are trying to get into "their" college you've already got college credits.  The real stink is you can start taking CLEP examines when your 16 years old.

This sh*t is real and I CLEPed college humanities, Freshman English and other non-important stupid arse classes that cost thousands at the big "U".


I'd also add AP courses.  I got lucky, and went to the high school that classes.map{ |class| class.gsub('Honors', 'AP')} despite it being the mediocre high school, and walked into my first day of classes as a sophomore with 43 credits.

/And then I failed to understand the meaning of the word prerequisite, messed around doing all my non-major courses for 2 years, and was forced to do 80+-hour weeks junior and senior years taking 4 400-level EECS courses.
//Mind you, the good high school was nationally ranked, effectively closed for Yom Kippur because it was about 80% Jewish, and had a "+.5 to GPA" note at every major state school and Ivy because it was that hard.
///And the bad school was designed around student riots when they built it.
 
2013-04-03 03:33:32 PM

victrin: Let's see. When I was in high school...

I was a peer leader, an eagle scout, an all-state athlete, an all-state musician, a mathlete, a volunteer, an AP student, class salutatorian, tutor, and had a job. I had 12 hour school days thanks to my extra-curriculars, plus 4-6 hours of homework per night. I ended up graduating with enough college credit to classify as a Junior after one semester. I also received full academic scholarships to my top 2 universities. I bled, sweat and cried my way through. If only I had come out in high school, I could have gotten some minority support, but silly me waited until college to do that. Otherwise I was just a middle class, white boy. I worked my damn ass off. This princess needs a reality check. The "participation trophies" end at some point.


No they don't they just become achievements on the XBox.
 
2013-04-03 03:35:02 PM

jvl: So I finally read the piece by the kid in the Journal.

That was funny, not whiny. It was almost Fark-good.


That was the whiniest complaint that ever whined.
 
2013-04-03 03:35:08 PM

namegoeshere: Wow what a biatch.


I still stand by "lazy biatch"
 
2013-04-03 03:35:14 PM
....had I known two years ago what I know now, I would have gladly worn a headdress to school. Show me to any closet, and I would've happily come out of it. "Diversity!" I offer about as much diversity as a saltine cracker. If it were up to me, I would've been any of the diversities: Navajo, Pacific Islander, anything. Sen. Elizabeth Warren, I salute you and your 1/32 Cherokee heritage.

Sweetheart, you're a legacy.  That's better than any of those lucky minority things... and you were born into it just like those lucky minorities.

Oh well, I guess you can cry into your trust fund.
 
2013-04-03 03:36:17 PM
You basically need a pulse and a bank account to get into state school so she should be fine.
 
2013-04-03 03:36:29 PM

Lollipop165: or played at Carnegie Hall.


Well, I actually have done that (the acoustics are excellent), but honestly I think those schools admitted me because I wrote bizarre essays and had decent enough grades.  I've always just kind of assumed they thought, "this guy is so weird, it just might work!"

Instead of "founding a fake charity" I volunteered at a summer camp for autistic children.  Not because I was even thinking about college at the time--just because I've always suspected I was mildly autistic and felt like I could relate as a camp counselor.  I was able to throw that in the mix.

My high school also paired all the seniors with individual counselors, and I remember giving my counselor some big BS lecture about how I was going to save the world and shiat.  She totally ate it up.  I'm thinking the combo of all that stuff was more than enough to dilute my mediocre SAT scores and sub-4.0GPA.

Plus, while selective schools, none of them were Ivy-League selective; I doubt I would have been admitted to anything more selective than UChicago.
 
2013-04-03 03:37:07 PM

mjohnson71: Mike Chewbacca: Amusement: [s17.postimg.org image 304x175]


What high school career counselors won't tell you is this, you CAN get college credit.  College Level Examine Program offers over 33 examines to get college credit and it costs less than community (comedy) college.

http://clep.collegeboard.org/

While other students are trying to get into "their" college you've already got college credits.  The real stink is you can start taking CLEP examines when your 16 years old.

This sh*t is real and I CLEPed college humanities, Freshman English and other non-important stupid arse classes that cost thousands at the big "U".

English isn't that unimportant. You should have paid closer attention.

You sound like someone who has a liberal arts degree.


I'll take that as a compliment. Liberal arts degrees may be useless for getting a job, but those folks know how to write.

And Amusement writes like a 15-year-old.

gunther_bumpass: should of

I can't believe I have to point that out.


*snicker*
 
2013-04-03 03:37:26 PM
I had a less-than-stellar high school career. When I was accepted to a no-name college with a small scholarship, my guidance counselor said, "How'd you manage that?"

I signed up for a research project one of my psych professors was doing during my junior year (just for the hell of it). I ended up writing some of the resulting papers with him in conjunction with another professor from Harvard. It was published and even now appears in a psych textbook. I presented it to the APA at a conference at the end of my senior year. I graduated with honors in psychology.

That was 20 years ago. I now work in technology as a network administrator.

Lesson 1: It doesn't matter where you go, it's what you do while you're there.
Lesson 2: That might not even matter in the long run.
 
2013-04-03 03:37:41 PM

Mike Chewbacca: EvilRacistNaziFascist: Fano: What about her racist dig at all them undeserving minorities?

Her complaint about universities making a mindless fetish of "diversity" was quite accurate, and the most sensible thing she said in the entire letter.

She also made a valid point about having to find some way to interact with adversity. She's a normal teenager living a bland life, and she doesn't have the resources to fly to another country to see how awful the world really can be.


She didn't have to fly to Africa. In every major city, there's a big brothers or big sisters program. She could volunteer at a soup kitchen. She could go do charity work for a retirement home.

She didn't even bother looking AT ALL. I'm positive had she run the idea of tutoring an underprivileged inner city kid past her folks, they would have helped her.

And she didn't have any hobbies at all? Shoot, the hobbies I had aside from sports weren't that interesting either, but I'm creative enough to be able to make it SOUND like something awesome.

Gah. Entitlement.
 
2013-04-03 03:38:26 PM
The kid did make a few points... though poorly:

Parents are to some extent responsible for their offspring's success.  Kids don't have rights until they're 18 because they lack the proper decision making capacity before then.  Parents: don't let your kid be this kid.

Also, money can buy your way into college.  If you don't have the wherewithal to "volunteer" in Africa (aka take an international vacation and glean credit from it), or happen to look for work between 2008 and now when jobs are at a premium (so you never found a job in which to excel or pay your gas money for "volunteering"), you are not starting from a good point to get into some of the high-brow places.

However, if she showed no interest in extended academics and her parents washed their hands of her, I can have a trifle of sympathy.  But writing that letter was stupid.
 
2013-04-03 03:39:03 PM
Dear whiney-ass biatch:

Please tell us who you are, not who you aren't and then maybe you won't come across as a whiney-ass biatch.

/feel free to move the hyphen one word to the right if it pleases you.
 
2013-04-03 03:39:55 PM

Amusement: This sh*t is real and I CLEPed college humanities, Freshman English and other non-important stupid arse classes that cost thousands at the big "U".


Sounds like reasons not to accept you as a profit center, er, I mean prospective student.

Anyhow... The school wants to get what they're shown, but if it's a fake extrovert that collapses into deep depression because they're really an introvert who's been "faking it till they make it." This isn't a knock against introverts, it's a knock against the schools preparing lemmings extroverts to follow the crowd.

/Anyhow, if you're gonna be yourself
//Be awesome.
 
2013-04-03 03:39:58 PM
Her brother had no trouble getting into the school of his choice
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MdM7vNOgGPM
 
2013-04-03 03:40:36 PM
I think it's satire.
 
2013-04-03 03:40:38 PM

Mike Chewbacca: Amusement: [s17.postimg.org image 304x175]


What high school career counselors won't tell you is this, you CAN get college credit.  College Level Examine Program offers over 33 examines to get college credit and it costs less than community (comedy) college.

http://clep.collegeboard.org/

While other students are trying to get into "their" college you've already got college credits.  The real stink is you can start taking CLEP examines when your 16 years old.

This sh*t is real and I CLEPed college humanities, Freshman English and other non-important stupid arse classes that cost thousands at the big "U".

English isn't that unimportant. You should have paid closer attention.


English isn't unimportant, double negatives.  English is important.  Pay closer attention.

Engrish has been very good for me.
 
2013-04-03 03:40:59 PM
I'd like to know what exactly made her "dream college" so appealing to her.  They seem to have such differing priorities.

If she's female, white, privileged, has middling grades and test scores and doesn't want to work hard, then there are plenty of 3rd tier state colleges and little private school start-ups that would love to have her.
 
2013-04-03 03:41:03 PM
At this rate, she probably won't even get into Vassar.
 
2013-04-03 03:41:14 PM
I didn't get into my first choice, either. I read the rejection letter, said, "Shiat! That sucks!", got over it, and went to my second choice.

Kids these days...
 
2013-04-03 03:41:30 PM
Meh... No extra-curricular activities, played hockey (badly) for two years, mediocre grades, and mediocre SAT scores for me.

Did two years at a Community College, transfered to a State school (Go UMass!), lived and worked a variety of shiat jobs in Ireland for 5 years, spent 3 years as a chef, 4 years as a travel agent and currently work for myself as a designer and teach photography at the same Community College I attended all those years ago.

What college you go to isn't that big of a deal, little girl... Stop whining and go to a state school. Maybe grow up a little bit, too.
 
2013-04-03 03:41:45 PM

Half Right: I don't get all the hate and outrage about this letter. I thought it was funny. If anything the Gawker response author seems to be the bitter, angry, self-important one.


You have no idea what any of those words mean.
 
2013-04-03 03:42:28 PM
I went in the Army. I got the MOS of my choice and choice of first assignment. Oh, how the guys who only got to choose Combat Arms were envious of me. There I was, strutting about the base with my E-2 and crew chief wings.

But I studied for the ASVAB. I learned my letters A, S, V and B. I knew the Army wouldn't accept me if I cut off a finger or thumb so I tried to avoid doing just that. My research also told me I needed a pulse just to get looked at by the recruiters, I made sure my heart was beating just before I went in there.

All this paid off for me. I got Observation Helicopter Repairer and Hawaii but it wasn't the Hawaii with the condos and boats(*). They must have just redone the place and brought the 25th ID in.

Hard work, a good score, a steady pulse and nine out of ten fingers and thumbs. That's what did it for me.

(*) That might have been the Fort Ord poster.
 
2013-04-03 03:42:40 PM
Like any serious publication would deign to accept open letters?
 
2013-04-03 03:43:10 PM

factoryconnection: Her listed of supposed "required" attributes were a mere one varsity letter higher than my resume coming out of HS.  I had this odd sense at that age that I had to apply myself to stand out.  Thank you, parents for lighting a fire under me.

If her rich parents never made her get off her ass and be anything more than a FB surfer, then yeah they get plenty of blame, too.  They do have nice taste in home design, I'll give them that.


I don't blame them much.  A bit, but not much.  The kid is clearly an spoiled little biatch who couldn't get in to her school of choice because she apparently -- going by her mocking of the SATs -- had weak test scores and no interest in anything other than being a spoiled little biatch.

"Yeah, that black kid had better SAT scores and a 4.0 and raised his sister on his own after his mom died by working two jobs, but Harvard just let him in because of affirmative action!  It's not fair!"
 
2013-04-03 03:43:27 PM

WinoRhino: Lesson 1: It doesn't matter where you go, it's what you do while you're there.


I agree with this.  I have classmates in college that did everything from flunk out to become profoundly successful in various fields.  I'm still a work in progress, but I thought I got a fantastic education.  I think it was mainly because I sought out interesting professors, subjects outside of my "comfort zone," and other such things.  I imagine someone could do that at any school, really--there are good professors everywhere if you know where to look.
 
2013-04-03 03:43:42 PM
This is what I take away from this...

I don't think anyone could possibly be so shortsighted to think that colleges litterally are ONLY interrested in "being yourself" when referring to possible applicants.  Purhaps they will tell you that in an interview...  But they don't mean for you to just shirk ever piece of resonsibility that would make them accept your application..  That's the opening to her argument.  Then she goes on to cite that, since that's all she needed to do, she did nothing more.  Now it's all the gays and minority's faults for taking a place in colleges she feels she deserves.

Considering how completely absurd that sounds, I'm guessing this is either a hoax, or some sort of satire.  I know th WSJ is supposed to be above such types of stories.  But April 1st did just go by.
 
2013-04-03 03:44:18 PM

cman: Woman applies for college
College rejects woman
Woman biatches about being rejected
Everyone sits and points and laughs

This seems like an old story by now


Ah, but you forget the step, "Woman's complaint have bigot dog-whistles in them, so WSJ picks it up and runs with it."
 
2013-04-03 03:44:46 PM

Dion Fortune: What's this obsession with getting into extra-selective schools?  If you get good grades you can get into public State U and it'll be much cheaper.  You'll use the same textbooks and learn the same crap, and the school will offer you more scholarships and financial aid.  Learn skills that are actually in demand or benefit society and you'll always have a job.


But, then I cant get into Tappa Kegga Bru, since they dont have a chapter at State.
 
2013-04-03 03:45:08 PM

wildcardjack: Amusement: This sh*t is real and I CLEPed college humanities, Freshman English and other non-important stupid arse classes that cost thousands at the big "U".

Sounds like reasons not to accept you as a profit center, er, I mean prospective student.

Anyhow... The school wants to get what they're shown, but if it's a fake extrovert that collapses into deep depression because they're really an introvert who's been "faking it till they make it." This isn't a knock against introverts, it's a knock against the schools preparing lemmings extroverts to follow the crowd.

/Anyhow, if you're gonna be yourself
//Be awesome.


///Fark Yah!
 
2013-04-03 03:46:11 PM
MikeChewbacca there are actually some pretty good public schools in Seattle -- if your friends can afford 16 years of private they should be able to afford one of those neighborhoods. Or is the idea that their son's life will be destroyed if he doesn't get into an Ivy?

I thought the writer was trying to be funny and self-deprecating; I'd take her over the trolls at Gawker any day. And in a way I do get what she means -- one thing that was clear in the application process, even 15 years ago, was in addition to looking for good academics, colleges were also looking for what boiled down to interesting stories, often involving overcome some dramatic trauma or unusual background history. But when you're eighteen, a lot of your life is more about what's happened to you than what you could potentially accomplish. I get that they don't want the entire campus to be a monoculture, but at the same time I think they lose sight of the fact that you didn't have control over a lot of it.

/Got into my first choice, which was not an Ivy.
 
2013-04-03 03:46:16 PM

Warthog: mrlewish: Interesting how we rate ourselves on what job we do or what school we went to.

All concerned sides are full of whiny self entitles biatches.

To treat you like a human being I don't have to give a damn what school you went to, or what fancy job titles you have, or who you are or who you know.

Fourth Tier Public College typing detected.


Does it really matter?  Lets just say this.  If all the lawyers on Earth disappeared, life would go on for the rest of us after a "WTF just happened" disturbance. If all the farmers on Earth disappeared we would all be truly be farked. Guess who society values more.
 
2013-04-03 03:47:09 PM
Whiners whining about whiners.

I know what we can do. Lets kick it up a notch.
 
kab
2013-04-03 03:47:16 PM
The colleges that turned you down did you a favor.  At least now, your unemployment won't be saddled with tens of thousands of non-dismissable debt.
 
2013-04-03 03:47:46 PM

Harry Freakstorm: I went in the Army. I got the MOS of my choice and choice of first assignment. Oh, how the guys who only got to choose Combat Arms were envious of me. There I was, strutting about the base with my E-2 and crew chief wings.

But I studied for the ASVAB. I learned my letters A, S, V and B. I knew the Army wouldn't accept me if I cut off a finger or thumb so I tried to avoid doing just that. My research also told me I needed a pulse just to get looked at by the recruiters, I made sure my heart was beating just before I went in there.

All this paid off for me. I got Observation Helicopter Repairer and Hawaii but it wasn't the Hawaii with the condos and boats(*). They must have just redone the place and brought the 25th ID in.

Hard work, a good score, a steady pulse and nine out of ten fingers and thumbs. That's what did it for me.

(*) That might have been the Fort Ord poster.


WTF is a MOS?
 
2013-04-03 03:47:46 PM

reklamfox: I had no extracurricular activities and never took my SATs and I still got into a respectable college. You know why? I did the smart thing and went to a community college the first 2 yrs. Having a college degree before applying to a larger university makes you look good without having to pump your application with a bunch of BS. No SAT required.


I basically did high school in junior college (algebra, history, etc) and transferred to a great university. I remember spending something like $500 a semester (including books). Two years at the university racked up some loans though, I dont know how kids do it these days. My guess is that, like online dating, online college will eventually win out as the smart, efficient and cheaper way to do things. I used to work at a brick and mortar university - I cashed out my retirement because I don't think they'll be around in 30 years.
 
2013-04-03 03:49:03 PM

StrangeQ: Kingly Weevil: I didn't get into the graduate program I wanted because I didn't have enough research experience.

Which we all know is code for, "He doesn't have any interesting ancestors."

Clearly.

Can't tell if you're being serious or not...but that will in fact keep you from getting into grad school.  And it might make you a little bitter, especially when the last of the undergrad research funding was spent on the girl barely holding a C average because we need more female science majors, aptitude be damned!


Only the first bit was serious.  I thought their criticism was a bit weak, since they didn't specify what type of research, and I do research verification as a profession, currently.

Their main complaint seemed to be, "Why did someone with grades as good as yours, and who absolutely aced the GRE, not go straight to graduate school?"

Apparently the correct answer is NOT, "Because I wanted a couch not made of plywood and milk cartons."

Either way, it's all for the best. The prof who I would've worked with (She was an alternate choice) has research focused on children. And I hate children. So I'll try again next year.
 
2013-04-03 03:49:23 PM
Schools lie.  Do well enough on your SATS and nothing else matters.  Those other things they ask for are pure window dressing/used to make a determination on admission right before the coin flip.   back when a perfect SAT was a 1600 no school in the world is seriously gonna turn away anyone with a 1450+ no matter what thier transcript looked like, short of a felony or two on thier permanent record.

Hell when I applied to law school, my academic undergrad record could charitably be called "checkered".  Yes I had managed many semesters of striaght A's but I also had not one but two seperate "academic dismissals" from different colleges (I was both lazy and likely  battling undiagnosed depression in those years, plus I had no real conception of what I wanted to do with my life...at one point pursuing an EE despite the fact that I am severely "discalculate" (like dyslexia with numbers)

OTOH I scored a 173 out of a possible 180 on my LSATS (99th percentile).  Not only was I inivited to apply to a flood of law schools, but I wasn;t rejected from any school I applied to, even a top ten school I didn;t end up going to (U-Penn) because another school offered me a bigger scholarship than they did
 
2013-04-03 03:49:59 PM
My advice: If your local community college is decent, do a year or two knocking off basic graduation requirements. Take your basic English and Math, kick serious ass and then transfer over to the university that would have bounced you as a Freshman. Just be sure that your credits will transfer over.

You'll also probably save money in the long run.

When you can't get into the front door, wait a while for the crowd to die down and try going in the back.
 
2013-04-03 03:50:14 PM
What ?!?! Negative fallout from raising your child in this BS PC everything is good, everyone wins, and thinking bad thoughts about someone is bullying society. It is about time kids realize that the world is NOT fair, you can do EVERYTHING CORRECTLY and STILL LOSE. Stop swaddling your crotch fruit in bubble wrap and let them understand loss a little. Competitive games like dodgeball, and other sports highlight the skills needed to lose gracefully, and hopefully somewhere you master the skill to win in the same manner.
 
2013-04-03 03:50:16 PM

RenownedCurator: MikeChewbacca there are actually some pretty good public schools in Seattle -- if your friends can afford 16 years of private they should be able to afford one of those neighborhoods. Or is the idea that their son's life will be destroyed if he doesn't get into an Ivy?

I thought the writer was trying to be funny and self-deprecating; I'd take her over the trolls at Gawker any day. And in a way I do get what she means -- one thing that was clear in the application process, even 15 years ago, was in addition to looking for good academics, colleges were also looking for what boiled down to interesting stories, often involving overcome some dramatic trauma or unusual background history. But when you're eighteen, a lot of your life is more about what's happened to you than what you could potentially accomplish. I get that they don't want the entire campus to be a monoculture, but at the same time I think they lose sight of the fact that you didn't have control over a lot of it.

/Got into my first choice, which was not an Ivy.


My friends know that the easiest way for their son to excel in education is to start him off at a private school in kindergarten. They know he won't be destroyed if he goes the public school route, but they want him to have every chance at success. They realize it's ridiculous to send a 5 year old to private kindergarten, but it's just harder to get into private high school if you didn't go to private grade school.

And yes, colleges are looking for interesting stories. Unfortunately, most teenagers have lived boring lives. I enjoyed her letter and thought it was funny and tongue-in-cheek. Kids today are under such pressure to excel in every way possible. We make fun of their parents for being helicopter parent soccer moms, but when a kid DOESN'T have a helicopter parent, then she's apparently an entitled lazy biatch.
 
2013-04-03 03:50:43 PM
Surely this has to be a troll.

"I'm not that smart, have  noinitiative, hobbies or interests, I don't take part in school activities and by the way I've openly got a chip on my shoulder about minorities and homosexuals, yet can you believe top universities across the nation weren't falling over themselves to offer me a place"
 
2013-04-03 03:50:50 PM

GiantRex: I went to engineering school, where being able to write a coherent essay of any sort is usually good enough to get you admitted.


To the Honors Program.
 
2013-04-03 03:51:03 PM
Funny.  I wasn't lied to.  I was told I probably wouldn't get in to MIT, so I should also apply to my state U.  I had a classic profile of not living up to my potential.  My grades and ACT meant an easy automatic acceptance at state and almost no shot at my "dream" schools. And of course, that's exactly what happened. I was also accepted at neighboring state U. Anyway, that saved me a lot of money when I dropped out 4 years later and just a few credits shy of a degree in the wrong field.
 
2013-04-03 03:51:04 PM
2.bp.blogspot.com
 
2013-04-03 03:51:06 PM
Wow. Refer to an African as Kinto? That will score you points with anyone with a 4th grade education. I can only imagine what her parents are like. Insufferable wastes of space.
 
2013-04-03 03:51:31 PM

Nana's Vibrator: Response to Gawker:

Dear Gawker,

You're Gawker.

In your face,
NV


exactly.
 
2013-04-03 03:51:47 PM

mjohnson71: Mike Chewbacca: Eh, I see the letter-writer's very bitter point. In this day and age, kids HAVE to go to college or they're almost guaranteed a life of near-poverty. Going to college is the new normal, but colleges still think normal students have no place in their special snowflake universities.

I'm just waiting for the college cost bubble to burst.


easy way for that to happen:  end Student laons as they currently exist and have the Federal government adopt a medicare like model for finacial student aid where they reimburse the school a fixed amount per puil at rates a government board sets based on the need for that particular educational specialty, and the cost of living, and expected furture salary of the graduates
 
2013-04-03 03:53:22 PM
Back in the day (80's California), this was the deal:

1: Go to a community college to get your core courses knocked out (it was free, except for books)

2: Transfer to a decent school

3: Graduate (PROFIT)...I didn't profit, I was making more money doing what I did through college. I can't imagine the loans kids are taking on now.

If I had a child coming of age now, I'd put him/her in a journeyman position in electrical/HVAC/something practical.
 
2013-04-03 03:53:24 PM
I went to public high school, got good grades (3.95 or something), AP, SAT, lots of extracurricular stuff (not only because I knew it would look good for college, but I liked all the stuff I did) and I got into every school I applied including Notre Dame and Northwestern (Go U!).  I only got to go to Northwestern because they have truly fantastic financial aid and half my tuition was paid by a grant from the school and we didn't have to pay it back.  Not a chance in hell we could have afforded it otherwise.  Oh and I didn't do any charity or start any fake companies or whatever and I spent a fair amount of time with the assistant principal and had me a few suspensions.
 
2013-04-03 03:54:47 PM
I'm not sure what people expect to get as a result of whining about not getting unimportant stuff that other people have. I mean, not getting food or housing is a big deal worth whining over.

But not getting into your preferred college isn't Killing Fields-level oppression. It's not even "harassed by your HOA"-level oppression. It's more like "Dammit, they can't get me the Mercedes in silver so I had to settle for gray" oppression. One-percenter problems.
 
2013-04-03 03:55:59 PM
This is up there with the Lehigh Univ grad student who sued the university and prof because she got a grade lower than what she thought she deserved (and the damages she was claiming it  would do to her earnings were such a stretch)
 
2013-04-03 03:56:13 PM

PiffMan420: My advice: If your local community college is decent, do a year or two knocking off basic graduation requirements. Take your basic English and Math, kick serious ass and then transfer over to the university that would have bounced you as a Freshman. Just be sure that your credits will transfer over.

You'll also probably save money in the long run.

When you can't get into the front door, wait a while for the crowd to die down and try going in the back.



If you weren't that competitive as an HS grad/incoming freshman, I don't think you'd be any more competitive with some college coursework under your belt.

Now, if you can do better in a community college than your HS record, that's different.
 
2013-04-03 03:57:05 PM
FTA: If you worked two full-time jobs all the way through high school and one of them was "being yourself" and the other was "trying your best," you actually worked zero full-time jobs.

I LOL'd.  I want to buy her a drink for giving me a new favorite quote for the snowflakes.
 
2013-04-03 03:57:11 PM

GiantRex: I went to engineering school, where being able to write a coherent essay of any sort is usually good enough to get you admitted.


Engineer here, am agree for that.
 
2013-04-03 03:57:41 PM

Carn: I went to public high school, got good grades (3.95 or something), AP, SAT, lots of extracurricular stuff (not only because I knew it would look good for college, but I liked all the stuff I did) and I got into every school I applied including Notre Dame and Northwestern (Go U!).   I only got to go to Northwestern because they have truly fantastic financial aid and half my tuition was paid by a grant from the school and we didn't have to pay it back.  Not a chance in hell we could have afforded it otherwise.  Oh and I didn't do any charity or start any fake companies or whatever and I spent a fair amount of time with the assistant principal and had me a few suspensions.


Not any more.  My sister applied last year, got in, and didn't get anything (despite looking very poor on paper).  We had some friends get in a few years back and they were sending out little booklets to all the acceptees saying things like: "Take out a second mortgage" and "Ask for your inheritance early"
 
2013-04-03 03:57:52 PM
Going to college can lead you to sweet gigs "taking down" high schoolers and pretending it's work or somehow noteworthy.
 
2013-04-03 03:58:11 PM
The tipoff is the ending where she says "homosexual behavior is learned behavior," and the capstone, "evolution is the tinfoil hat atheists use to keep God out of their brainwaves."
 
2013-04-03 03:58:13 PM
Thinking back on it, I was involved in a bunch of bullshiat activities whose purpose was to make my college app look good. I mean, in the end I enjoyed some of them but it doesn't change the fact that I probably wouldn't have done them at all if it didn't affect college apps.

Ultimately, the purpose of college is to become educated - in an ideal world, that in and of itself should be enough reason to apply and be accepted.
 
2013-04-03 03:59:31 PM
You want to know the  real trick to getting into a lot of schools?  Apply for an under-utilized major.  Then, when you're accepted, just focus on gen eds and such.  Keep your grades up, and then apply for the major you actually want.

Alternatively, go to community college for a year or two.  Study your gen eds, get good grades, and then apply to the college of your choice.  By that time, your college transcript will likely replace your high school transcript and standardized test scores.
 
2013-04-03 04:00:20 PM
I bet she thinks "Girls" totally sums up her life.
 
2013-04-03 04:00:40 PM

meyerkev: Carn: I went to public high school, got good grades (3.95 or something), AP, SAT, lots of extracurricular stuff (not only because I knew it would look good for college, but I liked all the stuff I did) and I got into every school I applied including Notre Dame and Northwestern (Go U!).   I only got to go to Northwestern because they have truly fantastic financial aid and half my tuition was paid by a grant from the school and we didn't have to pay it back.  Not a chance in hell we could have afforded it otherwise.  Oh and I didn't do any charity or start any fake companies or whatever and I spent a fair amount of time with the assistant principal and had me a few suspensions.

Not any more.  My sister applied last year, got in, and didn't get anything (despite looking very poor on paper).  We had some friends get in a few years back and they were sending out little booklets to all the acceptees saying things like: "Take out a second mortgage" and "Ask for your inheritance early"


Man, that blows.  I haven't been paying my loans too fast because they're consolidated Stafford and I locked em in at 3%.  Gonna pay them off in the next two years then I seriously want to donate back to the financial aid fund so some other kid like me can go there.  I imagine part of the problem is that I'm sure tuition has skyrocketed since i was a freshman in '97.  It was something like 28 grand my first year.
 
2013-04-03 04:01:44 PM
I like this girls moxy. Not her SAP scores, GPA or extracurriculars. But damn she has some moxy.
 
2013-04-03 04:01:54 PM

mrlewish: Warthog: mrlewish: Interesting how we rate ourselves on what job we do or what school we went to.

All concerned sides are full of whiny self entitles biatches.

To treat you like a human being I don't have to give a damn what school you went to, or what fancy job titles you have, or who you are or who you know.

Fourth Tier Public College typing detected.

Does it really matter?  Lets just say this.  If all the lawyers on Earth disappeared, life would go on for the rest of us after a "WTF just happened" disturbance. If all the farmers on Earth disappeared we would all be truly be farked. Guess who society values more.


I'm not sure what society you're aware of, but I'm fairly certain that's farmers.  They make more than lawyers too.
 
2013-04-03 04:04:27 PM

error 303: At this rate, she probably won't even get into Vassar.


I've had just about enough of your Vassar bashing, Missy!

Was trying to remember that quote during the other thread, thanks.
 
2013-04-03 04:06:28 PM

Fano: error 303: At this rate, she probably won't even get into Vassar.

I've had just about enough of your Vassar bashing, Missy!

Was trying to remember that quote during the other thread, thanks.


"Vassar Bashing" sounds really dirty.
 
2013-04-03 04:09:50 PM
Just give the guy in the admissions office a good blowjob. No teeth, please.
 
2013-04-03 04:12:26 PM
CSB:

Recently had dinner with my nephew, now a college senior at a small bible-based college in Southern California. He complained non-stop about how "affirmative action" kept him out of all the UC schools he applied for - he didn't get into ANY UC school. He went to a church-run school in a small town, and then transferred to a charter school for his last two years of high school. Of course, I asked him what his extra-curricular activities were (no athletics, since neither school had athletic teams), and he gave me three things: he ran marathons, he completed an "intensive" senior project (it was a DVD of an interview with some runner from the 60s) and he belonged to the Bible club. So I asked him what kind of classes did he take - AP? IB? Any honors? Nope, because neither the church school or the charter school offered them. When I pointed out that most of his competition to the UC schools would have taken AP or IB courses, he expressed genuine surprise that the courses he took in high school even mattered. He thought it all would come down to SAT scores and extra activities.

He was pretty surprised to find out that his choice of classes mattered. Or that his competition would be so far ahead of him on the classes that matter scale. He was also pretty surprised to find that because of this, "affirmative action" (as he'd been told by his parents and church) didn't affect his acceptance.

You could almost see the lightbulb going off in his head. It was a Doh! moment for him, poor guy.

//Not poor guy at all - grew up the golden boy at church school and was shocked when that didn't translate to college acceptance.
 
2013-04-03 04:12:50 PM
An awful lot of these people still get into college. I should know. I have to read their workstudy job applications...of the roughly 1500 apps I see annual, probably 1000-1200 could've been written by this girl...
 
2013-04-03 04:14:19 PM

HotWingConspiracy: Going to college can lead you to sweet gigs "taking down" high schoolers and pretending it's work or somehow noteworthy.


Anybody who gets paid to make fun of high schoolers has already lapped you in the game of life.
 
2013-04-03 04:15:21 PM
Truth be told, most students, including snowflake, shouldn't even be applying for college in the first place. Please, just find something you like and that you're good at that actually benefits society and go with that. You'll be surprised how well you do even if your main goal is just making money.
 
ows
2013-04-03 04:15:43 PM
but, but, she had a...........................9.37 gpa
 
2013-04-03 04:15:54 PM
WAAAAH, IT'S SO HARD BEING WHITE AND LAZY.
 
2013-04-03 04:16:05 PM
On the one hand, the kid's getting excoriated for being a whiner.

On the other, she has a point.

When you are young and have not experienced the deep FML that is Life, you might still believe things more "experienced" and world weary people tell you, like the chirpy "Just be yourself!"

People hear that three word lie for everything: finding a date, getting married, joining a club, getting a job, getting into a school, or even just making friends.

I don't blame her for being angry. She's a kid. Someone told her a big big lie. She believed it. She got screwed.

Stop lying to children, folks. Seriously.
 
2013-04-03 04:16:33 PM

Half Right: I don't get all the hate and outrage about this letter. I thought it was funny. If anything the Gawker response author seems to be the bitter, angry, self-important one.


I don't understand why people are so farking butthurt over this. It's satire, not reality.

We get it, you worked hard to get where you are. What the fark makes you so special? We all work hard, get over yourself, you're not special snowflake.

/Starting to wonder who the real snowflakes are in this situation.
 
2013-04-03 04:18:15 PM

abhorrent1: Poor girl. Probably can't even be a stripper.


I'd like to see her try.
 
2013-04-03 04:19:08 PM

T.rex: I just read the gal's original article.  Its clearly intentionally self-effacing and humorous.   And just look at all these people she successfully trolled.  Plus, she got published. Well done.


Seconded. How are we the only ones that got this?
 
2013-04-03 04:19:51 PM
joediliberto.files.wordpress.com
 
2013-04-03 04:21:27 PM
I don't think her essay was all that bad, it was kind of funny, somewhat self deprecating, if anything.
Didn't deserve the flaming backlash.
 
2013-04-03 04:22:15 PM

WelldeadLink: abhorrent1: Poor girl. Probably can't even be a stripper.

I'd like to see her try.


getdefault.com
 
2013-04-03 04:22:58 PM
Like me, millions of high-school seniors with sour grapes are asking themselves this week how they failed to get into the colleges of their dreams. It's simple: For years, they-we-were lied to.

Her point isn't that colleges should have accepted her, it's that they mislead students on what they're looking for.
 
2013-04-03 04:23:21 PM
This is inane.  People who got C averages in schools turn out to be better leaders because they're less concerned with being nerds and more concerned with life.  People who get A averages and become leaders are the MBA type that think education = authority, the stiff no-nonsense bosses that don't know jack shiat but get through management school with polished resumes and no friends other than suits they met in management school.
 
2013-04-03 04:23:44 PM

Contents Under Pressure: On the one hand, the kid's getting excoriated for being a whiner.

On the other, she has a point.

When you are young and have not experienced the deep FML that is Life, you might still believe things more "experienced" and world weary people tell you, like the chirpy "Just be yourself!"

People hear that three word lie for everything: finding a date, getting married, joining a club, getting a job, getting into a school, or even just making friends.

I don't blame her for being angry. She's a kid. Someone told her a big big lie. She believed it. She got screwed.

Stop lying to children, folks. Seriously.



Just another example of liberals trying to turn America into a Nanny State
 
2013-04-03 04:24:20 PM
Flawless whine.

Mediocrity
 
2013-04-03 04:24:45 PM

T.rex: I just read the gal's original article.  Its clearly intentionally self-effacing and humorous.   And just look at all these people she successfully trolled.  Plus, she got published. Well done.


Which is great, good for her.  Provocation is a great incitement to discuss privilege, expectations, and entitlement.

Except, she did none of that.  She wrote a humorous article that is being taken at face value.  It's a reflection on her, for good or ill.  What is the purpose of satire if the point is completely missed?  Instead of discussing the perceived necessity of "9 activities, 3 sports, and 2 moms", the competitiveness of college admissions, and what it really means to "be yourself", we're calling her out for her behavior (Rightly So).  Classic case of all form no substance.

It's sad because there are a few decent points to be found - "fake" charities (like collecting a few hundred bucks in your "Pens For Schoolkids" senior project charity) and "life changing" photo ops ARE worthy of ridicule.

When she pointed out about the 9/3/2 thing, I thought "you're a well-off white girl.  How haven't your parents signed you up for 12 different sports/activities by now?"  In the affluent suburbs where I work, kids go all day every day, year round - jumping from sport to sport, activity to club to activity.  Doesn't matter that, of 12 activities, they only participate in 2 or 3, half-ass 5, and pad their college resume by saying they're members of the rest though they've never been to a meeting after the 1st.
 
2013-04-03 04:24:50 PM

ajt167: T.rex: I just read the gal's original article.  Its clearly intentionally self-effacing and humorous.   And just look at all these people she successfully trolled.  Plus, she got published. Well done.

Seconded. How are we the only ones that got this?


Perhaps we all have liberal arts degrees?
 
2013-04-03 04:24:53 PM

bluefoxicy: This is inane.  People who got C averages in schools turn out to be better leaders because they're less concerned with being nerds and more concerned with life.  People who get A averages and become leaders are the MBA type that think education = authority, the stiff no-nonsense bosses that don't know jack shiat but get through management school with polished resumes and no friends other than suits they met in management school.


Black guys drive a car like this...
 
2013-04-03 04:25:03 PM
On the one hand.... Oh God, I had a roommate like that. She blamed having to go to Pretty Great State School in our home state instead of Exclusive Private University on "black people." Yes, that's a quote. It was kinda crazy.

On the other hand, I saw a forum post elsewhere recently by a mom who was upset because she didn't know that the top kids in her son's high school class were fudging the GPA weighting by doing the state mandated health class at the local community college instead of at the high school. Her son had done the health class at the school, and the result was a drop in his GPA of tenths of a point... which took him out of the top tier necessary to get into the Pretty Great State School in this state. She was panicked and asking if anyone knew a way to fix it. That's farked up.
 
2013-04-03 04:27:20 PM

Harry Freakstorm: Gabrielmot


abhorrent1: Poor girl. Probably can't even be a stripper.

can't wait to see *that* rejection letter...

She's gonna do porn and it's going to really bad porn.


Great.  Now we'll have to read a letter to the editors written by her G-spot, complaining that sex wasn't what she expected based on what she was told.
 
2013-04-03 04:27:44 PM

Rapmaster2000: mrlewish: Does it really matter?  Lets just say this.  If all the lawyers on Earth disappeared, life would go on for the rest of us after a "WTF just happened" disturbance. If all the farmers on Earth disappeared we would all be truly be farked. Guess who society values more.

I'm not sure what society you're aware of, but I'm fairly certain that's farmers.  They make more than lawyers too.


BLS data here.

"Lawyers" (23-1011) averaged $130,880 annual.  If you sort by annual wage, the only categories above "Lawyers" are various flavors of medical doctor, "Chief Executives", petroleum engineers, and architects.

"Farming, Fishing and Forestry Occupations" (45-0000) averaged $24,230 annual.  No sub-group of that averaged more than $46,410 ("First-Line Supervisors of Farming, Fishing, and Forestry Workers").

You're not just wrong, you're hilariously wrong.  I'm guessing you don't know any farmers.  Or you think that executives who own agribusinesses are "farmers".
 
2013-04-03 04:28:12 PM
They totally left out: "To those claiming that I am bitter-you bet I am! An underachieving selfish teenager making excuses for her own failures? That too! To those of you disgusted by this, shocked that I take for granted the wonderful gifts I have been afforded, I say shhhh-"The Real Housewives" is on."

I think this was meant to be satire and people took it as literal...
 
2013-04-03 04:28:41 PM

TenaciousP: C U Next Tuesday


Qualifies as a life support system for a pussy.
 
2013-04-03 04:29:49 PM

PiffMan420: My advice: If your local community college is decent, do a year or two knocking off basic graduation requirements. Take your basic English and Math, kick serious ass and then transfer over to the university that would have bounced you as a Freshman. Just be sure that your credits will transfer over


i'd take that a step further- skip at least your senior year of highschool and go to community college. i'm not sure about every state, but NY allows you to do it. I got SUNY credits, only had to be on campus for at most a few hours a day (rather than slowly churning through a normal highschool day) and got excellent core courses taken care of that let me jump into the interesting stuff quicker and allowed me to graduate early (thus saving quite a bit of money) the only odd thing was that i had to take a physical fitness course at the college to satisfy the NYS requirement for highschool physical education.
 
2013-04-03 04:30:33 PM

Rapmaster2000: They make more than lawyers too.


You must know corporate farmers and shiatty lawyers.  Because I'm a lawyer and rancher, and lawyering pays far better.
 
2013-04-03 04:31:28 PM
Entitled "To (All) the Colleges That Rejected Me,"

I see what you did there.
 
2013-04-03 04:31:46 PM
I don't really blame her for being mad, but the problem isn't with the school. The schools she was applying to were all for high achievers, and she isn't one. Honestly, she shouldn't have gotten in. She shouldn't have even wanted to apply.

The problem everyone's ignoring is that it is becoming increasingly necessary to go to places like that whether you want to or not, because society in the US is getting increasingly grim for anyone normal. The job prospects and pay rate for someone with a normal degree from an average school are going continuously downhill. It's becoming increasingly necessary to do something special just to reach the middle class - either go to a high-ranked college, or graduate school, or do something else to distinguish yourself. And that's really hard for people without special talents to handle. Yet, what's the alternative? To get washed into the service sector so you can spend your entire life pointlessly pushing the boulder of your student loans up a hill of their interest rate?

So yeah, the problem isn't that we're telling everyone they're exceptional. The problem is that if you aren't exceptional, you're screwed.
 
2013-04-03 04:33:19 PM
If you want to go to Harvard, okay, whatever.
But most schools you apply at want a decent SAT or ACT grade and your money.
 
2013-04-03 04:33:24 PM
What a jappy little biatch.
 
2013-04-03 04:33:31 PM

reklamfox: I had no extracurricular activities and never took my SATs and I still got into a respectable college. You know why? I did the smart thing and went to a community college the first 2 yrs. Having a college degree before applying to a larger university makes you look good without having to pump your application with a bunch of BS. No SAT required.


Only in America would they have the temerity to call the piece of paper you got in two years from a community college a "degree". In the thinking world, we call that a "two-year diploma".
 
2013-04-03 04:34:23 PM

Christian Bale: Like me, millions of high-school seniors with sour grapes are asking themselves this week how they failed to get into the colleges of their dreams. It's simple: For years, they-we-were lied to.

Her point isn't that colleges should have accepted her, it's that they mislead students on what they're looking for.


And she's wrong.  She wasn't lied to, she just didn't understand what they meant.  Fark that, it's not that she didn't understand, it's that she didn't even try to understand.
 
2013-04-03 04:36:55 PM
1/10. She can't even troll. Her best bet is going to be going out and getting knocked up by some dude so she can get by through life on some dudes child support checks.

Being yourself isn't a skill. Dumbass.
 
2013-04-03 04:38:24 PM

nickeyx: Half Right: I don't get all the hate and outrage about this letter. I thought it was funny. If anything the Gawker response author seems to be the bitter, angry, self-important one.

I don't understand why people are so farking butthurt over this. It's satire, not reality.

We get it, you worked hard to get where you are. What the fark makes you so special? We all work hard, get over yourself, you're not special snowflake.

/Starting to wonder who the real snowflakes are in this situation.


Yeah, WSJ doesn't really do satire. Or at least not well.

Also, when the "satire" comes from the privileged class, it's not really satire anymore.
 
2013-04-03 04:39:39 PM

Amusement: [s17.postimg.org image 304x175]


What high school career counselors won't tell you is this, you CAN get college credit.  College Level Examine Program offers over 33 examines to get college credit and it costs less than community (comedy) college.

http://clep.collegeboard.org/

While other students are trying to get into "their" college you've already got college credits.  The real stink is you can start taking CLEP examines when your 16 years old.

This sh*t is real and I CLEPed college humanities, Freshman English and other non-important stupid arse classes that cost thousands at the big "U".


You know how I know you didn't take Freshman English?
 
2013-04-03 04:39:45 PM
Abrasive and condescending.  She didn't become that way all on her own.  Did she?   Good thing she was turned down.  The sense of entitlement is nauseating.
 
2013-04-03 04:40:09 PM
There is nothing funnier than seeing reality smack these bubble-wrapped snowflakes right between the eyes.

...or sadder.
 
2013-04-03 04:40:50 PM
She insulted the gays and the minorities with high school wit.  Of course Gawker would shiat all over her.

She'll get into a school now with a scholarship because she was published in the WSJ and got attention.
 
2013-04-03 04:40:57 PM

factoryconnection: zobear: She tried nothing and now she's fresh out of ideas.

/I deal with kids like her almost every single day.

Literal LOL.


Consider the phrase stolen.

seems to me she was trying to get into her dream school simply to work on her MRS any ways... so... no great loss
 
2013-04-03 04:42:04 PM

mesmer242: On the other hand, I saw a forum post elsewhere recently by a mom who was upset because she didn't know that the top kids in her son's high school class were fudging the GPA weighting by doing the state mandated health class at the local community college instead of at the high school


that is odd... i took the state mandated health class at the community college (since i as going full time senior year) and it was significantly harder to get a good grade than the highschool class. highschool was basically pass-fail if you showed up and partcipated with something like 10% reliant on the state physical fitness exam (which itself was a joke, you had to arm hang for 20 seconds, do 10 pushups, etc to get the full 10 points)

the community college course i took had a textbook, 2 written exams and did a baseline fitness test at the begining and end of each semester, you were graded 30% on the text book stuff (things like labeling all the muscle groups, explaining respitory functions, etc) and you had to show significant improvement (like 20%) on a whole serious of exercises. it was way more intense
 
2013-04-03 04:43:32 PM

Cerebral Knievel: Consider the phrase stolen.


Yeah--from the Simpson's.  Or any of a dozen movies.
 
2013-04-03 04:44:48 PM

AdmirableSnackbar: Christian Bale: Like me, millions of high-school seniors with sour grapes are asking themselves this week how they failed to get into the colleges of their dreams. It's simple: For years, they-we-were lied to.

Her point isn't that colleges should have accepted her, it's that they mislead students on what they're looking for.

And she's wrong.  She wasn't lied to, she just didn't understand what they meant.  Fark that, it's not that she didn't understand, it's that she didn't even try to understand.


...and understand one of the simplest concepts in high school:  You join clubs and sports and do charity because it looks good to schools.  Even the druggies that show up to meet up with friends know that shiat, but like her they choose not to.  The only difference is that this person is the perfect example of our entitled, spoiled rotten youth in this country.
 
2013-04-03 04:48:31 PM

Magorn: Schools lie.  Do well enough on your SATS and nothing else matters.  Those other things they ask for are pure window dressing/used to make a determination on admission right before the coin flip.   back when a perfect SAT was a 1600 no school in the world is seriously gonna turn away anyone with a 1450+ no matter what thier transcript looked like, short of a felony or two on thier permanent record.

Hell when I applied to law school, my academic undergrad record could charitably be called "checkered".  Yes I had managed many semesters of striaght A's but I also had not one but two seperate "academic dismissals" from different colleges (I was both lazy and likely  battling undiagnosed depression in those years, plus I had no real conception of what I wanted to do with my life...at one point pursuing an EE despite the fact that I am severely "discalculate" (like dyslexia with numbers)

OTOH I scored a 173 out of a possible 180 on my LSATS (99th percentile).  Not only was I inivited to apply to a flood of law schools, but I wasn;t rejected from any school I applied to, even a top ten school I didn;t end up going to (U-Penn) because another school offered me a bigger scholarship than they did


Depends on how long ago and what tier of schools you're talking about - I can tell you from personal experience that you could definitely get rejected from Harvard with a 1600 even ~10 years ago, and it's only gotten more competitive since then.

I'm of both minds with regards to this article - on the one hand, she does come off a bit whiny and entitled; on the other, that doesn't necessarily mean that her overall point is invalid. It's gotten impossible to be 'good' at something without going to a crazy degree with it- whereas 'good at math' used to mean 'straight A's, maybe in some sort of math club, all the teachers thought you're really smart', now in order to be competitive you need to have straight A's + have won state math competitions + go to math camp + win math research competitions.

The charity thing is another big one - they really do need to sit freshmen down in high school and explicitly say 'if you don't do some amount of charity / volunteer work your college resume is going to look terrible'. The problem is that it's not something that every parent is going to necessarily assume, so you get two groups of kids - one group whose parents know how to play the resume-building game and get pushed into all that stuff, and another group who don't think that stuff is important and just want their kids to focus on school work, which quite honestly isn't enough anymore.

The issue is, these aren't all lessons that a high school student by default should magically be able to have pulled out of thin air - the stupid people graduating law school at 25 and then complaining that there are no jobs I have less patience for, because they're adults and should know better. But unless either the parents or the school gives kids this kind of information, I don't really have that much blame for a 15 year old not realizing that they have to play the system in order to get to where they want to be - that's a lesson that you need to learn, but may not necessarily have had to learn by that time.
 
2013-04-03 04:49:25 PM
The education system from the roots up is rotten. Students are enrolling in SAT Prep classes and are more concerned with fluffing their GPA on paper and sufficing AP Exams for College Credits and being part of committees or activities that look good on paper rather than education itself. They are pushed to the point where they will do almost anything to look good on paper so they can get into the college of their dreams, in order to get a degree from there which, in turn looks good on paper so hopefully they get the job they are looking for so they can live a half-way decent life-style. You have the top echelon of students who by-and-large cheat to get ahead, just like your top athletes.

Schools? They are just as corrupt. They cook attendance records and test scores in hopes of getting funding and a bump to their paychecks. They can't risk their students doing poorly on tests since it is detrimental to their income and livelihood.

College? Hah! The so-called "core-curriculum" is more or less a litmus test created because their PREVIOUS litmus test's are not sufficient or efficient enough (SAT/ACT, TAKS/STAR or the state equivalents), and simply a way for schools to pump people for more money.

We do not try to teach concepts and make sure students are learning and retaining. It is all about the short-term. Once that pathetic fraudulent journey is completed, then you start a whole nother fraudulent journey in the corporate world. I think it would be HIGHLY telling and interesting if the same exams given in high school were given at the start of college, immediately after college, and then 5 & 10 years later. If after 10 years students are only retaining certain concepts, why the fark do we continue to really try to teach other things? Students should be required to show a MASTERY of something before moving onto the next thing. We cannot do this in our society however because so many people would be butt-hurt their snowflakes were "held back".

I took Calculus BC my Junior year of HS and got a 4 on my AP test, and a 98 in school. I guarantee you I couldn't do a 1/10th of those same problems that were easy for me then. Why? I wasn't really learning things for long-term retention, but for the short term. I was learning those concepts and principals well enough to receive high marks and then move onto the next thing. Rarely, if ever at the outset of a class do they have a test to benchmark students and how they have retained information, so what happens? They end up teaching the same shiat using the same methods and maybe you might learn a few more things in the process, but mostly it is rehashed or different content altogether.
 
2013-04-03 04:50:15 PM

Mike Chewbacca: Eh, I see the letter-writer's very bitter point. In this day and age, kids HAVE to go to college or they're almost guaranteed a life of near-poverty. Going to college is the new normal, but colleges still think normal students have no place in their special snowflake universities.


or you could just go to a technical school and learn the trade depending on what you want to do. I wasted 4 years at film school, when i could have taken an avid 16 week course and learned the same thing but in a real world environment. I would have saved a ton of cash and be making well over six figures by now, but hey, i went to college cause i felt i had to for the reasons you listed
 
2013-04-03 04:51:05 PM
I, too, read the original article. Gawker pretty much nailed it. Maybe all the people, both here and on the WSJ comment board, who thought it was a "funny satire" can let the rest of us in on the joke.
 
2013-04-03 04:51:24 PM
Wow.  Just...wow.

I read most of the comments here and I'll add my CSB (though I don't expect many to read it)

I graduated HS with a 2.8 GPA, no extracurricular activities to speak of, and I worked two -time jobs (after school and on the weekends).  Never took the SATs.

My HS student advisor laughed hard (no joke) when I asked half-way through my senior year what colleges I had a chance at being accepted into when I graduated.  So I just accepted the idea I was never going to college.

I've always had a love for science and had a nice A+ going in my General Physics science class, so while I didn't need the extra credit, I wrote a paper on rotating and non-rotating black holes, examining the Schwarzschild, Kerr and Kerr-Newman solutions to Einstien's equations and put forth my opinion that a true Schwarzschild non-rotating blackhole could not exist in nature.  It was just a fun way to waste some time and learn about something that interested me.

I didn't know that my teacher had passed my paper on to a few local college professors he knew and within a few weeks, I had college recruiters stopping my parents' house or asking us to meet them at a restraunt for dinner, then asking if I had made plans for after high school.   It confused the hell out of me and my folks at first but after the first sit-down, we learned why they were interested.

I accepted an offer to one of the colleges that my folks could afford but still was fairly well known.  A friend of mine who had a killer SAT score, was in numerous after-school programs and was enrolled into various AP classes applied to the same college but was not accepted.  Kind of ruined our friendship when he found out I was accepted and he wasn't. (and yes, I did graduate from that college)

This young woman (I won't use the term lady) either failed to pay attention to what is required for getting into an ivy league college or believed that her privilaged life would be give her an automatic acceptance into her dream college.  Perhaps she should also realize that if you want to attend that dream college, get that dream job, or have that dream life then a lot of hard work needs to be done ahead of time.  This is a good wakeup call for little Ms. Princess.
 
2013-04-03 04:52:15 PM
'Be yourself' only works for people who aren't worthless.
 
2013-04-03 04:52:30 PM

Dion Fortune: What's this obsession with getting into extra-selective schools?  If you get good grades you can get into public State U and it'll be much cheaper.  You'll use the same textbooks and learn the same crap, and the school will offer you more scholarships and financial aid.  Learn skills that are actually in demand or benefit society and you'll always have a job.


Top notch community college typing detected.
 
2013-04-03 04:52:45 PM

mrlewish: Warthog: mrlewish: Interesting how we rate ourselves on what job we do or what school we went to.

All concerned sides are full of whiny self entitles biatches.

To treat you like a human being I don't have to give a damn what school you went to, or what fancy job titles you have, or who you are or who you know.

Fourth Tier Public College typing detected.

Does it really matter?  Lets just say this.  If all the lawyers on Earth disappeared, life would go on for the rest of us after a "WTF just happened" disturbance. If all the farmers on Earth disappeared we would all be truly be farked. Guess who society values more.


Farming is hard work, but it's not actually hard. If all the farmers disappeared tomorrow, we could have passable farmers trained up to take their places in 6-8 weeks.
 
2013-04-03 04:54:53 PM

Bschott007: Wow.  Just...wow.

I read most of the comments here and I'll add my CSB (though I don't expect many to read it)

I graduated HS with a 2.8 GPA, no extracurricular activities to speak of, and I worked two -time jobs (after school and on the weekends).  Never took the SATs.

My HS student advisor laughed hard (no joke) when I asked half-way through my senior year what colleges I had a chance at being accepted into when I graduated.  So I just accepted the idea I was never going to college.

I've always had a love for science and had a nice A+ going in my General Physics science class, so while I didn't need the extra credit, I wrote a paper on rotating and non-rotating black holes, examining the Schwarzschild, Kerr and Kerr-Newman solutions to Einstien's equations and put forth my opinion that a true Schwarzschild non-rotating blackhole could not exist in nature.  It was just a fun way to waste some time and learn about something that interested me.

I didn't know that my teacher had passed my paper on to a few local college professors he knew and within a few weeks, I had college recruiters stopping my parents' house or asking us to meet them at a restraunt for dinner, then asking if I had made plans for after high school.   It confused the hell out of me and my folks at first but after the first sit-down, we learned why they were interested.

I accepted an offer to one of the colleges that my folks could afford but still was fairly well known.  A friend of mine who had a killer SAT score, was in numerous after-school programs and was enrolled into various AP classes applied to the same college but was not accepted.  Kind of ruined our friendship when he found out I was accepted and he wasn't. (and yes, I did graduate from that college)

This young woman (I won't use the term lady) either failed to pay attention to what is required for getting into an ivy league college or believed that her privilaged life would be give her an automatic acceptance into her dream coll ...


I cried through the whole movie.
 
2013-04-03 04:57:01 PM
Funny, when I was a junior in high-school, I knew EXACTLY what it took to get into my dream college.
 
2013-04-03 04:57:28 PM

tlchwi02: PiffMan420: My advice: If your local community college is decent, do a year or two knocking off basic graduation requirements. Take your basic English and Math, kick serious ass and then transfer over to the university that would have bounced you as a Freshman. Just be sure that your credits will transfer over

i'd take that a step further- skip at least your senior year of highschool and go to community college. i'm not sure about every state, but NY allows you to do it. I got SUNY credits, only had to be on campus for at most a few hours a day (rather than slowly churning through a normal highschool day) and got excellent core courses taken care of that let me jump into the interesting stuff quicker and allowed me to graduate early (thus saving quite a bit of money) the only odd thing was that i had to take a physical fitness course at the college to satisfy the NYS requirement for highschool physical education.


Washington State has that program too. My husband did it when he was in high school. I am pretty certain that its the ideal way to go since college is expensive and the state covers it if you're a capable high school student. I finished my BA in WA after I moved here at 21 and I was in college with 18 year olds who finished almost their entire associate's degree in their last two years of high school. We have the #2 community college in the country in the suburbs near us, so if its still worth the effort, I'd send my [hypothetical] kids there. My husband was allowed to participate in high school sports and activities, but his education was much more appropriate to his career interests (at the time, he was planning to go into automotive stuff and he attended the Community-Technical college because they had no "auto shop" classes beyond the introduction class.)

I wouldn't force my kids into college though if they weren't cut out for it. My husband is moving to a masters degree program in 2014, because his interests have changed since he was 17. I think there is no good reason to shuffle the kids into college as a compulsory activity. My husband would have probably pursued a really useless degree if his parents were more adamant about him being a college graduate. Though, my in-laws suffer from education apathy, and my brother in law barely graduated high school and makes far less than he could if he'd actually cultivated a career rather than a series of dead end jobs. I think he's smart enough, but his ambition and drive were probably given to someone else. At least my mother in law makes enough to supplement his lifestyle and make things easy for his family.
 
2013-04-03 04:58:38 PM

IRQ12: AdmirableSnackbar: Christian Bale: Like me, millions of high-school seniors with sour grapes are asking themselves this week how they failed to get into the colleges of their dreams. It's simple: For years, they-we-were lied to.

Her point isn't that colleges should have accepted her, it's that they mislead students on what they're looking for.

And she's wrong.  She wasn't lied to, she just didn't understand what they meant.  Fark that, it's not that she didn't understand, it's that she didn't even try to understand.

...and understand one of the simplest concepts in high school:   You join clubs and sports and do charity because it looks good to schools.  Even the druggies that show up to meet up with friends know that shiat, but like her they choose not to.  The only difference is that this person is the perfect example of our entitled, spoiled rotten youth in this country.


Fark that, too.  I did all of those things, and not just because it looks good to schools.  I did them because they interested me.  At my private, elitist high school we were urged (forced, technically, since it was necessary for graduation) to do charity work to make us realize just how bad other people had it - and it worked, too.  But the time to try new things and see new perspectives is when you're young because a) it instills curiosity and a sense of adventure that you keep with you for life, and b) even if it doesn't stick with you, you've got decades to stick yourself in a rut and never experience anything outside of your comfort zone.

Oddly enough, my one regret from high school (other than not partying more, I spent too much time buying into the DARE bullshiat until my senior year) was that I wasn't involved more in the theatre program.  I was on the crew for a play my senior year to fulfill my performance art credit and had a farking blast.  I wished I had known it would be that much fun because it would have given me yet another enjoyable thing to do with my time and would have gladly sacrificed a portion of whatever video game time I had.

This girl couldn't be bothered to push herself at all academically, socially, athletically, or artistically and is now whining about the results of her lack of effort and blaming minorities and gays.  Why am I supposed to feel anything but pity or scorn for her?
 
2013-04-03 04:59:24 PM
Suck it up.
Go to a community college, do your high school part 2 classes (english, math, history, etc.) and transfer the units.
It's cheaper that way AND easier to transfer to the college of your choice!
Maybe not Harvard, but UCSB took me after not taking me as a freshman.
Then I majored in surfing and partying, then changed my major and went to a more serious school and graduated.
 
2013-04-03 05:00:15 PM

IRQ12: AdmirableSnackbar: Christian Bale: Like me, millions of high-school seniors with sour grapes are asking themselves this week how they failed to get into the colleges of their dreams. It's simple: For years, they-we-were lied to.

Her point isn't that colleges should have accepted her, it's that they mislead students on what they're looking for.

And she's wrong.  She wasn't lied to, she just didn't understand what they meant.  Fark that, it's not that she didn't understand, it's that she didn't even try to understand.

...and understand one of the simplest concepts in high school:   You join clubs and sports and do charity because it looks good to schools.  Even the druggies that show up to meet up with friends know that shiat, but like her they choose not to.  The only difference is that this person is the perfect example of our entitled, spoiled rotten youth in this country.


THAT is the problem right there. By and large kids are not a part of those activities because they want to be, or contribute to them in any meaningful way but simply because it looks good to schools or they are told they are required to. The motivation behind school is the wrong kind of motivation. Students should be motivated to learn and understand the material. Teachers, should be motivated to teach those materials so that the students learn and understand that material. That isn't the case. Students are motivated to get into a good college. Teachers are motivated by salary bonuses. (I understand I am stereotyping and there are those whom are righteous, but I believe them to be the minority).
 
2013-04-03 05:01:00 PM

babygoat: HotWingConspiracy: Going to college can lead you to sweet gigs "taking down" high schoolers and pretending it's work or somehow noteworthy.

Anybody who gets paid to make fun of high schoolers has already lapped you in the game of life.


Yeah running a glorified blog and shiatting on high school kids has always been just out of reach for me.
 
2013-04-03 05:02:20 PM
Ahhh, to be young and have someone else to blame for all of your failures...
 
2013-04-03 05:03:52 PM

Bschott007: I've always had a love for science and had a nice A+ going in my General Physics science class, so while I didn't need the extra credit, I wrote a paper on rotating and non-rotating black holes


Cool.  I wrote about general relativity on my college applications ... I'm sure it helped.

My brother took the same route you did, writing a paper on the Schroedinger equation.  Only got him onto the wait list at his first choice school, though.

I can't emphasize how important it is to demonstrate to colleges that you actually learn things on your own outside of school, out of intrinsic interest.
 
2013-04-03 05:05:01 PM

the money is in the banana stand: IRQ12: AdmirableSnackbar: Christian Bale: Like me, millions of high-school seniors with sour grapes are asking themselves this week how they failed to get into the colleges of their dreams. It's simple: For years, they-we-were lied to.

Her point isn't that colleges should have accepted her, it's that they mislead students on what they're looking for.

And she's wrong.  She wasn't lied to, she just didn't understand what they meant.  Fark that, it's not that she didn't understand, it's that she didn't even try to understand.

...and understand one of the simplest concepts in high school:   You join clubs and sports and do charity because it looks good to schools.  Even the druggies that show up to meet up with friends know that shiat, but like her they choose not to.  The only difference is that this person is the perfect example of our entitled, spoiled rotten youth in this country.

THAT is the problem right there. By and large kids are not a part of those activities because they want to be, or contribute to them in any meaningful way but simply because it looks good to schools or they are told they are required to. The motivation behind school is the wrong kind of motivation. Students should be motivated to learn and understand the material. Teachers, should be motivated to teach those materials so that the students learn and understand that material. That isn't the case. Students are motivated to get into a good college. Teachers are motivated by salary bonuses. (I understand I am stereotyping and there are those whom are righteous, but I believe them to be the minority).


Teachers get bonuses?  I'll be nice and say that it doesn't sound like you know what you're talking about.
 
2013-04-03 05:08:33 PM

ElStreak: Amusement: [s17.postimg.org image 304x175]


What high school career counselors won't tell you is this, you CAN get college credit.  College Level Examine Program offers over 33 examines to get college credit and it costs less than community (comedy) college.

http://clep.collegeboard.org/

While other students are trying to get into "their" college you've already got college credits.  The real stink is you can start taking CLEP examines when your 16 years old.

This sh*t is real and I CLEPed college humanities, Freshman English and other non-important stupid arse classes that cost thousands at the big "U".

You know how I know you didn't take Freshman English?


Knowledge is a terrible thing to waste.
 
2013-04-03 05:09:49 PM

AdmirableSnackbar: Teachers get bonuses?  I'll be nice and say that it doesn't sound like you know what you're talking about.


The teachers around here haven't even gotten cost-of-living raises for years, let alone bonuses.  There's been a pay freeze since the economy crashed.
 
2013-04-03 05:11:24 PM

puddleonfire: It's cheaper


this should be one of the most important considerations for a high school kid about to go to college.  it will ruin your first years out of college, and those are the hardest for you professionally.  once you put in 5+ years professionally, no one cares what school you went to.  and for those 5 years, it would be nice not to have 100K+ in loans.
 
2013-04-03 05:12:58 PM

Timmy the Tumor: Ahhh, to be young and have someone else to blame for all of your failures...


Well, she certainly sounded republican in her letter.
 
2013-04-03 05:13:02 PM

Ambitwistor: I can't emphasize how important it is to demonstrate to colleges that you actually learn things on your own outside of school


I mean outside of school requirements; could be something outside of school, or could be extra credit or honors projects in school.  Something that distinguishes you from the herd.  Great, you got an A in math.  So did 100,000 other students.  What makes you notable?
 
2013-04-03 05:15:07 PM

Ambitwistor: Bschott007: I've always had a love for science and had a nice A+ going in my General Physics science class, so while I didn't need the extra credit, I wrote a paper on rotating and non-rotating black holes

Cool.  I wrote about general relativity on my college applications ... I'm sure it helped.

My brother took the same route you did, writing a paper on the Schroedinger equation.  Only got him onto the wait list at his first choice school, though.

I can't emphasize how important it is to demonstrate to colleges that you actually learn things on your own outside of school, out of intrinsic interest.


That's pretty cool about what you did on your applications.

Actually, what you said about proving what you know over just having an impressive transcript is what the recruiters mentioned at the sit-downs with my family.
 
2013-04-03 05:15:17 PM

ImpatientlyUnsympathetic: We have the #2 community college in the country in the suburbs near us, so if its still worth the effort, I'd send my [hypothetical] kids there. My husband was allowed to participate in high school sports and activities, but his education was much more appropriate to his career interests


i'd also point out if you don't go to a large affluent highschool, it offers you a lot more interesting opportunities than highschool. We did have a handful of AP classes in my school, but we had a pitiful group of choices for classes. if you weren't into art or music, there really wasn't anything but the core courses required by the state for graduation. at the community college i got to take econ, western civ, american and english literature (counted as "english" for the states criteria but wasn't writing form essays all day long to pass the standardized tests) psychology, geology etc. So it gave me the chance to poke around with some college level classes and get a feel for what interested me before i got to the 4 year school that cost exponentially more (and i got to skip the entry level stuff when i got there anyway, so win-win)
 
2013-04-03 05:16:40 PM

First thing I thought of:

"Ladies First"  by Shel Silverstein
Pamela Purse yelled, "Ladies first,"
Pushing in front of the ice cream line.
Pamela Purse yelled, "Ladies first,"
Grabbing the ketchup at dinnertime.
Climbing on the morning bus
She'd shove right by all of us
And there'd be a tiff or a fight or a fuss
When Pamela Purse yelled, "Ladies first."

Pamela Purse screamed, "Ladies first,"
When we went off on our jungle trip.
Pamela Purse said her thirst was worse
And guzzled our water, every sip.
[con't]...
 
2013-04-03 05:21:41 PM
"Be yourself" is good advice for most people.

However, for some people, the best advice may be to try being someone else.
 
2013-04-03 05:25:49 PM

tlchwi02: ImpatientlyUnsympathetic: We have the #2 community college in the country in the suburbs near us, so if its still worth the effort, I'd send my [hypothetical] kids there. My husband was allowed to participate in high school sports and activities, but his education was much more appropriate to his career interests

i'd also point out if you don't go to a large affluent highschool, it offers you a lot more interesting opportunities than highschool. We did have a handful of AP classes in my school, but we had a pitiful group of choices for classes. if you weren't into art or music, there really wasn't anything but the core courses required by the state for graduation. at the community college i got to take econ, western civ, american and english literature (counted as "english" for the states criteria but wasn't writing form essays all day long to pass the standardized tests) psychology, geology etc. So it gave me the chance to poke around with some college level classes and get a feel for what interested me before i got to the 4 year school that cost exponentially more (and i got to skip the entry level stuff when i got there anyway, so win-win)


My husband went to an affluent school (near Microsoft) but it still didn't have anything beyond "Intro" classes to keep him engaged. He loves history, writes well, is extremely athletic and very capable with a set of tools, but being locked up in a school for 6+ hours a day was torture to him, so sending him to community/technical college was ideal. It cut out the bullshiat. I also think that, based on the former schoolmates of his that I've met, probably kept him off the Stuff White People Like: Illicit Substances. Some real stoner/tweeker stuff went on in the bored rich kid school. At least he wasn't exposed to boredom like the rest.

/Seriously, if he's bored, I have a problem.
//No, his parents never doped him up on ADD/ADHD drugs.
///They found a better learning environment for him instead. Strangely, it was like parenting, only effective, without hand-wringing!
 
2013-04-03 05:28:34 PM
I had good grades, Merit scholarship, a few extracurricular activities, part time job in the summer. Got waitlisted by an Ivy League, ended up going to a slightly lower ranking school on almost full scholarship. I think my alma mater wanted geographical diversity from their students and I happened to live in the South at the time of application (although I'd only been there a few years).

A name brand school carries some weight when your resume is in a giant pile. My undergrad uni is fairly well-known. I'm pretty sure it helped me get into a good Master's program and increased my desirability in applicant pools for jobs.
 
2013-04-03 05:30:49 PM

Bschott007: Wow.  Just...wow.

I read most of the comments here and I'll add my CSB (though I don't expect many to read it)

I graduated HS with a 2.8 GPA, no extracurricular activities to speak of, and I worked two -time jobs (after school and on the weekends).  Never took the SATs.

My HS student advisor laughed hard (no joke) when I asked half-way through my senior year what colleges I had a chance at being accepted into when I graduated.  So I just accepted the idea I was never going to college.

I've always had a love for science and had a nice A+ going in my General Physics science class, so while I didn't need the extra credit, I wrote a paper on rotating and non-rotating black holes, examining the Schwarzschild, Kerr and Kerr-Newman solutions to Einstien's equations and put forth my opinion that a true Schwarzschild non-rotating blackhole could not exist in nature.  It was just a fun way to waste some time and learn about something that interested me.

I didn't know that my teacher had passed my paper on to a few local college professors he knew and within a few weeks, I had college recruiters stopping my parents' house or asking us to meet them at a restraunt for dinner, then asking if I had made plans for after high school.   It confused the hell out of me and my folks at first but after the first sit-down, we learned why they were interested.

I accepted an offer to one of the colleges that my folks could afford but still was fairly well known.  A friend of mine who had a killer SAT score, was in numerous after-school programs and was enrolled into various AP classes applied to the same college but was not accepted.  Kind of ruined our friendship when he found out I was accepted and he wasn't. (and yes, I did graduate from that college)

This young woman (I won't use the term lady) either failed to pay attention to what is required for getting into an ivy league college or believed that her privilaged life would be give her an automatic acceptance into her dream college.  Perhaps she should also realize that if you want to attend that dream college, get that dream job, or have that dream life then a lot of hard work needs to be done ahead of time.  This is a good wakeup call for little Ms. Princess.


Wasn't this Good Will Hunting?
 
2013-04-03 05:33:02 PM

Amusement: Knowledge is a terrible thing to waste.


How would you know?
 
2013-04-03 05:34:10 PM
Yeah, like I'm giving Gawker a click.
Which real website did they lift the article off of?
 
2013-04-03 05:35:26 PM

Christian Bale: Like me, millions of high-school seniors with sour grapes are asking themselves this week how they failed to get into the colleges of their dreams. It's simple: For years, they-we-were lied to.

Her point isn't that colleges should have accepted her, it's that they mislead students on what they're looking for.


Yes, because School admission forms and guidelines are just the words "HAVE FUN YOLO" on them.

Schools tell people what they want, and it's no secret the more plusses you have, the better. So do scholarships, jobs, internships, placements etc. People choose to hear what they want to hear and we have an entire generation convincing each other of the dream of you can spend your entire life doing what you enjoy casually as a full-time job, get paid well and live the dream. The alternative is them believing that they have to do a job sometimes because it's a job, whether the love it or just are okay with it, and that involves sacrifice, delayed gratification and work. Guess which reality most people are choosing to believe.

I have an entire crop of friends who are currently deciding between Animation, Fine Art, Fashion Design, Video Game Design, Theatre and every other dream job program scam out there. They're all convinced they can make their casual hobby their breadwinning career, even as all the ones older than them are getting out of school and realizing there's no job waiting for them. It's depressing as hell, because their facebook walls are plastered with inspirational quote about how they can make a living doing whatever they want, and it's the big bad mean adults and education system lying to them.

tl;dr - kids, when faced with a grim reality and a sugar-coated lie, will decide the lie is real.
 
2013-04-03 05:38:54 PM
All I had to do was be myself to get my various degrees, including a Ph.D.  Myself being the son of parents with the willingness to pay a significant portion of their income to put me through decent schools.  The same parents who never spoke of what they deserved by virtue of wanting.  The same parents who showed, not told, me how to live well.

I was fortunate enough to have good parents.  If this girl wants to blame someone other than herself for her lot in life perhaps she should explore how she came to be herself - if being herself isn't enough to impress.

Breeding is entirely too easy.  That's why stupid people do it so much.  (Disclaimer: I was an accident)
 
MFK
2013-04-03 05:39:26 PM
wow.... the comments on the original WSJ op-ed are just insane - saying how she should view it as a good thing because Ivy League schools are BAD! What in the actual fark is going on where conservatives are shiatting on the best schools because they are some how "librul elitist". and when did the WSJ start catering to people who believe that shiat? I can guarantee that the a pretty sizable chunk of the people who read the WSJ for market information have a Harvard MBA on their wall so what gives?
 
2013-04-03 05:39:29 PM
IDK if they still do this but in Colorado they had a grid based on your ACT score and you high school GPA. You would find you GPA on one side then the ACT score on the other and on the grid it would have a corresponding code. The code detailed the state schools that had to accept you if you fell above a certain point on the grid. I pretty much new I wanted to go to the University of Colorado and since I was above the grid I new I would get in. Seems like maybe she should have applied to some state schools.
 
2013-04-03 05:42:03 PM
As someone who overachieved in high school and college despite humble origins, this girl's attitude is sad to me. What did she think was going to happen?

Someone else here was right- too many participation trophies.
 
2013-04-03 05:42:16 PM
If this was meant to be satire, it's bad satire. Which shows her privilege, because I would expect someone who could get published nationally for a satirical essay would know how to...you know...write. Bottom line, she was published because of who she knows. The irony of which seems to be lost on her.

And no, this is not Alanis irony.
 
2013-04-03 05:44:12 PM
i bet she's a lousy lay, too.
 
2013-04-03 05:48:38 PM
Every day that goes by, I become more and more tempted to register gawkerer.com as a parody website.

There would only be one kind of story -- 'Look at this idiot' -- which would also be the sum total of opinion offered on every topic. Kind of a TL:DR for Gawker.
 
2013-04-03 05:52:05 PM
Are people really overlooking the fact Gawker dug up that this girl's sister used to be a features editor for the WSJ and probably got this thing run in a bit of nepotism?  And that the WSJ did an article not long ago about their parents' house in Pittsburgh?
 
2013-04-03 05:52:17 PM

GAT_00: FloydA: ambassador_ahab:   This tells me there must have been something else defective about her application.

Its author.

Since the WSJ is on her side, I expect she acted like a privileged little biatch and demanded admittance.


Pretty much. She whined that she didn't have any social activism or charities on her resume, and suggested that those who did had "fake" charities and so on.

What is with conservatives that they think that since they are selfish, everyone else must be?
 
2013-04-03 05:52:25 PM
Contrabulous Flabtraption: ...I'm going to adapt this for my next job rejection

Might as well.  That appointment rejection rejection was adapted by somebody from an employment rejection rejection that is at least 15 years old.
 
2013-04-03 05:57:05 PM
How hard is it to slaughter your GPA and the SAT? I mean, seriously, if you aren't 90th percentile or better, you really should be considering suicide methods, not career paths. It will be better for you, and doubtless those around you.

All you losers need to stop breathing.
 
2013-04-03 05:58:54 PM
The only two things that got me into college were band and my SAT scores.  My grades were terrible.  I also never tried actively to do anything, but wound up doing some neat stuff like chess club (sucked but got better), math club (extra credit) and doing film for the HS football team.

This biatch is clearly just lazy.  Not so lazy that she won't go out of her way to ruin any hope that she would get in anywhere, but lazy.

She didn't even get her rant published on it's merits. She only got into the WSJ with her tripe because her sister worked there and it was a hit-piece on diversity.

God this planet sucks.
 
2013-04-03 05:59:41 PM
Gawker is a tabloid for the internet.
 
2013-04-03 05:59:52 PM
She'll make a great welfare queen.
 
2013-04-03 06:01:45 PM

Lollipop165: ambassador_ahab: Meh.  All I did in High School was go to Phish concerts and get high.  But because I was into music, I studied piano very seriously, and I even (shock) practiced, because I wanted to get better.  And so I got better and had various nice accomplishments to tell colleges about.  My grades were acceptable, but not great, and neither were my SAT scores.

But I got into every single school I applied to, including: University of Chicago, NYU, Northwestern, and most importantly, my 1st choice and alma mater: Oberiln.  Oddly, none of those schools cared that I wasn't top of my class, nor did they care that my SAT score was like 1000 (they used a 1600 scale back in my day.)  This tells me there must have been something else defective about her application.

WTF? Whose dick did you suck to get into these schools?

A decent piano player and a 1000 SAT will not get you into any of these schools. Unless you went to Julliard or played at Carnegie Hall. Hell, even then you would have had a hard time.


Oberlin? The hell? I've been to Oberlin, it's not all that impressive.
 
2013-04-03 06:04:32 PM
Epic. Nice work, Gawker dude/dudette.
 
2013-04-03 06:11:16 PM
She doesn't even understand the concept of "sour grapes", which almost all Americans understand from reading Aesop's fables in FARKing 2nd grade.

Just be yourself. In your case, being yourself is a tater tot cook at the bowling alley...if you are lucky.
 
2013-04-03 06:12:35 PM
Pretty typical, and sadly all too common:

Kid grows up in a wishy--washy, feel--good environment, where they will give you the grades if you smile, show up regularly, and hold the "right" opinions.  You get rewarded whether you perform or not.

Kid never has to perform, never has to produce---and there is no real penalty for ever coming up short.  Kid never learns the sting of failure, never has to try harder to succeed.

Kid grows up thinking success is a rubber stamp:  Right school, good job, plenty of money, a "right" to an easy life, irrespective of performance.

Kid gets rejected by a premium school because kid is just average at best----kid gets all butthurt, Awwwwwwwwwww. . . . . . . .

All I can say is, wait till you get out in that cold cruel world, kid; you are going to get your ass handed to you on a silver platter.
 
2013-04-03 06:14:43 PM
jayphat:

Oberlin? The hell? I've been to Oberlin, it's not all that impressive.


Oh yeah?  Let's see you kill Darth Maul!
 
2013-04-03 06:20:02 PM

Ambitwistor: AdmirableSnackbar: Teachers get bonuses?  I'll be nice and say that it doesn't sound like you know what you're talking about.

The teachers around here haven't even gotten cost-of-living raises for years, let alone bonuses.  There's been a pay freeze since the economy crashed.


It's the opposite here and I bang my head on the wall. My oldest friend is a teacher. She's bitaching because "I haven't gotten a pay raise in years. Just my COLA increase."
"has your insurance gone up at all?"
"no."
I'm half tempted to tell her to STFU.  Seriosuly, I get my pay raise 2 days ago. 2.5%.  In 60 days, my insurance rates will, once again, rise and swallow all of that 2%. Great stuff. Although, I hear this year we'll transition to a hybrid FSA so I'll actually bring home more money.
 
2013-04-03 06:24:48 PM

Yanks_RSJ: I feel bad for people who are told to follow their dreams, then have stupid dreams that aren't worth following.


Was it a dream where you see yourself standing in some sort of sun god robes on a pyramid with a thousand naked women screaming and throwing little pickles at you?
 
2013-04-03 06:25:46 PM

Warthog: North Arlington, VA.


My wife is a music teacher at a private studio in Reston.  The NoVa parents she deals with (40+ families) are INSANE, FARKING BATSHIAT INSANE...I have never seen more overly scheduled children in my life.  These kids, usually teens have 5-7 extra activities OUTSIDE whatever extracurricular activities they do with their school.

Every single one of her teens breaks at some point throughout the year.  Hour lesson becomes a counseling session.  I have no idea how these kids can keep up with what their parents have scheduled for them.
 
2013-04-03 06:27:11 PM

Fano: The tipoff is the ending where she says "homosexual behavior is learned behavior," and the capstone, "evolution is the tinfoil hat atheists use to keep God out of their brainwaves."


That, or mentioning that your nickname is actually your surname.
 
2013-04-03 06:31:00 PM
Gawker: America's response to the Daily Mail.
 
2013-04-03 06:31:09 PM

karnal: Just another example of liberals trying to turn America into a Nanny State


Poe's Law, paging Poe to Fark thread #7680618 ....
 
2013-04-03 06:36:40 PM

Endive Wombat: I have no idea how these kids can keep up with what their parents have scheduled for them.


Endive Wombat: Every single one of her teens breaks at some point throughout the year.


You answered your question.  They don't.

/I knew a couple of kids like that, mostly Indian.  They usually have no souls.  Totally dead inside.
 
2013-04-03 06:37:29 PM

Kimothy: Recently had dinner with my nephew, now a college senior at a small bible-based college in Southern California.


Biola?  Concordia?  Pepperdine? Azusa Pacific?  Westmont?

/Went to Biola
//Got in with mediocre HS grades, but did have a 1325 out the the possible 1600 SAT
///My parents are loaded and once the school saw that my parents could pay, I was in
 
2013-04-03 06:38:34 PM
Much of Suzy's bitter criticism is leveled at her parents (whose lovely home, shared by Suzy, you can tour in Wall Street Journal article), whose refusal to force their teenaged daughter to pursue a hobby against her will borders on child abuse:
But my parents also left me with a dearth of hobbies that make admissions committees salivate. I've never sat down at a piano, never plucked a violin. Karate lasted about a week and the swim team didn't last past the first lap. Why couldn't Amy Chua have adopted me as one of her cubs?
I take great schadenfreude at the fact that this kid's parents probably raised her to be the whiney, self-entitled biyotch she sounds like here.  Fortunately, being a bad parent is a self-punishing crime.
 
2013-04-03 06:41:38 PM
i1121.photobucket.com
 
2013-04-03 06:41:39 PM

thetubameister: But writing that letter was stupid brilliant.


Kid's sister worked for WSJ. Kid's parents' house was featured in WSJ. Kid's "open letter" gets published in WSJ. If she swallows, she'll be the next Mrs. Rupert Murdoch before she turns 21. Or at least his latest mistress. Either way, she'll get her dream job and won't have to do anything except be herself.
 
2013-04-03 06:42:46 PM

tlchwi02: i'd take that a step further- skip at least your senior year of highschool and go to community college.


A family friend's teen did this.  He was semi-home schooled as well as private schooled.  He arranged it with the school that some classes would double count as college credit, of course, but also as high school credit.  He started this his Jr. year and did 50/50 Jr. College and HS.  His Sr. year he was 99% college, the only thing he did at the HS was cross country and track.  He took summer courses at the community college too.

Long story short, he graduated high school as a Jr. in college.  He got into the college he wanted, and will be graduating this coming December, oh...he will be 19 when he graduates (his 20th birthday is on Dec 31st).
 
2013-04-03 06:44:42 PM

SlothB77: To those claiming that I am bitter-you bet I am! An underachieving selfish teenager making excuses for her own failures? That too! To those of you disgusted by this, shocked that I take for granted the wonderful gifts I have been afforded, I say shhhh-"The Real Housewives" is on.

yikes, it just gets worse.


See, this paragraph is what makes me think it might actually be an (off-target) attempt at satire.
 
2013-04-03 06:44:59 PM

Mitrovarr: The problem everyone's ignoring is that it is becoming increasingly necessary to go to places like that whether you want to or not, because society in the US is getting increasingly grim for anyone normal. The job prospects and pay rate for someone with a normal degree from an average school are going continuously downhill.


I blame corporate America.  Seriously.

Since when does "Entry Level" mean (aside from a college degree) 2-4 years experience too?
 
2013-04-03 06:45:08 PM

meyerkev: Endive Wombat: I have no idea how these kids can keep up with what their parents have scheduled for them.

Endive Wombat: Every single one of her teens breaks at some point throughout the year.

You answered your question.  They don't.

/I knew a couple of kids like that, mostly Indian.  They usually have no souls.  Totally dead inside.


I have family like that. Chinese. And none of them, not a one, can entertain themselves for shiat. "What should we do now?" " I don't know, go play." "Play what?" "Outside".

So I go out in a few minutes and they're all sitting there, doing nothing. "We're bored!"
 
2013-04-03 06:54:25 PM
Gawker's "brutal takedown" was anything but. If anything it was just as whiny as the girl's letter.
 
2013-04-03 06:59:32 PM

Hermione_Granger: Gawker's "brutal takedown" was anything but. If anything it was just as whiny as the girl's letter.


Glad I'm not the only person who thought that.
 
2013-04-03 07:02:39 PM

CheatCommando: GiantRex: I went to engineering school, where being able to write a coherent essay of any sort is usually good enough to get you admitted.

To the Honors Program.


Electrical Engineer here - you talk good.
 
2013-04-03 07:07:13 PM
Typical OWS type entitlement mentality.   If she does get into into a college, in a few years we will be hearing about how someone else should be paying her student loans for her.
 
2013-04-03 07:10:42 PM
babygoat

Harry Freakstorm:

WTF is a MOS?


Military Occupational Specialty Your job that the Army decides you are going to do when they don't need a truck driver, a fox hole filler, a guard or a Kitchen Policemen (not as cool as it sounds). Your MOS decides which Advanced Individual Training you'll have and when you come up[ for E-5, how many promotion points you'll need to get E-5. Since they needed a lot of E-5s in aviation, in 1981, the promotion score for my MOS (67V10) was 499. Back then, IIRC, you got points for time in service, deployments, the number of vehicles you could drive, training, college, high school.

Another guy that I worked with, an E-4 with an MOS of 71L (Clerk Typist) had a promotion score of 999. They had plenty of E-5 clerk typists.
 
2013-04-03 07:12:19 PM
Ill chime in with my CSB:

Went to a catholic highschool, graduated third in my class, 4.0 GPA and took every AP class that I could (except for AP physics and AP Latin) and got a 3 on every test but AP Chem (4) and AP Bio (5) and had a part time job. Was in NHS and quill and scroll. Took the SATs as a junior and scored a 1320 (out of 1600).

Now I did all this because I wanted a challenge and the honors classes were easy. Around junior year my parents approached me about college plans. Honestly hadn't considered it. I went "well I'm good at math and science what can I do with that?" My dad, being an engineer, said "engineering" so they started helping me research that. Of course they wanted me to go to MIT. When it came to picking which engineering, I looked at average starting salaries. Chemical engineering was the highest at that time. So that's what I picked. Thank god I enjoyed the challenge and subject matter.

My dad and I went to one, one, MIT information session. I was the only white kid there. I looked around and after ten minutes said "dad, I'm smart but I'm not as smart as half the kids here nor do I have the extras that they have. Can we leave?"

So we did. Then had a trip to my eventual alma mater (Drexel University) and got an app as apart of the visit. It was one page, front and back. Filled it out and submitted it.

Then for shiats and giggles applied to UPenn and Purdue (my choice). Got wait listed to UPenn and accepted to Drexel and Purdue. Surprisingly Purdue ended up being more and Drexel gave me a nice scholarship (so long as I maintained a 3.0 GPA) which made it cheaper in the end.

Wouldn't change my choices for a minute.

But it comes down to individual ambition and parental help. This biatch sounds whiny and entitled.
 
2013-04-03 07:20:23 PM
"You'd better wise up, Suzy WWWWeeeeeeeiiissssss"
24.media.tumblr.com
 
2013-04-03 07:23:13 PM

jayphat: Oberlin? The hell? I've been to Oberlin, it's not all that impressive.


I was extremely impressed, and I wouldn't have gone to any of the other schools that admitted me for anything.  Plus, when I first started working in labs out of there, I was easily the only person with only a bachelor's degree who also had graduate-level neuroscience training, also the only person who had done neuro labs with live rodents...etc.  It was awesome.
 
2013-04-03 07:32:09 PM

ThrobblefootSpectre: Typical OWS type entitlement mentality.   If she does get into into a college, in a few years we will be hearing about how someone else should be paying her student loans for her.


You obviously didn't read her "article."
 
2013-04-03 07:39:49 PM
She sounds entitled.
 
2013-04-03 07:41:17 PM

beezeltown: REPEAT much?

I just finished reading this the first time....


No, the tag is "Follow-Up."
 
2013-04-03 07:41:23 PM
I understand for the IVY league schools why it might require 100% time dedication but there is no reason why a normal state school should require such strict admission requirements.  Its like requiring a PHD to work at McDonald's   It just makes no sense.
 
2013-04-03 07:44:01 PM

tallguywithglasseson: You're a white girl from a privileged background. You didn't have outstanding grades, test scores, didn't have accomplishments in extra-curricular activities or elsewhere outside of school.

And now you didn't get into your first choice dream college. Probably got right into all kinds of good schools, but not the elite college of your dreams.
Clearly, the blame must be placed on affirmative action, and anyone who values diversity. Minorities, gays, etc...  too bad you aren't any of those things. I'm sure your attitude and work ethic would have carried you much further if you had those "advantages", you know, they just give those people things for nothing.

And of course it gets published in the WSJ. Reads like pretty much every other argument against affirmative action or diversity considerations. Scalia will probably cite it in his opinion on  Schuette v. Coalition to Defend Affirmative Action. Hoping it will be in the dissent... but probably won't be.


According to Gawker, her sister is Bari Weiss, former Wall Street Journal editorial features editor, so she's does have some connections to WSJ.
 
2013-04-03 07:46:08 PM

Warlordtrooper: is no reason why a normal state school should require such strict admission requirements.


any school that does it is because it can:  if there are that many people who are willing and able to go there that meet the strict criteria, then why loosen the requirements?  By being a difficult admissions filter, you get more students who might go on to make money and then pump money back into their alma mater.
 
2013-04-03 07:46:43 PM

jayphat: Hermione_Granger: Gawker's "brutal takedown" was anything but. If anything it was just as whiny as the girl's letter.

Glad I'm not the only person who thought that.


They both need to check their privilege.

She wrote about what people perceive it takes to get into a good school. Gawker wrote about her personally. That's their "style."
 
2013-04-03 07:47:33 PM

Latinwolf: Clearly, the blame must be placed on affirmative action, and anyone who values diversity. Minorities, gays, etc


I bet Harvard is 100% black gay people.  I bet there's not a single white person on the whole campus.
 
2013-04-03 07:49:34 PM

AdmirableSnackbar: the money is in the banana stand: IRQ12: AdmirableSnackbar: Christian Bale: Like me, millions of high-school seniors with sour grapes are asking themselves this week how they failed to get into the colleges of their dreams. It's simple: For years, they-we-were lied to.

Her point isn't that colleges should have accepted her, it's that they mislead students on what they're looking for.

And she's wrong.  She wasn't lied to, she just didn't understand what they meant.  Fark that, it's not that she didn't understand, it's that she didn't even try to understand.

...and understand one of the simplest concepts in high school:   You join clubs and sports and do charity because it looks good to schools.  Even the druggies that show up to meet up with friends know that shiat, but like her they choose not to.  The only difference is that this person is the perfect example of our entitled, spoiled rotten youth in this country.

THAT is the problem right there. By and large kids are not a part of those activities because they want to be, or contribute to them in any meaningful way but simply because it looks good to schools or they are told they are required to. The motivation behind school is the wrong kind of motivation. Students should be motivated to learn and understand the material. Teachers, should be motivated to teach those materials so that the students learn and understand that material. That isn't the case. Students are motivated to get into a good college. Teachers are motivated by salary bonuses. (I understand I am stereotyping and there are those whom are righteous, but I believe them to be the minority).

Teachers get bonuses?  I'll be nice and say that it doesn't sound like you know what you're talking about.


Yes they do. In the state of Texas, teachers receive a bonus if the school is recognized as Exemplary through outstanding scores on the State Assesment test. It is a SIZEABLE number which has caused a lot of controversy and a lot of people trying to game the system. Last year, a child spoke up to the teacher administering the test in Beaumont and asked "You aren't going to give me the answers like my other teacher did?" It is commonplace. Considering I have 4 people in my family who are teachers, I am pretty well informed on matters.
 
2013-04-03 08:05:17 PM
Amusement:
What high school career counselors won't tell you is this, you CAN get college credit.  College Level Examine Program offers over 33 examines to get college credit and it costs less than community (comedy) college.

http://clep.collegeboard.org/

While other students are trying to get into "their" college you've already got college credits.  The real stink is you can start taking CLEP examines when your 16 years old.

This sh*t is real and I CLEPed college humanities, Freshman English and other non-important stupid arse classes that cost thousands at the big "U".


Nice mail order degree you have there, Batman. If you are trying to promote this approach you should have someone with an edumacation write your posts.
 
2013-04-03 08:24:19 PM

ambassador_ahab: Latinwolf: Clearly, the blame must be placed on affirmative action, and anyone who values diversity. Minorities, gays, etc

I bet Harvard is 100% black gay people.  I bet there's not a single white person on the whole campus.


Actually at most of the top schools, affirmative action works to keep Asians out and get more whites in, otherwise the campus would be mostly Asian. Even now, Asians are the largest ethnic group on UC campuses, not whites. Opinion piece, but fairly non-controversial:

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/12/20/opinion/asians-too-smart-for-their -o wn-good.html

I believe the current term is "applying while Asian", and a lot of Asians don't check the box, but when you're named Libing Xao or something it's not like they don't know. However, white people don't complain so heavily when they're the ones getting in via affirmative action.
 
2013-04-03 08:39:47 PM

ajt167: T.rex: I just read the gal's original article.  Its clearly intentionally self-effacing and humorous.   And just look at all these people she successfully trolled.  Plus, she got published. Well done.

Seconded. How are we the only ones that got this?


It wasn't really that funny, for one thing; Poe's Law, for another; and also there are way too many people out there who actually think and act like her. She didn't exaggerate by much. There are a lot of kids out there who are clueless as to why they're not getting into top-tier schools with straight A's but subpar SATs and nothing else on their transcripts; who don't "get" why they need to do extracurricular activities; and who genuinely think that minorities are taking "their" spaces in "their" colleges.

These are the ones who go to community colleges, btw, and negotiate with the instructors about finals--"Can it be 25 questions, multiple-choice, take-home? How many days late can it be and still get full credit? Are we expected to actually participate in class?"--or like the kids (and they were kids) in my law school who took a week off in the middle of bar prep to take a trip to Vegas because they were so stressed (and then didn't pass the bar, gee, who could have seen that one coming).

There have always been lazy, entitled, clueless students who expect to just go to college because they're so special; but it's gotten worse recently. This girl may have thought she was joking, but really she wasn't.
 
2013-04-03 08:39:52 PM
College is largely useless bullshiat.

/i would know, i have a master's
//found her op-ed amusing
 
2013-04-03 08:44:19 PM

Half Right: I don't get all the hate and outrage about this letter. I thought it was funny. If anything the Gawker response author seems to be the bitter, angry, self-important one.


Maybe you have Aspergers?
 
2013-04-03 08:47:53 PM
Fark all those azzhats/morans at Gawker.

If it wasn't for peoples desire to read snark about others they would be out of business.
 
2013-04-03 09:00:44 PM

ambassador_ahab: Latinwolf: Clearly, the blame must be placed on affirmative action, and anyone who values diversity. Minorities, gays, etc

I bet Harvard is 100% black gay people.  I bet there's not a single white person on the whole campus.


They had to short dick every cannibal on the Congo, but they motivated them.
 
2013-04-03 09:05:17 PM

FlyingJ: "You'd better wise up, Suzy WWWWeeeeeeeiiissssss"
[24.media.tumblr.com image 598x442]


I probably laughed at this much harder than I should have.
 
2013-04-03 09:05:22 PM

detroitdoesntsuckthatbad: CheatCommando: GiantRex: I went to engineering school, where being able to write a coherent essay of any sort is usually good enough to get you admitted.

To the Honors Program.

Electrical Engineer here - you talk good.


I went to university in Vancouver. One of the Engineering entrance requirements was an "English Proficiency" test. I was nervous about taking it, as I don't English very good. I walked into the examination room and sat down. I looked to my left: rows of ESL students. I looked to my right: more ESL students. I looked up at the examiner. He gave me a knowing smile.

Needless to say, I passed with flying colours.
 
2013-04-03 09:38:04 PM
Hopefully her parents are mocked pretty hard for this, as well.
 
2013-04-03 09:44:40 PM

WhippingBoy: I don't English very good


Better than 99% of the people on Fark.
 
2013-04-03 10:20:04 PM
I kinda feel like if it were a guy who wrote this, he'd be getting a lot of pats on the back from the bitter, affirmative-action hating, aspey engineering student demographic.  But it's a girl, so she's just a biatch.
 
2013-04-03 10:25:01 PM
I'm stunned by how many Farkers have been successfully trolled by the WSJ and a high-school girl. This is clearly facetious - Sweetie Pie will be matriculating exactly where she wants to come fall.

No, my friends, this is just the latest salvo in the conservatards' Great War On Thinking For Yourself. "Colleges Are Bad. They Harm Our Babies. Won't Somebody PLEASE Think of the Children?" The rhetoric will inevitably begin to contain phrases such as "elitist intellectuals and progressives". Once they've successfully established their message that it's uncool to be able to think critically, then, and ONLY then, will Sarah Palin be cleared to run for President.
 
2013-04-03 10:35:16 PM

swingbozo: Amusement:
What high school career counselors won't tell you is this, you CAN get college credit.  College Level Examine Program offers over 33 examines to get college credit and it costs less than community (comedy) college.

http://clep.collegeboard.org/

While other students are trying to get into "their" college you've already got college credits.  The real stink is you can start taking CLEP examines when your 16 years old.

This sh*t is real and I CLEPed college humanities, Freshman English and other non-important stupid arse classes that cost thousands at the big "U".

Nice mail order degree you have there, Batman. If you are trying to promote this approach you should have someone with an edumacation write your posts.


You may have had a valid point if CLEP was an mail order degree.
 
2013-04-03 10:38:10 PM

Mike Chewbacca: EvilRacistNaziFascist: Fano: What about her racist dig at all them undeserving minorities?

Her complaint about universities making a mindless fetish of "diversity" was quite accurate, and the most sensible thing she said in the entire letter.

She also made a valid point about having to find some way to interact with adversity. She's a normal teenager living a bland life, and she doesn't have the resources to fly to another country to see how awful the world really can be.


If her dad was just diagnosed with MS recently, family vacations wouldn't be priority at this time nor would driving their child around to extracurricular activities.
 
2013-04-03 10:39:37 PM

ElStreak: Amusement: Knowledge is a terrible thing to waste.

How would you know?


Thanks for the witty comment.
 
2013-04-03 10:47:15 PM
SHE SHOULD HAVE THE SAME OPPORTUNITY TO FINANCIALLY CRIPPLE HERSELF AND DROP OUT AS THOSE THAT HAVE THE MINIMUM SKILLS TO SUCCEED IN COLLEGE!!!11ELEVENTY!!!
 
2013-04-03 11:13:16 PM

the money is in the banana stand: AdmirableSnackbar: the money is in the banana stand: IRQ12: AdmirableSnackbar: Christian Bale: Like me, millions of high-school seniors with sour grapes are asking themselves this week how they failed to get into the colleges of their dreams. It's simple: For years, they-we-were lied to.

Her point isn't that colleges should have accepted her, it's that they mislead students on what they're looking for.

And she's wrong.  She wasn't lied to, she just didn't understand what they meant.  Fark that, it's not that she didn't understand, it's that she didn't even try to understand.

...and understand one of the simplest concepts in high school:   You join clubs and sports and do charity because it looks good to schools.  Even the druggies that show up to meet up with friends know that shiat, but like her they choose not to.  The only difference is that this person is the perfect example of our entitled, spoiled rotten youth in this country.

THAT is the problem right there. By and large kids are not a part of those activities because they want to be, or contribute to them in any meaningful way but simply because it looks good to schools or they are told they are required to. The motivation behind school is the wrong kind of motivation. Students should be motivated to learn and understand the material. Teachers, should be motivated to teach those materials so that the students learn and understand that material. That isn't the case. Students are motivated to get into a good college. Teachers are motivated by salary bonuses. (I understand I am stereotyping and there are those whom are righteous, but I believe them to be the minority).

Teachers get bonuses?  I'll be nice and say that it doesn't sound like you know what you're talking about.

Yes they do. In the state of Texas, teachers receive a bonus if the school is recognized as Exemplary through outstanding scores on the State Assesment test. It is a SIZEABLE number which has caused a lot of controversy and a lot of pe ...


Don't worry, he's just parroting the old narrative that ZOMG NONE OF THE TEACHERS CAN FEED THEMSELVES.
 
2013-04-03 11:17:17 PM
I wrote a Letter to the Editor when I was 14 or so against the death penalty.  Someone actually called my house and started screaming at me how Jesus wanted us to have it and how stupid I was, as I'm standing in shock with the phone to my ear and in a towel (just got out of the shower).

It's all well and good if you put yourself out there that you should expect the f--king crazies and people in general to take you down, especially in this age.  And in this age, that'll stick to you.  It'll show up on Google four years from now.  I heard rants like this from friends in high school who went to their second or third choice schools, and over four years grew the f--k up (most of them anyway).  The better ones maned up, worked their asses off, and transferred to their dream school.  But that doesn't mean there wasn't plenty of grumbling senior year too, and living in Michigan pre-Supreme Court Affirmative Action case there was *plenty*.  (I'm still in favor of economic affirmative action more than racial, but debate for another stupid day).

But maybe an editor at the WSJ could have some f--king discretion. You know, her f--king sister.

Not saying this kid didn't have the rebuttal coming - but 18 or not she's a f--king kid.  As a society, can't we just shake our heads and move on to let her figure this out?

/oh wait, Gawker.
//never f--king mind
///both parties here suck equally I guess, but I'll throw most of my hatred toward the sister-editor.
 
2013-04-03 11:25:28 PM

GAT_00: Harvard realized this long ago: if you only take the best, the suicide rate is prohibitively high. So take some average students with good extracurriculars who also have the balls to apply to Harvard with anything below a 4.0. They'll happily take average grades, and some of them perform very well in college environments.

Of course, this is less true these days I think because nobody really curves.


I went to a public (working to middle class, generally) math-science high school where they did grade on a pretty harsh curve (RELATIVELY speaking, I had far harsher ones in college).

Our counselor there had nice packets printed to put in our college applications to explain that we had a) fewer AP courses (because we did research projects for 1/4th of the year each year, couldn't cover all the BS although I still got Physics and Calc AB in), b) not all 4.0s even though we were a pretty damn select group and c) a rundown of what classes we all took (including 300 level college statistics).  She also made sure to keep track of where we were applying, and if she didn't know the admissions people there knew our tiny (72 per class) school she'd call them and give them a heads up.

We had a few folks on a frequent clip every year get into Harvard or MIT.  I didn't bother applying, but 2 kids a few years ahead of me got in and cobbled together full rides from scholarships.

Anyway, our counselor kind of kicked ass for going the extra mile for us.
 
2013-04-03 11:30:22 PM
That girl has just what I'm looking for. I'd like to offer her a position on my staff.

/Girl: My staff; get on it.
 
2013-04-03 11:37:40 PM

Archfeld: What ?!?! Negative fallout from raising your child in this BS PC everything is good, everyone wins, and thinking bad thoughts about someone is bullying society. It is about time kids realize that the world is NOT fair, you can do EVERYTHING CORRECTLY and STILL LOSE. Stop swaddling your crotch fruit in bubble wrap and let them understand loss a little. Competitive games like dodgeball, and other sports highlight the skills needed to lose gracefully, and hopefully somewhere you master the skill to win in the same manner.


And this is important - don't try to teach those skills. Tacit learning is something not just teachers, but parents, have totally fallen down on. Insist on certain activities, and don't allow any questioning.
 
2013-04-03 11:39:29 PM

i upped my meds-up yours: Archfeld: What ?!?! Negative fallout from raising your child in this BS PC everything is good, everyone wins, and thinking bad thoughts about someone is bullying society. It is about time kids realize that the world is NOT fair, you can do EVERYTHING CORRECTLY and STILL LOSE. Stop swaddling your crotch fruit in bubble wrap and let them understand loss a little. Competitive games like dodgeball, and other sports highlight the skills needed to lose gracefully, and hopefully somewhere you master the skill to win in the same manner.

And this is important - don't try to teach those skills. Tacit learning is something not just teachers, but parents, have totally fallen down on. Insist on certain activities, and don't allow any questioning.


As long as you don't mind being put in some shady retirement home after you retire, sure.
 
2013-04-03 11:42:05 PM

olddinosaur: Pretty typical, and sadly all too common:

Kid grows up in a wishy--washy, feel--good environment, where they will give you the grades if you smile, show up regularly, and hold the "right" opinions.  You get rewarded whether you perform or not.

Kid never has to perform, never has to produce---and there is no real penalty for ever coming up short.  Kid never learns the sting of failure, never has to try harder to succeed.

Kid grows up thinking success is a rubber stamp:  Right school, good job, plenty of money, a "right" to an easy life, irrespective of performance.

Kid gets rejected by a premium school because kid is just average at best----kid gets all butthurt, Awwwwwwwwwww. . . . . . . .

All I can say is, wait till you get out in that cold cruel world, kid; you are going to get your ass handed to you on a silver platter.


The lesson is not just that "being yourself isn't enough." It's that sometimes, <i>all you can do isn't enough.</i> Some of us, even the dedicated ones with lots to offer, are just going to have to go thru life pulling someone else's truck.
 
2013-04-03 11:44:39 PM

Mitrovarr: I don't really blame her for being mad, but the problem isn't with the school. The schools she was applying to were all for high achievers, and she isn't one. Honestly, she shouldn't have gotten in. She shouldn't have even wanted to apply.

The problem everyone's ignoring is that it is becoming increasingly necessary to go to places like that whether you want to or not, because society in the US is getting increasingly grim for anyone normal. The job prospects and pay rate for someone with a normal degree from an average school are going continuously downhill. It's becoming increasingly necessary to do something special just to reach the middle class - either go to a high-ranked college, or graduate school, or do something else to distinguish yourself. And that's really hard for people without special talents to handle. Yet, what's the alternative? To get washed into the service sector so you can spend your entire life pointlessly pushing the boulder of your student loans up a hill of their interest rate?

So yeah, the problem isn't that we're telling everyone they're exceptional. The problem is that if you aren't exceptional, you're screwed.


It's a demand issue. We don't need most of the people we have. They're either going to have to become different people or go off and starve someplace. The market is more important than any one of us. In fact, it's more important than millions of us.
 
2013-04-03 11:46:30 PM

meyerkev: Carn: I went to public high school, got good grades (3.95 or something), AP, SAT, lots of extracurricular stuff (not only because I knew it would look good for college, but I liked all the stuff I did) and I got into every school I applied including Notre Dame and Northwestern (Go U!).   I only got to go to Northwestern because they have truly fantastic financial aid and half my tuition was paid by a grant from the school and we didn't have to pay it back.  Not a chance in hell we could have afforded it otherwise.  Oh and I didn't do any charity or start any fake companies or whatever and I spent a fair amount of time with the assistant principal and had me a few suspensions.

Not any more.  My sister applied last year, got in, and didn't get anything (despite looking very poor on paper).  We had some friends get in a few years back and they were sending out little booklets to all the acceptees saying things like: "Take out a second mortgage" and "Ask for your inheritance early"


That's really sad to hear. My Dad grew up pretty poor in Chicago, and Northwestern gave him a full ride through undergrad and, along with the National Health Service Corps, put him through med school. Making good education affordable is such a huge factor in social mobility, and when school is getting so much more expensive...
 
2013-04-04 12:06:54 AM

i upped my meds-up yours: It's a demand issue. We don't need most of the people we have. They're either going to have to become different people or go off and starve someplace. The market is more important than any one of us. In fact, it's more important than millions of us.


I think the ultimate problem is, we don't need many of the people we have - not in any capacity. Automation has reduced the number of workers we need (or everyone needs to work less) and there isn't a field left that can absorb the glut of overtrained people we have. The 'catch' fields that can expand indefinitely are usually service jobs that get little respect and no money, so they don't count. We really need to do something about this before it results in enough societal unrest to capsize either the government or the economy.
 
2013-04-04 12:10:34 AM
The mistake we've made, I think, is treating our children as people who matter. No one matters until they know what it means not to matter. That means being reminded that they don't matter, and won't matter, until they give society what it asks of them.
 
2013-04-04 12:15:34 AM

cptjeff: meyerkev: Carn: I went to public high school, got good grades (3.95 or something), AP, SAT, lots of extracurricular stuff (not only because I knew it would look good for college, but I liked all the stuff I did) and I got into every school I applied including Notre Dame and Northwestern (Go U!).   I only got to go to Northwestern because they have truly fantastic financial aid and half my tuition was paid by a grant from the school and we didn't have to pay it back.  Not a chance in hell we could have afforded it otherwise.  Oh and I didn't do any charity or start any fake companies or whatever and I spent a fair amount of time with the assistant principal and had me a few suspensions.

Not any more.  My sister applied last year, got in, and didn't get anything (despite looking very poor on paper).  We had some friends get in a few years back and they were sending out little booklets to all the acceptees saying things like: "Take out a second mortgage" and "Ask for your inheritance early"

That's really sad to hear. My Dad grew up pretty poor in Chicago, and Northwestern gave him a full ride through undergrad and, along with the National Health Service Corps, put him through med school. Making good education affordable is such a huge factor in social mobility, and when school is getting so much more expensive...


My Dad grew up poor in Detroit, and got a full ride for tuition to University of Michigan.  Still had to work like crazy to pay for food and rent, but he made it through.

A kid in his situation nowadays would more than likely never get that chance in the first place.  And even if you're completely on your own and with no support whatsoever from your parents, even if you're estranged from them, their income gets worked into what aid you're gonna get.  So right off the bat good luck propelling kids taking care of themselves into being able to get a good education without scrambling to find private scholarships.
 
2013-04-04 12:21:18 AM

StreetlightInTheGhetto: cptjeff: meyerkev: Carn: I went to public high school, got good grades (3.95 or something), AP, SAT, lots of extracurricular stuff (not only because I knew it would look good for college, but I liked all the stuff I did) and I got into every school I applied including Notre Dame and Northwestern (Go U!).   I only got to go to Northwestern because they have truly fantastic financial aid and half my tuition was paid by a grant from the school and we didn't have to pay it back.  Not a chance in hell we could have afforded it otherwise.  Oh and I didn't do any charity or start any fake companies or whatever and I spent a fair amount of time with the assistant principal and had me a few suspensions.

Not any more.  My sister applied last year, got in, and didn't get anything (despite looking very poor on paper).  We had some friends get in a few years back and they were sending out little booklets to all the acceptees saying things like: "Take out a second mortgage" and "Ask for your inheritance early"

That's really sad to hear. My Dad grew up pretty poor in Chicago, and Northwestern gave him a full ride through undergrad and, along with the National Health Service Corps, put him through med school. Making good education affordable is such a huge factor in social mobility, and when school is getting so much more expensive...

My Dad grew up poor in Detroit, and got a full ride for tuition to University of Michigan.  Still had to work like crazy to pay for food and rent, but he made it through.

A kid in his situation nowadays would more than likely never get that chance in the first place.  And even if you're completely on your own and with no support whatsoever from your parents, even if you're estranged from them, their income gets worked into what aid you're gonna get.  So right off the bat good luck propelling kids taking care of themselves into being able to get a good education without scrambling to find private scholarships.


Life sucks. Doesn't mean you get shiat for it.
 
2013-04-04 12:26:12 AM

Mitrovarr: i upped my meds-up yours: It's a demand issue. We don't need most of the people we have. They're either going to have to become different people or go off and starve someplace. The market is more important than any one of us. In fact, it's more important than millions of us.

I think the ultimate problem is, we don't need many of the people we have - not in any capacity. Automation has reduced the number of workers we need (or everyone needs to work less) and there isn't a field left that can absorb the glut of overtrained people we have. The 'catch' fields that can expand indefinitely are usually service jobs that get little respect and no money, so they don't count. We really need to do something about this before it results in enough societal unrest to capsize either the government or the economy.


I believe we're in too deep. Probably nothing can be done until our economy capsizes. I don't think capsizing the government will do much. We're going to need to see so many people starving that we can't do shiat about it.
 
2013-04-04 12:44:19 AM

Christian Bale: Like me, millions of high-school seniors with sour grapes are asking themselves this week how they failed to get into the colleges of their dreams. It's simple: For years, they-we-were lied to.

Her point isn't that colleges should have accepted her, it's that they mislead students on what they're looking for.


Except, they didn't. No college, when asked "what do I have to do get accepted at your school?" told her, "just be yourself" and then ended there. Those words may have appeared somewhere in their answer, but that was the only thing she took away from the experience.

She wasn't lied to. She paid as much attention to what they were saying as she apparently did to her schoolwork, test scores, and general process of growing up and doing something responsible with her life.
 
2013-04-04 12:50:00 AM

Yogimus: That's really sad to hear. My Dad grew up pretty poor in Chicago, and Northwestern gave him a full ride through undergrad and, along with the National Health Service Corps, put him through med school. Making good education affordable is such a huge factor in social mobility, and when school is getting so much more expensive...

My Dad grew up poor in Detroit, and got a full ride for tuition to University of Michigan. Still had to work like crazy to pay for food and rent, but he made it through.

A kid in his situation nowadays would more than likely never get that chance in the first place. And even if you're completely on your own and with no support whatsoever from your parents, even if you're estranged from them, their income gets worked into what aid you're gonna get. So right off the bat good luck propelling kids taking care of themselves into being able to get a good education without scrambling to find private scholarships.

Life sucks. Doesn't mean you get shiat for it.


Boy, did you miss the point on that one.
 
2013-04-04 12:56:02 AM
Here is why colleges have these entrance boards... they don't want to set their students up for failure. First, it makes them look bad. Second, it does NO favors to the student to enroll in a college where she can't keep up. She will accrue debt, and drop out after getting drunk, used as a cum dumpster by some "nice guy", gaining 20+ lb, falling into a depression, and sleeping in her dorm room instead of going to classes.

Colleges care about your extra curricular activities, because it shows you can handle the stress that comes with time management. Colleges care about volunteerism, because they know that it takes personal commitment to stick with something that has no immediate benefit. Her letter showed a lack of maturity that proved the admission board correct. College resources are finite, she doesn't "deserve" a god damned thing, and got exactly that.
 
2013-04-04 12:58:04 AM
I am a dynamic figure, often seen scaling walls and crushing ice. I have been known to remodel train stations on my lunch breaks, making them more efficient in the area of heat retention. I translate ethnic slurs for Cuban refugees, I write award-winning operas, I manage time efficiently. Occasionally, I tread water for three days in a row.

I woo women with my sensuous and godlike trombone playing, I can pilot bicycles up severe inclines with unflagging speed, and I cook Thirty Minute Brownies in twenty minutes. I am an expert in stucco, a veteran in love, and an outlaw in Peru.

Using only a hoe and a large glass of water, I once single-handedly defended a small village in the Amazon Basin from a horde of ferocious army ants. I play bluegrass cello, I was scouted by the Mets. I am the subject of numerous documentaries. When I'm bored, I build large suspension bridges in my yard. I enjoy urban hang gliding. On Wednesdays, after school, I repair electrical appliances free of charge.

I am an abstract artist, a concrete analyst, and a ruthless bookie. Critics worldwide swoon over my original line of corduroy evening wear. I don't perspire. I am a private citizen, yet I receive fan mail. I have been caller number nine and won the weekend passes. Last summer I toured New Jersey with a traveling centrifugal-force demonstration. I bat .400. My deft floral arrangements have earned me fame in international botany circles. Children trust me.

I can hurl tennis rackets at small moving objects with deadly accuracy. I once read Paradise Lost, Moby Dick, and David Copperfield in one day and still had time to refurbish an entire dining room that evening. I know the exact location of every food item in the supermarket. I have performed covert operations for the CIA. I sleep once a week; when I do sleep, I sleep in a chair. While on vacation in Canada, I successfully negotiated with a group of terrorists who had seized a small bakery. The laws of physics do not apply to me.

I balance, I weave, I dodge, I frolic, and my bills are all paid. On weekends, to let off steam, I participate in full-contact origami. Years ago I discovered the meaning of life but forgot to write it down. I have made extraordinary four-course meals using only a Mouli and a toaster oven. I breed prizewinning clams. I have won bullfights in San Juan, cliff-diving competitions in Sri Lanka, and spelling bees at the Kremlin. I have played Hamlet, I have performed open-heart surgery, and I have spoken with Elvis.

But I have not yet gone to college.
 
2013-04-04 01:00:50 AM

Yogimus: Colleges care about your extra curricular activities, because it shows you can handle the stress that comes with time management. Colleges care about volunteerism, because they know that it takes personal commitment to stick with something that has no immediate benefit.


Excellent point. College really doesn't give a shiat that you are a well-rounded individual who cares about the less fortunate. They want to know that you will accept stress and not question it - not to the point of, say, the army, but it's the bottom line.
 
2013-04-04 01:34:08 AM

Harry Freakstorm: Gabrielmot


abhorrent1: Poor girl. Probably can't even be a stripper.

can't wait to see *that* rejection letter...

She's gonna do porn and it's going to really bad porn.


Porn is like scotch. Even when it's bad it's still pretty good.
 
2013-04-04 01:37:24 AM

victrin: Let's see. When I was in high school...

I was a peer leader, an eagle scout, an all-state athlete, an all-state musician, a mathlete, a volunteer, an AP student, class salutatorian, tutor, and had a job. I had 12 hour school days thanks to my extra-curriculars, plus 4-6 hours of homework per night. I ended up graduating with enough college credit to classify as a Junior after one semester. I also received full academic scholarships to my top 2 universities. I bled, sweat and cried my way through. If only I had come out in high school, I could have gotten some minority support, but silly me waited until college to do that. Otherwise I was just a middle class, white boy. I worked my damn ass off. This princess needs a reality check. The "participation trophies" end at some point.


Huh. I spent my youth getting high, playing Dungeons and Dragons and masturbating, now I make 6 figures building web apps.
 
2013-04-04 01:39:13 AM
<i>And</i> I still get high and masturbate! I'd probably play D&D too, if I knew any dungeonmasters.
 
2013-04-04 06:38:56 AM

Mike Chewbacca: Eh, I see the letter-writer's very bitter point. In this day and age, kids HAVE to go to college or they're almost guaranteed a life of near-poverty. Going to college is the new normal, but colleges still think normal students have no place in their special snowflake universities.


I think that is starting to change.  Tuition hikes exceeding inflation is economically unsustainable; meanwhile, it's harder to outsource blue collar jobs like trucker or electrican than whatever career that communications degree got little Johnny into...
 
2013-04-04 07:44:07 AM
FTFA:
"
I bet if I'd had great SAT scores, they would have accepted me.


I bet that too. That is a safe bet. I bet if you had performed well on your driving exam, you would have a driver's license right now. I bet if you hadn't burned down that barn, that barn would still be standing. All reasonable assumptions."


Wow... go Gawker.
 
2013-04-04 07:57:11 AM

frizzo: I am a dynamic figure, often seen scaling walls and crushing ice. I have been known to remodel train stations on my lunch breaks, making them more efficient in the area of heat retention. I translate ethnic slurs for Cuban refugees, I write award-winning operas, I manage time efficiently. Occasionally, I tread water for three days in a row.

I woo women with my sensuous and godlike trombone playing, I can pilot bicycles up severe inclines with unflagging speed, and I cook Thirty Minute Brownies in twenty minutes. I am an expert in stucco, a veteran in love, and an outlaw in Peru.

Using only a hoe and a large glass of water, I once single-handedly defended a small village in the Amazon Basin from a horde of ferocious army ants. I play bluegrass cello, I was scouted by the Mets. I am the subject of numerous documentaries. When I'm bored, I build large suspension bridges in my yard. I enjoy urban hang gliding. On Wednesdays, after school, I repair electrical appliances free of charge.

I am an abstract artist, a concrete analyst, and a ruthless bookie. Critics worldwide swoon over my original line of corduroy evening wear. I don't perspire. I am a private citizen, yet I receive fan mail. I have been caller number nine and won the weekend passes. Last summer I toured New Jersey with a traveling centrifugal-force demonstration. I bat .400. My deft floral arrangements have earned me fame in international botany circles. Children trust me.

I can hurl tennis rackets at small moving objects with deadly accuracy. I once read Paradise Lost, Moby Dick, and David Copperfield in one day and still had time to refurbish an entire dining room that evening. I know the exact location of every food item in the supermarket. I have performed covert operations for the CIA. I sleep once a week; when I do sleep, I sleep in a chair. While on vacation in Canada, I successfully negotiated with a group of terrorists who had seized a small bakery. The laws of physics do not apply to me.

I bal ...


Stay thirsty my friends.
 
2013-04-04 08:59:53 AM
Suzy Lee Weiss:  "I was just 'being myself'".

Well, I guess 'yourself' isn't very good, it it?

\the world needs ditchdiggers, too
\\and whores to service them
 
2013-04-04 09:02:25 AM
LouDobbsawaaay
I kinda feel like if it were a guy who wrote this, he'd be getting a lot of pats on the back from the bitter, affirmative-action hating, aspey engineering student demographic.  But it's a girl, so she's just a biatch.


I know. it's like your post. If someone else wrote it I wouldn't even notice it but it's you so I think "what an asshole"
 
2013-04-04 09:07:31 AM

super_grass: Don't worry, he's just parroting the old narrative that ZOMG NONE OF THE TEACHERS CAN FEED THEMSELVES.


Not at all, I was refuting  the money is in the banana stand's notion that teachers don't care about their students and only care about bonuses.  Well, in most states teachers do not get bonuses and right now they are lucky if they get their supposedly guaranteed annual pay raise. the money is in the banana stand could have specified that he was talking solely about Texas and he might not have come across like such a jackass.

Then again, your douchebag knee-jerk response has made him look fairly rational and intelligent.  If that was your goal, then well done!
 
2013-04-04 10:47:32 AM
Goddamn, what a stupid, narcissistic coont.
I reserve that word for emergencies, so you know it's serious.
 
2013-04-04 11:11:41 AM

ElStreak: mrlewish: Warthog: mrlewish: Interesting how we rate ourselves on what job we do or what school we went to.

All concerned sides are full of whiny self entitles biatches.

To treat you like a human being I don't have to give a damn what school you went to, or what fancy job titles you have, or who you are or who you know.

Fourth Tier Public College typing detected.

Does it really matter?  Lets just say this.  If all the lawyers on Earth disappeared, life would go on for the rest of us after a "WTF just happened" disturbance. If all the farmers on Earth disappeared we would all be truly be farked. Guess who society values more.

Farming is hard work, but it's not actually hard. If all the farmers disappeared tomorrow, we could have passable farmers trained up to take their places in 6-8 weeks.


No. You're wrong.
 
2013-04-04 11:21:55 AM

Artisan Sandwich: No. You're wrong.


No, you're wrong. Wow, debating is easy!

Would you perhaps care to elaborate on why you (mistakenly) think I'm wrong? I'd be interested to hear your reasons.
 
2013-04-04 11:33:41 AM

GAT_00: FloydA: ambassador_ahab:   This tells me there must have been something else defective about her application.

Its author.

Since the WSJ is on her side, I expect she acted like a privileged little biatch and demanded admittance.


I don't know that WSJ is really on her side. I suspect they published her letter so the internet could deliver the beat down for them.
 
2013-04-04 01:09:04 PM
It's tough to really say much that hasn't been said.

My undergrad openly admits they have lower requirements for minority students- the stats that got me a $3000 scholarship as a white guy would have gotten me a full ride ($8500 tuition, plus room, board and books) as a minority.

I am very egalitarian when it comes to scores, hiring, whatever. I want the best. If the police department is hiring, I want the 10 best cops. I don't care if they're all white guys, all black women, or whatever. I want the best.

Anything less is a disservice to society as a whole.
 
2013-04-04 02:13:42 PM
The passage to adulthood has become too cheaply earned. It used to be that you didn't get to call yourself an adult unless you let the world break you first. Those who got stronger in the broken places could go on. Those who did not heal, or did not heal fast enough, were expendable, and nobody cared. Most of today's 20somethings would have been on the fringes of society then.
 
2013-04-04 05:32:35 PM

optional: College is largely useless unless it's bullshiat.


FTFY. College ought to prepare one for reality, and reality involves believing large amounts of bullshiat.
 
2013-04-05 01:07:47 PM

Dougie AXP: Ill chime in with my CSB:

Went to a catholic highschool, graduated third in my class, 4.0 GPA and took every AP class that I could (except for AP physics and AP Latin) and got a 3 on every test but AP Chem (4) and AP Bio (5) and had a part time job. Was in NHS and quill and scroll. Took the SATs as a junior and scored a 1320 (out of 1600).

Now I did all this because I wanted a challenge and the honors classes were easy. Around junior year my parents approached me about college plans. Honestly hadn't considered it. I went "well I'm good at math and science what can I do with that?" My dad, being an engineer, said "engineering" so they started helping me research that. Of course they wanted me to go to MIT. When it came to picking which engineering, I looked at average starting salaries. Chemical engineering was the highest at that time. So that's what I picked. Thank god I enjoyed the challenge and subject matter.

My dad and I went to one, one, MIT information session. I was the only white kid there. I looked around and after ten minutes said "dad, I'm smart but I'm not as smart as half the kids here nor do I have the extras that they have. Can we leave?"

So we did. Then had a trip to my eventual alma mater (Drexel University) and got an app as apart of the visit. It was one page, front and back. Filled it out and submitted it.

Then for shiats and giggles applied to UPenn and Purdue (my choice). Got wait listed to UPenn and accepted to Drexel and Purdue. Surprisingly Purdue ended up being more and Drexel gave me a nice scholarship (so long as I maintained a 3.0 GPA) which made it cheaper in the end.

Wouldn't change my choices for a minute.

But it comes down to individual ambition and parental help. This biatch sounds whiny and entitled.


Why do so many of these comments just involve the poster bragging about what college they went to or what their SATs were?  Nobody cares nor are these comments appropriate responses to the story.
 
Displayed 352 of 352 comments

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »






Report