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(Popular Science)   Something is killing half of America's bees. Looks like Davros is trying to steal the planet again   (popsci.com) divider line 48
    More: Scary, disappearing bees, beekeepers, bees, half, hives, honeybees  
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2002 clicks; posted to Geek » on 30 Mar 2013 at 2:22 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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ZAZ [TotalFark]
2013-03-30 09:58:10 AM  
Half of honey bees. There are still thousands of species of native bees. Look low to the ground in the woods of New England this time of year and you may find a variety of hairy yellowish-brown and black Andrena with bare, red-and-black Nomada following them around.
 
2013-03-30 10:32:30 AM  
Friggin gays, now they are killing the bees. Has their depravity no end?
 
2013-03-30 10:38:28 AM  

ZAZ: Half of honey bees. There are still thousands of species of native bees. Look low to the ground in the woods of New England this time of year and you may find a variety of hairy yellowish-brown and black Andrena with bare, red-and-black Nomada following them around.


When honey costs $30/oz, be sure to thank your corporate overlords at Monsanto, citizen.
 
2013-03-30 11:12:40 AM  
Again???
 
2013-03-30 11:14:19 AM  

vudutek: ZAZ: Half of honey bees. There are still thousands of species of native bees. Look low to the ground in the woods of New England this time of year and you may find a variety of hairy yellowish-brown and black Andrena with bare, red-and-black Nomada following them around.

When honey costs $30/oz, be sure to thank your corporate overlords at Monsanto, citizen.


I'll just buy Honeyette, made from the pure goodness of corn sugar*.

*NOW WITH 20 PERCENT MORE HONEY FLAVOR
 
2013-03-30 11:40:02 AM  
Which reminds me: has anyone seen the Lost Moon of Poosh?
 
2013-03-30 12:16:29 PM  
I wish we could figure out what's going on and then manipulate it to kill off these invasive stink bugs!
 
2013-03-30 12:20:05 PM  

vudutek: When honey costs $30/oz, be sure to thank your corporate overlords at Monsanto, citizen.


Oh, good.  Guy on Internet has found the cause!
 
2013-03-30 12:31:33 PM  
Who'd want Clom?
 
2013-03-30 12:34:17 PM  
Being kept in a dog's mouth can be a traumatic experience for bees.
 
2013-03-30 01:15:06 PM  
To the Beemobile!
 
2013-03-30 01:26:21 PM  

Angry Drunk Bureaucrat: Which reminds me: has anyone seen the Lost Moon of Poosh?


Donna Doctor found it.
 
2013-03-30 01:41:53 PM  

King Something: Who'd want Clom?


Angry Drunk Bureaucrat: Which reminds me: has anyone seen the Lost Moon of Poosh?


I'm glad you can all joke about it, but this is serious bees-ness.

:/
 
2013-03-30 02:09:45 PM  

King Something: Who'd want Clom?




Certainly not the Raxacoricofallapatorians.
 
2013-03-30 02:16:40 PM  
oh this again?
 
2013-03-30 02:25:14 PM  
Should be labeled "Monsanto Bee Extinction". But they'll probably send drones after any scientists that speak of it.
 
2013-03-30 02:31:57 PM  
fastanddirty.ca
 
2013-03-30 02:36:48 PM  
In other news, Monsanto recently announced the Api-Nic™ patented neonicotinoid-resistant bee product.
 
2013-03-30 02:50:25 PM  
I'm not worried. After the honey bees go extinct we can use their DNA to create new ones!

.....and this time I'll make them smarter, faster, bigger and able to make choco-honey directly from their butts!
 
2013-03-30 02:51:50 PM  
thanks Bayer Aspirin, which makes an extremely bee-unfriendly pesticide
 
2013-03-30 03:20:44 PM  
Wanted for questioning

collider.com
 
2013-03-30 03:31:24 PM  
Poor Eric. Bisected accidentally.
 
2013-03-30 03:44:25 PM  
Okay this has been happening for like eight Goddamn years, but every year shiatty science bloggers trot it out like it's some new shiat like a 14-year old telling me about Led Zeppelin.
 
2013-03-30 03:45:17 PM  
I thought Pyrovillia was a closed case.
 
2013-03-30 04:04:28 PM  

vudutek: ZAZ: Half of honey bees. There are still thousands of species of native bees. Look low to the ground in the woods of New England this time of year and you may find a variety of hairy yellowish-brown and black Andrena with bare, red-and-black Nomada following them around.

When honey costs $30/oz, be sure to thank your corporate overlords at Monsanto, citizen.


Not just honey, but every flowering fruit and nut.
 
2013-03-30 04:28:32 PM  

RedVentrue: vudutek: ZAZ: Half of honey bees. There are still thousands of species of native bees. Look low to the ground in the woods of New England this time of year and you may find a variety of hairy yellowish-brown and black Andrena with bare, red-and-black Nomada following them around.

When honey costs $30/oz, be sure to thank your corporate overlords at Monsanto, citizen.

Not just honey, but every flowering fruit and nut.


Nuts flower?
/stumped!
 
2013-03-30 04:39:08 PM  

Stile4aly: I thought Pyrovillia was a closed case.


Cold case. Big difference.
 
2013-03-30 04:57:44 PM  
 
ZAZ [TotalFark]
2013-03-30 05:23:40 PM  
Christian Bale: Nuts flower?

Walnut flowers: http://innajam.blogspot.com/2009/05/female-walnut-flowers.html.
 
2013-03-30 06:29:37 PM  
It's obviously because plants have become aware of us because of global warming and are releasing toxic spores into th air to make us commit suicide! It's hopeless! I, a random biology teacher, will have to flee north with Zooey Deschanel while being chased by the wind and M. Night Shamalon... For some reason. But it is hopeless as there is no escape from our new plant overlords... Except for, like a gas mask or a dust mask or a surgical mask.
 
2013-03-30 07:16:18 PM  
 
2013-03-30 07:47:48 PM  
Eh? I thought we'd discovered early this year that it's quite probably the neonicotinoids. The Wiki page talks about the European Food Safety Admin looking at it, and a bunch of people are suing the American EPA over it. No action yet though. I figure they'll still use the neonicotinoids for at least another two full years before anyone gets around to maybe possibly suggesting we stop. We've been using the damn things for 50 years or more, now.
 
2013-03-30 08:16:04 PM  

Aidan: Eh? I thought we'd discovered early this year that it's quite probably the neonicotinoids. The Wiki page talks about the European Food Safety Admin looking at it, and a bunch of people are suing the American EPA over it. No action yet though. I figure they'll still use the neonicotinoids for at least another two full years before anyone gets around to maybe possibly suggesting we stop. We've been using the damn things for 50 years or more, now.


FTW: Although these low level exposures do not normally kill bees directly, they may impact some bees' ability to forage for nectar, learn and remember where flowers are located, and possibly impair their ability to find their way home to the nest or hive.

Yeah, well, they could get around that by writing things down instead of relying on interpretive dance for communication.
 
2013-03-30 09:03:34 PM  

Baron Bear: Stile4aly: I thought Pyrovillia was a closed case.

Cold case. Big difference.


I knew that. I had a dumb and forgot how to brain.
 
2013-03-30 09:28:40 PM  

Aidan: Eh? I thought we'd discovered early this year that it's quite probably the neonicotinoids. The Wiki page talks about the European Food Safety Admin looking at it, and a bunch of people are suing the American EPA over it. No action yet though. I figure they'll still use the neonicotinoids for at least another two full years before anyone gets around to maybe possibly suggesting we stop. We've been using the damn things for 50 years or more, now.


Wikipedia says (I know, I know) that it's only been recently used since the 80's.

Where have you seen that it's been 50?

Is it just honey bees or all the bees (knees)?
 
2013-03-30 09:35:23 PM  
That's ok!

Completely by coincidence, Monsanto's GM Bees just happen to be finishing up their patent approval

Their proprietary bees will be made available for pollination contracts to both commercial, state and civilian entities for a very reasonable and competitive price.
 
2013-03-30 10:14:02 PM  

White_Scarf_Syndrome: Aidan: Eh? I thought we'd discovered early this year that it's quite probably the neonicotinoids. The Wiki page talks about the European Food Safety Admin looking at it, and a bunch of people are suing the American EPA over it. No action yet though. I figure they'll still use the neonicotinoids for at least another two full years before anyone gets around to maybe possibly suggesting we stop. We've been using the damn things for 50 years or more, now.

Wikipedia says (I know, I know) that it's only been recently used since the 80's.

Where have you seen that it's been 50?

Is it just honey bees or all the bees (knees)?


Whoops. First new class of insecticides in the last 50 years. I'm not good with remembering numbers. :\

There seems to be the implication that neonicotinoids affect all animals, but especially insects more than mammals (which is why it was used). I get the impression that the stuff is building up in the soil/on plants in certain conditions that cause trouble for bees. If built-up more, I assume more insects would be affected? Eh.
 
2013-03-30 11:27:53 PM  
so long and thanks for the honey
 
2013-03-31 01:04:09 AM  

Aidan: White_Scarf_Syndrome: Aidan: Eh? I thought we'd discovered early this year that it's quite probably the neonicotinoids. The Wiki page talks about the European Food Safety Admin looking at it, and a bunch of people are suing the American EPA over it. No action yet though. I figure they'll still use the neonicotinoids for at least another two full years before anyone gets around to maybe possibly suggesting we stop. We've been using the damn things for 50 years or more, now.

Wikipedia says (I know, I know) that it's only been recently used since the 80's.

Where have you seen that it's been 50?

Is it just honey bees or all the bees (knees)?

Whoops. First new class of insecticides in the last 50 years. I'm not good with remembering numbers. :\

There seems to be the implication that neonicotinoids affect all animals, but especially insects more than mammals (which is why it was used). I get the impression that the stuff is building up in the soil/on plants in certain conditions that cause trouble for bees. If built-up more, I assume more insects would be affected? Eh.


Aren't neonicotinoids just a nicotine derivative?
 
2013-03-31 02:35:01 AM  
img.abc.lv
 
2013-03-31 02:48:05 AM  

The Beatings Will Continue Until Morale Improves: Aidan: White_Scarf_Syndrome: Aidan: Eh? I thought we'd discovered early this year that it's quite probably the neonicotinoids. The Wiki page talks about the European Food Safety Admin looking at it, and a bunch of people are suing the American EPA over it. No action yet though. I figure they'll still use the neonicotinoids for at least another two full years before anyone gets around to maybe possibly suggesting we stop. We've been using the damn things for 50 years or more, now.

Wikipedia says (I know, I know) that it's only been recently used since the 80's.

Where have you seen that it's been 50?

Is it just honey bees or all the bees (knees)?

Whoops. First new class of insecticides in the last 50 years. I'm not good with remembering numbers. :\

There seems to be the implication that neonicotinoids affect all animals, but especially insects more than mammals (which is why it was used). I get the impression that the stuff is building up in the soil/on plants in certain conditions that cause trouble for bees. If built-up more, I assume more insects would be affected? Eh.

Aren't neonicotinoids just a nicotine derivative?


No
They're synthesized chemical compounds with "active ends" that act like nicotine.  If you think in terms of barbituates the synthetic ones are almost always more potent than the refined ones even though the refined ones also give a wider spectrum of comfort and relief.
You can't really patent the chemical result from refinement or process breakdown from a natural compound but if all you want is a razor blade instead of a razor sharp axe, its pretty easy to just make razor blades.

Keep in mind, when Bees come in contact with neonictinoids it is because the chemicals were incorrectly applied.  We are NOT allowed to use them on plants that are in flower.
 
2013-03-31 02:51:21 AM  
The solution to this is to petition to ban homeowner use of neonictinoids and increase support of regulation and EDUCATION about pest control procedures and laws.
I swear if I charged minimum wage to customers and random passer-by for educating them I'd make twice as much money as I do spraying people's lawns, basements and houses.


When I DO have to kill bees, I use Bifenthrin on a xylene carrier.
 
2013-03-31 03:04:42 AM  
You know what we all forgot, right?

www.belch.com
 
2013-03-31 06:39:13 AM  

prjindigo: regulation


It boggles the mind that I can't go down to Home Depot and buy some fertilizer for July 4'th party poppers, but they practically throw all manner of pesticides and herbicides at you. I'm sure ricin will kill some sort of bug out there, when can I hop over to Lowes and pick up a can?

Although it is nice that I still can mosey on over and pick up a bottle of stump remover, no questions asked. Nothing quite like making homemade black powder.
 
2013-04-01 09:44:30 AM  
My GMO Neonicotinoid-Ready(tm) Monsanto brand bees seem to be doing fine.
 
2013-04-01 03:43:09 PM  
How about we figure out whatever is killing the bees and instead of fixing it, use it against yellow jackets? Spring is coming and yet again I'll be waging a war to keep them from creating a colony in my garden shed.

Yes, I know in theory I should be able to just knock out the mother hive, but short of burning my neighbors' houses doesn't seem like a viable solution.
 
2013-04-01 04:25:16 PM  
Beepocalypse, Beejesus...etc, etc and so on.

Pretty sure we had this conversation in 2007 and some hack writer from a Kansas newspaper stole the content for his story.

Or I could have been drunk.

Or both.
 
2013-04-01 06:35:21 PM  
a bunch of buzz of nothingness...
 
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