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(NBC News)   Google Street View allows you to tour the city of Namie, Japan, abandoned after the Fukushima nuclear accident. The Earth abides   (science.nbcnews.com) divider line 44
    More: Interesting, Japan, Google, Fukushima, nuclear accidents  
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7810 clicks; posted to Main » on 28 Mar 2013 at 8:52 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-03-28 04:09:42 AM  
what about the dude?

does he abide??

with his friends jesus the pedophile
white the russian
and ego the pragmatist?
 
2013-03-28 08:58:23 AM  
www.godlikeproductions.com
 
2013-03-28 08:58:32 AM  
1.bp.blogspot.com
Man teaches class what it's like to live near the irradiated communities of Fukushima

 
2013-03-28 08:59:41 AM  
George R. Stewart nods approvingly at subby's headline.
 
2013-03-28 09:07:19 AM  
Boss: "Hey,  Google Street View driver, we want you to drive through the radiation filled no-go zone..."

Driver: "F*ck you"
 
2013-03-28 09:12:13 AM  
Wonder what they did with the car afterwards.

Dude, why is there a blue haze around your car when it rains?
 
2013-03-28 09:16:38 AM  

tillerman35: George R. Stewart nods approvingly at subby's headline.


Does anyone have a hammer?
 
2013-03-28 09:24:24 AM  
 
2013-03-28 09:27:16 AM  

lendog: McDonald's

http://maps.google.com/maps?q=Namie,+Japan+mcdonalds&hl=en&ll=37.496 96 9,140.990615&spn=0.001841,0.003484&sll=37.497633,140.990939&sspn=0.001 249,0.002763&t=h&gl=us&z=19&layer=c&cbll=37.497054,140.99064&panoid=OS vtAxP_Rk6Sw3htr69RNA&cbp=12,127.36,,0,3.2


It's actually a shopping center with a McDs.

Bet the food is still edible. Or as edible as McDonald's food can be.
 
2013-03-28 09:30:38 AM  
are plants just immune to radiation or is it that their metabolism is so slow that it takes longer to see the effects?
 
2013-03-28 09:34:08 AM  

rwfan: Wonder what they did with the car afterwards.

Dude, why is there a blue haze around your car when it rains?



Repo Man re-make?
 
2013-03-28 09:35:32 AM  
Get out of here STALKER!
 
2013-03-28 09:41:42 AM  
Did they use one of their driver optional cars or was it remote controlled?
 
2013-03-28 10:09:43 AM  

lendog: McDonald's

http://maps.google.com/maps?q=Namie,+Japan+mcdonalds&hl=en&ll=37.496 96 9,140.990615&spn=0.001841,0.003484&sll=37.497633,140.990939&sspn=0.001 249,0.002763&t=h&gl=us&z=19&layer=c&cbll=37.497054,140.99064&panoid=OS vtAxP_Rk6Sw3htr69RNA&cbp=12,127.36,,0,3.2


As a child I had night terrors of wandering though empty cities, in a odd way these pictures feel like I've come home. Sort of a dream come true.
 
2013-03-28 10:29:38 AM  

wildstarr: Boss: "Hey,  Google Street View driver, we want you to drive through the radiation filled no-go zone..."

Driver: "F*ck you"


Driver 1: "Why are there those weird speckles on all the photos?"

Driver 2: "Hey chuck, what does it look like when hard radiation hits a photo-detector?"

Driver 1 and 2: "fark."
 
2013-03-28 10:30:32 AM  

lendog: McDonald's

http://maps.google.com/maps?q=Namie,+Japan+mcdonalds&hl=en&ll=37.496 96 9,140.990615&spn=0.001841,0.003484&sll=37.497633,140.990939&sspn=0.001 249,0.002763&t=h&gl=us&z=19&layer=c&cbll=37.497054,140.99064&panoid=OS vtAxP_Rk6Sw3htr69RNA&cbp=12,127.36,,0,3.2


Wow, Mac AND takoyaki in the same place?  Genius!
 
2013-03-28 10:30:56 AM  
Totally disappointed at the lack of zombies....
 
2013-03-28 10:32:44 AM  

DubtodaIll: are plants just immune to radiation or is it that their metabolism is so slow that it takes longer to see the effects?


Mostly the radiation in the exclusion zone isn't that bad and as a general rule simpler organisms are more resistant to radiation.

/also it takes A LOT of radiation to kill something outright, the bigger danger is nasty genetic mutations(cancer) and birth defects
 
2013-03-28 10:34:11 AM  

Devolving_Spud: [www.godlikeproductions.com image 576x458]


A bakeneko!

Seriously, why is there no 'Sad' tag? Having everything you've ever known and loved wiped out in one moment, never to return again?
 
2013-03-28 10:35:31 AM  
 
2013-03-28 10:38:44 AM  

Jon iz teh kewl: what about the dude?

does he abide??

with his friends jesus the pedophile
white the russian
and ego the pragmatist?


Long before the dude:
Earth Abides
Pretty cool reading for a kid in 5th grade.
 
2013-03-28 10:45:26 AM  

SickAsAParrot: The traffic lights still work


https://maps.google.co .uk/maps?q=Namie,+Fukushima+Prefecture,+Japan&hl =en&ll=37.492337,140.994587&spn=0.000017,0.009195&sll=37.309014,141.12 7625&sspn=0.742752,1.17691&oq=namie&t=h&hnear=Namie,+Futaba+District,+ Fukushima+Prefecture,+Japan&z=17&layer=c&cbll=37.492322,140.994431&pan oid=9HpmyJMxaCzTMpcBE69eJA&cbp=12,170.85,,0,0


The water does too. Some people won't leave, and so the basic amenities are still provided.

Look for laundry hanging outside.
 
2013-03-28 11:42:22 AM  
Looks like Namie has a current radiation levels of 0.83-3.2 mSv/hr or 7.3-28 Sv/yr.  That's around 8 to 32 to times the typical levels in the rest of Japan.  Americans typically get 3 mSv/yr (so parts of Namie get as much dose in an hour that Americans get in a year).
 
2013-03-28 11:42:26 AM  
Looks like more than a few people are going to be getting nastygrams from their HOA.
 
2013-03-28 11:57:23 AM  

rwfan: Looks like Namie has a current radiation levels of 0.83-3.2 mSv/hr or 7.3-28 Sv/yr.  That's around 8 to 32 to times the typical levels in the rest of Japan.  Americans typically get 3 mSv/yr (so parts of Namie get as much dose in an hour that Americans get in a year).


I assume the radiation reporting stations are on the ground, I wonder if you can see them in street view but my guess is the only thing you would be able to spot is the solar cell running the thing.  There is one at the Namie town office but I don't see anything.
 
2013-03-28 11:59:33 AM  

SickAsAParrot: The traffic lights still work


https://maps.google.co .uk/maps?q=Namie,+Fukushima+Prefecture,+Japan&hl =en&ll=37.492337,140.994587&spn=0.000017,0.009195&sll=37.309014,141.12 7625&sspn=0.742752,1.17691&oq=namie&t=h&hnear=Namie,+Futaba+District,+ Fukushima+Prefecture,+Japan&z=17&layer=c&cbll=37.492322,140.994431&pan oid=9HpmyJMxaCzTMpcBE69eJA&cbp=12,170.85,,0,0


BTW, if you take an immediate left and then go straight, you'll find that Google isn't the only one there.
 
2013-03-28 12:02:36 PM  

AverageAmericanGuy: SickAsAParrot: The traffic lights still work


https://maps.google.co .uk/maps?q=Namie,+Fukushima+Prefecture,+Japan&hl =en&ll=37.492337,140.994587&spn=0.000017,0.009195&sll=37.309014,141.12 7625&sspn=0.742752,1.17691&oq=namie&t=h&hnear=Namie,+Futaba+District,+ Fukushima+Prefecture,+Japan&z=17&layer=c&cbll=37.492322,140.994431&pan oid=9HpmyJMxaCzTMpcBE69eJA&cbp=12,170.85,,0,0

BTW, if you take an immediate left and then go straight, you'll find that Google isn't the only one there.


Over by the town hall a truck drives by the google car.  It doesn't look like anyone is picking up the trash though.
 
2013-03-28 12:13:55 PM  

rwfan: Looks like Namie has a current radiation levels of 0.83-3.2 mSv/hr or 7.3-28 Sv/yr.  That's around 8 to 32 to times the typical levels in the rest of Japan.  Americans typically get 3 mSv/yr (so parts of Namie get as much dose in an hour that Americans get in a year).


I'd be curious to know the radiation levels of non-air sources: say the dust that's settled in homes, or soil contamination levels.
 
2013-03-28 12:23:58 PM  
I find this very sad... I can't imagine this happening to a town near my home, nor do I want to imagine it.
 
2013-03-28 12:25:57 PM  
Love the bike lanes.
 
2013-03-28 01:16:49 PM  
No thanks. If I ever go back to Japan, it's straight to Fujikawaguchiko.

jrosenberry1.files.wordpress.com

And the caves near Aokigahara

s1.hubimg.com

www.fujisan.ne.jp
 
2013-03-28 01:20:21 PM  

MrSteve007: rwfan: Looks like Namie has a current radiation levels of 0.83-3.2 mSv/hr or 7.3-28 Sv/yr.  That's around 8 to 32 to times the typical levels in the rest of Japan.  Americans typically get 3 mSv/yr (so parts of Namie get as much dose in an hour that Americans get in a year).

I'd be curious to know the radiation levels of non-air sources: say the dust that's settled in homes, or soil contamination levels.


I am pretty sure the sources of the radiation (primarily compounds of Iodine and Cesium)  are in the soil but they are beta and gamma emitters.  I am not sure the levels of radiation are going to be a lot higher if you stuck a probe into the soil, certainly not for the gamma emitters.
 
2013-03-28 02:35:46 PM  

DubtodaIll: are plants just immune to radiation or is it that their metabolism is so slow that it takes longer to see the effects?


Off the top of my head, I'd reply that plants are not immune to radiation but are variously affected by doses, just like animals. Radiation that would kill humans can be survived by rats, and radiation that would kill rats can be survived by cockroaches. Trees are more vulnerable than some plants but even D. radiodurans so-namedbecause it can survive outerspace levels of radiation thanks to some remarkable DNA repair capabilities, is not immune. All radiation is risky. A tiny dose might kill one out of a billion people, but that's little comfort if you are one of the people in question.

Radiation has different effects in different organs also. Getting radioactive dust in your lungs is deadlier than getting it on your feet. An animal that washes itself with its mouth (flies, cats) is more vulnerable than one that doesn't bathe, and one which drinks water is more vulnerable than one that gets its water from thick-skinned fruit which it bites or breaks open without chewing and swallowing.

Infants are at risk because of mother's milk or cow's milk and because they are weaker than full grown adults. Iodine is not given to the elderly because they don't need it as much as children and pregnant women and because the side effects are more of a risk, while the benefits are smaller.

Many other factors play a role:  how fast the organism grows, how much radiation it absorbs, whether it has bones, and so forth. Many plants grow very slowly or very rapidly and would escape radiation damage. A tree, for example, grows in a thin outer layer of living cells. Radiation might destroy this whole layer but not harm the dead wood inside. Or the tree might stop growing for a year or more, having lost its leaves to radiation like a person who loses hair and teeth, etc.

The food we consume (notably bananas and brazil nuts) are naturally radioactive because some of the elements have radioactive isotopes. Potassium in the case of bananas and Brazil nuts. Of course, potassium is needed by your body and you should not boycott bananas and Brazil nuts for this reason alone. The risk-benefit analysis says eat well and don't worry about every little inconvenience or risk.

It is never an either/or proposition. Radiation affects each type of living thing differently. One of the big dangers of a nuclear war would be the lose of keystone species that are particularly vulnerable but vital to the community of living organisms. Whole ecosystems might collapse, while other ecosystems might thrive without apparent long-term damage.
 
2013-03-28 02:40:13 PM  
Isn't that abandoned Japanese city one of the exotic locations in the James Bond movie Skyfall?

If not, they certainly did a lot of expensive CGI to produce something remarkably similar.

If you want to see it again, you can rent or borrow the movie. It's a shame to waste a whole city, but it looks like the city had no room for parks or green spaces, and it must have been a semi-unpleasant place to live, being a bit of over-developed urban landscape stuck on a fairly small island not unlike the dark ominous city in  Dark City.
 
2013-03-28 03:34:58 PM  
i.imgur.com
 
2013-03-28 03:39:42 PM  

brantgoose: DubtodaIll: are plants just immune to radiation or is it that their metabolism is so slow that it takes longer to see the effects?

Off the top of my head, I'd reply that plants are not immune to radiation but are variously affected by doses, just like animals. Radiation that would kill humans can be survived by rats, and radiation that would kill rats can be survived by cockroaches. Trees are more vulnerable than some plants but even D. radiodurans so-namedbecause it can survive outerspace levels of radiation thanks to some remarkable DNA repair capabilities, is not immune. All radiation is risky. A tiny dose might kill one out of a billion people, but that's little comfort if you are one of the people in question.

Radiation has different effects in different organs also. Getting radioactive dust in your lungs is deadlier than getting it on your feet. An animal that washes itself with its mouth (flies, cats) is more vulnerable than one that doesn't bathe, and one which drinks water is more vulnerable than one that gets its water from thick-skinned fruit which it bites or breaks open without chewing and swallowing.

Infants are at risk because of mother's milk or cow's milk and because they are weaker than full grown adults. Iodine is not given to the elderly because they don't need it as much as children and pregnant women and because the side effects are more of a risk, while the benefits are smaller.

Many other factors play a role:  how fast the organism grows, how much radiation it absorbs, whether it has bones, and so forth. Many plants grow very slowly or very rapidly and would escape radiation damage. A tree, for example, grows in a thin outer layer of living cells. Radiation might destroy this whole layer but not harm the dead wood inside. Or the tree might stop growing for a year or more, having lost its leaves to radiation like a person who loses hair and teeth, etc.

The food we consume (notably bananas and brazil nuts) are naturally radioactive because ...


I remember watching one of those "X days after human population dies out" shows on Discovery years ago where all the nuclear power plants eventually overheat and blow up. The radiation particles settle on the foliage and over a period of hundreds of years or something those particles eventually make it through their roots and down into the soil. At that point it would be safer for animal life that are effected by the radiation (except maybe subterranean dwellers?). Memory is kind of fuzzy on the time or the process though.
 
2013-03-28 05:53:27 PM  

brantgoose: Isn't that abandoned Japanese city one of the exotic locations in the James Bond movie Skyfall?

If not, they certainly did a lot of expensive CGI to produce something remarkably similar.

If you want to see it again, you can rent or borrow the movie. It's a shame to waste a whole city, but it looks like the city had no room for parks or green spaces, and it must have been a semi-unpleasant place to live, being a bit of over-developed urban landscape stuck on a fairly small island not unlike the dark ominous city in  Dark City.


That was Hashima Island

By the way, Street View works for many coastal areas where clean up is still underway. The piles of debris and denuded landscape is truly astounding

/subs
 
2013-03-28 05:55:18 PM  

zerkalo: brantgoose: Isn't that abandoned Japanese city one of the exotic locations in the James Bond movie Skyfall?

If not, they certainly did a lot of expensive CGI to produce something remarkably similar.

If you want to see it again, you can rent or borrow the movie. It's a shame to waste a whole city, but it looks like the city had no room for parks or green spaces, and it must have been a semi-unpleasant place to live, being a bit of over-developed urban landscape stuck on a fairly small island not unlike the dark ominous city in  Dark City.

That was Hashima Island

By the way, Street View works for many coastal areas where clean up is still underway. The piles of debris and denuded landscape is truly astounding

/subs


Oh hay! I misspoke. Per wikipedia: <I>"In the 2012 , the island served as an inspiration for the lair of villain Raoul Silva but filming did not take place on the island itself. One section was recreated at  Pinewood Studios in Great Britain and the rest via CGI
 
2013-03-28 06:05:46 PM  

neversubmit: lendog: McDonald's

http://maps.google.com/maps?q=Namie,+Japan+mcdonalds&hl=en&ll=37.496 96 9,140.990615&spn=0.001841,0.003484&sll=37.497633,140.990939&sspn=0.001 249,0.002763&t=h&gl=us&z=19&layer=c&cbll=37.497054,140.99064&panoid=OS vtAxP_Rk6Sw3htr69RNA&cbp=12,127.36,,0,3.2

As a child I had night terrors of wandering though empty cities, in a odd way these pictures feel like I've come home. Sort of a dream come true.


Reminds me of a apocalypse movie. Everyones just...gone.
 
2013-03-28 06:50:37 PM  
 
2013-03-28 08:56:28 PM  
Windows intact, and no looters.

That says a lot about Japanese society
 
2013-03-29 12:34:12 AM  
Man, these screenshot previews of the next Fallout game look incredible!
 
2013-03-29 11:55:57 AM  

Devolving_Spud: [www.godlikeproductions.com image 576x458]


static.environmentalgraffiti.com www.coollikepie.com
4.bp.blogspot.com2.bp.blogspot.com
 
2013-03-30 12:31:02 AM  
https://cbks0.google.com/cbk?output=report&panoid=_tOd7wYuviKNRZMGktT_ RA&cb_client=maps_sv&cbp=1,218.91009006528213,,0,14.468527918781733&hl =ja">https://cbks0.google.com/cbk?output=report&panoid=_tOd7wYuviKNRZ MGktT_ RA&cb_client=maps_sv&cbp=1,218.91009006528213,,0,14.468527918781733&hl =ja

I found a dude!
 
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