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(Bon Appetit)   Official forager for celebrity chef Daniel Boloud says ramps are SO over, and that cool people are foraging for garlic mustard and purslane to kick their dishes up a notch   (bonappetit.com) divider line 42
    More: Strange, TMW, celebrity chef, corporate lawyers, corporate law, Michelin Guide, health food store, foraging, native plants  
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1732 clicks; posted to Entertainment » on 29 Mar 2013 at 2:34 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-03-29 02:33:38 PM
wtf is ramp?
 
2013-03-29 02:35:36 PM

SlothB77: wtf is ramp?


The state vegetable of west Virginia.
 
2013-03-29 02:43:41 PM
She never said anything bad about ramps - it's the azzhats who pull every single bulb and leave nothing to replenish next season.  You should never pick them all.  It's the same thing that happens with wild ginseng.  Rednecks will go in and pick everything and an already rare plant becomes even more so.
 
2013-03-29 02:45:05 PM
Thread is useless without the spice weasel.....
 
2013-03-29 02:46:58 PM

SlothB77: wtf is ramp?

www.gourmet.com
 
2013-03-29 02:48:39 PM
I'll kill everyone in this thread for some sweet, sweet fiddleheads.
 
2013-03-29 02:50:28 PM
It's what the French call Nostalgie de la Boue: a fond yearning for the mud.  Two things have to be in place to really appreciate this particular brand of gluttony posing as asceticism.   First, you have to have endured years of plenty, the mud a long distant, nearly forgotten memory.   One must have decades of such surfeit under your belt that you have been fortunate enough to grow sick of it all. (Using this economic model, Russians thirty years hence might pose less of a threat to the imperiled world supply of Versace and sequins.)  And second - and this is what really seperates the the men from the boys - in order to maintain a life free of clutter and suitable for sacred space, you'll need another room to hide your shiat.

-- David Rackoff
 
2013-03-29 02:55:59 PM

SlothB77: wtf is ramp?


wild onion-like things with a smell you can't easily get rid of.
 
2013-03-29 03:04:08 PM

MylesHeartVodak: She never said anything bad about ramps - it's the azzhats who pull every single bulb and leave nothing to replenish next season.  You should never pick them all.  It's the same thing that happens with wild ginseng.  Rednecks will go in and pick everything and an already rare plant becomes even more so.



Unfortunately there's no danger of that happening with Garlic Mustard -- it's everywhere in Wisconsin. Literally everywhere. And each plant produces a couple hundred seeds, each of which lasts for years in the soil. There's no getting rid of that stuff...
 
2013-03-29 03:05:58 PM

phaseolus: Literally everywher

e where there's dirt and sunlight

fixed. You're not going to find it in basements, of course...
 
2013-03-29 03:15:38 PM
Ramps are going for $15 a pound now, when I first tried them a few years back they seemed pricey at $4 a pound.
 
2013-03-29 03:46:56 PM

theorellior: I'll kill everyone in this thread for some sweet, sweet fiddleheads.


Or puffball, sliced and fried up with butter and some garlic.
 
2013-03-29 03:54:40 PM

MylesHeartVodak: She never said anything bad about ramps - it's the azzhats who pull every single bulb and leave nothing to replenish next season.  You should never pick them all.  It's the same thing that happens with wild ginseng.  Rednecks will go in and pick everything and an already rare plant becomes even more so.


They did it with goldenseal in some areas.
 
2013-03-29 04:13:31 PM
Here in Quebec, it's a protected species. You can harvest it from private land for your own use, but you can't sell it or serve it in restaurants. Of course, one can poach it and sell it across the border in Ontario, like we rednecks are wont to do.
 
2013-03-29 04:17:42 PM
Garlic Mustard?

No.

Poison that plant to death, and wipe it away.
 
2013-03-29 04:32:46 PM
official forager...

I kind of find that odd, in a way. like downsizing to a smaller mansion, or driving a hybrid SUV.
 
2013-03-29 05:29:10 PM

docmattic: theorellior: I'll kill everyone in this thread for some sweet, sweet fiddleheads.

Or puffball, sliced and fried up with butter and some garlic.


mmmm --- i work out in the woods all summer in north alberta and i love collecting fiddleheads. Last time i had them i tossed wild violet petals into the mix after and it ended up being a big pile of lucious green circles with little indigo stars glistening here  and there. Wow. I may have gone 10 days straight without seeing another human face but i had my food. And nobody to share it with and that was good and also a bummer. With butter and a dash of lemon juice? hell yeah. The puff balls too -- try roasting them on a stick like you would a marshmallow. Try roasting them and then dipping them in garlic butter and then try dipping them in garlic butter and roasting them.

Blanche dandelion leaves are great -- just put a box over the young leaves and harvest once they turn white. The roots aren't too bad either. Cow parsnip is really good if you prep it right -- it tastes like anise and celery and carrot all mixed together. idiots will confuse it with water hemlock though so dont be an idiot and make sure you can identify a plant before you eat it.

I have a thing about identifying plants and knowing what i can use medicinally or for food...  My favorite is teas. Hemp nettle tea is actually weird stuff. It honest to god has some sort of mood elevator in it. It WILL cheer you up and it tastes almost exactly like store bought green tea... Wild mint, Lab tea, Pyrola leaves, wild rasberry leaves and wild strawberry root....

Foraging is fun stuff. I hate jogging or running on paths so instead to stay in shape i grab a side bag and gloves and go for walks straight trough the heavy bush and i collect stuff when i come across it. A few containers and its easy to sit for a few mins and pick through a berry bush or a mint patch or collect rose petals for homemade rosewater... Its a good workout with all the under and over trees and scrub brush up to your hip. I like it because as i said i have a thing for herbalism and i get bored just walking to a destination and back. I live at the bottom of a valley thats about 1000 feet in elevation change from bottom to top. Going to the top and back down is a good workout...

sphotos-g.ak.fbcdn.net

And whens the last time you got to see something like this on your walk?
\Yes i take a shovel -- best walking stick i ever  had.
 
2013-03-29 05:50:33 PM
This is a fad now? You know it's funny but i keep see all of these trends. Eat local, canning, pickling, gardens, chickens in the backyard, etc. All of this stuff we did when I was growing up in the country. We had two areas where we knew morels grew so when it was season we would go pick them. We also would get the wild berries and whatever else grew around us. We did all of this because one we were poor and couldn't afford much, and two there isn't much else to do out in the sticks. For all this time I had no idea that growing up poor white trash meant I was hip and cool. I wish i knew that when all those city kids used to laugh at us farmers that they would be paying big money some day for the very things they laughed at us for...
 
2013-03-29 05:52:47 PM
I have a purslane problem in my gravel driveway.  That shiat is everywhere.  Sneaky bastard.
 
2013-03-29 06:05:50 PM
I like purslane and pick it outta every place I find it when it shows up.

It grows outta the damn sidewalks here and I got a park next door.

Little saute, a little pepper, as it doesn't really need salt and I go to town on a mess of that stuff.

And dammit now I gotta go look for some.
 
2013-03-29 06:11:41 PM
Oh....mikefinch, would that be "hemp nettle" as in Galeopsis?

If it's a mood elevator I'd like to try some, if I can get it.
 
2013-03-29 06:17:59 PM

MylesHeartVodak: She never said anything bad about ramps - it's the azzhats who pull every single bulb and leave nothing to replenish next season.  You should never pick them all.  It's the same thing that happens with wild ginseng.  Rednecks will go in and pick everything and an already rare plant becomes even more so.


You could always grow your own. (Which I am doing)

Besides, I thought the in thing now is microgreens and mache(corn salad).

//Waiting for chickweed and cowslip to become the "in" thing.
 
2013-03-29 06:18:02 PM

Tellingthem: This is a fad now? You know it's funny but i keep see all of these trends. Eat local, canning, pickling, gardens, chickens in the backyard, etc. All of this stuff we did when I was growing up in the country. We had two areas where we knew morels grew so when it was season we would go pick them. We also would get the wild berries and whatever else grew around us. We did all of this because one we were poor and couldn't afford much, and two there isn't much else to do out in the sticks. For all this time I had no idea that growing up poor white trash meant I was hip and cool. I wish i knew that when all those city kids used to laugh at us farmers that they would be paying big money some day for the very things they laughed at us for...


Yup -- I do stuff like canning and grow a garden because thats what i grew up with. Picking saskatoons in the valley and then grandma would make her killer saskatoon pie (the best pie. by far.) We had chickens and we would give cartons away to neighbors and stuff. Our garden took up an acre and a half and that still left half the garden fallow.

My family was mainly farming grain but my wife grew up nearby and her family was beef and sheep. They had chickens for eggs and meat, they grew their own beef -- her parents are dutch so they garden like pros, and her dad managed the dairy her and her brothers worked at so they always had a 5 gallon pail of fresh raw milk in the basement. Oh -- and one of her bothers worked at the apiary so they always had free honey. Her bro brings us tins of honey from each individual hive and you can taste the difference in the field they came from. I kid you not our honey comes in white containers with a sticker noting the apiary name and the lot number and legal land description written in sharpie on it. You can taste the difference in tins -- its really different in taste, consistency, colour... and with fresh milk at her farm?

I feel like my food consumption can seem a bit hipstery but i have a freezer full of grass fed beef not because the food channel told me it was cool... but because my father inlaw cant fit "billy the bull" (my beef had a name!) into his freezer.

CSB: my mom grew up near where i did and when she was a kid it was straw mattresses and no running water and cutting cattle on horse back with a collie... Like when she talks about her child hood it sounds like something out of a western novel. The north really is a step back in time sometimes...

\The worst jobs for a kid exist on a farm. The worst.
1: cleaning out the chicken coop -- its hot - dusty -- and the smell of ammonia is overpowering.
2: cleaning out grain bins full of rotten peas. Its hot (35C) dusty -- and the smell of mold is overpowering. And if you have a drag auger to help you you get to beware of a big spinning blade running across the floor...
3: Stomping fescue seed -- its hot -- its dusty -- and you have to tape up your entire body because the tiny grass seeds have little barbs and you will itch your skin off if you have an opening in your clothes anywhere.
 
2013-03-29 06:34:20 PM

Kittypie070: Oh....mikefinch, would that be "hemp nettle" as in Galeopsis?

If it's a mood elevator I'd like to try some, if I can get it.


Yeah -- Galeopsis tetrahit Its common hemp nettle and it grows in disturbed areas everywhere in north america -- its kindof an introduced weed from Europe. It looks a bit like a thistle and and has tiny pinkish purple flowers. You can prolly get seeds for your flower garden as its a bit ornamental. Someone who works around plants would be able to help you identify it for sure...

If you get some pictures of it -- look around and identify some (it can grow in ditches or near construction sites) and once you know you have some just cut the plant up in its entirety and toss it into a pot of boiling water. Turn off the heat and let it steep for 10 miniutes and strain and drink. (only make tea from 100% fresh or 100% plants -- they get toxic during the in between) You can dry it out and crush it up and put it in a tin for later too. Stinging nettle is also fantastic in tea but careful then you pick it because that shiat hurts.

I have had it and its just wonderful. Add raspberry leaves and strawberry leaves and you have a really nice green tea that is good for you and it lightens the heart. Thats the best way to describe the mood elevation -- it lightens the heart.
 
2013-03-29 06:38:51 PM

mikefinch: Tellingthem: This is a fad now? You know it's funny but i keep see all of these trends. Eat local, canning, pickling, gardens, chickens in the backyard, etc. All of this stuff we did when I was growing up in the country. We had two areas where we knew morels grew so when it was season we would go pick them. We also would get the wild berries and whatever else grew around us. We did all of this because one we were poor and couldn't afford much, and two there isn't much else to do out in the sticks. For all this time I had no idea that growing up poor white trash meant I was hip and cool. I wish i knew that when all those city kids used to laugh at us farmers that they would be paying big money some day for the very things they laughed at us for...

Yup -- I do stuff like canning and grow a garden because thats what i grew up with. Picking saskatoons in the valley and then grandma would make her killer saskatoon pie (the best pie. by far.) We had chickens and we would give cartons away to neighbors and stuff. Our garden took up an acre and a half and that still left half the garden fallow.

My family was mainly farming grain but my wife grew up nearby and her family was beef and sheep. They had chickens for eggs and meat, they grew their own beef -- her parents are dutch so they garden like pros, and her dad managed the dairy her and her brothers worked at so they always had a 5 gallon pail of fresh raw milk in the basement. Oh -- and one of her bothers worked at the apiary so they always had free honey. Her bro brings us tins of honey from each individual hive and you can taste the difference in the field they came from. I kid you not our honey comes in white containers with a sticker noting the apiary name and the lot number and legal land description written in sharpie on it. You can taste the difference in tins -- its really different in taste, consistency, colour... and with fresh milk at her farm?

I feel like my food consumption can seem a bit hipstery but i ha ...


Ahh It's cool and I actually like that stuff is getting popular but i just find it weird. I guess that i'm maybe a bit bitter that I still see people making fun of the people in "flyover" states while co-opting a lot of what we did or do. I ran away from that life to go to the big city out west but more and more I keep seeing it pop up out here. But it's kind of this weird almost like surreal version on what people think small town midwest is all about. Everything from the new "dive" bars with the fish and deer on the the walls, the music, and now this. I have friends who have never been hunting or even shot a gun before now buying tactical 12-gauges for what reason i have no idea. I see more grandma quilts coming for 20 somethings than actual grandmas. It's just very strange for me.
 
2013-03-29 06:40:12 PM
Oh and seriously the honey thing is so true. We had a neighbor who used to give us some from time to time...amazing.
 
2013-03-29 06:55:54 PM

Tellingthem: Ahh It'...r me.


I know exactly how you feel.
-- I think its a sign of people getting tired of the connected life -- the consumption and how items in our lives rarely hold sentimental value -- and we still have a generation of people who grew up in a world of rotary telephones and typewriters. IF they lived in a technologically advanced part of the world. Its a way for them to try to hold on to a past that is rapidly slipping away and we cant exactly explain it ever say it really without loosing the huge advantages our modern lives give us but we yearn for community and a simpler, slower, less drama packed life. Going back to those crafts of old lets us feel closer to the sense of community those people have.

I know how you feel though -- Its cool i have so many resources and stuff being propagated but the people i know eating wild game are drunk in the back of a pickup hunting out of season -- not at a farmers market. The people i know eating fresh homegrown produce are Ukrainian families with grandmas who grow enough in their gardens to last all winter.
 
2013-03-29 07:59:31 PM

mikefinch: I know exactly how you feel.
-- I think its a sign of people getting tired of the connected life -- the consumption and how items in our lives rarely hold sentimental value -- and we still have a generation of people who grew up in a world of rotary telephones and typewriters. IF they lived in a technologically advanced part of the world. Its a way for them to try to hold on to a past that is rapidly slipping away and we cant exactly explain it ever say it really without loosing the huge advantages our modern lives give us but we yearn for community and a simpler, slower, less drama packed life. Going back to those crafts of old lets us feel closer to the sense of community those people have.


I'm as urban as you can get, and I could give a rat's ass about community. What's driving me toward things like free-range meat and local produce is the bankruptcy of the industrial food complex. At one point in time it was a good thing: it was more efficient, it smoothed out shortages, and made sure things were available year-round. But right now industrial food is all about shortchanging the consumer for profit, using the cheapest inputs possible and leaching out any nutrition or variation that might sneak in. Who cares if a corn-heavy diet full of engineered flavor profiles is the shortcut to an obese, unhealthy population? Well, I do. And when I can afford it, I can make sure my dollars go toward a local person who managed to slaughter a healthy cow, or raise a healthy chicken, or grow a tomato that wasn't designed for long shelf life.
 
2013-03-29 08:17:46 PM

theorellior: Well, I do. And when I can afford it, I can make sure my dollars go toward a local person who managed to slaughter a healthy cow, or raise a healthy chicken, or grow a tomato that wasn't designed for long shelf life.


And that supports the small farmer and their families and when they end up getting to make that profit (even though it might be riding on trendy urban marketing) they get to keep their land and their herds. The big industrial complex got that way by crushing small farmers out of the market - by takeing up huge chunks of land and the small farming communities start to die off and those are things that are really hard to get back.

Even though forager movements, and back to the landers, and hipster foodies are kind of kitschy they support something that benifits everyone and harms nobody. Its a win win scenario.

Knowing where your food comes from might seem a bit like that "Portlandia" sketch but in reality it really benefits the economy to support smaller farming industries. Its one of those fields that leads into all sorts of culture and it builds the health of the money AND the people AND the plants and animals we farm.

Rock on theorellior. Rock on.
 
2013-03-29 08:46:10 PM
mikefinch

forager movements, and back to the landers, and hipster foodies are kind of kitschy

   I am a gardener, forager and have been a long time supporter of locally sourced food; never looked at it as being trendy, I just enjoy fresh tasty food.
 
2013-03-29 08:53:07 PM

Tellingthem: I guess that i'm maybe a bit bitter that I still see people making fun of the people in "flyover" states while co-opting a lot of what we did or do.


To be fair, most people make fun of the flyover states not for their survival prowess, but for their opinions on anything which concerns the world outside their hometown/county.  I will trust someone from Kentucky when it comes to matters of tobacco, farming, and bacon, but the minute they start getting into global economic policy the earflaps tend to go on.
 
2013-03-29 09:14:03 PM
I LOVE RAMP
 
2013-03-29 09:14:59 PM
FTA :

Tama Matsuoka Wong: Well, I worked in Hong Kong, Tokyo, New York for 25 years, but I wanted a cleaner environment for my family. So we moved back to near where I grew up in New Jersey.

wat
 
2013-03-29 09:20:57 PM

theorellior: And when I can afford it, I can make sure my dollars go toward a local person who managed to slaughter a healthy cow, or raise a healthy chicken, or grow a tomato that wasn't designed for long shelf life.


Hear hear.  It's win-win not just from the "keep tax dollars in the county" standpoint, but from the equally important "this s%$# is tasty" standpoint.  I'm not saying store meat can't be tasty, but what I've noticed is that it is inconsistent from week to week or even day to day just by virtue of different suppliers.  When you buy from one local guy, even from different animals, the meat is going to taste pretty much the same no matter when you buy it.
 
2013-03-29 09:58:17 PM

7th Son of a 7th Son: FTA :

Tama Matsuoka Wong: Well, I worked in Hong Kong, Tokyo, New York for 25 years, but I wanted a cleaner environment for my family. So we moved back to near where I grew up in New Jersey.

wat


Hong Kong Smog
graphics8.nytimes.com
 
2013-03-29 10:21:47 PM
mikefinch:\Yes i take a shovel -- best walking stick i ever  had.

Indeed, it's the paleontologists's third fourth leg
 
2013-03-29 10:42:00 PM

mikefinch: Kittypie070: Oh....mikefinch, would that be "hemp nettle" as in Galeopsis?

If it's a mood elevator I'd like to try some, if I can get it.


Yeah -- Galeopsis tetrahit Its common hemp nettle and it grows in disturbed areas everywhere in north america -- its kindof an introduced weed from Europe. It looks a bit like a thistle and and has tiny pinkish purple flowers. You can prolly get seeds for your flower garden as its a bit ornamental. Someone who works around plants would be able to help you identify it for sure...

If you get some pictures of it -- look around and identify some (it can grow in ditches or near construction sites) and once you know you have some just cut the plant up in its entirety and toss it into a pot of boiling water. Turn off the heat and let it steep for 10 miniutes and strain and drink. (only make tea from 100% fresh or 100% plants -- they get toxic during the in between) You can dry it out and crush it up and put it in a tin for later too. Stinging nettle is also fantastic in tea but careful then you pick it because that shiat hurts.

I have had it and its just wonderful. Add raspberry leaves and strawberry leaves and you have a really nice green tea that is good for you and it lightens the heart. Thats the best way to describe the mood elevation -- it lightens the heart.


Thanks very much :)

I can get plain old nettles at the park next door if I'm watchful, the city parks & recreation department is pretty sharp on maintaining the grounds.

I have handled nettles barehanded once cuz I dared myself to do it out of sheer curiousity.

:D
 
2013-03-30 12:09:07 AM

Dallymo: I have a purslane problem in my gravel driveway.  That shiat is everywhere.  Sneaky bastard.


Us too, it took over our garden last summer. Dug it all up and fed it to the chickens, it's supposed to up the omega 3. I tried to cook some, I didn't care for it.
 
2013-03-30 09:01:06 AM

MylesHeartVodak: She never said anything bad about ramps - it's the azzhats who pull every single bulb and leave nothing to replenish next season.  You should never pick them all.  It's the same thing that happens with wild ginseng.  Rednecks will go in and pick everything and an already rare plant becomes even more so.



There are still plenty of ramps in Georgia, though:

www.fhwa.dot.gov

/oh, you mean the vegetable
 
2013-03-30 12:42:09 PM
I like French fried taters
 
2013-03-31 12:26:53 AM

Tellingthem: This is a fad now? You know it's funny but i keep see all of these trends. Eat local, canning, pickling, gardens, chickens in the backyard, etc. All of this stuff we did when I was growing up in the country. We had two areas where we knew morels grew so when it was season we would go pick them. We also would get the wild berries and whatever else grew around us. We did all of this because one we were poor and couldn't afford much, and two there isn't much else to do out in the sticks. For all this time I had no idea that growing up poor white trash meant I was hip and cool. I wish i knew that when all those city kids used to laugh at us farmers that they would be paying big money some day for the very things they laughed at us for...


THIS

Hell, I didn't even grow up in the "country". I was born in the heart of Manila, Philippines. My family was not poor by any means (We had maids and a driver) and we still grew our own food and raised chickens and ducks. I had about a dozen chickens and three ducks to raise when I was 6, and many a morning was spent chasing the loud cocks and hens from our properties. There wasn't a tree in our neighborhood that didn't produce something useful (we had mangoes, coconuts, mountain apples, guiabano, guava, moringa  and others I can't remember) and my cousins and I would constantly walk around and pick what we wanted. There was an empty lot next to my aunt's house that we used to grow eggplants, bok choi, sweet potatoes, calamansi, peppers and other stuff.

When we moved to Hawaii that didn't change at all. Again I lived in the city (Honolulu). We had a tiny yard where we grew papaya, sweet potatoes, okra and a bunch of other stuff. My family and I would drive around the neighborhood to forage for fruit (mainly mangoes, coconuts, moringa, candlenuts, lychee and guavas) and I had friends who would make trips to the mountain forests and the beaches to forage more stuff (bamboo shoots, mushrooms, sea weed, shellfish).

It wasn't about saving money or the environment. It was something that everyone did and was a part of everyday life. I never questioned it, or thought I was weird for doing it.

So when I moved to California and saw that this was the "New, hip thing to do." I was all like "Huh? I've been doing this all my life."

/Hippies and hipsters...ugh.
 
2013-04-02 09:09:13 AM
Hey now, Garlic Mustard can be used to make a really tasty pesto. Just take the leaves and thin stems, crush them up, add some olive oil, pine nuts, and maybe some other herbs/seasonings if you'd like, and boom, PESTO!

Also, it's almost morel season! WOOOOO!!!
 
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