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(Yahoo)   NY Times admits that, in retrospect, it might have been a wee bit sexist for them to lead off the obituary of a brilliant rocket scientists and National Technology Medal winner with a description of what a great cook and homemaker she was   (news.yahoo.com) divider line 32
    More: Obvious, prompt corner, National Medal of Technology, obituary, descriptions, NYT  
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5805 clicks; posted to Main » on 01 Apr 2013 at 11:32 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



Voting Results (Funniest)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


Archived thread
2013-04-01 11:44:41 AM
8 votes:
That's nothing. The original version began: "She could suck the chrome off a bumper...."
2013-04-01 11:49:42 AM
7 votes:
Well, to be fair her beef stroganoff recipie involved pre-browning the meat by subjecting it to a three second thruster burn of an LOX booster
2013-04-01 11:35:36 AM
5 votes:
What else are they supposed to lead off with? She sure wasn't a looker.
2013-04-01 11:35:19 AM
5 votes:
If they truly want to make amends, they should post her beef stroganoff recipe...
2013-04-01 01:08:54 PM
4 votes:

ImpatientlyUnsympathetic: Skirl Hutsenreiter: ImpatientlyUnsympathetic: I'm not a scientist, nor am I a mother [yet] but I sure hope that I get as much respect for my cooking and homemaking as I get from my work in sales. I take my laundry, cooking, dog-care, cleaning, baking and general domestication very seriously. Yeah... I seriously doubt my sales work (not Mary Kay or Scentsy) will be noteworthy... I'll be glad to recognized as a good wife, homemaker at the same time as being a working woman.

One may hope to be remembered by those close to you however you like, but nobody gets an obituary in the NYT for being a wonderful parent, much less keeping house well.  She got an obituary for her work as a scientist.

If I had an NYT Obit, I would actually like if it said my food was as good as my work. I think it would be nice if we could stop acting like its an affront to feminism to be good at traditional homemaker skills at the same time as we compete with men.


Amateur violinist, husband, and father of two Albert Eistein has passed away, he was also considered by some to be an accomplished physcist,

Father of two and star of his familiy's annual Thanksgiving Day touch football game, John F. Kennedy passed away in Dallas after a very short illness, he was also briefly President of the United States from 1960-1963

Local Businessman and former University of Cleveland Engineering Professor Neil Armstrong has passed away, he is survived by a wife and son, who will miss his gardening and landscaping skills.  He was also  a commissioned officer in the Navy, and a Korean war vet, who also is credited with doing some pioneering aerospace work while employed by NASA in the late 1960's
2013-04-01 11:43:02 AM
4 votes:

itsdan: staplermofo: Can we praise a women without taking petty jabs at men?

 
I think the proper response to this is "lol fragile male ego!"
 
You big meanie! I have feelings, too!
 
Two, I mean. I have two feelings.
2013-04-01 11:59:07 AM
3 votes:
I don't remember much complaining when they led off with John Wayne Gacy's ability to make balloon animals.
2013-04-01 11:18:29 AM
3 votes:
All the same, she was a great homemaker.  Have you ever seen her pleats?  You could castrate yourself with her pleats!
2013-04-01 02:08:13 PM
2 votes:

FarkingReading: That's nothing. The original version began: "She could suck the chrome off a bumper...."


She was also recognized as being the Pele of anal
2013-04-01 12:40:53 PM
2 votes:

ImpatientlyUnsympathetic: I'm not a scientist, nor am I a mother [yet] but I sure hope that I get as much respect for my cooking and homemaking as I get from my work in sales.


I would not be surprised if you get exactly as much respect for your cooking and homemaking as you do for your work in sales.
2013-04-01 12:11:25 PM
2 votes:

minoridiot: I met her back in 1989.  The one thing that really remember about her was that she had tuck her shirt into her underwear which was showing about 1" above her waistline.


So a typical engineer, then.
2013-04-01 12:04:35 PM
2 votes:
Really, her signature dish is beef stroganoff?  Come on, male scientists and engineers would be ashamed to admit we even cook that garbage let alone it being our best dish.  A male engineer would be cooking cool stuff like sushi or New England clam chowder or tiramisou.  Women still have a long way to go.
2013-04-01 12:01:35 PM
2 votes:

Theaetetus: Lumpmoose: But it shows the NYT is tone deaf to decades of women fighting to get more representation in STEM fields.
 
Although they do include these bits:
It was a distinction she earned in the face of obstacles, beginning when the University of Manitoba in Canada refused to let her major in engineering because there were no accommodations for women at an outdoor engineering camp, which students were required to attend.
 
"You just have to be cheerful about it and not get upset when you get insulted," she once said.
 
... Part of Mrs. Brill's rationale for going into rocket engineering was that virtually no other women were doing so. "I reckoned they would not invent rules to discriminate against one person," she said in a 1990 interview.


Yes, but I heard she went to a conference once and someone made a joke about Two stage rockets and she didn't broadcast this sexist image to the BBS boards or anything. Obviously a terrible woman who let men walk all over her. How dare she.
2013-04-01 11:37:04 AM
2 votes:
Soon, the couple went square-dancing, only to discover that they both hated it. They found other interests, and married in 1951.
 
Those "other interests" were sex, right?
2013-04-01 11:09:30 AM
2 votes:

staplermofo: Can we praise a women without taking petty jabs at men?


I think the proper response to this is "lol fragile male ego!"
2013-04-01 10:55:21 PM
1 votes:
Wait... Chicken parmesan, and also brownies... I guess that is okay.

I assumed that was one thing. And if it actually was,  you monster!
2013-04-01 05:26:57 PM
1 votes:

Man On Pink Corner: ProfessorOhki: Your evaluation presupposes that scientists are more important than cooks; check your privilege.

Can't eat science.


I'm going to gently point out that you are very mistaken.  Unless my sarcasm detector is broken, in which case I award you one of these.
2013-04-01 03:49:38 PM
1 votes:

PunGent: Theaetetus: Soon, the couple went square-dancing, only to discover that they both hated it. They found other interests, and married in 1951.

Those "other interests" were sex, right?

IrishFarmer: Graffito: You're a straight, white, cis-gendered, heteronormative male who never experiences microaggressions, aren't you?

And you're a 20-something, middle class white female, aren't you?  Look, if stereotyping people is a bad thing, then it's always a bad thing.  Don't just pick and choose.

Also, you missed a few labels to apply to the other poster, but fortunately I was able to add them back into your quotes.

A slight pet peeve of mine:  The NYT article was (probably) not sexism.  I didn't read the original form, but if we're going to use words like sexism and racism this way, then they just lose all meaning.  Sexism is hatred or mistrust of a person based on whether they're male or female.  That definition does not include, "failure to write an article in line with an ideological script."

Cheapening the word just makes actually sexism all the harder to spot.

The dictionary definition is broader than "hatred or mistrust" and includes gender-based "devaluation";  which putting her cooking above her science arguably does.


Your evaluation presupposes that scientists are more important than cooks; check your privilege.
2013-04-01 03:45:09 PM
1 votes:

ImpatientlyUnsympathetic: This text is now purple: Magorn: Amateur violinist, husband, and father of two Albert Eistein has passed away, he was also considered by some to be an accomplished physcist,

The difference is, Einstein was a terrible father and husband.

I think that is what he meant by amateur violinist, husband and father of two. He was amateur at all of those things...


Being a professional father is illegal.
2013-04-01 03:28:34 PM
1 votes:
Did someone say "feminism"?

QUICK!  SUMMON THE GAMER BOYS!  THEY WILL PROTECT US FROM THE "F" WORD!

i.imgur.com
2013-04-01 01:17:10 PM
1 votes:

Magorn: ImpatientlyUnsympathetic: Skirl Hutsenreiter: ImpatientlyUnsympathetic: I'm not a scientist, nor am I a mother [yet] but I sure hope that I get as much respect for my cooking and homemaking as I get from my work in sales. I take my laundry, cooking, dog-care, cleaning, baking and general domestication very seriously. Yeah... I seriously doubt my sales work (not Mary Kay or Scentsy) will be noteworthy... I'll be glad to recognized as a good wife, homemaker at the same time as being a working woman.

One may hope to be remembered by those close to you however you like, but nobody gets an obituary in the NYT for being a wonderful parent, much less keeping house well.  She got an obituary for her work as a scientist.

If I had an NYT Obit, I would actually like if it said my food was as good as my work. I think it would be nice if we could stop acting like its an affront to feminism to be good at traditional homemaker skills at the same time as we compete with men.

Amateur violinist, husband, and father of two Albert Eistein has passed away, he was also considered by some to be an accomplished physcist,

Father of two and star of his familiy's annual Thanksgiving Day touch football game, John F. Kennedy passed away in Dallas after a very short illness, he was also briefly President of the United States from 1960-1963

Local Businessman and former University of Cleveland Engineering Professor Neil Armstrong has passed away, he is survived by a wife and son, who will miss his gardening and landscaping skills.  He was also  a commissioned officer in the Navy, and a Korean war vet, who also is credited with doing some pioneering aerospace work while employed by NASA in the late 1960's


This made me LOL.
2013-04-01 01:08:17 PM
1 votes:
SAMMICHES!
2013-04-01 12:15:39 PM
1 votes:

Dr._Michael_Hfuhruhurr: Rocket science that whitens teeth.

Invented by a mom.


This one weird trick that dentists hate.
2013-04-01 12:07:12 PM
1 votes:
I met her back in 1989.  The one thing that really remember about her was that she had tuck her shirt into her underwear which was showing about 1" above her waistline.
2013-04-01 12:01:56 PM
1 votes:

Cletus C.: I don't remember much complaining when they led off with John Wayne Gacy's ability to make balloon animals.

 
"he vas a great painter! He could do an entire apartment in one afternoon! Two coats!"
2013-04-01 11:55:31 AM
1 votes:

Ponzholio: stroganoff

 
img827.imageshack.us
2013-04-01 11:50:04 AM
1 votes:

Farty McPooPants: Keepin' it Classy, That's the Clean Way To Live!TM


OK, whatever you say, Mr. Farty McPooPants.
2013-04-01 11:47:29 AM
1 votes:
She was a rocket surgeon and her lasagna was the bomb. I'm failing to see the problem.
2013-04-01 11:43:30 AM
1 votes:

Lumpmoose: But it shows the NYT is tone deaf to decades of women fighting to get more representation in STEM fields.

 
Although they do include these bits:
It was a distinction she earned in the face of obstacles, beginning when the University of Manitoba in Canada refused to let her major in engineering because there were no accommodations for women at an outdoor engineering camp, which students were required to attend.
 
"You just have to be cheerful about it and not get upset when you get insulted," she once said.
 
... Part of Mrs. Brill's rationale for going into rocket engineering was that virtually no other women were doing so. "I reckoned they would not invent rules to discriminate against one person," she said in a 1990 interview.
2013-04-01 11:41:55 AM
1 votes:
Was she a beloved aunt, too?
2013-04-01 11:41:02 AM
1 votes:
The person who wrote the obit is no brain surgeon.
2013-04-01 11:39:10 AM
1 votes:
It seems the obituary is about her transformation from dutiful wife, mother and cook to brilliant scientist. I liked it. Also would like to try that beef stroganoff.
 
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