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(CBS News)   Nearly 1,500 times a year seven highly trained horses carry the remains of American Heroes to their final resting place at Arlington National Cemetery   (cbsnews.com) divider line 50
    More: Interesting, Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, Americans, John Ford  
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4731 clicks; posted to Main » on 28 Mar 2013 at 11:09 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-03-28 10:39:52 PM
Someone forgot to wash those seven for that last funeral in the clip, they were white right up 'til then...
 
2013-03-28 11:11:33 PM
Yum.
 
2013-03-28 11:13:04 PM
Good horsies.
 
2013-03-28 11:21:06 PM
MURRIKA fark YEA!
 
2013-03-28 11:22:36 PM
Nice clip, subby. Too bad it's so goddamn depressing.
 
2013-03-28 11:25:15 PM
I was expecting to hear Landslide playing in the background.
 
2013-03-28 11:26:03 PM
Poignant, but very nice clip none the less. The respect seems even nicer when there seems to be so little of it around these days.
 
2013-03-28 11:26:10 PM
They only showed 14 shots
 
2013-03-28 11:29:21 PM

ski9600: They only showed 14 shots


WOW, just went and watched again...
/fark CBS
 
2013-03-28 11:31:25 PM
Up to eight full-honors funerals a day?  Wow.
 
2013-03-28 11:38:52 PM
The caisson is for those that are killed in action, all officers and some senior non-commissioned officers receive caisson and army full-honors funeral.

So every officer in the U.S. military is a hero?
 
2013-03-28 11:44:55 PM
how highly trained do horses have to be to pull things?
 
2013-03-28 11:50:59 PM

Plant Rights Activist: how highly trained do horses have to be to pull things?


you have to train them to wait for bathroom breaks
 
2013-03-28 11:56:37 PM
The article was too short. But it is heartening to know that those who die in battle are treated with such honor.
 
2013-03-29 12:00:53 AM
They should get Bush and Cheney to pull the caissons.
 
2013-03-29 12:05:14 AM

2chris2: The caisson is for those that are killed in action, all officers and some senior non-commissioned officers receive caisson and army full-honors funeral.

So every officer in the U.S. military is a hero?


Well, officers tend to get off more on that sort of thing whereas the average deceased grunt is content to just be deceased.
 
2013-03-29 12:15:52 AM

Pointy Tail of Satan: They should get Bush and Cheney to pull the caissons.



No shiat.

We go to such great lengths to bury the war dead with pomp and pageantry. Yet we do nothing to punish those that caused the unnecessary and unjustifiable death and misery.

upload.wikimedia.org
upload.wikimedia.org
upload.wikimedia.org
upload.wikimedia.org

And yes,

upload.wikimedia.org

Sorry, you get no pass.

Did I miss anyone? Of course I did.


/So many assholes, so little time
//Fark unjust wars
///And those that perpetrate
 
2013-03-29 12:19:20 AM

2chris2: The caisson is for those that are killed in action, all officers and some senior non-commissioned officers receive caisson and army full-honors funeral.

So every officer in the U.S. military is a hero?


No, every officer is part of a tradition started centuries ago that endures today.  They're not heroes, just men and women who are accorded certain respects because tradition demands it.  The officer has always been elevated above the average enlisted man.  It's been that way for centuries and will no doubt continue until we see the end of war and the need for soldiers.
 
2013-03-29 12:19:44 AM

Pointy Tail of Satan: They should get Bush and Cheney to pull the caissons.


They need 7 highly trained horses, not a couple of horses' asses.
 
2013-03-29 12:22:33 AM

ski9600: They only showed 14 shots


It was part of a three volley salute, which is the tradition for military and police funerals.  This is not the same as a 21 gun salute, which is reserved for the President and other heads of state.  In fact, there is a chart showing the number of salutes a person is entitled to based on their rank.
 
2013-03-29 12:25:59 AM

Kanemano: Plant Rights Activist: how highly trained do horses have to be to pull things?

you have to train them to wait for bathroom breaks


Came for this.
 
2013-03-29 12:27:11 AM
I work at ANC occasionally, so I'm getting a kick, etc.

/we try not to step where the horses let loose the bowels of war
 
2013-03-29 12:32:14 AM
I'm not a jingoist.  I'm not that guy who says "Murka, fark yeah!" or thinks that all servicemen are heroes.  But there's something about the ceremony of burying our dead that gets me.  I saw a film of the burial of a Marine and I farkin' cried.  I didn't know the guy or how he died, but the respect given to him was amazing.

There's a scene in an early NCIS episode (Charles Durning was nominated for an Emmy, and he's a REAL WAR HERO), where they exhume a marine from WWII.  Touching scene every time I see it.
 
2013-03-29 12:35:59 AM

LawyerBuzz: ski9600: They only showed 14 shots

It was part of a three volley salute, which is the tradition for military and police funerals.  This is not the same as a 21 gun salute, which is reserved for the President and other heads of state.  In fact, there is a chart showing the number of salutes a person is entitled to based on their rank.


Also, rifles vs. cannons.
 
2013-03-29 12:37:46 AM
I've walked behind one of those caissons, too recently and for someone far too young.  The pageantry of the whole event was equal parts lovely and awful.  No one thought to mention the gun salute to the KIA military member's MIL, who speaks no English and is wholly unfamiliar w/ American military customs.  The volley rang out, she screamed and jumped, her daughter had to grab her by the shoulders to hold her down on her graveside chair.  Luckily Marine One drifted along and was a nice, brief distraction to us all.
Thank you, horses.
Thank you, heroes.
 
2013-03-29 12:48:57 AM

Aquapope: I'm not a jingoist.  I'm not that guy who says "Murka, fark yeah!" or thinks that all servicemen are heroes.  But there's something about the ceremony of burying our dead that gets me.  I saw a film of the burial of a Marine and I farkin' cried.  I didn't know the guy or how he died, but the respect given to him was amazing.

There's a scene in an early NCIS episode (Charles Durning was nominated for an Emmy, and he's a REAL WAR HERO), where they exhume a marine from WWII.  Touching scene every time I see it.


I know that episode of NCIS very well. I cry every time I see it. Can't help it, don't want to.
 
2013-03-29 12:52:13 AM

undernova: LawyerBuzz: ski9600: They only showed 14 shots

It was part of a three volley salute, which is the tradition for military and police funerals.  This is not the same as a 21 gun salute, which is reserved for the President and other heads of state.  In fact, there is a chart showing the number of salutes a person is entitled to based on their rank.

Also, rifles vs. cannons.


Correct,  thank you for pointing that out.  I believe the three volley is done with 3, 5, or 7 rifles, as opposed to a "salute," which is done with  the specified number of artillery.
 
2013-03-29 01:06:09 AM

ThePea: I've walked behind one of those caissons, too recently and for someone far too young.  The pageantry of the whole event was equal parts lovely and awful.  No one thought to mention the gun salute to the KIA military member's MIL, who speaks no English and is wholly unfamiliar w/ American military customs.  The volley rang out, she screamed and jumped, her daughter had to grab her by the shoulders to hold her down on her graveside chair.  Luckily Marine One drifted along and was a nice, brief distraction to us all.
Thank you, horses.
Thank you, heroes.


What worries me is, they have had to begin implementing stricter entry requirements, because their current estimates have the cemetery reaching full capacity by 2030.

What irritates me is someone may not qualify to get a space there, that deserves it...but this guy gets a plot:

farm9.staticflickr.com
 
2013-03-29 01:07:38 AM
That is entirely too many times per year, unless the veterans are all really really old.
 
2013-03-29 01:14:08 AM
Here's the criteria:

In accordance with the 1986 Title 32 Code of Federal Regulations Part 553, section 15, the following individuals are eligible for interment (ground burial) at Arlington National Cemetery:

Any active duty member of the Armed Forces (except those members serving on active duty for training only).Any retired member of the Armed Forces. A retired member of the Armed Forces, in the context of this paragraph, is a retired member of the Army, Navy, Air Force, Marine Corps, Coast Guard, or a Reserve component who has served on active duty (other than for training), is carried on an official retired list, and is entitled to receive retired pay stemming from service in the Armed Forces. If, at the time of death, a retired member of the Armed Forces is not entitled to receive retired pay stemming from his service in the Armed Forces until some future date, the retired member will not be eligible for ground burial.Any former member of the Armed Forces separated for physical disability prior to 1 October 1949 who has served on active duty (other than for training) and who would have been eligible for retirement under the provisions of 10 United States Code (U.S.C.) 1201 had that statute been in effect on the date of his separation.Any former member of the Armed Forces whose last active duty (other than for training) military service terminated honorably and who has been awarded one of the following decorations:Medal of HonorDistinguished Service Cross (Air Force Cross or Navy Cross)Distinguished Service MedalSilver StarPurple HeartPersons who have held any of the following positions provided their last period of active duty (other than for training) as a member of the Armed Forces terminated honorably:An elective office of the United States GovernmentOffice of the Chief Justice of the United States or of an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United StatesAn office listed in 5 U.S.C. 5312 or 5 U.S.C. 5313The Chief of a mission who was at any time during his/her tenure classified in class I under the provisions of Section 411 of the Act of 13 August 1946, 60 Stat. 1002, as amended (22 U.S.C. 866, 1964 ed.)Any former prisoner of war who, while a prisoner of war, served honorably in the active military, naval, or air service, whose last period of active military, naval, or air service terminated honorably and who died on or after November 30, 1993.The term "former prisoner of war" means a person who, while serving in the active military, naval, or air service, was forcibly detained or interned in line of duty-By an enemy government or its agents, or a hostile force, during a period of war; orBy a foreign government or its agents, or a hostile force, under circumstances which the Secretary of Veterans Affairs finds to have been comparable to the circumstances under which persons have generally been forcibly detained or interned by enemy governments during periods of war.The term "active military, naval, or air service" includes active duty, any period of active duty for training during which the individual concerned was disabled or died from a disease or injury incurred or aggravated in line of duty, and any period of inactive duty training during which the individual concerned was disabled or died from an injury incurred or aggravated in line of duty.The spouse, widow or widower, minor child and, at the discretion of the Secretary of the Army, unmarried adult child of any of the persons listed above.The term "spouse" refers to a widow or widower of an eligible member, including the widow or widower of a member of the Armed Forces who was lost or buried at sea or officially determined to be permanently absent in a status of missing or missing in action. A surviving spouse who has remarried and whose remarriage is void, terminated by death, or dissolved by annulment or divorce by a court with basic authority to render such decrees regains eligibility for burial in Arlington National Cemetery unless it is determined that the decree of annulment or divorce was secured through fraud or collusion.An unmarried adult child may be interred in the same gravesite in which the parent has been or will be interred, provided that child was incapable of self-support up to the time of death because of physical or mental condition. At the time of death of an adult child, a request for interment will be submitted to the Executive Director, Army National Cemeteries Program, Arlington National Cemetery. The request must be accompanied by a notarized statement from an individual who has direct knowledge as to the marital status, degree of dependency of the deceased child, the name of that child's parent, and the military service upon which the burial is being requested. A certificate of a physician who has attended the decedent as to the nature and duration of the physical and/or mental disability must also accompany the request for interment.Widows or widowers of service members who are interred in Arlington National Cemetery as part of a group burial may be interred/inurned in the cemetery, but not in the same gravesite as the group burial.The surviving spouse, minor child, and, at the discretion of the Secretary of the Army, an unmarried adult dependent child of any person already buried in Arlington. (Army Regulation 290-5 defines an adult dependent child as an adult permanently incapable of self-support because of physical or mental disability incurred before age 21.)The parents of a minor child or unmarried adult dependent child whose remains, based on the eligibility of a parent, are already buried in Arlington National Cemetery. (Army Regulation 290-5 defines an adult dependent child as an adult permanently incapable of self-support because of physical or mental disability incurred before age 21.)
 
2013-03-29 01:15:14 AM
Godammit so much, this new posting format farked it all up.

Well, here's the link
 
2013-03-29 01:23:42 AM
www.sonofthesouth.net

Wants all involved to get off his lawn.
 
2013-03-29 01:31:07 AM

Gyrfalcon: That is entirely too many times per year, unless the veterans are all really really old.


1,500 go into Arlington alone.  The VA administers 130 national cemeteries. Many States have veterans' cemeteries.  Can't find any recent totals, but 2008 was a peak year.

http://www.cnn.com/2008/US/05/24/veterans.burials/

"An average of 1,800 veterans die each day, and 10 percent of them are buried in the country's 125 national cemeteries, which are expected to set a record with 107,000 interments, including dependents, this year. And more national cemeteries are being built.

"The peak year for veterans' deaths will be 2007 or 2008, Tuerk said. An estimated 686,000 veterans died in 2007. Although many World War II veterans are dying, so are an increased number of Korean War and Vietnam veterans."

So if 10% make it into a natl. cemetery, about 69,000 vets went there in 2007.
 
2013-03-29 01:32:41 AM

UNC_Samurai: Godammit so much, this new posting format farked it all up.

Well, here's the link


Do that next time instead posting a wall of text, please.
 
2013-03-29 02:00:30 AM

Danger Avoid Death: [www.sonofthesouth.net image 587x870]

Wants all involved to get off his lawn.


Except it was never "his" lawn.  Mary's father left her the estate until her death, whereupon it was to pass to her eldest son.  Marse Robert was just a caretaker.

BarkingUnicorn: UNC_Samurai: Godammit so much, this new posting format farked it all up.

Well, here's the link

Do that next time instead posting a wall of text, please.


I have a standing policy of not linking to pages with light text on dark background, if I can help it.  Web design like that is a crime against humanity.
 
2013-03-29 02:21:06 AM

Pointy Tail of Satan: They should get Bush and Cheney to pull the caissons.


It would be out of balance- more horses asses than horses.
 
2013-03-29 03:05:51 AM
mmmm, mare pussy
 
2013-03-29 03:10:03 AM

JosephFinn: Up to eight full-honors funerals a day?  Wow.


Yeah...

 I don't know if I could do that. Remaining somber that long and that often would wear on me....
 
2013-03-29 03:19:03 AM
UNC_Samurai:
What irritates me is someone may not qualify to get a space there, that deserves it...but this guy gets a plot:

[farm9.staticflickr.com image 640x603]


He's misunderstood. McNamara made a pretty convincing argument that his role was to advise the president, but since the president is elected he represents the will of the people and by appointment would ultimately carry out the orders he was given.

Tapes show he advised Kennedy to withdraw from Vietnam in 1963 and then later Johnson was complaining to McNamara about how he used to make talk about withdrawal and sounding like a loser to Kennedy. Also, the whole Gulf of Tonkin incident was basically the Navy brass bumbling around with mixed information, no doubt about that... I think.

A lot of people think McNamara is a son of a biatch.

He also probably saved millions of lives with the insistence on automobile safety and the introduction of the seat belt and non-impaling steering wheel while at Ford.
 
2013-03-29 04:37:21 AM

sat1va: UNC_Samurai:
What irritates me is someone may not qualify to get a space there, that deserves it...but this guy gets a plot:

[farm9.staticflickr.com image 640x603]

He's misunderstood. McNamara made a pretty convincing argument that his role was to advise the president, but since the president is elected he represents the will of the people and by appointment would ultimately carry out the orders he was given.

Tapes show he advised Kennedy to withdraw from Vietnam in 1963 and then later Johnson was complaining to McNamara about how he used to make talk about withdrawal and sounding like a loser to Kennedy. Also, the whole Gulf of Tonkin incident was basically the Navy brass bumbling around with mixed information, no doubt about that... I think.

A lot of people think McNamara is a son of a biatch.

He also probably saved millions of lives with the insistence on automobile safety and the introduction of the seat belt and non-impaling steering wheel while at Ford.


McNamara was a very complex and complicated person, no doubt. He was the wrong person to be handling Vietnam, I will say that--I'll also observe that even though it was decades too late, he was the only member of any administration involved to say he was wrong about Vietnam.
 
2013-03-29 04:42:13 AM

cuzsis: JosephFinn: Up to eight full-honors funerals a day?  Wow.

Yeah...

 I don't know if I could do that. Remaining somber that long and that often would wear on me....


I lucked into a short trip to DC in 2011 when Lordfortuna had to attend a training session for a few days; he had a college car to get there and was reimbursed for hotel and had a food allowance, so for $40 of my own money I was able to play tourist for three days. Arlington was the first stop on my last day, and I had no idea how big the place was, or how much it would affect me. Ended up spending a big chunk of the day there, and was pretty emotional the whole time. The weather was beautiful though.


i391.photobucket.com

i391.photobucket.com

i391.photobucket.com
i391.photobucket.com
i391.photobucket.com i391.photobucket.com i391.photobucket.com
 
2013-03-29 07:39:11 AM
when clinton was appointing pals to get buried there,
we would march to the graves, and do the ceremonies with our nuts hanging out.
"hey, the horse is winking at you"!
- off-post soldiers funeral where the taps player was too drunk and forgot his mouthpiece
he stood at the top of the hill with the van behind him playing taps from a cassette
- the black family that didn't want white guys carrying the casket, they fell in the wet grass and it slid down a long incline
- doing mr. Miyagi's fake funeral
- the cheap casket where the embalming fluid soaked through. The bottom started to open and the body was sliding out..kicking the arm back in as we put it down.
- standing at the tomb demanding some idiot get their baby away from the mat

raising a glass to my fellow ballwalkers
 
2013-03-29 08:13:07 AM
The horse drawn funeral procession is an old, old tradition:

http://youtu.be/wGSlAkc37K8
 
2013-03-29 08:38:39 AM
Taking care of the horses is the job Browne should have had instead of the head of FEMA
 
2013-03-29 08:41:21 AM

natas6.0: when clinton was appointing pals to get buried there,
we would march to the graves, and do the ceremonies with our nuts hanging out.
"hey, the horse is winking at you"!
- off-post soldiers funeral where the taps player was too drunk and forgot his mouthpiece
he stood at the top of the hill with the van behind him playing taps from a cassette
- the black family that didn't want white guys carrying the casket, they fell in the wet grass and it slid down a long incline
- doing mr. Miyagi's fake funeral
- the cheap casket where the embalming fluid soaked through. The bottom started to open and the body was sliding out..kicking the arm back in as we put it down.
- standing at the tomb demanding some idiot get their baby away from the mat

raising a glass to my fellow ballwalkers


Ha! Haven't seen anything like that yet.

/respect
 
2013-03-29 10:47:16 AM

Danger Avoid Death: Pointy Tail of Satan: They should get Bush and Cheney to pull the caissons.

They need 7 highly trained horses, not a couple of horses' asses.


Done in... however many posts that was.


JosephFinn: Up to eight full-honors funerals a day?  Wow.


Yeah, that is rough duty.  The NCO interviewed in the article says that being part of bringing closure to the family members helps, but still...  Much respect for them.


/"why should we fear the dead?  so many of our friends are amongst them."
 
2013-03-29 11:51:36 AM

Amos Quito: Pointy Tail of Satan: They should get Bush and Cheney to pull the caissons.


No shiat.

We go to such great lengths to bury the war dead with pomp and pageantry. Yet we do nothing to punish those that caused the unnecessary and unjustifiable death and misery.

[upload.wikimedia.org image 220x291]
[upload.wikimedia.org image 220x293]
[upload.wikimedia.org image 220x275]
[upload.wikimedia.org image 220x275]

And yes,

[upload.wikimedia.org image 220x275]

Sorry, you get no pass.

Did I miss anyone? Of course I did.


/So many assholes, so little time
//Fark unjust wars
///And those that perpetrate


Agreed, add to your list

www.suntimes.com
 
2013-03-29 12:46:09 PM
cdn-0.nflximg.com
Fascinating stuff.
 
2013-03-29 07:41:06 PM

ladyfortuna: cuzsis: JosephFinn: Up to eight full-honors funerals a day?  Wow.

Yeah...

 I don't know if I could do that. Remaining somber that long and that often would wear on me....

I lucked into a short trip to DC in 2011 when Lordfortuna had to attend a training session for a few days; he had a college car to get there and was reimbursed for hotel and had a food allowance, so for $40 of my own money I was able to play tourist for three days. Arlington was the first stop on my last day, and I had no idea how big the place was, or how much it would affect me. Ended up spending a big chunk of the day there, and was pretty emotional the whole time. The weather was beautiful though.


[i391.photobucket.com image 682x1024]

[i391.photobucket.com image 682x1024]

[i391.photobucket.com image 682x1024]
[i391.photobucket.com image 682x1024]
[i391.photobucket.com image 850x566] [i391.photobucket.com image 850x566] [i391.photobucket.com image 850x566]


Salute to the fallen. Thanks for sharing your pictures, Ladyfortuna.

///Subby
 
2013-03-30 03:29:40 PM
Glad you enjoyed them. I never deployed, but being prior service, you feel an extra weight while walking around there. The first two are of the Women's Memorial, which I didn't even KNOW about, and I was lucky enough to meet the female general who spearheaded the display areas behind it. I'll never forget that day...
 
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