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(io9)   What would happen if the sun vanished?   (io9.com) divider line 116
    More: Cool, reflected light  
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6448 clicks; posted to Geek » on 01 Apr 2013 at 4:22 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-03-31 11:43:36 PM  
It'd be dark and stuff.
 
2013-03-31 11:47:19 PM  
Black Hole Sun.
 
2013-03-31 11:56:09 PM  
We'd all be dead in hours or days. Those idiot preppers would be first.
 
2013-04-01 12:07:30 AM  
The Sun isn't there.
 
2013-04-01 12:11:33 AM  
Rupert Murdock would cry.
 
2013-04-01 12:12:59 AM  
Goddam, that guy's annoying. Couldn't stand it past 2 minutes.
 
2013-04-01 12:21:25 AM  
Like an old oak table?

Oh, vanished.
 
2013-04-01 12:49:24 AM  

Generation_D: We'd all be dead in hours or days. Those idiot preppers would be first.


Not people who stockpiled fuel, water and a generator.
 
Actually, people in cities would be first once the electricity shut off.  They wouldn't even have transportation to leave.  Suburbs would be a close second because water and food wouldn't be available.  Anyone with self-sufficient power and water who was well isolated from the rest of the world (rural) would last until the food ran out, which would be shortly thereafter.
 
Winners?  Anyone in Afghanistan or the mountains near Pakistan, at least short term.
 
2013-04-01 01:15:18 AM  

Lsherm:  Anyone with self-sufficient power and water who was well isolated from the rest of the world (rural) would last until the food ran out,

 
I would bet the food would still be there once Earth's surface reached ambient background temperature of 0.^A Kelvin. Only ones likely to survive much beyond a few days would be those in nuclear subs.
 
2013-04-01 01:15:37 AM  

Godscrack: Black Hole Sun.


No, there's a difference. We would still happily orbit a black hole.
 
2013-04-01 01:24:13 AM  
We'd be hoping there wasn't a mine shaft gap.
 
2013-04-01 01:34:16 AM  

Speaker2Animals: Lsherm:  Anyone with self-sufficient power and water who was well isolated from the rest of the world (rural) would last until the food ran out,
 
I would bet the food would still be there once Earth's surface reached ambient background temperature of 0.^A Kelvin. Only ones likely to survive much beyond a few days would be those in nuclear subs.


Thank you.  The longer he went on, the more stabby I was getting about ambient temperature.
 
2013-04-01 01:40:11 AM  

Benevolent Misanthrope: Speaker2Animals: Lsherm:  Anyone with self-sufficient power and water who was well isolated from the rest of the world (rural) would last until the food ran out,
 
I would bet the food would still be there once Earth's surface reached ambient background temperature of 0.^A Kelvin. Only ones likely to survive much beyond a few days would be those in nuclear subs.

Thank you.  The longer he went on, the more stabby I was getting about ambient temperature.


Geothermal might be able to provide enough heat for survival if you're lucky enough to be near a source (deep mine, volcano, etc.), but starvation would follow unless by some miracle underground farms of some kind were successfully cultivated (obviously using lifeforms not dependent on the sun).
 
2013-04-01 01:51:14 AM  
I'd have to switch to the Daily Fail as my primary source for English celebrity news?
 
2013-04-01 01:57:07 AM  

Sid_6.7: Benevolent Misanthrope: Speaker2Animals: Lsherm:  Anyone with self-sufficient power and water who was well isolated from the rest of the world (rural) would last until the food ran out,
 
I would bet the food would still be there once Earth's surface reached ambient background temperature of 0.^A Kelvin. Only ones likely to survive much beyond a few days would be those in nuclear subs.

Thank you.  The longer he went on, the more stabby I was getting about ambient temperature.

Geothermal might be able to provide enough heat for survival if you're lucky enough to be near a source (deep mine, volcano, etc.), but starvation would follow unless by some miracle underground farms of some kind were successfully cultivated (obviously using lifeforms not dependent on the sun).


How long would it take for the earth to cool to a temperature that would not support life, though?
 
2013-04-01 02:06:10 AM  

Benevolent Misanthrope: How long would it take for the earth to cool to a temperature that would not support life, though?


Billions of years? Probably at least millions. I believe the tidal action of the sun helps keep the middle churning, but it should still take a very long time to cool off. We're talking about the thermal inertia of the entire earth. And at least some of the heat is from radioactive decay, which would not be affected by the presence of the sun.
 
The simple lifeforms living around the black smokers in the abysses of the oceans should be fine for a very long time.
 
2013-04-01 03:09:06 AM  

Benevolent Misanthrope: How long would it take for the earth to cool to a temperature that would not support life, though?


Macrobiotic life? Not as long as you'd think. Microbes? I don't think some microbes can be killed by cold.
 
2013-04-01 04:46:34 AM  
Clearly, it's April Fool's day because that article is a joke. Here is the video.
 
2013-04-01 04:51:29 AM  
The exploding Tardis would keep us warm for a couple thousand years without the sun.
 
2013-04-01 05:15:46 AM  

BarkingUnicorn: Goddam, that guy's annoying. Couldn't stand it past 2 minutes.


THIS.
I was half-expecting him to start pulling out puppets.
 
2013-04-01 05:24:05 AM  

Benevolent Misanthrope: How long would it take for the earth to cool to a temperature that would not support life, though?

 
Billions of years. The interior of the earth is not warmed by the sun.
 
2013-04-01 05:29:04 AM  

Sid_6.7: Benevolent Misanthrope: How long would it take for the earth to cool to a temperature that would not support life, though?

Billions of years? Probably at least millions. I believe the tidal action of the sun helps keep the middle churning

 
You're thinking Io or Enceladus. The moon exerts more tidal friction on the earth than the sun does. Most of heat in the interior comes from radioactive decay. The rest of it comes from leftover heat from the formation of the earth.
 
2013-04-01 05:40:18 AM  

Ed Grubermann: Benevolent Misanthrope: How long would it take for the earth to cool to a temperature that would not support life, though?
 
Billions of years. The interior of the earth is not warmed by the sun.


and the exterior of the earth is not warmed by the interior. 
 
Sure some hot spots would still exist, but the a huge majority of the earths surface would be unlivable in a much shorter amount of time than that. I'm guessing more like days or weeks.
 
2013-04-01 05:57:59 AM  
We wouldn't have to worry about daylight saving time?
 
2013-04-01 06:19:05 AM  
Ants living near an elementary schools would no longer be terrorized by blinding beams of hot death?
 
2013-04-01 06:35:25 AM  
 
2013-04-01 06:37:05 AM  
THIS IS WHY WE NEED GLOBAL WARMING
 
2013-04-01 06:58:18 AM  
 

Dancis_Frake: BarkingUnicorn: Goddam, that guy's annoying. Couldn't stand it past 2 minutes.

THIS.
I was half-expecting him to start pulling out puppets.

 
I barely made it to 20 seconds. Which is a pity because I kinda wanted to hear about all the dying.
 
2013-04-01 07:03:28 AM  

Lsherm: Actually, people in cities would be first once the electricity shut off. They wouldn't even have transportation to leave.


Um, most transportation runs on fossil fuels.  You're thinking zombocalypse.  Most people will be fending off an increasing cold unless the food runs out first.  The result is likely to be mass pandemonium, but if someone could gather plant lights, crops, enough fuel and a generator and set up a hydroponic farm deep underground, one could subsist on fossil fuels for a while.  But such a hopeless existence is likely to result in suicide.  Otherwise, in this case humans will potentially be among the last species to go because of their dependence on fossil fuels.  If we don't annihilate ourselves with derp, probably only the critters around the aforementioned black smokers would beat us, as well as underground bacteria.
 
2013-04-01 07:12:14 AM  

log_jammin: Ed Grubermann: Benevolent Misanthrope: How long would it take for the earth to cool to a temperature that would not support life, though?
 
Billions of years. The interior of the earth is not warmed by the sun.

and the exterior of the earth is not warmed by the interior. 
 
Sure some hot spots would still exist, but the a huge majority of the earths surface would be unlivable in a much shorter amount of time than that. I'm guessing more like days or weeks.


I'm thinking temps globally would take a sharp and sudden drop for the first few hours/days until we got to something relative and then it would be a slow steady decline.
 
2013-04-01 07:43:04 AM  
Superman would be a giant pussy?
 
2013-04-01 07:54:24 AM  

Benevolent Misanthrope: Sid_6.7: Benevolent Misanthrope: Speaker2Animals: Lsherm:  Anyone with self-sufficient power and water who was well isolated from the rest of the world (rural) would last until the food ran out,
 
I would bet the food would still be there once Earth's surface reached ambient background temperature of 0.^A Kelvin. Only ones likely to survive much beyond a few days would be those in nuclear subs.

Thank you.  The longer he went on, the more stabby I was getting about ambient temperature.

Geothermal might be able to provide enough heat for survival if you're lucky enough to be near a source (deep mine, volcano, etc.), but starvation would follow unless by some miracle underground farms of some kind were successfully cultivated (obviously using lifeforms not dependent on the sun).

How long would it take for the earth to cool to a temperature that would not support life, though?


The cooling temperatures are only part of the problem.  Most life on earth depends on the sun for energy, either directly or indirectly, and that's not 'heat' energy.  Plant life would perish, and there goes our primary producers of food and oxygen.  I don't think human production with sunlamps would adequately offset that loss.
 
2013-04-01 08:56:35 AM  
media.comicvine.com
 
I thought this was pretty thoroughly covered in a research paper a few years ago...
 
2013-04-01 09:14:20 AM  
I would LOVE it if the Sun vanished.  What a crap assed tabloid.
 
2013-04-01 09:19:54 AM  
vanished or blocked out?
 
1.bp.blogspot.com
 
2013-04-01 09:26:13 AM  
Depends on if conservation of mass/energy is observed during this "disappearance" event.
 
2013-04-01 09:38:08 AM  
came for Sunshine references....
 
2013-04-01 09:42:13 AM  
Fark would lose a running joke. Duke would still suck though.
 
2013-04-01 09:47:22 AM  
 
2013-04-01 09:50:54 AM  
Then we'd switch to The Daily Mail. Duh.
 
2013-04-01 09:51:16 AM  
It would be weird that the night would then be brighter than the "day" thanks to the Moon.
 
2013-04-01 09:54:43 AM  
 
2013-04-01 09:56:23 AM  

dragonchild: Lsherm: Actually, people in cities would be first once the electricity shut off. They wouldn't even have transportation to leave.

 
Um, most transportation runs on fossil fuels.  You're thinking zombocalypse.  Most people will be fending off an increasing cold unless the food runs out first.  The result is likely to be mass pandemonium, but if someone could gather plant lights, crops, enough fuel and a generator and set up a hydroponic farm deep underground, one could subsist on fossil fuels for a while.  But such a hopeless existence is likely to result in suicide.  Otherwise, in this case humans will potentially be among the last species to go because of their dependence on fossil fuels.  If we don't annihilate ourselves with derp, probably only the critters around the aforementioned black smokers would beat us, as well as underground bacteria.
 
The zombocalypse would be great. You could do anything, the only limit would be your self.
 
2013-04-01 09:56:43 AM  

Lord Dimwit: It would be weird that the night would then be brighter than the "day" thanks to the Moon.


Except that night and day is not defined by the moon, but technically by the amount of light in the sky.
So moonrise would become the beginning of "night" and moonset would be the beginning of "day."
 
lol
 
2013-04-01 10:01:15 AM  

dragonchild: Most people will be fending off an increasing cold unless the food runs out first.


hmmmm
how long would it take to cool?
A huge amount of heat is generated from within the planet itself. As long as there is enough heat to keep the atmosphere vapor ... probably isnt.
 

dragonchild: Otherwise, in this case humans will potentially be among the last species to go because of their dependence on fossil fuels.


please.
all of the life which lives outside of the reach of the sun would still continue unabated. ocean thermal vents ecologies are oblivious to the rest of the solar-driven ecosystem.
 
plus in theory, we would have plenty of time ...
nah you are right, the mass panic would kill all the humans pretty quickly
 
2013-04-01 10:08:36 AM  

Lord Dimwit: It would be weird that the night would then be brighter than the "day" thanks to the Moon.


*chomp*

Since the moon reflects the sun, if the sun vanishes, the moon will also cease to shine.
 
2013-04-01 10:11:02 AM  

qorkfiend: Lord Dimwit: It would be weird that the night would then be brighter than the "day" thanks to the Moon.

*chomp*

Since the moon reflects the sun, if the sun vanishes, the moon will also cease to shine.


what was being referred to was that the moon would effectively block "some" starlight. causing it to be brighter when the moonset rather than the current brighter at night with the moon in the sky....
 
2013-04-01 10:16:57 AM  

namatad: qorkfiend: Lord Dimwit: It would be weird that the night would then be brighter than the "day" thanks to the Moon.

*chomp*

Since the moon reflects the sun, if the sun vanishes, the moon will also cease to shine.

what was being referred to was that the moon would effectively block "some" starlight. causing it to be brighter when the moonset rather than the current brighter at night with the moon in the sky....


I don't think so.

In any case, the moon would not block an appreciable amount of starlight, certainly not enough to draw a day vs. night distinction.
 
2013-04-01 10:20:48 AM  
So, life on Earth would survive for billions of years because of the geothermal vents at the bottom of the oceans and the heat from the Earth's core. If the sun disappeared without warning humanity would die out although people living in nuclear subs and in the ISS might be able to hold out for a little while. However, if we had advanced warning manufacturing facilities could be moved to areas with easy access to geothermal energy (e.g. Iceland, Yellowstone) and humanity could survive underground indefinitely.
 
2013-04-01 10:23:04 AM  
It seems to me that there would be about a 50/50 chance that our Moon would end up crashing into Earth at some point if the Earth was gravitationally let go from its orbit around the Sun. If the Moon was behind the Earth, then it seems like it would fly off on its own. If the Moon was ahead of the Earth when the Earth went off tangentially, then it seems like the Moon would end up running into the Earth.
 
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