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(The Daily Beast)   The Wall Street Journal goes full Onion as it publishes an open letter from a high school senior to all the colleges who rejected her application   (thedailybeast.com) divider line 168
    More: Asinine, Wall Street Journal, Amy Chua, onions, University and college admissions, bake sales, college application, disaster recovery, war correspondents  
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16156 clicks; posted to Main » on 03 Apr 2013 at 9:45 AM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-04-03 10:18:10 AM  

bulldg4life: somedude210: can we also get rid of the idea that business majors are gonna be the cream of the crop? Cause most of them failed out of tougher majors (like engineering)

Hey, having to transfer from one of the engineering majors to management is a difficult choice. I mean, at GT that means they'll have to walk across the bridge to get to all the business classes. The engineering students have it easy since their classes are all on the main campus.


I always enjoyed seeing the business majors biatch and moan about a 5 page paper they have to write....in a bullshiat history class, I might add
 
2013-04-03 10:18:11 AM  
Don't make the critical error of not being born into a legacy family, who keep as a birthright a place for their progeny one of the elite universities.

Learn your place, proles.
 
2013-04-03 10:18:35 AM  
Ms. Weiss is a senior at Taylor Allderdice High School in Pittsburgh twat.
 
2013-04-03 10:19:48 AM  
bulldg4life: "How are people making it this difficult?"

Because the writer's talking about Ivy League schools.
Which underscores the truly absurd part of this whole rant.

If they *weren't* ridiculously exclusive, she wouldn't have wanted to go.
But now that she can't actually get in, she's going to moan about how exclusive they are?

I mean, the entire Ivy League 'prestige' *revolves* around self-aggrandizing bullshiat.
If the clueless rant-writer *really* doesn't want any part of that nonsense, her even applying was a huge mistake and they've done her a favor.

But upon being rejected, she felt liking climbing up on the cross and having a nice little "everyone look at me" moment. 
Which makes it a *touch* hard to believe that she's actually a naive innocent who had her dreams stymied by a snooty club that wouldn't let her in.
 
2013-04-03 10:20:11 AM  

somedude210: daily beast/WSJ aside, the letter does make a good point. The higher-ed industry is a ridiculous place.

The higher education system needs to be reformed. We need to stop making it all about profits, we need to educate our kids about how you don't need to go through college if you're gonna waste it on a degree that'll get you as far in life as not having a college degree at all (I'm looking at you, philosophy majors). We need to stop the stigma of vocational schooling in lue of high school. We need to stop compounding so much debt on the kids who do want to go through college so that they don't have to keep paying off the loans until they're in their mid-40s.

The younger generations are completely screwed with our education system. We keep going on and on how we absolutely, positively need to have an bachelor's in something,anything, as long as it's a bachelor's. and then, 3 years into our 4 year degree, we get told that the degree is utterly useless and you were better off going into this degree or that degree, or hell, if you just worked your ass off in a factory or something, you'd be making a shiatload more and without all the student debt by now.

Stop treating us like children on the realities of education and give us honest answers as to what we can expect in life if we choose this path or that path.


Stop acting like this advice is ubiquitous and realize that whoever sold you on it is an idiot.  If you want to go into a certain career, find out what kind of education it requires and go from there.  By the time you're 18 years old you should be able to come up with a better plan than
1) Get a degree in "anything"
2) See what happens next
 
2013-04-03 10:20:21 AM  

Kiwimann: Plan that whatever you learn, you're gonna be stuck doing it day in and day out until you retire, so pick something that's at least tolerable over the course of 40+ years. If you have no real interest in it except for the salary you think you'll earn, your days are gonna suuuuuck and your life is gonna suuuuuuck.


exactly, but we need to stop treating all degrees as equal. They're not. That general liberal arts degree isn't gonna get you anything. Don't get a degree because you want a degree in something, do it if you want to be a professional in that area but accept that that degree may not have the financial return you think it will because it's a degree
 
2013-04-03 10:21:30 AM  

somedude210: I always enjoyed seeing the business majors biatch and moan about a 5 page paper they have to write....in a bullshiat history class, I might add


Look, Physics 1101 was a hard class. And, don't even get me started on Calculus 2...what kind of person invents linear algebra?

On a side note, the Physics 1101 class I took ended up with 60% of the class getting Cs or worse. The two professors teaching that semester ended up getting suspended from teaching classes for a semester and the class was noticeably easier the next semester.

Bastards.
 
2013-04-03 10:23:00 AM  

somedude210: art degree? If you're the next Picasso, a piece of paper isn't going to be required


You know, I used to think like that (then I took an arrow to the knee).

Then I spoke with a friend who did video game character design (including for Skyrim. Some of the gear is her handiwork, and I think she did some off-book VO work as well). I was talking about how I suck at art, and she countered: "You play bass, right? Were you this good when you first picked it up?" Another friend who majored in Set Design (I think) from Knox, Stephen Colbert's alma mater, told me that you can see all the art without a class, but to know why the art was important beyond "it looks good", you may need someone to explain it.

It takes hard work to be a good artist, but also good/the right tutelage. Even Picasso was taught by his father (who was an art professor).
 
2013-04-03 10:23:03 AM  
Sorry, worse than Cs. Getting Cs or worse makes the class seem fine.
 
2013-04-03 10:24:05 AM  

BEER_ME_in_CT: I quit all extracurriculars my senior year and held down 3 jobs for both my Junior and Senior year. This was about 17 years ago so things may have been different, but I was sick of all the teachers pet extracurricular junkies. Their parents bought them everything. If I wanted a car or to go out on fri night I had to pay. I did have a great GPA 10th in class maybe that helped a little, but Admissions weren't solely about all this other BS.

On the other side of the coin, if you want to go help kids in Africa, go do it. Whatever floats your boat. Its alot more noble that what I wanted to do with my spare time over High School summer. Smoke weed, drink beer, try to get laid.


These days, admissions is all about a perfect GPA, plus being a letterman athlete and a superior musician, and the master of multiple extracurriculars. Your summers should be spent doing charity work, preferably in a foreign country full of brown people. If you couldn't get a passport, you should have spent your summer doing advanced academics at the community college or participating in the Olympic tryouts.

Of course, this sort of thing favors kids from affluent backgrounds with the time and money to found a charity or establish a house band for the local disco. Kids who have to work to pay for gas/clothes have a hard time amassing these "enrichment" activities.

The hard fact is that every admissions officer I've spoken to (and I've worked in higher ed for more than 20 years at several different universities) hates this dynamic. They even admit that the "cool" thing nowadays is to have some enlightened thoughts about the sufferings of the underprivileged, not actually being underprivileged. This "proves" that the candidate will want to do something to improve the world, but we all know that the university hopes they will make a pile of money to "give back" when the time comes. And, of course, get their kids into the institution as well. It's the circle of life, of sorts. The boomers who had enlightened thoughts about themselves on their admissions essays, now coach their kids to have enlightened thoughts about the poor folks in Kenya, or wherever.

So that's the current arms race of admissions. Everyone knows the score, everyone plays the game.

Luckily, both my kids got into top ten universities. And we did it the old-fashioned way: my daughter had a major donor intercede in her behalf (she knew the rich guy's daughter from cheerleading) and my son had a state senator pave the way (the senator's son was his best friend).

Frankly, the higher ed admissions game is the most lie-encrusted institution in American outside of  Congress. But as long as that diploma is considered the ticket to the middle class, the game will continue and every year a new class of future consumers of cheap Chinese textiles will move into the groves of academe.
 
2013-04-03 10:25:04 AM  
I got through two paragraphs and was sickened by the pretentiousness.  Yes, kiddo, it's totally your parents fault that you didn't get off your ass and do things that would help you get into the school you wanted.  It's totally their fault that you spent your time partying and basket weaving and whacking off instead.  Blaming others in a public forum for your own inadequacies is sure to garner positive attention from the colleges you desire.

I'm hoping this is a belated April Fools joke.
 
2013-04-03 10:25:09 AM  
The most exciting thing an admission person can hear is that if the applicant is a "winner", someone they'd be proud to say is a member, someone who'd carry the university's name well.
More so for grad/mba.
Want something to copy and paste into your essay?* here:
"I love challenges and learning new skills and applicable information. The biggest benefits were working summers (as a young teen) and two afternoons a week (in high school) at my father's IT company. He made sure I started in the mailroom and every year he'd "promote" me to a higher position, that way I got to see how most if the functions in the company work and made a lot of friends in the meantime. Towards my last year in high school, I was actually managing small projects and also attending high-level meetings with my father and on the drive home he'd explain to me why he made certain decisions or why he had treated people/situations differently. I dream of the day that I can be by his side, helping him manage this 200-employee company."**

So the messages are:
1) I already have it made
2) I can take responsibility and challenges
3) I won't default on the tuition

And presto, you are admitted.***


*no, of course I don't recommend actually doing that. They'd screen your application and throw it out for plagiarism by either googling your essay or using some of the sites that actually check for that. Maybe even blacklist you.
**none of this resembles me
***YMMV


/everyone loves a winner
//a more realistic approach would be to build a decent connection to the admission people, be nice to them and ask "what key areas or points are you looking for in an application so that I can highlight them in my application? Thank you"
 
2013-04-03 10:25:47 AM  

haterade: Or just volunteer you lazy biatch


Ah yes, the Tracy flick route every good do-bee pre-med follows
 
2013-04-03 10:25:49 AM  

babygoat: Stop acting like this advice is ubiquitous and realize that whoever sold you on it is an idiot. If you want to go into a certain career, find out what kind of education it requires and go from there. By the time you're 18 years old you should be able to come up with a better plan than
1) Get a degree in "anything"
2) See what happens next


dude, guidance counselors have been selling the idea of "get a degree, it's worth it" since at least the 90s. The college system has been selling it for longer. Remember the old "if you have a degree, you'll make $1 million dollars more over your life than someone who doesn't" posters? They failed to mention that most of that money would be spent paying off the debts you have from your education
 
2013-04-03 10:26:35 AM  
^^^good thing you have "service" background because the 1.8 GPA pretty much sums it up.
 
2013-04-03 10:27:18 AM  
Next up: Kerry Killinger's letter bemoaning the FDIC takeover of Washington Mutual as poopy and unfair.
 
2013-04-03 10:29:59 AM  

bulldg4life: Look, Physics 1101 was a hard class. And, don't even get me started on Calculus 2...what kind of person invents linear algebra?

On a side note, the Physics 1101 class I took ended up with 60% of the class getting Cs or worse. The two professors teaching that semester ended up getting suspended from teaching classes for a semester and the class was noticeably easier the next semester.

Bastards.


pfft, Calc3 was enjoyable. Hated Calc 2 though. inital learning of integrals was terrible. By calc3, doing triple integrals was fun. (yes, I'm a freak)

Dr Dreidel: You know, I used to think like that (then I took an arrow to the knee).

Then I spoke with a friend who did video game character design (including for Skyrim. Some of the gear is her handiwork, and I think she did some off-book VO work as well). I was talking about how I suck at art, and she countered: "You play bass, right? Were you this good when you first picked it up?" Another friend who majored in Set Design (I think) from Knox, Stephen Colbert's alma mater, told me that you can see all the art without a class, but to know why the art was important beyond "it looks good", you may need someone to explain it.

It takes hard work to be a good artist, but also good/the right tutelage. Even Picasso was taught by his father (who was an art professor).


I don't deny that something like graphic design isn't something that may require a degree, but degrees in painting and whatnot just seemed unnecessary. a few classes make sense, but not a degree program.
 
2013-04-03 10:30:39 AM  

HMS_Blinkin: Priapetic: Tough shiat.  Life is not a big invitation to do the things you want to do.  Or, if that's your goal, don't be surprised if people aren't lining up to give you the fruits of their own labor.

Life's hard.  It takes work.  And success, be it educational, financial, athletic, etc.., is the result of hard work and sacrifice.  That's sort of the opposite of what most people (all generations) would prefer doing.  The difference is the current generation is being given a different message.

But when young people who do work for money during HS rather than non-paying work, that gets looked down upon by college admissions people.  The problem isn't that "kids these days" aren't working---it's that the admissions process values some kinds of work more than others.

I never said that hard work and sacrifice aren't important.  The problem is that college admissions places too much emphasis on doing a whole bunch of things badly rather than drilling down and focusing on doing one thing really well.  Colleges would rather have a kid who did some BS volunteer work they didn't really care about + was crappy at 3 different sports rather than a kid who had a real passion for one extracurricular activity and excelled at it, or a kid who put in lots hours working a job through the school year and the summer.


This is true. It appears they prefer you join every club even if you don't do anything. Also, for you to have an elected post, as though that isn't bogus. I was voted president of pur model u.n. ... Because I was out of the room when they took the vote and nobody wanted the position.
 
2013-04-03 10:31:46 AM  

somedude210: I always enjoyed seeing the business majors biatch and moan about a 5 page paper they have to write....in a bullshiat history class, I might add


In my engineering undergrad we had a requirement of x number of humanities courses and one of them had to have a 'writing credit' because engineers and business students are apparently really stupid when it comes to communicating.  In my second year I already had my writing credit but I needed another humanities course. The only one that interested me and fit my schedule was a philosophy class which also had a writing credit. The professor told the whole class on the first day that her course has a writing credit and if they don't need any more that students should consider switching to a different philosophy course that doesn't have the credit.

I read the course syllabus and totaled the amount of writing for the semester. It was less than 20 pages of writing.  I have written detailed technical reports that dwarfed that workload by an order of magnitude in a single evening. Still the next time we had the class there were a lot less people in it.
 
2013-04-03 10:31:47 AM  
As an Ivy League grad, I'm getting a kick out of these responses!
 
2013-04-03 10:33:12 AM  
I'm impressed that she understands just how shiatty the system is so young. It'll be much easier to navigate the insane amounts of hypocrisy when she's doing her studies. I wish someone had given me a crash course in 'university administrative bullshiat' before I started.
 
2013-04-03 10:33:48 AM  
And, white trash I am, I dropped out of Community College.

/Had to work full time to support self
//Wasn't ready for college anyhow.
 
2013-04-03 10:36:35 AM  

sinanju: Assuming the letter is real, she has managed to validate the wisdom of the institutions that rejected her.


This. Also there are a lot of excellent schools that are not Ivy League that are also a lot easier to get in to.
 
2013-04-03 10:36:46 AM  
The author's sister, Bari Weiss, is a former Wall Street Journal editorial features editor.
 
2013-04-03 10:37:45 AM  
Wait, so one needs to do these things to get into college? Well luckily I live in Europe.
 
2013-04-03 10:37:59 AM  

Egoy3k: somedude210: I always enjoyed seeing the business majors biatch and moan about a 5 page paper they have to write....in a bullshiat history class, I might add

In my engineering undergrad we had a requirement of x number of humanities courses and one of them had to have a 'writing credit' because engineers and business students are apparently really stupid when it comes to communicating.  In my second year I already had my writing credit but I needed another humanities course. The only one that interested me and fit my schedule was a philosophy class which also had a writing credit. The professor told the whole class on the first day that her course has a writing credit and if they don't need any more that students should consider switching to a different philosophy course that doesn't have the credit.

I read the course syllabus and totaled the amount of writing for the semester. It was less than 20 pages of writing.  I have written detailed technical reports that dwarfed that workload by an order of magnitude in a single evening. Still the next time we had the class there were a lot less people in it.


Oh yeah. We had a writing component (english 1&2) as well as an engineering writing (technical comm.) course we had to take. Both english classes had like 5 papers to write and the tech comm class built up to a 20 page research paper (mine was on whether nuclear power had the possibility of returning (this was before Fukishima). I knew a bunch of business majors because they were all failed engineering majors. They smoked pot daily, drank nightly and then complained that they had to go to class the next day.

I can understand burning out on classes once in awhile requiring a day of skipping, but not if you burn yourself out daily.
 
2013-04-03 10:38:13 AM  

farkinlovit: ^^^good thing you have "service" background because the 1.8 GPA pretty much sums it up.


Hey, it's what the MIC is for. My first time around in college, I had like a 2.2. I just had no focus, discipline, desire, or clue. Dropped out, joined the infantry, pulled my head out of my ass.

My second time around, my GPA was in the high 3s. Totally different perspective on life, totally different approach to school, totally different set of priorities. Oh, and a business degree.
 
2013-04-03 10:40:11 AM  
"Why do we force prospective college students to engage in exorbitant exaggeration?" How about peer-promotion and self-esteem BS making grades meaningless?
 
2013-04-03 10:41:28 AM  
She sounds like an unholy mix of Lena Dunham and Ann Coulter.
 
2013-04-03 10:41:31 AM  

somedude210: I don't deny that something like graphic design isn't something that may require a degree, but degrees in painting and whatnot just seemed unnecessary. a few classes make sense, but not a degree program.


Don't read this as an attack, but what you've described is the difference between a hobby musician (like me) and Troy Sanders (of Mastodon). If you want to learn a skill, get a hobby. If you want a career, get an education.
 
2013-04-03 10:44:00 AM  
I must disagree with the "Asinine" tag on this one.  The senior in question speaks truthfully, and is entertaining to boot.

Someone trying to get into a top-flight school should have something more than merely getting through school with a decent GPA and SAT score, but the line between "well-rounded" and something almost absurdly stereotypical is hard to find.

Just an opinion, and your mileage may vary, but if some young up-and-comer works for a charity solely for the sake of getting into a college, it seems to me that person is missing the point of why that person's doing it.

/Community college, then transferred.
//Doing just fine, thanks.
 
2013-04-03 10:45:33 AM  

Gonz: farkinlovit: ^^^good thing you have "service" background because the 1.8 GPA pretty much sums it up.

Hey, it's what the MIC is for. My first time around in college, I had like a 2.2. I just had no focus, discipline, desire, or clue. Dropped out, joined the infantry, pulled my head out of my ass.

My second time around, my GPA was in the high 3s. Totally different perspective on life, totally different approach to school, totally different set of priorities. Oh, and a business degree.


Sometimes, you don't need the military to get your head out of your ass. The best decision I ever made was taking a semester off college. I left with a sub-2 GPA, came back and only got 1 B and 1 C until graduation (finished with something like a 2.8 or 3.2 - but again, no one cares anymore).

You apparently do a lot of growing up between 18 and 21 whether you're in college, the military, an oil rig, shrimpin boat, or high finance. Who knew?

// psychologists knew, and they probably learned that IN COLLEGE
// *ominous music*
 
2013-04-03 10:45:55 AM  

Nickninja: It hasn't been that long since I was accepted to college (10 years), but I don't remember it being that difficult... I took a few honors courses, didn't sit around and smoke weed all day every day, and surprise: I got into a good school!

Sure, if you didn't do anything in high school you might have had trouble, but those people didn't really want to go.  I don't think I knew anyone from my graduating class who wanted to go to college, but didn't get in anywhere.

As long as you're not ONLY applying to Ivy league status schools, you should be able to find a good fit.


This, unless things have changed drastically in the ~9 years since I applied (high school class of '05 applying in fall '04), I was able to get into one of the top 10 schools for my major just by doing that.  I am betting that it helped quite a bit that my high school required a certain number of volunteer hours in order to graduate though.
 
2013-04-03 10:49:58 AM  

I should be in the kitchen: I was expecting a letter whining about how "you should of (sic) picked me!" and how special she is... but she did have a point.

Luckily, my college selection process consisted only of "which state school is farthest away from home?" and the admission process was cake. And I don't feel I missed much. And considering I changed careers pretty quickly after graduation, I'm REALLY glad I didn't kill myself with stress and debt to attend a prestigious school.

/Southern Oregon University, class of 02 & 03
//yeah, you've never heard of it


I live in ashland.  amazing SOU still has accredidation.....seeing how they have to fight for it every now and then.
 
2013-04-03 10:51:25 AM  

Dr Dreidel: You apparently do a lot of growing up between 18 and 21 whether you're in college, the military, an oil rig, shrimpin boat, or high finance. Who knew?


I was woefully unready to be in university but I suffered through it. It was a mistake. I manged to do a lot of damage to my mental health all so I could get myself into the labor market in the spring of 2007. That turned out terribly for everyone involved.  I think a gap year is a great idea for the kids who can afford it.
 
2013-04-03 10:55:30 AM  
By Megan McArdle

And that's where I stopped reading, and closed the tab.
 
2013-04-03 10:55:33 AM  

Egoy3k: Dr Dreidel: You apparently do a lot of growing up between 18 and 21 whether you're in college, the military, an oil rig, shrimpin boat, or high finance. Who knew?

I was woefully unready to be in university but I suffered through it. It was a mistake. I manged to do a lot of damage to my mental health all so I could get myself into the labor market in the spring of 2007. That turned out terribly for everyone involved.  I think a gap year is a great idea for the kids who can afford it.


I took a gap year after college and it was one of the best things I've ever done. I tell younger people to do this whenever I can. No one will miss a year on their resume in their early 20s. My son is taking a gap year right now, doing a little traveling and snowboarding before grad school. I spent my gap year surfing and traveling. Those are experiences you will never forget, and it's much better for you than joining the rat race right out of school.

/the rats won
 
2013-04-03 10:58:14 AM  
Columbia just hired a convicted cop killer/terrorist to teach there.

Maybe Snowflake should apply to Columbia?
 
2013-04-03 11:03:51 AM  
I remember in the mid-90's, the New York Times Magazine decided to follow the lives of like 6 or so freshmen in high school who dreamed of going to Harvard and every year they would do updates on where the kids were in following their dreams. These were mostly working class Queens kids, if I remember correctly.  In 1998, when they had graduated HS (same year as me) they had done some AMAZING things - learned 5 languages, developed their own businesses, excelled amazingly at sports, and so on. These kids were IMPRESSIVE.

And not one ended up getting into Harvard - in fact, if I remember correctly, only 1 ended up at an Ivy at all.

Now let's look at my public high school - it is one of the best in the nation, and insanely competitive. If you graduated in the top 25, chances are you went to an Ivy. I was in top quarter in my class and went to a top 20 college. My graduating year we sent 4 kids to Harvard.   Now, I will fully admit those four Harvard kids in particular were very smart and talented but they weren't the type of kids that the NYTimes Magazine wrote about (at least not in my opinion). So what was the difference? I believe it is that the kids from my HS came from well-educated, monied families. The working class kids did not.

I graduated the same year as the kids in that article and it was a real eye opener for me. I showed it to one of my "Heading to Harvard" classmates and it was straight cognitive dissonance on why they thought the kids in the story didn't get in.

/sorry if I'm ranting I have a head cold and no coffee :-(
 
2013-04-03 11:04:20 AM  

Fano: HMS_Blinkin: Priapetic: Tough shiat.  Life is not a big invitation to do the things you want to do.  Or, if that's your goal, don't be surprised if people aren't lining up to give you the fruits of their own labor.

Life's hard.  It takes work.  And success, be it educational, financial, athletic, etc.., is the result of hard work and sacrifice.  That's sort of the opposite of what most people (all generations) would prefer doing.  The difference is the current generation is being given a different message.

But when young people who do work for money during HS rather than non-paying work, that gets looked down upon by college admissions people.  The problem isn't that "kids these days" aren't working---it's that the admissions process values some kinds of work more than others.

I never said that hard work and sacrifice aren't important.  The problem is that college admissions places too much emphasis on doing a whole bunch of things badly rather than drilling down and focusing on doing one thing really well.  Colleges would rather have a kid who did some BS volunteer work they didn't really care about + was crappy at 3 different sports rather than a kid who had a real passion for one extracurricular activity and excelled at it, or a kid who put in lots hours working a job through the school year and the summer.

This is true. It appears they prefer you join every club even if you don't do anything. Also, for you to have an elected post, as though that isn't bogus. I was voted president of pur model u.n. ... Because I was out of the room when they took the vote and nobody wanted the position.


Actually, I suspect they'd like some evidence that you're not a typical stoner, xBox baby or reality TV junkie.  You can provide this evidence by demonstrating you have enough self-motivation do do something other than the bare minimum to get by (which includes working part time, by the way).  This is important because in college, unlike high school, Mommy and Daddy aren't  there to drag your ass out of bed.  If you don't have enough motivation to do it on your own, you're going to crash and burn spectacularly and be a distraction to everyone around you.

Of course, there's also a percentage of bullshiat as well.
 
2013-04-03 11:04:22 AM  
The cost of education needs to come down significantly. I'm 27, trying to go back to school, but I have to cancel this term. I just can't afford it with my medical bills. Pre-financial aid, a single class costs about $360, plus books that can cost in the realm of $99 a pop.
 
2013-04-03 11:04:44 AM  

Thunderpipes: Columbia just hired a convicted cop killer/terrorist to teach there.

Maybe Snowflake should apply to Columbia?


oh do tell. Your posts/rants are always so insightful

who's this terrorist and why should snowflakes go to Columbia
 
2013-04-03 11:04:52 AM  
She should have gotten better grades.
 
2013-04-03 11:07:05 AM  

Lollipop165: I graduated the same year as the kids in that article and it was a real eye opener for me. I showed it to one of my "Heading to Harvard" classmates and it was straight cognitive dissonance on why they thought the kids in the story didn't get in.


what were their reasons. This sounds like there's an amusing punchline coming ^_^
 
2013-04-03 11:09:23 AM  
I think she just wants a participation ribbon for filling out all those applications.

If we give her one, will she shut up and go away?
 
2013-04-03 11:09:47 AM  

IronOcelot: [rack.1.mshcdn.com image 850x477]


Welcome to Fark.
 
2013-04-03 11:10:07 AM  

somedude210: Aren't tiger moms just overbearing "super helicopter moms"? Why in god's name are we advocating this crap. This is the crap that gave us "EVERYBODY GETS A MEDAL!!!" parenting. Fark, your kid isn't awesome and super and the best at everything, I'd be willing to bet that they want you to calm the fark down a bit and let them explore life on their own without you interfering in everything.

When we make "helicopter parenting" and "tiger moms" bad things to be, will our generations start to fix themselves.


To my understanding, there's a subtle but important difference between "tiger moms" and "helicopter moms" - the latter kind tries to remove all obstacles in their child's path, the former kind leaves the obstacles and pushes the kid over them.

The "tiger mom" strategy isn't good for all kids, by any means - but I'd say that I had a "tiger mom", and if I hadn't, I'd be flipping burgers today. I've got high talent but also tend to be lazy, and if my mom hadn't tried her damnedest to scour the lazy out of me, I'd never have amounted to anything at all.
 
2013-04-03 11:10:13 AM  

somedude210: Thunderpipes: Columbia just hired a convicted cop killer/terrorist to teach there.

Maybe Snowflake should apply to Columbia?

oh do tell. Your posts/rants are always so insightful

who's this terrorist and why should snowflakes go to Columbia


Kathy Boudin. Spent 22 years in prison, part of Bill Ayers' group the weather underground. She drove the getaway car in which 2 cops and an armored car guy were murdered. 22 years in prison. She now is an esteemed professor at Columbia.

Colleges really are BS, especially Ivy League ones. But, the piece of paper can make you a winner.
 
2013-04-03 11:11:11 AM  

somedude210: babygoat: Stop acting like this advice is ubiquitous and realize that whoever sold you on it is an idiot. If you want to go into a certain career, find out what kind of education it requires and go from there. By the time you're 18 years old you should be able to come up with a better plan than
1) Get a degree in "anything"
2) See what happens next

dude, guidance counselors have been selling the idea of "get a degree, it's worth it" since at least the 90s. The college system has been selling it for longer. Remember the old "if you have a degree, you'll make $1 million dollars more over your life than someone who doesn't" posters? They failed to mention that most of that money would be spent paying off the debts you have from your education


How the hell did your useless degree program involve Calc 3?
 
2013-04-03 11:11:23 AM  

OldManDownDRoad: The hard fact is that every admissions officer I've spoken to (and I've worked in higher ed for more than 20 years at several different universities) hates this dynamic. They even admit that the "cool" thing nowadays is to have some enlightened thoughts about the sufferings of the underprivileged, not actually being underprivileged. This "proves" that the candidate will want to do something to improve the world, but we all know that the university hopes they will make a pile of money to "give back" when the time comes. And, of course, get their kids into the institution as well. It's the circle of life, of sorts. The boomers who had enlightened thoughts about themselves on their admissions essays, now coach their kids to have enlightened thoughts about the poor folks in Kenya, or wherever.


Had I known that was the secret I would have gotten into everywhere.

That being said it always bothered me that I got shiat for not having extra curriculars. I came from quite a wealthy background but it was sure as hell expected of me to have a job. I've been working since I was 14.  I never understood why having a job isn't considered as being as well rounded as someone who, say, plays softball or whatever.

My parents may have bought me a brand new car, but I sure as hell was expected to put the gas into it.
 
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