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(CNN)   Launder billions in drug money? That's a slap on the wrist. But messing with standardized testing? That's a jailing   (cnn.com) divider line 104
    More: Followup, Atlanta, Fulton County, District Attorney Paul Howard  
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7523 clicks; posted to Main » on 02 Apr 2013 at 8:49 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-04-02 10:00:01 PM  
uhh...are you implying the law isn't equal??


/say it ain't so
 
2013-04-02 10:00:56 PM  

TheTurtle: "Excessive bail shall not be required..."
- 8th Amendment, United States Constitution


"Psh..."

-Ed Bassmaster
 
2013-04-02 10:12:48 PM  
Its always easy to go after the weak and powerless.  Some guy laundering money might have a DA and his wife, or a assistant DA killed in a hail of bullets.  Teachers are a safe target.
 
2013-04-02 10:15:59 PM  
Isn't money laundering a "victimless crime"

Surely more victimless than drug use where a junkie might kill someone and rob them for their next fix...and we don't want to punish drug users...right?.
 
2013-04-02 10:17:26 PM  
I chuckle at these public school threads.  I went to private school and so do my kids.  The difference is astonishing.
 
2013-04-02 10:20:04 PM  

DarwiOdrade: feckingmorons: Are you suggesting that those who are accused of breaking the law shouldn't be arrested simply because they didn't launder money?
Are you suggesting that those who are accused of breaking the law shouldn't be arrested simply because they are teachers and administrators?
Are you suggesting that those who are accused of breaking the law shouldn't be arrested simply because it was a conspiracy and they acted in concert so they are not individually responsible.

Their actions as alleged in the charging documents are illegal, unethical and done solely for personal gain - for bonuses, for promotions, for job security. They should be arrested and tried just like anyone else who is accused of committing a crime.

Nobody is suggesting any of those things, but it is nice to see you living up to your handle.


You seem like a simpleton.
 
2013-04-02 10:22:08 PM  

Warlordtrooper: feckingmorons: Are you suggesting that those who are accused of breaking the law shouldn't be arrested simply because they didn't launder money?
Are you suggesting that those who are accused of breaking the law shouldn't be arrested simply because they are teachers and administrators?
Are you suggesting that those who are accused of breaking the law shouldn't be arrested simply because it was a conspiracy and they acted in concert so they are not individually responsible.

Their actions as alleged in the charging documents are illegal, unethical and done solely for personal gain - for bonuses, for promotions, for job security. They should be arrested and tried just like anyone else who is accused of committing a crime.

Do you really believe that changing a few things on a piece of paper should get years in jail?


Where did I say that? I said they should be arrested and tried like anyone else accused of a crime. Do you think that if convicted they will get more than probation? I don't think so. But they still should be charged, arrested and tried like everyone else. Subby acts as if nobody is ever arrested except billion dollar money launderers and standardized test cheaters.
 
2013-04-02 10:26:45 PM  

johnryan51: Arrested yes, but 45yrs? Murderers get less than that. I agree that what they did was wrong. I'm surprised at the amount of time that lady is facing.


I'm not. These teachers did more than merely forge some tests and take some money. They totally blew wide open the whole retarded scam known as "No Child Left Behind" and SATs. The Powers That Be don't like to have their schemes exposed. Not one bit.
 
2013-04-02 10:27:53 PM  

cman: I love these threads

These kind of threads brings out the most batshiat insane (like me) and the most paranoid conspiracy theorists.

This thread hasnt hit Alex Jones Conspiracy levels yet, but it will.


It's neither theory nor conspiracy.  It's greed and prejudice and business as usual.  A little bigotry, a little elitism, a little belief that private industry truly is magical, and a little greed for those tasty public dollars means any shot that hurts public schools is a shot towards making some scratch or hurting the "inferior" citizens who need to shut up and get back in the sweatshops anyway.
 
2013-04-02 10:30:18 PM  
Another fine group of union employees
 
2013-04-02 10:31:20 PM  
Keep in mind that they spend over $15,000/kid in the Atlanta public schools.  For a class of 20 kids, that's over $300,000/classroom/year.

Granted, the bail numbers are rediculous and the bankers should be sharing cells with them.
 
2013-04-02 10:40:49 PM  

Snarcoleptic_Hoosier: Earpj: She cost the district hundreds of thousands in federal aid, all while collecting her massive bonus'.

She screwed a ton of kids. Sure, not on the usual teacher way, but still...

What would a bank robber who took that much cash get?

A Vice President position.


Bank VP or VPOTUS?
 
2013-04-02 10:56:10 PM  

Weaver95: violentsalvation: They shiat on the growing minds of countless children and denied them the education they needed, for money. They should rot in prison.

nobody disagrees that this was against the law.
nobody disagrees that the teacher(s) involved should be punished.

thing is...we let bankers walk on laundering a LOT of money for drug cartels.  see, it sets up a very weird standard for 'justice'.  we're throwing teachers in jail over setting up a test scam, but we let rich bankers walk after laundering a shiat f*ck ton of drug money.  in effect, our society is saying drug use/abuse and money laundering is LESS a crime than this teacher scandal.


Have you noticed that the 'Occupy Wallstreet' crowd who pushed for bankers to be punished have been more than marginalized for the past 6 years that Obama has been President? Where's the outrage? Where's the coverage?
 
2013-04-02 11:03:38 PM  
Ready?   As soon as something becomes primarily about money, the thing it is purported to be about is the thing it used to be about.
 
2013-04-02 11:03:56 PM  
Not News: Ambitious, overpaid, showboating local DA slurps up headlines going after beleaguered schoolteachers for what everyone SAID "No Child Left Behind" would lead to.
 
2013-04-02 11:05:08 PM  

bunner: Ready?   As soon as something becomes primarily about money, the thing it is purported to be about is the thing it used to be about.


I like you. One more like that and I'll add you to Favs.
 
2013-04-02 11:17:55 PM  

feckingmorons: DarwiOdrade: feckingmorons: Are you suggesting that those who are accused of breaking the law shouldn't be arrested simply because they didn't launder money?
Are you suggesting that those who are accused of breaking the law shouldn't be arrested simply because they are teachers and administrators?
Are you suggesting that those who are accused of breaking the law shouldn't be arrested simply because it was a conspiracy and they acted in concert so they are not individually responsible.

Their actions as alleged in the charging documents are illegal, unethical and done solely for personal gain - for bonuses, for promotions, for job security. They should be arrested and tried just like anyone else who is accused of committing a crime.

Nobody is suggesting any of those things, but it is nice to see you living up to your handle.

You seem like a simpleton.


How cute. Now run along and play while the adults talk.
 
2013-04-02 11:23:01 PM  
Yes...............the poor victimized teachers. I wonder how many of them have those BS phd's from agriculture & mechanical swamp college yet insist upon being called doctor. Oh no, the poor lambs got called on their shenanigans. They are being treated like people in the real world.......no union to protect you.......facts will set your future. No more extended vacation. No more days off for conferences. No more union benefits. Buy bye,,,,
 
2013-04-02 11:23:27 PM  

ecmoRandomNumbers: I taught in this system for 10 years and it's disgusting. There is a concerted effort to destroy public education in this country and high-stakes testing is the justification. You'd shiat yourself if you saw how much of your tax money is going to private consulting firms and private tutoring companies that hire barely-literate tutors, instead of directly to the thousands of classrooms that need it.


Since we seem so keen on trying to replicate every other country in terms of healthcare... To the detriment of our own people.

Perhaps we should seem keen on trying to replicate every other country in terms of education... They're obviously doing something right.

And the teachers would be the first to scream "No!" if we tried by the way.
 
2013-04-02 11:25:04 PM  
t1.gstatic.com
 
2013-04-02 11:28:56 PM  
tenpoundsofcheese
jayhawk88: Racketeering. You're going to charge a bunch of teachers with racketeering for falsifying test scores, but not a single Wall Street investment banker is ever charged with any crime for their role in the meltdown. An entire international bank full of money launderers gets off with a fine paid for by THE VERY PROFITS THEY MADE FROM MONEY LAUNDERING, but teachers trying to game No Child Left Behind now have a bail bondsman.

My Farking God.

Well why hasn't 0bama and holder charged anyone for the meltdown? Maybe because they either didn't do anything illegal or there is no proof.


Haven't been paying attention, huh? How it works is this: Buy your lobbying muscle and keep passing around the swinging door (regulator one week/Head of the Treasury the next), Call for deregulation (really, it is just re-regulation to suit the purposes of those in the know), always be too big to fail. So, the Gov. that isn't in the pockets of the profiteers is so afraid of farking the system, totally, by going for the guillotines, simply allows all the players to write checks for the laundering & meltdown like clueless scofflaws (remember, always deny personal responsibility, always pay the fines and - with a bit of luck - and with the taxpayers still carrying the socialized risk portion of the `product' - those fines won't impact the next quarter's report. - Risk is still socialized, by the way).

Launderers were basically a subset of the TBTF (kill BOA? The horror!!) that is exactly why Lanny Brueur at Justice (until recently) collected fines like he was selling indulgences, and otherwise kept his yap shut.

/none of the losers referenced in the headline are anything but greedy filth
 
2013-04-02 11:30:27 PM  
Everybody in education could use more humility:  lawmakers, school boards, superintendents, principals, teachers, parents, and students.  The know-it-all attitude is what's killing us.
 
2013-04-02 11:39:21 PM  

feckingmorons: Are you suggesting


Big to small, fecking, big to small.

You don't arrest the town drunk for having an open bottle when there's a murderer running around with a shotgun on main street.

You don't bother investigating millions of dollars in fraud until the farker who're committing BILLIONS in fraud are put in jail first.

That's how a rational person approaches problems. Legal training removes rationality and replaces is with what you can get away with using sophistry. It's Lawful Evil.
 
2013-04-02 11:44:14 PM  

jayhawk88: Racketeering. You're going to charge a bunch of teachers with racketeering for falsifying test scores, but not a single Wall Street investment banker is ever charged with any crime for their role in the meltdown. An entire international bank full of money launderers gets off with a fine paid for by THE VERY PROFITS THEY MADE FROM MONEY LAUNDERING, but teachers trying to game No Child Left Behind now have a bail bondsman.

My Farking God.


The bankers can afford much better lawyers.
 
2013-04-02 11:45:12 PM  
Gotta keep up the demand for those prisons.
s24.postimg.org
Because
1. those with lack of critical thinking skills (rednecks, scared-cat conservatives) will vote for those "law'n'ordah" politicians, in spite of how they bankrupting the nation building all those prisons.
2. "Correction Services" are all about revenge and not actual correction.
 
2013-04-02 11:47:32 PM  

Pumpernickel bread: The bankers can afford much better lawyers.


Because they stole enough money to pay for them.

Hence why we should be arresting their lawyers too.
 
2013-04-02 11:59:35 PM  

ecmoRandomNumbers: Weaver95: ecmoRandomNumbers:
I taught in this system for 10 years and it's disgusting. There is a concerted effort to destroy public education in this country and high-stakes testing is the justification. You'd shiat yourself if you saw how much of your tax money is going to private consulting firms and private tutoring companies that hire barely-literate tutors, instead of directly to the thousands of classrooms that need it.

i'm hoping this is merely the result of GOP stupidity and misconceptions rather than a coordinated plan to make next generation voters stupid.

It would take an evil genius to make this a true, evil conspiracy. It's really just about money.

Public funds are being diverted from schools to private companies. We spend a LOT of money on education and you can ask just about any teacher in any state where the money is going, and they'll give you three answers: 1) The district is top-heavy. More is spent on administration in some small districts than on teachers and paraprofessionals. More chiefs than Indians. This is usually the local board's fault, though. 2) Private tutors as required when a school goes into corrective action because they don't make AYP. 3) Testing. Pre-assessments, practice tests, reteaching, re-testing, re-testing, re-testing, and finally, again, testing. The state also has to pay to have those tests graded. By whom? Private companies. All these companies are constantly lobbying state representatives and school districts for preferential treatment.


To be fair, teachers aren't exactly unbiased in this debate. Many do not want to be accountable.  Take the Chicago teachers union for example.  Some of the highest paid in the country with some of the worst performing students.  They went on strike over this.  They didn't want student performance to be tied to their evaluations (which were universally high). Also, the statement that preparing for the exams takes away from essential studies is untrue as the exams are aligned with the curriculum. What is on the tests are what has been deemed essential by the school districts.

There needs to be some metric to gauge school/teacher performance and student growth in core academic areas is a reasonable starting point.  Standardized testing is the one best way to get at this  The question is, how much testing and how much emphasis? NCLB requirements were onerous and the punishments for failing to meet goals could be harsh.   Going forward, the bar will be set a little lower with much less emphasis on punishment for schools not meeting standards.  Another positive trend is a shift away from college preparedness for everyone and a renewed emphasis on career readiness for those that want to go that route.
 
2013-04-03 12:07:32 AM  

MichiganFTL: [3.bp.blogspot.com image 580x480]


I would LOVE to think about the children as you request, but my psychiatrist says that If I keep doing that, they are going to come arrest me.
 
2013-04-03 12:08:05 AM  

Day_Old_Dutchie: Gotta keep up the demand for those prisons.
[s24.postimg.org image 674x466]
Because
1. those with lack of critical thinking skills (rednecks, scared-cat conservatives) will vote for those "law'n'ordah" politicians, in spite of how they bankrupting the nation building all those prisons.
2. "Correction Services" are all about revenge and not actual correction.


We didn't win the cold war - we traded food, decent clothes and shoes that fit for their play book.
 
2013-04-03 12:12:58 AM  

Weaver95: our society is saying drug use/abuse and money laundering is LESS a crime than this teacher scandal.


The fact that you have to explain this headline makes me sad.
 
2013-04-03 12:22:44 AM  

BarkingUnicorn: You don't want mandatory minimums for bankers?


The bankers weren't even prosecuted, despite being caught red handed laundering huge sums of money for drug cartels and terrorist organizations.
 
2013-04-03 12:24:19 AM  

Pumpernickel bread: To be fair, teachers aren't exactly unbiased in this debate. Many do not want to be accountable.   Take the Chicago teachers union for example.  Some of the highest paid in the country with some of the worst performing studentsThey went on strike over this.  They didn't want student performance to be tied to their evaluations (which were universally high). Also, the statement that preparing for the exams takes away from essential studies is untrue as the exams are aligned with the curriculum. What is on the tests are what has been deemed essential by the school districts.

There needs to be some metric to gauge school/teacher performance and student growth in core academic areas is a reasonable starting point.  Standardized testing is the one best way to get at this  The question is, how much testing and how much emphasis? NCLB requirements were onerous and the punishments for failing to meet goals could be harsh.   Going forward, the bar will be set a little lower with much less emphasis on punishment for schools not meeting standards.  Another positive trend is a shift away from college preparedness for everyone and a renewed emphasis on career readiness for those that want to go that route.


Of course they did.  Ever seen the inside of a Chicago public school?  Hell, ever been to a tough neighborhood in Chicago?  It's like a farking war zone.  Damn right they don't want test scores tied to their career security.  Can you blame them?  90% of the shiat keeping those kids from learning has NOTHING to do with the teachers.
 
2013-04-03 12:25:27 AM  

Warlordtrooper: feckingmorons: Are you suggesting that those who are accused of breaking the law shouldn't be arrested simply because they didn't launder money?
Are you suggesting that those who are accused of breaking the law shouldn't be arrested simply because they are teachers and administrators?
Are you suggesting that those who are accused of breaking the law shouldn't be arrested simply because it was a conspiracy and they acted in concert so they are not individually responsible.

Their actions as alleged in the charging documents are illegal, unethical and done solely for personal gain - for bonuses, for promotions, for job security. They should be arrested and tried just like anyone else who is accused of committing a crime.

Do you really believe that changing a few things on a piece of paper should get years in jail?


shiatty argument. Banks make their money by changing a few things on paper too. Or do you believe they shouldn't be held accountable as well?
 
2013-04-03 12:28:24 AM  

jayhawk88: Racketeering. You're going to charge a bunch of teachers with racketeering for falsifying test scores, but not a single Wall Street investment banker is ever charged with any crime for their role in the meltdown. An entire international bank full of money launderers gets off with a fine paid for by THE VERY PROFITS THEY MADE FROM MONEY LAUNDERING, but teachers trying to game No Child Left Behind now have a bail bondsman.

My Farking God.


Stealing from the people vs. stealing from the government. Of course the government is outraged, they crossed the line. Government coffers are sacred, they stole that wealth fair and square.
 
2013-04-03 12:33:32 AM  
For those of you who don't keep up with recent events...

The deal was announced quietly, just before the holidays, almost like the government was hoping people were too busy hanging stockings by the fireplace to notice. Flooring politicians, lawyers and investigators all over the world, the U.S. Justice Department granted a total walk to executives of the British-based bank HSBC for the largest drug-and-terrorism money-laundering case ever. Yes, they issued a fine - $1.9 billion, or about five weeks' profit - but they didn't extract so much as one dollar or one day in jail from any individual, despite a decade of stupefying abuses.

For at least half a decade, the storied British colonial banking power helped to wash hundreds of millions of dollars for drug mobs, including Mexico's Sinaloa drug cartel, suspected in tens of thousands of murders just in the past 10 years - people so totally evil, jokes former New York Attorney General Eliot Spitzer, that "they make the guys on Wall Street look good." The bank also moved money for organizations linked to Al Qaeda and Hezbollah, and for Russian gangsters; helped countries like Iran, the Sudan and North Korea evade sanctions; and, in between helping murderers and terrorists and rogue states, aided countless common tax cheats in hiding their cash.

"They violated every goddamn law in the book," says Jack Blum, an attorney and former Senate investigator who headed a major bribery investigation against Lockheed in the 1970s that led to the passage of the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act. "They took every imaginable form of illegal and illicit business."

That nobody from the bank went to jail or paid a dollar in individual fines is nothing new in this era of financial crisis. What is different about this settlement is that the Justice Department, for the first time, admitted why it decided to go soft on this particular kind of criminal. It was worried that anything more than a wrist slap for HSBC might undermine the world economy. "Had the U.S. authorities decided to press criminal charges," said Assistant Attorney General Lanny Breuer at a press conference to announce the settlement, "HSBC would almost certainly have lost its banking license in the U.S., the future of the institution would have been under threat and the entire banking system would have been destabilized."


Thanks Obama "Justice" Department
 
2013-04-03 12:38:44 AM  

Weaver95: violentsalvation: They shiat on the growing minds of countless children and denied them the education they needed, for money. They should rot in prison.

nobody disagrees that this was against the law.
nobody disagrees that the teacher(s) involved should be punished.

thing is...we let bankers walk on laundering a LOT of money for drug cartels.  see, it sets up a very weird standard for 'justice'.  we're throwing teachers in jail over setting up a test scam, but we let rich bankers walk after laundering a shiat f*ck ton of drug money.  in effect, our society is saying drug use/abuse and money laundering is LESS a crime than this teacher scandal.


? Personally I thought you'd got this one already, crimes against a LOT of people are not crimes, how else could we excuse the who knows how many deaths that resulted from the theft of what 6 trillion dollars, or the murder of what 1 million 1.5 million Iraqis

but sandyhook!

think of the children so long as they are white americans
 
2013-04-03 12:41:16 AM  

Day_Old_Dutchie: Gotta keep up the demand for those prisons.
[s24.postimg.org image 674x466]
Because
1. those with lack of critical thinking skills (rednecks, scared-cat conservatives) will vote for those "law'n'ordah" politicians, in spite of how they bankrupting the nation building all those prisons.
2. "Correction Services" are all about revenge and not actual correction.


That table is based misleading.  Those are numbers per 100k.  So, the percentage of imprisoned for all those listed is less than 1% of the population.  Looking at it that way, there are no meaningful differences in the incarceration rates of those countries.  An actual statistical test of proportions would likely back that up.
 
2013-04-03 12:55:16 AM  
Here is little Traiyakika, a young black girl who has just gotten a perfect school on her standardized test.  Yes, Traiyakika goes to public school in Atlanta.  She is very smart.  So tell us Traiyakika, what was the name of the event in the United States were people fought to end slavery.

"Um, it was the silverware".

Traikakika should have no problem getting into an ivy league school and seeing all the idiots that have recently graduated from them, she should fit in just fine.

Yes, black educators helping black kids, it doesn't get any uglier than this.
 
2013-04-03 12:57:50 AM  

mrlewish: My question is why did any of them talk?

I mean just shut up when cops ask you questions and refuse to answer.


www.amctv.com
 
2013-04-03 12:58:21 AM  
To prevent this, teachers should have to pass a test on cheating before being allowed to teach.


Okay, but seriously, a 7.5 million bond? A 1 million bond? For this? Even if she is a flight risk - is she in serious danger of being a reoffender? I mean come the fark on.
 
2013-04-03 01:28:13 AM  
Lower the bar.

Lower the bar.

Lower the bar.
 
2013-04-03 01:30:46 AM  

starsrift: To prevent this, teachers should have to pass a test on cheating before being allowed to teach.


Okay, but seriously, a 7.5 million bond? A 1 million bond? For this? Even if she is a flight risk - is she in serious danger of being a reoffender? I mean come the fark on.


lock her farking @$$ up
 
2013-04-03 02:17:54 AM  
www.lileks.com
 Well, Warden, looks like we'll have to use "Old Sparky". Some folks would consider hangin' to be "racist", you know ...
 
2013-04-03 03:21:50 AM  
Don't Fark with one of the Bush Crime Family's big money makers.
 
2013-04-03 06:18:11 AM  
Look at those mugshots. LOOK AT THEM.  Shoop them. Caption them. MOCK THEM......I've never seen a more scurrilous-looking bunch of con artists in my life...
 
2013-04-03 07:39:44 AM  
www.biography.com
I have a dream that my four little children will one day live in a country where they are not judged by the color of their skin, but by their scores on standardized tests.
 
2013-04-03 08:07:45 AM  
Atlantas' new motto should be "Our kids be stoopid".
 
2013-04-03 08:35:10 AM  
They committed fraud for personal gain. fek'em.
It is dumb to say that we shouldn't arrest them because we didn't arrest someone else for something else.
 
2013-04-03 09:39:01 AM  
Shouldn't you have to read the article you are submitting before it gets a greenlight? I can't find the drug launderers anywhere in the article
 
2013-04-03 10:07:22 AM  

feckingmorons: Their actions as alleged in the charging documents are illegal, unethical and done solely for personal gain - for bonuses, for promotions, for job security. They should be arrested and tried just like anyone else who is accused of committing a crime.


violentsalvation: They shiat on the growing minds of countless children and denied them the education they needed, for money. They should rot in prison.


Or, maybe the standardized test thing works... if you don't teach students anything useful, and instead teach them to be worthless mcdonalds test takers.  Can you squirt mayo on a burger, kid?

Maybe the teachers didn't know how to actually teach students AND make them pass standardized tests, so they spent their time teaching and just faked the stupid tests.
 
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