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(Marketwatch)   5 companies that guarantee many happy returns   (marketwatch.com) divider line 26
    More: Spiffy, lululemon  
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3722 clicks; posted to Business » on 31 Mar 2013 at 10:15 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-03-31 05:39:30 AM
Fail tag would be more appropriate, considering you can return anything short of a used motor vehicle to Kohl's or Home Depot.
 
2013-03-31 10:25:31 AM
...FWIW, a few years ago my dad was using a Craftsman adjustable wrench that his father had bought in the 30s, and one of the jaws broke.  Since Craftsman has always advertised a 'lifetime warranty', Dad figured what-the-hell and we took it to the nearest Sears.  Dad explained it to the hardware department manager, who took the broken wrench and came back a minute later with a brand new one.  Only question he ever asked was if he could send the broken one and a note to Craftsman.
 
2013-03-31 10:26:39 AM
Pennsylvania State stores are the best.  Walk in with an empty wine bottle and no receipt.  Tell them the wine was no good.  They then hand you the purchase price, no questions asked.
 
2013-03-31 10:27:43 AM

AtlanticCoast63: ...FWIW, a few years ago my dad was using a Craftsman adjustable wrench that his father had bought in the 30s, and one of the jaws broke.  Since Craftsman has always advertised a 'lifetime warranty', Dad figured what-the-hell and we took it to the nearest Sears.  Dad explained it to the hardware department manager, who took the broken wrench and came back a minute later with a brand new one.  Only question he ever asked was if he could send the broken one and a note to Craftsman.


My Craftsman power planer threw a belt last summer.  Went to Sears and they no longer make that model, so I had to throw it in the trash and buy a new one.
 
2013-03-31 10:33:50 AM

AtlanticCoast63: ...FWIW, a few years ago my dad was using a Craftsman adjustable wrench that his father had bought in the 30s, and one of the jaws broke.  Since Craftsman has always advertised a 'lifetime warranty', Dad figured what-the-hell and we took it to the nearest Sears.  Dad explained it to the hardware department manager, who took the broken wrench and came back a minute later with a brand new one.  Only question he ever asked was if he could send the broken one and a note to Craftsman.


Congrats on the new wrench that will only last 3 years.

Companies don't make good products anymore. Its not about the initial sale, its about repeat customers.

Parents finally replaced their hot water heater a few years ago. It had been working fine since the 1960s before it finally went. When they got the new one, they asked frtrhe same brand, only to be told that company went out of business because they didn't get repeat business since their stuff never broke.
 
2013-03-31 11:08:58 AM
As an online retailer I think I have a fairly good return policy. Because it's someone else's responsibility. I never want to hear from a farking customer ever again. I try to deliver value and a reasonable level of quality but some of you SOB's don't read the descriptions.

Oh, and I know a few of you farkers have returned different books. If the warehouse elves didn't have you return things UPS you'd be up for mail fraud.
 
2013-03-31 11:10:47 AM
Not an ad?

/getting insulting
 
2013-03-31 11:25:04 AM
CSB. When working in a Canadian consumer electronics chain, we would routinely have people "rent" electronics (ie: buy it, use it for a one-time event, return it), but given that there was no way we could actually prove this, in a lot of cases, we had to accept the return. One time though, we had someone try to "return" a DVD player, but since we check all the packages, what they did was repackage an old VCR in the hopes we wouldn't figure it out.
 
2013-03-31 11:49:32 AM
Lululemon makes almost all of their money selling $150 pairs of exercise pants to upper-middle class white women in their 30's so they feel better about their jiggly asses when attempting to do yoga at their $50 a session yoga/pilates studios while comparing their clothes to other women's.  Good on Lululemon for allowing these vain, fussy individuals to easily return their unnecessary purchases.
 
2013-03-31 12:12:12 PM
"Supermarkets typically allow shoppers to get a full refund for products they bought and opened, but didn't like, says Dworsky."

I've found supermarkets to be the worst places to return items and that's when the item is defective or spoiled, I've never tried to return an item I simply didn't like.
 
2013-03-31 12:38:22 PM

LemSkroob: Congrats on the new wrench that will only last 3 years.

Companies don't make good products anymore. Its not about the initial sale, its about repeat customers.


Craftsman is able to offer those lifetime warranty's because of their excessive markup coupled with the fact that people tend to lose/misplace hand tools more often than they break them.
 
2013-03-31 02:16:40 PM
The company I work for is:

Within 90 days AND a receipt - Cash back/refund on card
After 90 days or no receipt or a gift receipt - Store credit but never expires
Anything else up to 3 years - Store credit

I thought that was pretty generous considering the majority of inventory is small (less than $20) items.
 
2013-03-31 02:55:47 PM
Freezer Joe's has a great return policy, you don't even need a receipt. Which makes sense, it's not like you can buy Trader Jose's guacamole or whatever with that packaging anywhere else.
 
2013-03-31 04:10:03 PM

LemSkroob: AtlanticCoast63: ...FWIW, a few years ago my dad was using a Craftsman adjustable wrench that his father had bought in the 30s, and one of the jaws broke.  Since Craftsman has always advertised a 'lifetime warranty', Dad figured what-the-hell and we took it to the nearest Sears.  Dad explained it to the hardware department manager, who took the broken wrench and came back a minute later with a brand new one.  Only question he ever asked was if he could send the broken one and a note to Craftsman.

Congrats on the new wrench that will only last 3 years.

Companies don't make good products anymore. Its not about the initial sale, its about repeat customers.

Parents finally replaced their hot water heater a few years ago. It had been working fine since the 1960s before it finally went. When they got the new one, they asked frtrhe same brand, only to be told that company went out of business because they didn't get repeat business since their stuff never broke.


They are also requiring receipts now for replacement. Make sure you copy it, because the print will fade in about 6 mos, if you're lucky.

/mechanic, grumbled when she heard this one, would rather buy Snap-On anyway
//have a Snap-on torque wrench older than she is that is still perfectly calibrated
 
2013-03-31 04:12:20 PM

Snarcoleptic_Hoosier: The company I work for is:

Within 90 days AND a receipt - Cash back/refund on card
After 90 days or no receipt or a gift receipt - Store credit but never expires
Anything else up to 3 years - Store credit

I thought that was pretty generous considering the majority of inventory is small (less than $20) items.


90 days seems like a stretch to me but 3 years? What kind of store is this?
 
2013-03-31 05:35:18 PM

ReapTheChaos: Snarcoleptic_Hoosier: The company I work for is:

Within 90 days AND a receipt - Cash back/refund on card
After 90 days or no receipt or a gift receipt - Store credit but never expires
Anything else up to 3 years - Store credit

I thought that was pretty generous considering the majority of inventory is small (less than $20) items.

90 days seems like a stretch to me but 3 years? What kind of store is this?


i'm thinking produce or a farmers market.
 
2013-03-31 05:43:24 PM

ReapTheChaos: Snarcoleptic_Hoosier: The company I work for is:

Within 90 days AND a receipt - Cash back/refund on card
After 90 days or no receipt or a gift receipt - Store credit but never expires
Anything else up to 3 years - Store credit

I thought that was pretty generous considering the majority of inventory is small (less than $20) items.

90 days seems like a stretch to me but 3 years? What kind of store is this?


Home housewares with a massively rotating inventory system. Lots of brands redesign their utensils every 9-12 months, so lots of rotating inventory. Three years is approximately the time that corporate determined an item goes from new to in stock to on sale to clearance to phased out, mostly so new items can take the existing inventory numbers.

One example was Kitchenaid had a set of red nylon tools (which have been replaced with black nylon and stainless steel) that we carried before I got hired. My store has since sold the last of the red clearance tools, but a memo came through requiring that all existing inventory was to be phased out and destroyed by a certain date so the official company count would be zero.
 
2013-03-31 06:15:12 PM

Snarcoleptic_Hoosier: ReapTheChaos: Snarcoleptic_Hoosier: The company I work for is:

Within 90 days AND a receipt - Cash back/refund on card
After 90 days or no receipt or a gift receipt - Store credit but never expires
Anything else up to 3 years - Store credit

I thought that was pretty generous considering the majority of inventory is small (less than $20) items.

90 days seems like a stretch to me but 3 years? What kind of store is this?

Home housewares with a massively rotating inventory system. Lots of brands redesign their utensils every 9-12 months, so lots of rotating inventory. Three years is approximately the time that corporate determined an item goes from new to in stock to on sale to clearance to phased out, mostly so new items can take the existing inventory numbers.

One example was Kitchenaid had a set of red nylon tools (which have been replaced with black nylon and stainless steel) that we carried before I got hired. My store has since sold the last of the red clearance tools, but a memo came through requiring that all existing inventory was to be phased out and destroyed by a certain date so the official company count would be zero.


It would never cross my mind to return kitchen utensils after three years. I would consider I got my money's worth by that point. Hell, beyond 30 days I simply toss stuff in the trash and chalk it up as a loss unless it's a major appliance or electronics item.
 
2013-03-31 06:17:30 PM

ReapTheChaos: Snarcoleptic_Hoosier: ReapTheChaos: Snarcoleptic_Hoosier: The company I work for is:

Within 90 days AND a receipt - Cash back/refund on card
After 90 days or no receipt or a gift receipt - Store credit but never expires
Anything else up to 3 years - Store credit

I thought that was pretty generous considering the majority of inventory is small (less than $20) items.

90 days seems like a stretch to me but 3 years? What kind of store is this?

Home housewares with a massively rotating inventory system. Lots of brands redesign their utensils every 9-12 months, so lots of rotating inventory. Three years is approximately the time that corporate determined an item goes from new to in stock to on sale to clearance to phased out, mostly so new items can take the existing inventory numbers.

One example was Kitchenaid had a set of red nylon tools (which have been replaced with black nylon and stainless steel) that we carried before I got hired. My store has since sold the last of the red clearance tools, but a memo came through requiring that all existing inventory was to be phased out and destroyed by a certain date so the official company count would be zero.

It would never cross my mind to return kitchen utensils after three years. I would consider I got my money's worth by that point. Hell, beyond 30 days I simply toss stuff in the trash and chalk it up as a loss unless it's a major appliance or electronics item.


It's more along the lines of dealing with stuff we no longer carry, but still remain in the system. If something was in clearance for 2 years and gets bought during Christmas, then returned in January, the person doing the return may not know how long we've had it.
 
2013-03-31 11:11:38 PM
Make that 6 companies
 
a2.ec-images.myspacecdn.com
 
2013-04-01 01:38:34 AM

valkore: Lululemon makes almost all of their money selling $150 pairs of exercise pants to upper-middle class white women in their 30's so they feel better about their jiggly asses when attempting to do yoga at their $50 a session yoga/pilates studios while comparing their clothes to other women's.  Good on Lululemon for allowing these vain, fussy individuals to easily return their unnecessary purchases.


i've seen some in shape young women wearing these at the supermarket. it makes me feel much better about the high price of groceries.
 
2013-04-01 10:50:32 AM

KrispyKritter: i've seen some in shape young women wearing these at the supermarket. it makes me feel much better about the high price of groceries.


Careful, those pants are essentially Spanx for thighs and asses.  Instead of controlling a rampant FUPA or fat under the arms, it's shaping the butt into looking like something it's not.  False advertising.  The cake is a lie.
 
2013-04-01 02:51:36 PM
No love for Newegg?
 
2013-04-01 03:59:45 PM
No mention of REI?  That's a FAIL.
 
2013-04-01 10:37:27 PM
I just bought a chest freezer and a twin mattress at Costco, so I really got a kick.
 
2013-04-02 08:56:12 AM
Say what you want, WalMart has the best return policy ever.  They'll basically take anything back, receipt or not.
 
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