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(Forbes)   For those who need help deciphering the greatest video game plot/ending in years, an excellent take on Bioshock Infinite. Not that reading this will help one get any sleep   (forbes.com) divider line 8
    More: Spiffy, BioShock Infinite, BioShock, De Witt, plots, possible worlds, space-time, sleeps, alternate ending  
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3977 clicks; posted to Geek » on 28 Mar 2013 at 9:56 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-03-28 10:08:12 PM
2 votes:

Ned Stark: So, since people are agitated about spoilers why not talk about other stuff.


So, since people are so agitated about spoilers, why not NOT READ A FARK THREAD SPECIFICALLY ABOUT DISCUSSING THE ENDING OF THE GAME! Stop complaining about spoilers and just click that big red X at the top of the window. Or just push alt-f4. Either one works.

Here, I'll save you 10-15 hours: (SPOILERS)

Comstock is an alternate universe version of Booker, and in the end you have to kill yourself in order to prevent his rise to power. Oh, and Elizabeth is your daughter.

There. Now can we move on to an interesting and productive discussion of the story without people whining about things?

I think the ending was a real let-down that undermined the entire premise of the story. Think about it, the game goes to great lengths to make it clear that there is an infinite number of alternate universes. So, given that there is an infinite number of worlds, the probability of any possible outcome happening in the multiverse sits at exactly 1, and is completely immutable and unchangeable. In fact, the only to possible alternatives are that either everything that can possibly happen happens, or nothing happens. So when you go back and drown yourself in the baptism water, there is another alternate universe where you DIDN'T go back and drown yourself. There is also an infinite number of universes where Booker gets baptized and accepts it. An infinitely large subset of those universes have the reborn Comstock turning into an evil, insane villain. So going back and drowning yourself in ONE of those possible universes does nothing to alter any of the other ones. The only way for Booker to keep Comstock from being born would be to stop the multiverse from ever existing, at which point he will have killed everything.

So really, there was no point in him going back. In fact, there was no point to any of it. Because the game never wrestles with the idea of predestination and fate, which is what it SHOULD have focused on, or with learning to live in an inperfect world, which would ALSO have been a great take-away. Instead, it tries to go for the whole "noble, self-sacrificing hero" ending, which (again), not only doesn't make sense based on the underlying premise of the story, but also seems hackneyed and cheap.

My ideal ending would have been something like the ending of the first Metal Gear: Solid - You're left wondering if everything you have ever done and will ever do is purely based on faith, and come to the conclusion that it doesn't matter, so long as you believe yourself to be a free agent. Just my 2 cents.
2013-03-28 12:39:33 PM
2 votes:
Elizabeth is a sled.
2013-03-28 06:12:28 PM
1 votes:

Jim_Callahan: It's a fairy story.  There's nothing wrong with fairy stories (a good parallel to what Bioshock Infinite is going for is Alice in Wonderland, for instance), they just don't explore any scientific concepts.  Art major physics isn't the same thing as scientific philosophy.


Science fiction, as a genre, isn't nearly as restrictive as you suggest.  A classic motivation of science fiction is to make an alternate reality and explore the consequences of the alteration. The fact that the alteration might be scientifically plausible doesn't matter- the fact that the alteration might be physically impossible might be part of the draw!
2013-03-28 05:19:14 PM
1 votes:

scottydoesntknow: Ummm where did you get that from? Science has always dealt with the possibility of other worlds/dimensions. Hell String Theory is all about alternate universes. Science fiction is fiction that has a basis or groundwork in science.


Multiverse theory posits non-interacting timelines/universes, the non-interacting part is necessary for the math to work at even a basic level.  The kind of thing where you're randomly wandering between potential timelines and pulling stuff from them is outright fantasy of the "a wizard did it" variety, whereas science fiction posits an exception to or addition to current science and follows through on the implications.  For instance, Jurrasic Park posited that DNA was recoverable from amber-trapped insects (not an infeasible assumption at the time) and followed through on what people could do with that, keeping otherwise to how things actually work.

It's a fairy story.  There's nothing wrong with fairy stories (a good parallel to what Bioshock Infinite is going for is Alice in Wonderland, for instance), they just don't explore any scientific concepts.  Art major physics isn't the same thing as scientific philosophy.

//Albeit I guess you could interpret it as science fiction if you called it a time travel story instead.  References to string theory and so on, however, fall firmly into the meaningless technobabble category, as it doesn't work that way.
2013-03-28 05:07:59 PM
1 votes:

Jim_Callahan: So... that word "scientific", it doesn't mean what the author of TFA seems to think it means. Alternate world stuff is fantasy, not science fiction.


Ummm where did you get that from? Science has always dealt with the possibility of other worlds/dimensions. Hell String Theory is all about alternate universes. Science fiction is fiction that has a basis or groundwork in science.

Jurassic Park is considered science fiction because it's fiction, but the fictional stuff is supported by science (even if the science is fiction). Jurassic Park would be considered fantasy if Dr. Hammond swallowed magic dust and farted out a T-Rex.
2013-03-28 12:01:26 PM
1 votes:

gopher321: Damn, people just started the game, and idiots have to publish stories like this? No spoilers please in this thread.


Are... are you joking?

Is someone forcing you at gunpoint to click the link?
Furthermore, you've stated your intent to READ this thread, which is a thread about an article that explains the ENTIRE story. All the while being mad that spoilers are here.

Are you feeling alright?
2013-03-28 11:14:58 AM
1 votes:
Haven't played the game, but I did read the article.  I won't post spoilers here.  All I have to say is...does no one read science fiction any more?  I mean, it sounds like it was a pretty decent sci-fi story and all, but when reviewers like this guy break out the breathless prose making it sound like this is the greatest thing ever, it makes me raise my eyebrows just a bit.  These aren't new ideas.  Kudos to the game for telling the story well, but let's not act like this isn't a well-worn path.

Oh, well, whatever.  I don't actually care.
2013-03-28 10:45:19 AM
1 votes:
About two hours in. This is most certainly not a bookmark for much later.

I can't believe i spent a full hour in a FPS not shooting anything. The fact that that's not a complaint is a testament to just how beautiful the world they've built is.

Then they handed me a baseball, and things got real ugly real fast.
 
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