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(The New York Times)   Old and busted: verbing weirds language. New hotness: nominalizations responsible for language weirdification   (opinionator.blogs.nytimes.com) divider line 23
    More: Interesting  
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4865 clicks; posted to Main » on 02 Apr 2013 at 2:05 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-04-02 02:02:51 PM  
5 votes:
www.unmemorabletitle.co.uk
2013-04-02 02:30:33 PM  
4 votes:
graphics8.nytimes.com

Missing Panels:

The Public Announcement / You're Kidding, right?
The Starved to Death
Working 20 years in IT waiting for the market to catch up to you
2013-04-02 02:46:23 PM  
2 votes:
Ah, language evolution.  Grammar Nazis will tell you to always use proper forms, but slang develops from people adding meaning to words that didn't normally have them.  "Friend" used to only be a noun, but now it's a verb. (Friend me on Facebook)  If you use a dictionary to look up "jiggy," what will you find?

As an ESL teacher, I can sympathize with people who hate the process of nominalization, but you can't stifle language evolution. If you say "Stop saying YOLO," do you honestly think people will?  Language use changes over time.  When was the last time you used "cowabunga" in a conversation?  Or used a phrase like "throw the baby out with the bathwater?"  Yosemite Sam uses "tarnation," do you?

If these nominalized words annoy you, it sucks to be you.  I guess you should stop using "Long time no see," since it's grammatically incorrect.  After all, that phrase is a direct translation from Chinese.
2013-04-02 02:20:52 PM  
2 votes:
Look, it's really quite simple. There are a whole lot of stupid people out there. But we can't limit talking to just smart people; dumb people need to be able to communicate too. And this is how they do it. From a sociological perspective it's really quite interesting. From any other perspective, it makes me want to kill someone.
2013-04-02 10:46:10 AM  
2 votes:

MadSkillz: I don't understand some of his later examples. "That was an epic failure" for example. Failure has been a noun for a long time.


He mentions the fact that failure has been a noun for a long time, but makes the point that fail as a noun was around before failure. But he's also drawing a distinction between the two different kinds of nominalizations with those examples. The kind where you don't change the verb at all and use it as a noun, "epic fail", and the kind where you add a suffix to it to make it a noun, "epic failure".
2013-04-02 05:14:01 PM  
1 votes:

ciberido: DirtyDeadGhostofEbenezerCooke: bacchanalias and consequences: I don't catch his drift.

Let's table this matter.

"To table" dates back to 1718 as a verb, and has been used to mean "to postpone indefinitely" in the USA since 1866, so again, not a recent example.


Threadjack:

"To table" means what you say in American-speak.  In brit-speak, it means "to present for discussion" (e.g., to bring to the table).

Churchill tells a story in his memoirs about the Allies sitting down at a policy meeting.  Some topic gets mentioned.  The British leaders are adamant that the topic be tabled immediately, because it's important.  The American leaders are equally adamant that the topic not be tabled at all, because it's important.  Round and round they go, being stiffly formal with increasing tension.

Eventually somebody happens to restate his side's position without using the word "table", the people across the room blink and say "wait, what?", there are some impromptu vocabulary lessons for everyone involved, and a chuckle was had by all.
2013-04-02 04:07:06 PM  
1 votes:
And here I thought this sort of intentional grammatical error was only used for comic effect, as if the user was just trying to sound silly by appearing uneducated. I guess I was wrong, and will have to Google it later.
2013-04-02 03:32:56 PM  
1 votes:
"Would you let me see beneath your beautiful?"

I do believe that beautiful is neither a verb nor a noun...and I suck at teh englush.
2013-04-02 03:15:17 PM  
1 votes:

hitlersbrain: I'm no writer of great works but might I humbly suggest sticking to words used in ordinary conversation? The message should be the point, not how much time you wasted learning words no one uses or cares about.


The hypothesis of your manifesto is something that I accede to. The vexatious din of the immoderately circumlocutory of commonplace dictum is superfluous.
2013-04-02 03:07:26 PM  
1 votes:
For redundant corporate redundancy, give me "high level overview." What other kind can you have?
2013-04-02 03:04:02 PM  
1 votes:
I'm just a tiny bit surprised that no one has mentioned "Text" being used as both a noun and a verb, and that's become perfectly accptable.
2013-04-02 02:59:29 PM  
1 votes:
do512blog.com

/The king of wordifying everyday speechifications.
2013-04-02 02:56:51 PM  
1 votes:
www.toothpastefordinner.com
2013-04-02 02:38:46 PM  
1 votes:
2013-04-02 02:30:01 PM  
1 votes:
Also, it is exceptionally difficult not to punch people who use the word "dialogue" as a verb.  That only works as a stage direction.
2013-04-02 02:29:08 PM  
1 votes:

The Flexecutioner: my grandfather corrected my grammar in the early 80s when i went to a golf course with him.  He said, "You don't 'golf', you play golf.  It isn't a verb."  As much as he was technically correct circa 1940 that usage went the way of the dodo long before that.  He was just trying to teach me the usage he learned 50 years earlier.


I don't golf, I soccer.

(She hates it.)
2013-04-02 02:26:43 PM  
1 votes:
my grandfather corrected my grammar in the early 80s when i went to a golf course with him.  He said, "You don't 'golf', you play golf.  It isn't a verb."  As much as he was technically correct circa 1940 that usage went the way of the dodo long before that.  He was just trying to teach me the usage he learned 50 years earlier.
2013-04-02 02:26:10 PM  
1 votes:
I like you subby because of the interesting word usements you structure.
2013-04-02 02:14:48 PM  
1 votes:
encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.com
2013-04-02 02:11:14 PM  
1 votes:

ITGreen: [www.unmemorabletitle.co.uk image 800x273]


assets0.ordienetworks.com
2013-04-02 01:56:56 PM  
1 votes:
People called Romanes, they go, the house?
2013-04-02 12:18:31 PM  
1 votes:
Or, to quote a song that was recently a No. 1 hit in Britain, "Would you let me see beneath your beautiful?"

That's just awful.
2013-04-02 10:22:23 AM  
1 votes:
I don't understand some of his later examples. "That was an epic failure" for example. Failure has been a noun for a long time.
 
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