If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(AZCentral)   It's been 80 years since the crash of the USS Akron and this article makes clear just how dangerous those airships were   (azcentral.com) divider line 70
    More: Interesting, USS Akron, Akron, Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst, life vests, naval air station, Hindenburg, control car  
•       •       •

13719 clicks; posted to Main » on 31 Mar 2013 at 8:17 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



70 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

Archived thread

First | « | 1 | 2 | » | Last | Show all
 
2013-03-31 03:55:41 PM  
Pics or it didn't happen!!!
 
2013-03-31 05:51:06 PM  
Here's what I don't get. You mount airplanes in it for launching, but it doesn't appear to have any way to get the airplane back in the zepplin. So, they fly until they run out of gas and crash?
 
2013-03-31 06:44:00 PM  

MadSkillz: So, they fly until they run out of gas and crash?


Grumman F9C Sparrowhawk.
 
2013-03-31 06:48:28 PM  
OK, which of you Farkers is writing for the Arizona Republic?

LAKEHURST, N.J. - History buffs will gather this week near the New Jersey coast to commemorate a major airship disaster.

No, not that one.

---------------------------------------------

The Goodyear Tire & Rubber Co. in Akron, Ohio, had been awarded a Navy contract in 1928 to build the Akron and a second rigid airship, the Macon. Construction of the Akron by the Goodyear-Zeppelin Corp. was completed in 1931.

Goodyear?

The worst...
 
2013-03-31 07:58:59 PM  
Now that we have much superior weather tracking, airships will make a comeback.
 
2013-03-31 08:19:31 PM  
Was it rigid?
 
2013-03-31 08:21:40 PM  
This was debunked on Mythbusters.
images4.wikia.nocookie.net
 
2013-03-31 08:24:01 PM  
LAKEHURST, N.J. - History buffs will gather this week near the New Jersey coast to commemorate a major airship disaster.
No, not that one.
Newsreel footage and radio announcer Herbert Morrison's plaintive cry, "Oh, the humanity!" made the 1937 explosion of the Hindenburg at the Lakehurst Naval Air Station probably the best-known crash of an airship.
But just four years earlier, a U.S. Navy airship seemingly jinxed from the start and later celebrated in song crashed only about 40 miles away, claiming more than twice as many lives.
The USS Akron, a 785-foot dirigible, was in its third year of flight when a violent storm sent it plunging tail-first into the Atlantic Ocean shortly after midnight on April 4, 1933.
"No broadcasters, no photographers, no big balls of fire, so who knew?" said Nick Rakoncza, a member of the Navy Lakehurst Historical Society. "Everybody thinks that the Hindenburg was the world's greatest (airship) disaster. It was not."
A ceremony to commemorate the 80th anniversary of the crash, the deadliest airship disaster on record, is being held Thursday at a veterans park where there is a tiny plaque dedicated to the victims. Below it is a small piece of metal from the airship.
Few in the area seemed to know about the disaster, let alone the memorial plaque; even a Navy officer sent on an underwater mission to explore the wreckage many years later had not heard of the Akron.
"It's almost a forgotten accident," said Rick Zitarosa, historian for the Navy Lakehurst Historical Society. "The Akron deserves to be remembered."
The Akron crashed off the community of Barnegat Light just a few hours after taking off from Lakehurst, killing 73 of the 76 men aboard, largely because the ship had no life vests and only one rubber raft, according to Navy records and the Navy Lakehurst Historical Society. They had been moved to another airship and were never replaced.
Lt. Cmdr. Herbert Wiley, Moody Erwin and Richard Deal were pulled from the frigid waters by a German tanker that had been nearby.
Erwin and Deal had been hanging on a fuel tank. Wiley was clinging to a board, according to an account he gave to a newspaper the next day.
In a newsreel interview, Wiley, standing next to the other survivors, said he was in the control car just before the crash. He said crew members could not see the ocean until they were about 300 feet above the water.
"The order was given to stand by for a crash," Wiley said. "The ship hit the water within 30 seconds of that order and most of us, I believe, we catapulted into the water."
Among the casualties was Rear Adm. William Moffett, the first chief of the Bureau of Navy Aeronautics.
When the wreckage was found, Zitarosa said, the airship had collapsed to about 25 feet in height. It had originally stood at about 150 feet.
"It was a catastrophic disintegration of the ship once it hit the water," Zitarosa said.
Part of the wreckage was lifted from the sea a few weeks after the accident.
The Goodyear Tire & Rubber Co. in Akron, Ohio, had been awarded a Navy contract in 1928 to build the Akron and a second rigid airship, the Macon. Construction of the Akron by the Goodyear-Zeppelin Corp. was completed in 1931.
It was plagued by problems from the start.
It was involved in three accidents before its final flight, including one in which its tail slammed into the ground several times. Another accident killed two sailors.
Some men who died in the Akron had survived the airship crash of the USS Shenandoah less than a year before.
A day after the Akron disaster, a blimp sent out to look for bodies malfunctioned and crashed in Barnegat Light, killing two more crew members.
A year later, Wiley was the commanding officer on the USS Macon when it was lost in a storm off of Port Sur, Calif., also killing two crew members. Wiley survived, but that was it for him and airships.
In June 2002, the Navy ordered a mission to explore the wreckage of the Akron. The NR-1 explored several hundred feet of debris 120 feet deep.
The officer of the NR-1 at the time, Dennis McKelvey, said that they could not see much of the wreckage through murky waters, but that some metal along the ocean floor resembled "ribs sticking out of the mud."
Even McKelvey, now a retired Navy captain, had not heard of the Akron disaster before he was dispatched to view the site.
"I had to go do my own research," McKelvey said. "I thought I would have learned about it at some point."


/Like fark this page needs javascript to load.
 
2013-03-31 08:24:30 PM  
What blows my mind is completely unprepared people were when it came to crossing the freakin Atlantic. Even after a few hundred years, there was never any urge to have lifevests or rafts on anything.
 
2013-03-31 08:25:17 PM  

Vodka Zombie: What blows my mind is completely unprepared people were when it came to crossing the freakin Atlantic. Even after a few hundred years, there was never any urge to have lifevests or rafts on anything.


Better to drown then to die of exposure.
 
2013-03-31 08:25:26 PM  

vossiewulf: MadSkillz: So, they fly until they run out of gas and crash?

Grumman F9C Sparrowhawk.

Most days end with me being dumber at the end of the day after a few hours lurking on Fark. This is not one of those days.
 
2013-03-31 08:34:11 PM  

fluffy2097: Better to drown then to die of exposure.


I'm too lazy to die twice, even if it's better.
 
2013-03-31 08:35:10 PM  
That's why you have to upgrade to the Delphinus.

/and because the Moonstone Cannon is ridiculous...
/always choose the dolphin bird flag
 
2013-03-31 08:42:23 PM  
+1 for mention of NR-1!

/NNPP contractor
 
2013-03-31 08:43:12 PM  

powhound: vossiewulf: MadSkillz: So, they fly until they run out of gas and crash?

Grumman F9C Sparrowhawk.
Most days end with me being dumber at the end of the day after a few hours lurking on Fark. This is not one of those days.


imgs.xkcd.com
 
2013-03-31 08:44:40 PM  
No Archer rigid airship picture?
 
2013-03-31 08:45:08 PM  
images.askmen.com
RIP AKON
 
2013-03-31 08:50:50 PM  

antidisestablishmentarianism: No Archer rigid airship picture?


sharetv.org
 
2013-03-31 08:51:02 PM  
Javascript must be enabled on your browser to view this site.

Actually I can view it just fine. It's just that I can't highlight anything or use any links, and you grayed it out and put that annoying box in the way. So no, I will not let your site use javascript.
 
2013-03-31 08:51:48 PM  
It makes me ache that we can't travel like this today

upload.wikimedia.org
Hindenberg promenade deck
 
2013-03-31 08:51:49 PM  
Lt. Cmdr. Herbert Wiley, Moody Erwin and Richard Deal were pulled from the frigid waters by a German tanker that had been nearby.

A year later, Wiley was the commanding officer on the USS Macon when it was lost in a storm off of Port Sur, Calif., also killing two crew members. Wiley survived, but that was it for him and airships.


I think the only person unluckier than Wiley was Tsutomu Yamaguchi.
 
2013-03-31 08:52:42 PM  
fluffy2097

Thanks.
 
2013-03-31 08:56:08 PM  
The Germans seemed to do fine till the Hindenburg. In all honesty, every time I'm in New Jersey I feel like bursting into flames.
 
2013-03-31 09:05:43 PM  

puckrock2000: Lt. Cmdr. Herbert Wiley, Moody Erwin and Richard Deal were pulled from the frigid waters by a German tanker that had been nearby.

A year later, Wiley was the commanding officer on the USS Macon when it was lost in a storm off of Port Sur, Calif., also killing two crew members. Wiley survived, but that was it for him and airships.

I think the only person unluckier than Wiley was Tsutomu Yamaguchi.


Wasn't there some woman who survived the Olympic, the Britannic, and the Titanic disasters?  A nurse or such?
 
2013-03-31 09:13:11 PM  
...Wondered what happened to LCDR Wiley, and lo, the Innertubes tells us: (from www.findagrave.com)

In 1932, Lt. Commander Wiley was appointed executive officer of the airship USS Akron. On April 4, 1933, the Akron crashed off the coast of New Jersey as a result of high winds, killing all but three men, with Wiley being the sole surviving officer among them. Also killed on the Akron was the chief of the airship program, Rear Admiral William Moffett. In 1934, Commander Wiley was appointed commanding officer of the Navy's last airship, USS Macon, a post he held until 1935, when the Macon crashed off the coast of California killing two members of her crew. With the outbreak of World War Two, Captain Wiley commanded a Destroyer squadron in the Pacific Theater until 1944, when he was appointed Captain of the USS West Virginia, a post he held until the end of the war. He retired at the rank of Rear Admiral in 1947.

This guy had a set of Unfeasibly Large Brass Ones.
 
2013-03-31 09:20:11 PM  
No ticket!

2.bp.blogspot.com
 
2013-03-31 09:21:00 PM  

AtlanticCoast63: ...Wondered what happened to LCDR Wiley, and lo, the Innertubes tells us: (from www.findagrave.com)

In 1932, Lt. Commander Wiley was appointed executive officer of the airship USS Akron. On April 4, 1933, the Akron crashed off the coast of New Jersey as a result of high winds, killing all but three men, with Wiley being the sole surviving officer among them. Also killed on the Akron was the chief of the airship program, Rear Admiral William Moffett. In 1934, Commander Wiley was appointed commanding officer of the Navy's last airship, USS Macon, a post he held until 1935, when the Macon crashed off the coast of California killing two members of her crew. With the outbreak of World War Two, Captain Wiley commanded a Destroyer squadron in the Pacific Theater until 1944, when he was appointed Captain of the USS West Virginia, a post he held until the end of the war. He retired at the rank of Rear Admiral in 1947.

This guy had a set of Unfeasibly Large Brass Ones.


Just couldn't kill that crazy coyote.
 
2013-03-31 09:22:24 PM  

wildsnowllama: The Germans seemed to do fine till the Hindenburg. In all honesty, every time I'm in New Jersey I feel like bursting into flames.


Yep, that's Noo Joisey for you.  Everybody who goes there gets the urge to make a complete ash of themselves.

/pardon me
//getting ready for april fool's tomorrow
 
2013-03-31 09:22:50 PM  
I don't think that's how blimps work
 
2013-03-31 09:25:28 PM  
OK, this is an oldie, but also a goodie...

What's the difference between the Hindenburg and Rush Limbaugh?

One's a flaming Nazi gasbag, and the other one's a dirigible.
 
2013-03-31 09:28:42 PM  
24.media.tumblr.com

JESUS! WANNA BLOW US ALL TO SHIAT, SHERLOCK?!
 
2013-03-31 09:33:54 PM  

Xanadone: puckrock2000: Lt. Cmdr. Herbert Wiley, Moody Erwin and Richard Deal were pulled from the frigid waters by a German tanker that had been nearby.

A year later, Wiley was the commanding officer on the USS Macon when it was lost in a storm off of Port Sur, Calif., also killing two crew members. Wiley survived, but that was it for him and airships.

I think the only person unluckier than Wiley was Tsutomu Yamaguchi.

Wasn't there some woman who survived the Olympic, the Britannic, and the Titanic disasters?  A nurse or such?


Violet Jessop
 
2013-03-31 09:43:49 PM  

vossiewulf: MadSkillz: So, they fly until they run out of gas and crash?

Grumman F9C Sparrowhawk.


I like this one better.

/Still a crazy-ass-idea
//You choose the hyphen
 
2013-03-31 09:44:26 PM  
www.activewin.com
 
2013-03-31 09:51:33 PM  
Quick, to the HindenPeter!
 
2013-03-31 09:56:07 PM  

phamwaa: vossiewulf: MadSkillz: So, they fly until they run out of gas and crash?

Grumman F9C Sparrowhawk.

I like this one better.

/Still a crazy-ass-idea
//You choose the hyphen


THAT thing was batshiat crazy. You ever see the video of them testing the recovery? It didn't go so well. Which is totally surprising in something ridiculously short with highly loaded wings and minimal control surfaces so that it's less stable than a Russian without vodak, operating in the turbulence from a giant bomber a few feet away with a bomb bay open and a giant air hook sticking out that's also going so slow that the Goblin is on the edge of stall.

The Sparrowhawk worked and was a decent plane to fly.
 
2013-03-31 09:56:51 PM  

wildsnowllama: The Germans seemed to do fine till the Hindenburg. In all honesty, every time I'm in New Jersey I feel like bursting into flames.


It depended who was flying the thing. Lehmann (for most of his career) and Eckener really knew how to do it. Others? Well, just look at how many Zeppelins/SL/Gross-Basenach airships they lost during WWI (and not all by being shot down) to see how well they were doing. Key thing was a healthy respect for the weather and anything else that could bring you down. And a lot of practice. Many of the German crews were put into airships with little or no training. No wonder they didn't make it far.
 
2013-03-31 10:02:48 PM  
We have a guy in our LDS ward (i.e. congregation) who served on the USS Macon... he's in his late 90's but still mentally sharp. He always tells jokes at church, and funny stories about the navy from that time.

My favorite story is how he was in line to enlist (or be sent somewhere, I don't remember the exact detail), then his girlfriend showed up, so he had a buddy keep his place in line, while went to a different floor with his girlfriend, got married, then got back in line.

His jokes are a bit dated though... He came up to me after church one day and said "Hey, do you know what the DMB on Italian warships stands for?" "no" "It stands for..Dats-a My Boat-a!" - I still don't know what the "DMB" really means...

After his 70th anniversary with his wife, someone asked him what his secret was, and he just said "Yes Dear."

Funny guy.
 
2013-03-31 10:18:33 PM  

ISO15693: We have a guy in our LDS ward (i.e. congregation) who served on the USS Macon... he's in his late 90's but still mentally sharp. He always tells jokes at church, and funny stories about the navy from that time.

My favorite story is how he was in line to enlist (or be sent somewhere, I don't remember the exact detail), then his girlfriend showed up, so he had a buddy keep his place in line, while went to a different floor with his girlfriend, got married, then got back in line.

His jokes are a bit dated though... He came up to me after church one day and said "Hey, do you know what the DMB on Italian warships stands for?" "no" "It stands for..Dats-a My Boat-a!" - I still don't know what the "DMB" really means...

After his 70th anniversary with his wife, someone asked him what his secret was, and he just said "Yes Dear."

Funny guy.


The man is supposed to say "whiskey".
 
2013-03-31 10:27:47 PM  
Off topic, but how can I configure no-script to beat this site's little black-out popup of "we need javascript for this site?"

I remember an update saying something about a shift click, but not sure what to do here other than F5+well timed escape.
 
2013-03-31 10:28:28 PM  
A day after the Akron disaster, a blimp sent out to look for bodies malfunctioned and crashed

Jesus freaking Christ.  Hey guys, turns out these blimp things are death traps.  What should we do?  Eh, go get another blimp out of the hangar and send it after the last one.
 
2013-03-31 10:32:38 PM  

Xyphoid: Off topic, but how can I configure no-script to beat this site's little black-out popup of "we need javascript for this site?"

I remember an update saying something about a shift click, but not sure what to do here other than F5+well timed escape.


Not sure about noscript, but I have ABP block these IDs:

handleJS
requiredBg
 
2013-03-31 10:42:26 PM  

ISO15693: I still don't know what the "DMB" really means


I've never heard of a DMB prefix for Italian naval vessels.  During the war they were prefixed by "RN" for "Regia Nave" (Royal Ship).  These days they don't use prefixes, although NATO will occasionally identify an Italian vessel as "ITS".
 
2013-03-31 10:58:35 PM  

MadSkillz: Here's what I don't get. You mount airplanes in it for launching, but it doesn't appear to have any way to get the airplane back in the zepplin. So, they fly until they run out of gas and crash?


 Those old biplanes could barely travel at highway speeds to begin with, and most had a stall speed low enough you could damn near outrun one a freaking bicycle when it was in a glide.
 Recovery of them was pretty easy, actually, they just matched speed with the dirigible, particularly easy in a headwind, and grabbed onto the skyhook. then after engine shutdown and securing the plane, the pilot just climbed up a rope ladder back into the airship. Rudimentary, but effective.
 
2013-03-31 11:05:42 PM  
Fly no airships in the Barnegat Light.
 
2013-03-31 11:25:15 PM  

HotWingAgenda: A day after the Akron disaster, a blimp sent out to look for bodies malfunctioned and crashed

Jesus freaking Christ.  Hey guys, turns out these blimp things are death traps.  What should we do?  Eh, go get another blimp out of the hangar and send it after the last one.


Now the object of this expedition is to see if we can find any traces of last year's expedition.
 
2013-03-31 11:25:20 PM  

UNC_Samurai: DMB


A quick google turned up nothing other than that joke for the Italian Navy...(Actually one other bad Italian Navy joke about the Admiral needing a glass bottom boat to inspect the fleet.) But it comes up for the German Coast Guard... 
The Deutscher Marinebund 
so there's that.
 
2013-03-31 11:33:16 PM  

Xyphoid: Off topic, but how can I configure no-script to beat this site's little black-out popup of "we need javascript for this site?"

I remember an update saying something about a shift click, but not sure what to do here other than F5+well timed escape.

 
Go to Noscript's options, click the "Advanced" tab, then the "Untrusted" sub-tab, and put a check in the "Hide <NOSCRIPT> elements" and "Forbid META redirections inside <NOSCRIPT> elements" checkboxes.
 
2013-03-31 11:44:20 PM  
ProdigalSigh:

They need another Crimson Skies game.
 
2013-03-31 11:58:52 PM  

UNC_Samurai: ISO15693: I still don't know what the "DMB" really means

 
I've never heard of a DMB prefix for Italian naval vessels.  During the war they were prefixed by "RN" for "Regia Nave" (Royal Ship).  These days they don't use prefixes, although NATO will occasionally identify an Italian vessel as "ITS".
 
The nearest I can find is perhaps the Italian version of "diretoria de material belico" (something like the department of war materials) like the that was used at one time by brazil... Googling is difficult because of the language issues, and all the results for "Dave Matthews Band' that crop up :/ I do find plenty of references to the same old joke though.
 
I can find google references for the Italian submarines DMB Pietro Calvi , DMB Antonio Sciesa   - so maybe it was for a class of subs... I dunno. Like I said, dated.
 
Displayed 50 of 70 comments

First | « | 1 | 2 | » | Last | Show all

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is archived, and closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »






Report