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(Yahoo)   No Yu can't have a perfect game, not Yurs   (sports.yahoo.com) divider line 70
    More: Unlikely, Yu Darvish, Darvish, perfect game, Rick Ankiel, Mike Trout, Minute Maid Park, full count, Armando Galarraga  
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1100 clicks; posted to Sports » on 03 Apr 2013 at 6:19 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-04-03 06:40:57 AM
My fearless prediction: this won't be the last time something like this happens to Houston this year
 
2013-04-03 07:06:09 AM
Extry! Extry! Whirling Darvish in dizzying performance! Houston hitters hapless; didn't know where to turn! Extry!
 
2013-04-03 07:07:20 AM
Yu almost pitched a perfect game?

No, I didn't.

Of course not, Yu did.
 
2013-04-03 07:07:44 AM

Palmer Eldritch: Yu almost pitched a perfect game?

No, I didn't.

Of course not, Yu did.


Yao!

/...Gi. Yo Gi!
 
2013-04-03 07:10:05 AM
22,000 people got a treat.  Nothing quite like the tension when the pitcher is going for a perfect or no hitter.
 
2013-04-03 07:12:55 AM

Another Government Employee: Nothing quite like the tension when the pitcher is going for a perfect or no hitter.


That's every game, I'd imagine :)
 
2013-04-03 07:21:47 AM
In before the stay geeks threadshiat about the irrelevance of perfect games and no-hitters
 
2013-04-03 07:22:23 AM
Stat geeks. Damn you, autocorrect!
 
2013-04-03 07:26:32 AM
Hu's on first?
 
2013-04-03 07:27:47 AM

Soon Right Away: That's every game, I'd imagine :)


Serious answer -- not really.  Young pitchers often try to be cocky (confused with "confident") and get burned for it.  Smart starting pitchers understand the game's a lot like poker.  You'll face the same hitters 4-5 times a game and no fastball is unhittable in the MLB, so if given a lead (which is usually the case if you're working a shutout*), the crafty ones will often deliberately let a hitter get on base to set them up in future duels or walk a hitter on a streak.  Greg Maddux, in particular, sometimes let hitters beat him on purpose to set them up for at-bats weeks or months in the future.

*Unless you're the Mariners, in which case a King Felix shutout means a 0-0 tie (sob)
 
2013-04-03 07:37:56 AM
Is it hard to climb into the head of a pitcher dragonchild?  I'd imagine it's snug in there...
 
2013-04-03 07:39:34 AM
To paraphrase the Astros announcers, maybe this will teach him to learn English

/No, I don't get it either.
 
2013-04-03 07:40:58 AM

HaywoodJablonski: In before the stay geeks threadshiat about the irrelevance of perfect games and no-hitters


As a noted stat geek, I love wonky things like perfect games and no hitters.
 
2013-04-03 07:55:16 AM

Iceman208481: Is it hard to climb into the head of a pitcher dragonchild?  I'd imagine it's snug in there...


Really depends on the pitcher.  The head of Greg Maddux would be a library the size of the Superdome so stuffed with books and supercomputers it'd make a hoarder blush, but that's Greg effin' Maddux.  I've tracked the careers of a number of prospects who burned out because they tried to throw their 90mph heat past everyone without ever learning the finer points of pitching.  Only a small percentage of the population can throw 90mph, but in the majors it's mediocre so attrition is cruel to the idiots.  In my experience, the more snug craniums tend to be the relievers who get away with throwing 95-96 a couple innings a game.  One guy who drove me insane was Arthur Rhodes.  He probably didn't inject 'riods in his arm so much as liquid lightning, but god what an idiot.  He had a nice ERA mainly because 80% of major leaguers found his stuff completely unhittable, but he didn't have two brain cells to rub together to use against playoff-caliber lineups.  When he lost even a couple ticks off his fastball he quickly washed out.
 
2013-04-03 07:55:16 AM

HaywoodJablonski: In before the stay geeks threadshiat about the irrelevance of perfect games and no-hitters


Interestingly, there is a disparate number of perfect games broken up with 2 outs in the 9th.  Batters have an OBP of ~.500 in that situation, which is remarkable by itself, but even moreso considering we already know the pitcher has his stuff that day, and he's facing the #9 hitter in the line-up.
 
2013-04-03 07:56:42 AM

You're the jerk... jerk: HaywoodJablonski: In before the stay geeks threadshiat about the irrelevance of perfect games and no-hitters

As a noted stat geek, I love wonky things like perfect games and no hitters.


Not a stat geek but I like looking at them, having been to a no hitter there is nothing that compares in sports. (Can't imagine a perfect game)
 
2013-04-03 07:56:45 AM

dragonchild: In my experience, the more snug empty craniums tend to be the relievers who get away with throwing 95-96 a couple innings a game.


FTFM.  Apparently my own head has a lot of vacancy.
 
2013-04-03 08:01:47 AM

HaywoodJablonski: In before the stay geeks threadshiat about the irrelevance of perfect games and no-hitters


Considering more man have gone to the moon than thrown a perfect game, I doubt they will about a perfect game. No hitters, one can make the argument (walk 9 guys and allow no hits? Still a no hitter), yet I do not agree with that.
 
2013-04-03 08:07:07 AM
my brother was at Mike Witt's perfecto against the Rangers back in 1984. He called everyone he knew from a payphone at the stadium (1984, no cell phones back then). He still brings it up to this day. His wife, who was with him at the game, still doesn't see what the big deal was. I'm convinced that we're going to have to somehow include mention of it in his obit when the time comes.
 
2013-04-03 08:08:22 AM
Yu's attitude about this is perfect.   'It's a win. A win's a win'  Great kid.  Complete domination...somewhat disappointing, not game 6 levels of disappointment, but I was sad he lost the perfecto. His stuff was just plain nasty nasty.  I doubt this will be the only time he does this.
 
2013-04-03 08:14:18 AM
Would have been A.J.'s second Perfect game caught I believe. I wonder how many other catchers have done that?
 
2013-04-03 08:32:52 AM
Did Jim Joyce fark something up again?

Yeah, I'm still bitter.
 
2013-04-03 08:38:49 AM

Lost Thought 00: To paraphrase the Astros announcers, maybe this will teach him to learn English

/No, I don't get it either.


They said that? Really... really?
 
2013-04-03 08:41:16 AM
1-161 here we come!

/Bitter Astros fan
//Off to sob in the corner.
///Fark Tim Purpura & esp Ed Wade
 
2013-04-03 08:50:18 AM

Four Flushed on the Flop: Hu's on first?


No Hu's on second Fielder's on first.
 
2013-04-03 08:51:17 AM

balki1867: HaywoodJablonski: In before the stay geeks threadshiat about the irrelevance of perfect games and no-hitters

Interestingly, there is a disparate number of perfect games broken up with 2 outs in the 9th.


Well, from a purely statistical standpoint, there are a hell of a lot more perfect games broken up much earlier than that. You know, considering that every game starts out with the potential to be perfect.

I mean, how often does the average starting pitcher allow a baserunner in the first inning? I'd guess it's at least 40% of the time- pulling that number completely out of thin air because I don't feel like looking it up. We just don't usually think of that as "breaking up a perfect game" because it happens so early. It's just business as usual.
 
2013-04-03 08:52:47 AM
forum.tabletpcreview.com
 
2013-04-03 08:53:47 AM

ColTomParker: my brother was at Mike Witt's perfecto against the Rangers back in 1984. He called everyone he knew from a payphone at the stadium (1984, no cell phones back then). He still brings it up to this day. His wife, who was with him at the game, still doesn't see what the big deal was. I'm convinced that we're going to have to somehow include mention of it in his obit when the time comes.


I've only been to two major league games in my lifetime.  One was at Veterans Stadium in 1994 (I can't remember who the Phillies played, but I can recall with perfect clarity that both Ricky Jordan and Jim Eisenrich hit home runs).

The other was a game at Arlington Stadium in 1990.  They played the Tigers, and the starting pitcher was supposed to be someone I'd never heard of.  We get to the game, get seated in the outfield bleachers, and the PA announces that the replacement starter that night was....Nolan Ryan.  I got to see Ryan pitch 5 2/3, pick up 6 K, and get enough run support to carry the W.  When he left the game in the 6th, the place gave him a standing ovation, then they did the wave (it was still a thing to do).  That wave got around the ballpark 11 times.

As a ten-year-old, I got to see Nolan Ryan get win #299.  To this day, when someone brings him up I am compelled to mention being at that game and not shut up about it for a full five minutes.
 
2013-04-03 08:55:08 AM
to be fair, since it was against the Astros it wouldn't have really counted anyway.
 
2013-04-03 08:56:22 AM

italie: Would have been A.J.'s second Perfect game caught I believe. I wonder how many other catchers have done that?


Only one person, Ron Hassey.  He caught Len Barker in 1981 and Dennis Martinez in 1991.  (AJ has caught both a no-hitter, Mark Buerhle and a perfect game, Phil Humber; he had the day off of Buehrle's perfect game and Ramon Castro was the catcher.  Oddly, Buehrle I just saw had the same home plate umpire for both games.)
 
2013-04-03 09:05:05 AM

Lost Thought 00: To paraphrase the Astros announcers, maybe this will teach him to learn English

/No, I don't get it either.


I think the implication was that he'd be learning a bunch of brand new swear words.

dragonchild: One guy who drove me insane was Arthur Rhodes. He probably didn't inject 'riods in his arm so much as liquid lightning, but god what an idiot. He had a nice ERA mainly because 80% of major leaguers found his stuff completely unhittable, but he didn't have two brain cells to rub together to use against playoff-caliber lineups. When he lost even a couple ticks off his fastball he quickly washed out.


He washed out so quickly he was still in the bigs at the age of 42.

machoprogrammer: HaywoodJablonski: In before the stay geeks threadshiat about the irrelevance of perfect games and no-hitters

Considering more man have gone to the moon than thrown a perfect game, I doubt they will about a perfect game. No hitters, one can make the argument (walk 9 guys and allow no hits? Still a no hitter), yet I do not agree with that.


It's close. 24 men have orbited the moon, 23 1/2 have thrown perfect games.

balki1867: HaywoodJablonski: In before the stay geeks threadshiat about the irrelevance of perfect games and no-hitters

Interestingly, there is a disparate number of perfect games broken up with 2 outs in the 9th.  Batters have an OBP of ~.500 in that situation, which is remarkable by itself, but even moreso considering we already know the pitcher has his stuff that day, and he's facing the #9 hitter in the line-up.


Nope. Eleven perfect games have been broken up by the 27th batter. If you include the two un-perfect games that were lost in extra innings, when pitchers have gone 26 up, 26 down, they are 25-for-36 in shutting down the 27th, so an OBP of .306.
 
2013-04-03 09:05:32 AM
Got to see Randy Johnson's.

I don't think anybody in the stands around us knew what was going on til the 7th or so. There were 3/4 couples in front of us and two of the women were complaining cause the game was so boring. Conversation:

Women 1: "this game is stupid, the braves don't even have a hit"
Women 2: "I know. They aren't going to win. Can we leave?"
Everyone else: "holy shiat, they are right. Has anyone even been on base?"
 
2013-04-03 09:06:31 AM

Gonz: balki1867: HaywoodJablonski: In before the stay geeks threadshiat about the irrelevance of perfect games and no-hitters

Interestingly, there is a disparate number of perfect games broken up with 2 outs in the 9th.

Well, from a purely statistical standpoint, there are a hell of a lot more perfect games broken up much earlier than that. You know, considering that every game starts out with the potential to be perfect.

I mean, how often does the average starting pitcher allow a baserunner in the first inning? I'd guess it's at least 40% of the time- pulling that number completely out of thin air because I don't feel like looking it up. We just don't usually think of that as "breaking up a perfect game" because it happens so early. It's just business as usual.


I'd actually like to see a breakdown of how often a certain lineup spot breaks up perfect games in the 7th inning or later (on the last trip through the order). It'd be interesting
 
2013-04-03 09:07:13 AM

balki1867: HaywoodJablonski: In before the stay geeks threadshiat about the irrelevance of perfect games and no-hitters

Interestingly, there is a disparate number of perfect games broken up with 2 outs in the 9th.  Batters have an OBP of ~.500 in that situation, which is remarkable by itself, but even moreso considering we already know the pitcher has his stuff that day, and he's facing the #9 hitter in the line-up.


Compared to what? The perfect games broken up by a single in the first?
 
2013-04-03 09:10:49 AM

Palmer Eldritch: Yu almost pitched a perfect game?

No, I didn't.

Of course not, Yu did.


I did what?!?!?
 
2013-04-03 09:19:33 AM

balki1867: Interestingly, there is a disparate number of perfect games broken up with 2 outs in the 9th.  Batters have an OBP of ~.500 in that situation, which is remarkable by itself, but even moreso considering we already know the pitcher has his stuff that day, and he's facing the #9 hitter in the line-up.


In a close game (and all NL games) it will be a pinch hitter which is likely to be better than the regularly scheduled #9 hitter.

Also by the last out of the 9th there's a good chance the pitcher is nervous and more likely to hang a curveball or miss the corner with the fastball.
 
2013-04-03 09:22:05 AM

dragonchild: Soon Right Away: That's every game, I'd imagine :)

Serious answer -- not really.  Young pitchers often try to be cocky (confused with "confident") and get burned for it.  Smart starting pitchers understand the game's a lot like poker.  You'll face the same hitters 4-5 times a game and no fastball is unhittable in the MLB, so if given a lead (which is usually the case if you're working a shutout*), the crafty ones will often deliberately let a hitter get on base to set them up in future duels or walk a hitter on a streak.  Greg Maddux, in particular, sometimes let hitters beat him on purpose to set them up for at-bats weeks or months in the future.

*Unless you're the Mariners, in which case a King Felix shutout means a 0-0 tie (sob)


A lot of people don't understand this side of the game at all. The flip side is that a hitter can do something like swing late at a fastball because he knows the pitcher will come right after him again with another, and he can tattoo it.

Oh, and Greg Maddux was an absolute freak when it came to the thinking side of the game. Probably THE greatest thinker to ever play the game.
 
2013-04-03 09:44:32 AM

Peter von Nostrand: Lost Thought 00: To paraphrase the Astros announcers, maybe this will teach him to learn English

/No, I don't get it either.

They said that? Really... really?


"That'll force the guy to learn some of the language here in America." is the exact quote. It's not as bad in context, but it is still a very awkward phrase which will probably warrant an apology
 
2013-04-03 09:51:07 AM

You're the jerk... jerk: HaywoodJablonski: In before the stay geeks threadshiat about the irrelevance of perfect games and no-hitters

As a noted stat geek, I love wonky things like perfect games and no hitters.


Seconded.
 
2013-04-03 09:53:29 AM

RminusQ: machoprogrammer: HaywoodJablonski: In before the stay geeks threadshiat about the irrelevance of perfect games and no-hitters

Considering more man have gone to the moon than thrown a perfect game, I doubt they will about a perfect game. No hitters, one can make the argument (walk 9 guys and allow no hits? Still a no hitter), yet I do not agree with that.

It's close. 24 men have orbited the moon, 23 1/2 have thrown perfect games


23.5? Is Buerhle a trans*?

Also, I believe the record for "most 26-ups-26-downs" is Mike Mussina with 3. That man must wake up every day and scream "FARK!" thrice at the top of his lungs before getting coffee. And not for the same reason most of us do. Also, he played for Pete "The Nazi" Angelos for a long time - that can't help his psyche.

// also, Mad Dog Maddux, armed only with his "fast"ball (slower than some changeups), could supposedly knock a baseball off a whiskey bottle from the mound without touching the bottle
 
2013-04-03 09:53:43 AM
How many perfect games have ended after the 6th inning by an umpire who called Ball 4?
 
2013-04-03 09:55:31 AM

Lost Thought 00: To paraphrase the Astros announcers, maybe this will teach him to learn English

/No, I don't get it either.


They really said that!? Did they follow it up with how he stole the job from a good American white boy?

/ not racist at all
// also Yu knows and is learning quite a bit of English
 
2013-04-03 09:57:50 AM

Guelph35: balki1867: Interestingly, there is a disparate number of perfect games broken up with 2 outs in the 9th.  Batters have an OBP of ~.500 in that situation, which is remarkable by itself, but even moreso considering we already know the pitcher has his stuff that day, and he's facing the #9 hitter in the line-up.

In a close game (and all NL games) it will be a pinch hitter which is likely to be better than the regularly scheduled #9 hitter.


True, but NL pinch hitters in 2012 combined for a .304 OBP, which isn't great.  It was worse than the average #7 (.309) or #8 (.308) NL hitter in 2012.  The ~.500 OBP still stands out.

Also by the last out of the 9th there's a good chance the pitcher is nervous and more likely to hang a curveball or miss the corner with the fastball.

It's not necessarily all nerves.  There's a good chance the starter has already thrown 100+ pitches.

It might also be a strategy thing.  At that point, the pitcher is probably (selfishly) thinking, "there's no way I'm walking this guy" and throw everything in the zone.  (Walks are bad, but being willing to throw at the edges of the strike zone, or get batters to chase stuff is good.)  A smart batter knows this, and probably can also guess that fastballs are coming.
 
2013-04-03 10:01:02 AM

RminusQ: Nope. Eleven perfect games have been broken up by the 27th batter. If you include the two un-perfect games that were lost in extra innings, when pitchers have gone 26 up, 26 down, they are 25-for-36 in shutting down the 27th, so an OBP of .306.


Huh.  Nice catch.

It's right on the average pinch hitter's OBP, suggesting the pitcher's awesome day cancels out the fatigue or tendency to groove fastballs to avoid walks.  (Or that the umpire is giving a very generous strike zone at that point.)
 
2013-04-03 10:09:56 AM

dragonchild: One guy who drove me insane was Arthur Rhodes. He probably didn't inject 'riods in his arm so much as liquid lightning, but god what an idiot. He had a nice ERA mainly because 80% of major leaguers found his stuff completely unhittable, but he didn't have two brain cells to rub together to use against playoff-caliber lineups. When he lost even a couple ticks off his fastball he quickly washed out.


1) His career ERA as a reliever was 4.08.  Not so nice.

2) His postseason ERA (4.05) was a hair lower than his regular-season ERA (4.08).  He pitched just as well vs. "playoff-caliber lineups".

3) Exactly 22 pitchers in MLB history have appeared in more games than Arthur Rhodes.  (21 relievers and Cy Young.)  He appeared in 51 games at age 41.  "Quickly washed out" is funny.

You're trying to pass yourself off as some sort of insider scout, but you're forgetting that people write down what happens in baseball games.
 
2013-04-03 10:29:31 AM

Dr Dreidel: Also, I believe the record for "most 26-ups-26-downs" is Mike Mussina with 3.


He's only had one.  The others were mere no-hitters broken up by the last batter.

Another fun fact: Of the 11 perfect games broken up by the 27th batter, 2 ended as no-hitters: Hooks Wiltse in 1908 (which was 2nd 10-inning no-hitter in baseball history) and Milt Pappas in 1972 (though he's never forgiven Bruce Froemming for those two balls from 2-2 that cost him his perfect game).

And one more: Had Darvish sealed the deal, his would have been the earliest no-hitter in a calendar year, beating Hideo Nomo's 2nd no-hitter in 2001 by 2 days.
 
2013-04-03 10:38:42 AM

IlGreven: He's only had one. The others were mere no-hitters broken up by the last batter.


forums.watchuseek.com

// my mistake
// fun fact for you: google searching "you are correct sir" returns Ed McMahon's wiki page
 
2013-04-03 10:52:15 AM

chimp_ninja: dragonchild: One guy who drove me insane was Arthur Rhodes. He probably didn't inject 'riods in his arm so much as liquid lightning, but god what an idiot. He had a nice ERA mainly because 80% of major leaguers found his stuff completely unhittable, but he didn't have two brain cells to rub together to use against playoff-caliber lineups. When he lost even a couple ticks off his fastball he quickly washed out.

1) His career ERA as a reliever was 4.08.  Not so nice.

2) His postseason ERA (4.05) was a hair lower than his regular-season ERA (4.08).  He pitched just as well vs. "playoff-caliber lineups".

3) Exactly 22 pitchers in MLB history have appeared in more games than Arthur Rhodes.  (21 relievers and Cy Young.)  He appeared in 51 games at age 41.  "Quickly washed out" is funny.

You're trying to pass yourself off as some sort of insider scout, but you're forgetting that people write down what happens in baseball games.


To be fair to dragonchild, he was amazing for one week in 1994. That is probably what he was referring to.
 
2013-04-03 10:54:32 AM

IlGreven: Milt Pappas in 1972 (though he's never forgiven Bruce Froemming for those two balls from 2-2 that cost him his perfect game)


A guy I know was at that game. We were at a gathering last year when someone announced that Philip Humber had just pitched a perfect game. Later that night we were talking and I brought up the Milt Pappas game, and he told me that he was in the bleachers. A cold, windy day in September against the Padres with 30,000 fans at Wrigley dressed as empty seats. Every time I've seen him since Milt Pappas's name has come up at least once. He was also at the other finalist for "Most Infamous Chicago Baseball Game of the 1970's," Disco Demolition Night.

The closest I ever came to seeing a no-hitter in person was Ted Lilly in Seattle in 2002, one out in the 8th. He gave up an RBI single and lost the game 1-0. I was on the west coast for business and had to miss one of the games in my Mets mini-package. In that game, Shawn Estes took a perfect game into the 7th.
 
2013-04-03 11:04:30 AM

IlGreven: Had Darvish sealed the deal, his would have been the earliest no-hitter in a calendar year, beating Hideo Nomo's 2nd no-hitter in 2001 by 2 days.


Had he K'd the legendary Marwin Gonzalez, he would have finished with 15 Ks.

Bonus points for naming the other pitcher who struck out 15 batters during a perfect game.
 
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