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(Yahoo)   NY Times admits that, in retrospect, it might have been a wee bit sexist for them to lead off the obituary of a brilliant rocket scientists and National Technology Medal winner with a description of what a great cook and homemaker she was   (news.yahoo.com) divider line 147
    More: Obvious, prompt corner, National Medal of Technology, obituary, descriptions, NYT  
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5807 clicks; posted to Main » on 01 Apr 2013 at 11:32 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-04-01 10:58:58 AM  
It's an obituary, not a biography.
The offensive part is "The article went on to suggest that it took two men to create an adhesive stationery but only one woman to figure out how to keep satellites in place."
Can we praise a women without taking petty jabs at men?  Screw you Post-It Note guys, a woman did rocket science.  Classy.
 
2013-04-01 11:09:30 AM  

staplermofo: Can we praise a women without taking petty jabs at men?


I think the proper response to this is "lol fragile male ego!"
 
2013-04-01 11:18:29 AM  
All the same, she was a great homemaker.  Have you ever seen her pleats?  You could castrate yourself with her pleats!
 
2013-04-01 11:35:19 AM  
If they truly want to make amends, they should post her beef stroganoff recipe...
 
2013-04-01 11:35:36 AM  
What else are they supposed to lead off with? She sure wasn't a looker.
 
2013-04-01 11:37:04 AM  
Soon, the couple went square-dancing, only to discover that they both hated it. They found other interests, and married in 1951.
 
Those "other interests" were sex, right?
 
2013-04-01 11:39:10 AM  
It seems the obituary is about her transformation from dutiful wife, mother and cook to brilliant scientist. I liked it. Also would like to try that beef stroganoff.
 
2013-04-01 11:40:00 AM  
Besides the saccharine folksiness, there's nothing intrinsically wrong with starting the article like that.  But it shows the NYT is tone deaf to decades of women fighting to get more representation in STEM fields.
 
2013-04-01 11:41:02 AM  
The person who wrote the obit is no brain surgeon.
 
2013-04-01 11:41:55 AM  
Was she a beloved aunt, too?
 
2013-04-01 11:42:22 AM  
The whole thing is beyond silly. Time to grow up, whiney America!
 
2013-04-01 11:43:02 AM  

itsdan: staplermofo: Can we praise a women without taking petty jabs at men?

 
I think the proper response to this is "lol fragile male ego!"
 
You big meanie! I have feelings, too!
 
Two, I mean. I have two feelings.
 
2013-04-01 11:43:30 AM  

Lumpmoose: But it shows the NYT is tone deaf to decades of women fighting to get more representation in STEM fields.

 
Although they do include these bits:
It was a distinction she earned in the face of obstacles, beginning when the University of Manitoba in Canada refused to let her major in engineering because there were no accommodations for women at an outdoor engineering camp, which students were required to attend.
 
"You just have to be cheerful about it and not get upset when you get insulted," she once said.
 
... Part of Mrs. Brill's rationale for going into rocket engineering was that virtually no other women were doing so. "I reckoned they would not invent rules to discriminate against one person," she said in a 1990 interview.
 
2013-04-01 11:44:13 AM  
It looks like she made al ot of Beef Stroganof
 
2013-04-01 11:44:25 AM  
Way to demean all people that decide to keep a home and take care of their families.
 
Last time I checked, the Post It Note folks were not in charge of any satellites.
Apples =/= Oranges
Keepin' it Classy, That's the Clean Way To Live!TM
 
2013-04-01 11:44:41 AM  
That's nothing. The original version began: "She could suck the chrome off a bumper...."
 
2013-04-01 11:47:29 AM  
She was a rocket surgeon and her lasagna was the bomb. I'm failing to see the problem.
 
2013-04-01 11:49:42 AM  
Well, to be fair her beef stroganoff recipie involved pre-browning the meat by subjecting it to a three second thruster burn of an LOX booster
 
2013-04-01 11:50:04 AM  

Farty McPooPants: Keepin' it Classy, That's the Clean Way To Live!TM


OK, whatever you say, Mr. Farty McPooPants.
 
2013-04-01 11:51:02 AM  

JackieRabbit: The whole thing is beyond silly. Time to grow up, whiney America!

 
You're a straight white male, aren't you?
 
2013-04-01 11:51:29 AM  

Magorn: Well, to be fair her beef stroganoff recipie involved pre-browning the meat by subjecting it to a three second thruster burn of an LOX booster

 
That would be salmon stroganoff. For this, you use a bacon torch:
www.popsci.com
 
2013-04-01 11:52:05 AM  

Graffito: JackieRabbit: The whole thing is beyond silly. Time to grow up, whiney America!
 
You're a straight white able-bodied male, aren't you?


FTFY
 
2013-04-01 11:52:51 AM  
I've heard that Einstein enjoyed it more when people complimented his violin playing than when they gushed about how smart he was. Maybe she was the same way.
upload.wikimedia.org
 
2013-04-01 11:53:09 AM  
They're missing the point. Was she hot?
 
2013-04-01 11:55:06 AM  

rumpelstiltskin: What else are they supposed to lead off with? She sure wasn't a looker.

 
Well, she was no Werner von Braun, but who among us is?
 
upload.wikimedia.org
 
Why, he practically personified "handsome Nazi rocket scientist around whom we don't mention the war. Or the slave labour. Or any other unpleasantness."
 
2013-04-01 11:55:31 AM  

Ponzholio: stroganoff

 
img827.imageshack.us
 
2013-04-01 11:58:24 AM  
Rocket science that whitens teeth.

Invented by a mom.
 
2013-04-01 11:59:07 AM  
I don't remember much complaining when they led off with John Wayne Gacy's ability to make balloon animals.
 
2013-04-01 12:01:35 PM  

Theaetetus: Lumpmoose: But it shows the NYT is tone deaf to decades of women fighting to get more representation in STEM fields.
 
Although they do include these bits:
It was a distinction she earned in the face of obstacles, beginning when the University of Manitoba in Canada refused to let her major in engineering because there were no accommodations for women at an outdoor engineering camp, which students were required to attend.
 
"You just have to be cheerful about it and not get upset when you get insulted," she once said.
 
... Part of Mrs. Brill's rationale for going into rocket engineering was that virtually no other women were doing so. "I reckoned they would not invent rules to discriminate against one person," she said in a 1990 interview.


Yes, but I heard she went to a conference once and someone made a joke about Two stage rockets and she didn't broadcast this sexist image to the BBS boards or anything. Obviously a terrible woman who let men walk all over her. How dare she.
 
2013-04-01 12:01:56 PM  

Cletus C.: I don't remember much complaining when they led off with John Wayne Gacy's ability to make balloon animals.

 
"he vas a great painter! He could do an entire apartment in one afternoon! Two coats!"
 
2013-04-01 12:04:35 PM  
Really, her signature dish is beef stroganoff?  Come on, male scientists and engineers would be ashamed to admit we even cook that garbage let alone it being our best dish.  A male engineer would be cooking cool stuff like sushi or New England clam chowder or tiramisou.  Women still have a long way to go.
 
2013-04-01 12:07:12 PM  
I met her back in 1989.  The one thing that really remember about her was that she had tuck her shirt into her underwear which was showing about 1" above her waistline.
 
2013-04-01 12:08:54 PM  
She was a brilliant rocket scientist who followed her husband from job to job and took eight years off from work to raise three children. "The world's best mom," her son Matthew said.

They made it WORSE with this change. Now it makes no sense at all and puts her homemaking skills on equal billing with her scientific achievements.


The original was obviously meant to show how, at a time when things were just starting to change for women, she was at the forefront. To outside appearances, her life path would seem standard in many ways with home and family, but the real story of her life was her innovative work.

The people who criticized it really don't see that? They really think the writer wanted to highlight her home and family achievements and diminish the others?

Now, thanks to the change, that's exactly what it does.
 
2013-04-01 12:11:25 PM  

minoridiot: I met her back in 1989.  The one thing that really remember about her was that she had tuck her shirt into her underwear which was showing about 1" above her waistline.


So a typical engineer, then.
 
2013-04-01 12:11:43 PM  
www.ecofilms.com.au
 
2013-04-01 12:15:39 PM  

Dr._Michael_Hfuhruhurr: Rocket science that whitens teeth.

Invented by a mom.


This one weird trick that dentists hate.
 
2013-04-01 12:23:27 PM  
I'm not a scientist, nor am I a mother [yet] but I sure hope that I get as much respect for my cooking and homemaking as I get from my work in sales. I take my laundry, cooking, dog-care, cleaning, baking and general domestication very seriously. Yeah... I seriously doubt my sales work (not Mary Kay or Scentsy) will be noteworthy... I'll be glad to recognized as a good wife, homemaker at the same time as being a working woman.
 
2013-04-01 12:30:10 PM  
So women can't be brilliant and cook?

Good to know.
 
2013-04-01 12:37:56 PM  

Molavian: So women can't be brilliant and cook?

Good to know.


I should stop cooking now? Because, I am pretty proud of my professional achievements. I would like to have equal recognition for my cooking. Because it is what I like to do when I'm not working...
 
2013-04-01 12:39:28 PM  

ImpatientlyUnsympathetic: I'm not a scientist, nor am I a mother [yet] but I sure hope that I get as much respect for my cooking and homemaking as I get from my work in sales. I take my laundry, cooking, dog-care, cleaning, baking and general domestication very seriously. Yeah... I seriously doubt my sales work (not Mary Kay or Scentsy) will be noteworthy... I'll be glad to recognized as a good wife, homemaker at the same time as being a working woman.


One may hope to be remembered by those close to you however you like, but nobody gets an obituary in the NYT for being a wonderful parent, much less keeping house well.  She got an obituary for her work as a scientist.
 
2013-04-01 12:39:47 PM  

JackieRabbit: The whole thing is beyond silly. Time to grow up, whiney America!


upload.wikimedia.org

/ten, nine, eight, and all that
 
2013-04-01 12:40:53 PM  

ImpatientlyUnsympathetic: I'm not a scientist, nor am I a mother [yet] but I sure hope that I get as much respect for my cooking and homemaking as I get from my work in sales.


I would not be surprised if you get exactly as much respect for your cooking and homemaking as you do for your work in sales.
 
2013-04-01 12:48:06 PM  

Skirl Hutsenreiter: ImpatientlyUnsympathetic: I'm not a scientist, nor am I a mother [yet] but I sure hope that I get as much respect for my cooking and homemaking as I get from my work in sales. I take my laundry, cooking, dog-care, cleaning, baking and general domestication very seriously. Yeah... I seriously doubt my sales work (not Mary Kay or Scentsy) will be noteworthy... I'll be glad to recognized as a good wife, homemaker at the same time as being a working woman.

One may hope to be remembered by those close to you however you like, but nobody gets an obituary in the NYT for being a wonderful parent, much less keeping house well.  She got an obituary for her work as a scientist.


If I had an NYT Obit, I would actually like if it said my food was as good as my work. I think it would be nice if we could stop acting like its an affront to feminism to be good at traditional homemaker skills at the same time as we compete with men.
 
2013-04-01 12:50:10 PM  

Theaetetus: ImpatientlyUnsympathetic: I'm not a scientist, nor am I a mother [yet] but I sure hope that I get as much respect for my cooking and homemaking as I get from my work in sales.

I would not be surprised if you get exactly as much respect for your cooking and homemaking as you do for your work in sales.


BURN! If only the internet cared about me as much as my boss and my husband do. I am going to cry into my pillow!
 
2013-04-01 12:53:08 PM  

minoridiot: I met her back in 1989.  The one thing that really remember about her was that she had tuck her shirt into her underwear which was showing about 1" above her waistline.


I had an engineering professor that did that. Went oddly well with his lopsided mustache and combover.

/brilliant mind, no social awareness
 
2013-04-01 12:55:42 PM  

ImpatientlyUnsympathetic: I think it would be nice if we could stop acting like its an affront to feminism to be good at traditional homemaker skills at the same time as we compete with men.


Yes, and it would be nice if we could eat bacon and cheesecake for every meal and not become morbidly obese, but, alas, that it not the world we live in.
 
2013-04-01 12:57:19 PM  

Christian Bale: They made it WORSE with this change.


Yeah I'm with you on this one the edits made the whole thing a mess and I don't really see what was wrong with the first one. It's not like they made a joke of it, hell for all we knew she was damn proud of her beef stroganoff. It's not like they downplayed her engineering successes either. They just made a strong case for a woman who had success both professionally and privately.  That's a pretty damn big accomplishment for anybody and it should be celebrated.
 
2013-04-01 01:00:33 PM  
People like to zazz up their writings.

I think it was an honest mistake. I dont think that the writer knew how it was going to be perceived. He/she wanted to make the obit a bit more dramatic.
 
2013-04-01 01:04:03 PM  
Came to read about her sammich making abilities, leaving disappoint..
 
2013-04-01 01:05:58 PM  

ImpatientlyUnsympathetic: Skirl Hutsenreiter: ImpatientlyUnsympathetic: I'm not a scientist, nor am I a mother [yet] but I sure hope that I get as much respect for my cooking and homemaking as I get from my work in sales. I take my laundry, cooking, dog-care, cleaning, baking and general domestication very seriously. Yeah... I seriously doubt my sales work (not Mary Kay or Scentsy) will be noteworthy... I'll be glad to recognized as a good wife, homemaker at the same time as being a working woman.

One may hope to be remembered by those close to you however you like, but nobody gets an obituary in the NYT for being a wonderful parent, much less keeping house well.  She got an obituary for her work as a scientist.

If I had an NYT Obit, I would actually like if it said my food was as good as my work. I think it would be nice if we could stop acting like its an affront to feminism to be good at traditional homemaker skills at the same time as we compete with men.


I don't think we're acting like it's an affront to feminism to be good at those things.  But it is strange to emphasize them, considering obituaries for male scientists don't usually include anything about how great they were are keeping the lawn mown, or repairing the family car, or any other traditional male household roles.
 
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