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(io9)   Coolest picture of the lightest human-made substance on Earth you'll see all day   (io9.com) divider line 63
    More: Cool, matter, Microsoft Security Essentials, carbon nanotubes, Graphene  
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10661 clicks; posted to Geek » on 28 Mar 2013 at 10:41 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-03-28 08:33:39 PM
FTFA: Here's a brain-teaser for the MSE-inclined: the last several ultralight materials have had densities less than air (1.2 mg/cm3) - so why don't any of them float?

F*ck homeboy, because dat sh*t is porous n*gga! Peep this: dem sh*ts is like a dried sponge... modderf*cka floats until it fills up with water, mah schnizzle, then it straight-up f*cking sinks. Dem ultra-f*ckin-lights is da exact same thing. The less-dense f*cker has to mothaf*ckin displace its denser surrounding in order to float, you dig?
 
2013-03-28 08:56:25 PM
That's heavy doc.
 
2013-03-28 10:46:15 PM
After this graphene aerogel sucks up the spilled oil, you can burn it for heat.
 
2013-03-28 10:53:04 PM
I wish they'd invent something that can float in air.  Use some kind of superstrong carbon buckythingy and have it be a vacuum inside.  Closed-cell, so if you break it, the pieces still float.

Mass produce the stuff and we can have all kinds of wonderful flying vehicles that governments can buy and use to kill people.
 
2013-03-28 10:57:25 PM

DeltaPunch: FTFA: Here's a brain-teaser for the MSE-inclined: the last several ultralight materials have had densities less than air (1.2 mg/cm3) - so why don't any of them float?

F*ck homeboy, because dat sh*t is porous n*gga! Peep this: dem sh*ts is like a dried sponge... modderf*cka floats until it fills up with water,


The question meant float in air, like a balloon. But porosity is correct even though you went off the rails, drove through the orphanage, burned down the hospital, ran over the puppies, and generally went wrong after this point.
 
2013-03-28 10:58:23 PM

Li Wei approves.


i.imgur.com

i.imgur.com

i.imgur.com

i.imgur.com

i.imgur.com
 
2013-03-28 11:00:28 PM
Heavy.
 
2013-03-28 11:00:41 PM
Let me know when they invent Cavorite.
 
2013-03-28 11:01:26 PM

studebaker hoch: I wish they'd invent something that can float in air.  Use some kind of superstrong carbon buckythingy and have it be a vacuum inside.  Closed-cell, so if you break it, the pieces still float.

Mass produce the stuff and we can have all kinds of wonderful flying vehicles that governments can buy and use to kill people.


Well, I think of it as filling for a semi rigid dirigible. Instead of being just air, it can be a helium/foam of this stuff. Suddenly the danger of puncture is completely gone.

I wonder if filling this stuff with hydrogen and then lighting it on fire would be fun.
 
2013-03-28 11:04:14 PM

Any Pie Left: After this graphene aerogel sucks up the spilled oil, you can burn it for heat.


win win
 
2013-03-28 11:06:51 PM
It's Calista Flockhart circa 1998, right?
 
2013-03-28 11:26:01 PM

StopLurkListen: The question meant float in air, like a balloon.


Air and water are both fluids; his analogy holds.
 
2013-03-28 11:28:34 PM

DeltaPunch: FTFA: Here's a brain-teaser for the MSE-inclined: the last several ultralight materials have had densities less than air (1.2 mg/cm3) - so why don't any of them float?

F*ck homeboy, because dat sh*t is porous n*gga! Peep this: dem sh*ts is like a dried sponge... modderf*cka floats until it fills up with water, mah schnizzle, then it straight-up f*cking sinks. Dem ultra-f*ckin-lights is da exact same thing. The less-dense f*cker has to mothaf*ckin displace its denser surrounding in order to float, you dig?


But if the material itself is lighter than air, why would the material with air inside it suddenly become heavier than air?
 
2013-03-28 11:31:54 PM

John Nash: But if the material itself is lighter than air, why would the material with air inside it suddenly become heavier than air?


The "material itself" is graphene and carbon nanotubes, which still have the density of graphene and carbon nanotubes.

That density measurement is the mass of the object over the volume of the object.  Contained within the volume of the object are the empty spaces, which are filled with air.
 
2013-03-29 12:00:47 AM
That's almost as light as the reading I did on my last flight:

Famous Jewish Sports Legends
 
2013-03-29 12:17:46 AM

StopLurkListen: DeltaPunch: FTFA: Here's a brain-teaser for the MSE-inclined: the last several ultralight materials have had densities less than air (1.2 mg/cm3) - so why don't any of them float?

F*ck homeboy, because dat sh*t is porous n*gga! Peep this: dem sh*ts is like a dried sponge... modderf*cka floats until it fills up with water,

The question meant float in air, like a balloon. But porosity is correct even though you went off the rails, drove through the orphanage, burned down the hospital, ran over the puppies, and generally went wrong after this point.


Lulz.
 
2013-03-29 12:19:03 AM
[floats mystically past, fo shizz]
 
2013-03-29 12:30:26 AM
Now that the science has been done, how do we kill people with it?  Without that information it'll never be put to it's fullest possible use
 
2013-03-29 12:38:45 AM
I guess that they took the density measurements for this material inside a vacuum ?
 
2013-03-29 12:41:48 AM
I'm glad it's the Chinese wasting their money on this shiat.
 
2013-03-29 12:45:10 AM

Smeggy Smurf: Now that the science has been done, how do we kill people with it?  Without that information it'll never be put to it's fullest possible use


You know what's the hardest human substance? The apostrophe.
 
2013-03-29 12:46:44 AM
Lara Flynn Boyle?

/90s comedian will work for food.
 
2013-03-29 12:49:37 AM
My question its if its lighter then air due to the empty spaces, why does a giant empty space, say the astrodome, not count as super light (anti dense? Not quite sure how you say more less dense). It really just seems like very hollow structure.
 
2013-03-29 01:10:16 AM
Next up: Unobtainium.
 
2013-03-29 01:26:40 AM
Aerogel looks way cooler, solid smoke.

1.bp.blogspot.com
Properties of this shiat are cool though, works like Pig Cloth(soaks up oil, repels water), is springy so it can handle some shock.

IIRC Aerogel would basically disintegrate when wet, but could hold up a lot of weight(though not shock impact).

I'd love to see a side by side comparison of the properties(with numbers).  Insulation, weight bearing, material absorbtion(along with what will collapse it like water on aerogel), etc etc.
 
2013-03-29 01:28:21 AM

John Nash: DeltaPunch: FTFA: Here's a brain-teaser for the MSE-inclined: the last several ultralight materials have had densities less than air (1.2 mg/cm3) - so why don't any of them float?

F*ck homeboy, because dat sh*t is porous n*gga! Peep this: dem sh*ts is like a dried sponge... modderf*cka floats until it fills up with water, mah schnizzle, then it straight-up f*cking sinks. Dem ultra-f*ckin-lights is da exact same thing. The less-dense f*cker has to mothaf*ckin displace its denser surrounding in order to float, you dig?

But if the material itself is lighter than air, why would the material with air inside it suddenly become heavier than air?


Take some chicken wire as an example. Obviously the metal is denser than water and sinks. Now loosely scrunch up the chicken wire into a ball the size of a basketball (say). Obviously this is less dense than water, because an actually basketball-sized volume filled with water would be much heavier. But the ball of chicken wire still sinks in water. It's the exact same principle. So it's like comparing this to a solid iron basketball underwater -- the chicken wire would be much lighter, less dense than water, yet still sink.
 
2013-03-29 01:31:47 AM
weird..i was daydreaming just the other day about this "what if" carbon-graphine combo.
 
2013-03-29 01:32:59 AM

Quantum Apostrophe: Smeggy Smurf: Now that the science has been done, how do we kill people with it?  Without that information it'll never be put to it's fullest possible use

You know what's the hardest human substance? The apostrophe.


There's n'o garmmer in vodak
 
2013-03-29 01:56:04 AM
DeltaPunch

Snipped for brevity.

I was wondering though, if during fabriation(or just after refining so you get the right shape) it had a vacuum applied, and was coated with an airtight seal around the outside....
(simple example would be a dry sponge with a layer of latex)
If it was structurally strong enough, obviously.

Or, since these things can make great insulators, if the spaces could be made small enough so that air did not move easily through them(if it's like aerogel, air creeps in slowly as the other things evaporate(sort of, I'm a bit hazy on that last part, just watched a vid of some guy making some)
(a sponge like material that is hydrophobic would be the closest thing I can think of(like Pig Cloth) for a simple example to follow that same theme)
/talking about any of the super light structures anyhow

It's a neat concept to have a solid vacuum nugget that would float on air without the use of things like helium.
 
2013-03-29 02:01:56 AM

omeganuepsilon: DeltaPunch

Snipped for brevity.

I was wondering though, if during fabriation(or just after refining so you get the right shape) it had a vacuum applied, and was coated with an airtight seal around the outside....
(simple example would be a dry sponge with a layer of latex)
If it was structurally strong enough, obviously.

Or, since these things can make great insulators, if the spaces could be made small enough so that air did not move easily through them(if it's like aerogel, air creeps in slowly as the other things evaporate(sort of, I'm a bit hazy on that last part, just watched a vid of some guy making some)
(a sponge like material that is hydrophobic would be the closest thing I can think of(like Pig Cloth) for a simple example to follow that same theme)
/talking about any of the super light structures anyhow

It's a neat concept to have a solid vacuum nugget that would float on air without the use of things like helium.


That was what i was kinnda daydreaming about.
put it in a vacuum and then spray this on it
 
2013-03-29 02:28:17 AM
img.gawkerassets.com
pluckyoutoo.files.wordpress.com
 
2013-03-29 02:37:31 AM
I know that carbon buckynanowhatchamacallits have astonishing properties, but for those of you wondering about a vacuum-filled version of this, remember that the earth's atmosphere is heavy as fark, and this is literally the lightest solid material ever made.

Yeah, light things can be strong, but that's pushing it.
 
2013-03-29 02:42:01 AM

semiotix: Yeah, light things can be strong, but that's pushing it.


Specifically not thinking like that is what got these materials made.
 
2013-03-29 02:59:24 AM

UNHbeta19: My question its if its lighter then air due to the empty spaces, why does a giant empty space, say the astrodome, not count as super light (anti dense? Not quite sure how you say more less dense). It really just seems like very hollow structure.


Presumably because the Astrodome is not a material.  You've got to be constructed all out of essentially the same thing to be considered a material.  Even things like concrete not really "materials" since they're conglomerations of different materials.
 
2013-03-29 03:20:06 AM

DeltaPunch: John Nash: DeltaPunch: FTFA: Here's a brain-teaser for the MSE-inclined: the last several ultralight materials have had densities less than air (1.2 mg/cm3) - so why don't any of them float?

F*ck homeboy, because dat sh*t is porous n*gga! Peep this: dem sh*ts is like a dried sponge... modderf*cka floats until it fills up with water, mah schnizzle, then it straight-up f*cking sinks. Dem ultra-f*ckin-lights is da exact same thing. The less-dense f*cker has to mothaf*ckin displace its denser surrounding in order to float, you dig?

But if the material itself is lighter than air, why would the material with air inside it suddenly become heavier than air?

Take some chicken wire as an example. Obviously the metal is denser than water and sinks. Now loosely scrunch up the chicken wire into a ball the size of a basketball (say). Obviously this is less dense than water, because an actually basketball-sized volume filled with water would be much heavier. But the ball of chicken wire still sinks in water. It's the exact same principle. So it's like comparing this to a solid iron basketball underwater -- the chicken wire would be much lighter, less dense than water, yet still sink.


That's doesn't work, what the article is saying is that the basketball-sized volume of "chicken wire" is lighter than air.

Otherwise we get this equation:

material that is actually denser than air + air = density of helium.  somehow.
 
2013-03-29 03:20:09 AM
imageshack.us
 
2013-03-29 03:56:10 AM
I'm just going to post this in all threads I see.
\
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tGDT7wKvdRk" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tGDT7wKvdRk

/I love you you are my parents why wouldn't I
//wait no I hate you
 
2013-03-29 03:56:21 AM
I lost 20 pounds by eating 30 pounds of this....

but I look just the same?
 
2013-03-29 04:24:06 AM

jack21221: StopLurkListen: The question meant float in air, like a balloon.

Air and water are both fluids; his analogy holds.


Ima pretty sure air is comprised of several different type of gasses.
 
2013-03-29 05:58:55 AM

John Nash: DeltaPunch: John Nash: DeltaPunch: FTFA: Here's a brain-teaser for the MSE-inclined: the last several ultralight materials have had densities less than air (1.2 mg/cm3) - so why don't any of them float?

F*ck homeboy, because dat sh*t is porous n*gga! Peep this: dem sh*ts is like a dried sponge... modderf*cka floats until it fills up with water, mah schnizzle, then it straight-up f*cking sinks. Dem ultra-f*ckin-lights is da exact same thing. The less-dense f*cker has to mothaf*ckin displace its denser surrounding in order to float, you dig?

But if the material itself is lighter than air, why would the material with air inside it suddenly become heavier than air?

Take some chicken wire as an example. Obviously the metal is denser than water and sinks. Now loosely scrunch up the chicken wire into a ball the size of a basketball (say). Obviously this is less dense than water, because an actually basketball-sized volume filled with water would be much heavier. But the ball of chicken wire still sinks in water. It's the exact same principle. So it's like comparing this to a solid iron basketball underwater -- the chicken wire would be much lighter, less dense than water, yet still sink.

That's doesn't work, what the article is saying is that the basketball-sized volume of "chicken wire" is lighter than air.

Otherwise we get this equation:

material that is actually denser than air + air = density of helium.  somehow.





I have no idea how else this could be explained to you.
 
2013-03-29 06:34:37 AM

studebaker hoch: I wish they'd invent something that can float in air.  Use some kind of superstrong carbon buckythingy and have it be a vacuum inside.  Closed-cell, so if you break it, the pieces still float.

Mass produce the stuff and we can have all kinds of wonderful flying vehicles that governments can buy and use to kill people.


Step 1: make a bunch of this stuff.
Step 2: seal edges with something
Step 3: evacuate interior of lattice and/or fill it with something like helium or hydrogen, depending how strong your sealant is.
Step 4: There is no step 4, your material is already floating at this point.  Just finish the seal and then wonder why you just did that, since balloons are easier and cheaper and this isn't really what the material was designed for.

//It's not actually "light", it "has low density on the macro-scale".  On the micro-scale, the fibers themselves have roughly the density of graphite, maybe a bit denser.  However, the fact that it took me two full sentences to explain that for laymen pretty much sums up why they just say "lightweight" for headline-writing purposes.

relaxitsjustme: jack21221: StopLurkListen: The question meant float in air, like a balloon.

Air and water are both fluids; his analogy holds.

Ima pretty sure air is comprised of several different type of gasses.


Both of those gases, and air, are still fluids, which is the relevant metric for whether you can float things in/on them or not.  Air's compressible and water (as far as anything you'll ever do with your life) is not, but that doesn't actually make a difference in the context of the analogy.
 
2013-03-29 06:37:50 AM

UNHbeta19: My question its if its lighter then air due to the empty spaces, why does a giant empty space, say the astrodome, not count as super light (anti dense? Not quite sure how you say more less dense). It really just seems like very hollow structure.


In the context of buildings, the Astrodome is, in fact, very light.  Set it on a balance scale with a set of skyscrapers/office buildings filling a similar height and area, and the astrodome end will be floating up.
 
2013-03-29 06:44:53 AM
They discovered George Bush's dual treatise on why torture is wrong and why the Patriot Act is a bad thing?
 
2013-03-29 06:45:12 AM

UNHbeta19: My question its if its lighter then air due to the empty spaces, why does a giant empty space, say the astrodome, not count as super light (anti dense? Not quite sure how you say more less dense). It really just seems like very hollow structure.


Uniform density.
 
2013-03-29 07:10:20 AM
In aNature paper titled "," scientists from Zhejiang University in Hangzhou, China have introduced a graphene aerogel that comes in at just  0.16 milligrams per cubic centimeter.

One day, you'll tell your grandkids "Back in my day, the other countries made the cutting edge inventions".  They'll look up at you and say, "這是瘋狂的 "
 
2013-03-29 07:14:15 AM

Makh: That's heavy doc.


FizixJunkee: Heavy.


There's that word again. "Heavy." Why are things so heavy? Is there a problem with the Earth's gravitational pull?
 
2013-03-29 07:48:42 AM

neongoats: I wonder if filling this stuff with hydrogen and then lighting it on fire would be fun.


You are lighting it on fire. How can that not be fun?
 
2013-03-29 08:11:49 AM

John Nash: That's doesn't work, what the article is saying is that the basketball-sized volume of "chicken wire" is lighter than air.

Otherwise we get this equation:

material that is actually denser than air + air = density of helium.  somehow.


1. Weigh this thing

2. Get the volume of this thing (not volume of the material itself, but volume of it's expanded shape)

3. Divide
 
2013-03-29 08:18:43 AM

StopLurkListen: DeltaPunch: FTFA: Here's a brain-teaser for the MSE-inclined: the last several ultralight materials have had densities less than air (1.2 mg/cm3) - so why don't any of them float?

F*ck homeboy, because dat sh*t is porous n*gga! Peep this: dem sh*ts is like a dried sponge... modderf*cka floats until it fills up with water,

The question meant float in air, like a balloon. But porosity is correct even though you went off the rails, drove through the orphanage, burned down the hospital, ran over the puppies, and generally went wrong after this point.


Actually, his analogy was perfectly correct.  A sponge is still a sponge, but it "sinks" when it's pores are full of water, just as this stuff "sinks" because it's pores are full of air.

But I love your descriptive language...you use your tongue purdier than a $20 whore!
 
2013-03-29 09:31:15 AM

DeltaPunch: FTFA: Here's a brain-teaser for the MSE-inclined: the last several ultralight materials have had densities less than air (1.2 mg/cm3) - so why don't any of them float?

F*ck homeboy, because dat sh*t is porous n*gga! Peep this: dem sh*ts is like a dried sponge... modderf*cka floats until it fills up with water, mah schnizzle, then it straight-up f*cking sinks. Dem ultra-f*ckin-lights is da exact same thing. The less-dense f*cker has to mothaf*ckin displace its denser surrounding in order to float, you dig?


This could be one of my favorite posts of all time.

OF ALL TIME!
 
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