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(Mental Floss)   What the Internet looked like in 1995. "Successful home pages could be seen by twenty or thirty thousand people a week"   (mentalfloss.com) divider line 131
    More: Interesting, internet, FTP, security software  
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7375 clicks; posted to Geek » on 27 Mar 2013 at 3:02 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-03-27 02:27:46 PM
DAMMIT!
Ten minutes already and this page still hasn't loaded. That's it. I'm getting a new 14.4 modem.
mentalfloss.com
 
2013-03-27 02:35:17 PM

jehovahs witness protection: DAMMIT!
Ten minutes already and this page still hasn't loaded. That's it. I'm getting a new 14.4 modem.
[mentalfloss.com image 640x430]



CSB:

Back in high school, I recommended that our family should buy a faster modem because "I don't want to wait a half hour just to bring up a search engine".

My Mom's actual response:

"You need to learn how to be patient."

ARGGGGGGGHHHHHHH!!!!

/Fortunately, she's not like that anymore.
//Brother and I bought our parents an iPad for Christmas a while back.
///Mom hogs it all the time.
 
2013-03-27 03:10:40 PM
I had a homepage in 1995 so I'm getting a kick...

/certain I'm not even close to the most experienced user on Fark
 
2013-03-27 03:13:00 PM
Back in those days you were NOT cool, if you had an AOL or Compuserve email address. My first cool email was a hooked.net domain. Had to use Compuserves dial in numbers to get to it.
 
2013-03-27 03:13:29 PM
1995.  I was rocking a concentric.net shell account.  Then I got one with the local ISP and a job, shortly thereafter.
 
2013-03-27 03:15:10 PM
Damn...First ISP was a Prodigy account on a 14.4 modem around 1995.  Those were the days...
 
2013-03-27 03:16:44 PM
I remember when my mother used Q-Link on a Commodore 64. Suck it, Facebook!
 
2013-03-27 03:19:25 PM
animetoyboy.angelfire.com
 
2013-03-27 03:22:54 PM
The bbs I played a MMUD on was just getting telnet at around that time.
 
2013-03-27 03:24:42 PM
I hear the internet comes on computers now.
 
2013-03-27 03:31:27 PM
That's how many views your nude self-shot gets now.
 
2013-03-27 03:32:39 PM

Anastacya: I remember when my mother used Q-Link on a Commodore 64. Suck it, Facebook!


I used QLink on a C-64...  guess what QLink turned into....


AOL.

/Wondering if I ever saw your mother in Rabbit Jack's Casino.....
 
2013-03-27 03:33:05 PM
Getting a kick out of this because I was a cameraman on that show.   It was the biggest computer show on television at the time, seen all over the world on PBS and other outlets.   Back when people got their computer information from that thar teevee thing.
 
2013-03-27 03:39:16 PM
Ahhh, yes. The days when you would download a picture, and first her hair would appear, and then her forehead, and you would go make a sandwich and by the time you got back her eyes would be on the screen. Line by line your screen would fill up, and your anticipation would build up, until finally, GODAMMIT SHE'S GOT A PENIS! WHAT THE fark IS THIS BULLshiat?
 
2013-03-27 03:41:25 PM

SurfaceTension: /certain I'm not even close to the most experienced user on Fark


If you've ever seen a live nude woman, you probably are the most experienced
 
2013-03-27 03:42:15 PM

SurfaceTension: I had a homepage in 1995 so I'm getting a kick...

/certain I'm not even close to the most experienced user on Fark


I still have an electronic mail address from that era....that I check about once a year. I think it's filled with offers from Prodigy.
 
2013-03-27 03:44:25 PM

Smoky Dragon Dish: Anastacya: I remember when my mother used Q-Link on a Commodore 64. Suck it, Facebook!

I used QLink on a C-64...  guess what QLink turned into....


AOL.

/Wondering if I ever saw your mother in Rabbit Jack's Casino.....


Few people remember the early history of AOL.    And QLink didn't actually turn into AOL.  AOL was a separate service started by the same company, Quantum Computer Services in Vienna VA for Apple and PC users.    The C=64 and Amiga centric Q-link went away.   Some people online have resurrected the server software along with an emulator.

Aside from Rabbitjacks (which was really cool for the time) remember Club Caribe?  The first real avatar based social environment.   Also seen on Q-Link was a very early implementation of Easy-SAABRE which became Yahoo Travel.

The biggest suck factor of those early networks including compuserve, GENIE etc. is that they were all pay per minute usage for their premium features.   I spent a lot of time on local multi-line BBS's instead.  (galaticomm based systems which ran on 386's with serial card expansions - some had up to 32 lines using the galactibox serial port expansions.)
 
2013-03-27 03:45:12 PM
I remember those days.
 
2013-03-27 03:47:37 PM

Smoky Dragon Dish: Anastacya: I remember when my mother used Q-Link on a Commodore 64. Suck it, Facebook!

I used QLink on a C-64...  guess what QLink turned into....


AOL.

/Wondering if I ever saw your mother in Rabbit Jack's Casino.....


Good possibility. Her name was LoisLane. I remember Rabbit Jack's, too. I used to beg her to let us bop around on the "games". And Club Caribe. I remember the nude beach, as well.

My mom has a Fast Hackem' cartridge and we had hundreds of games. Hell, maybe even thousands. But I do remember her being on Q-Link a lot; in fact, it was how she met my stepfather. This August they will be married for 23 years... I think? Maybe 22. I can't remember if it was 1990 or 91 before we moved to Cleveland from Dayton.

/damn I feel old
 
2013-03-27 03:48:19 PM
And so went the sad sunset on the heyday of the BBS.  Those were some fun times.
 
2013-03-27 03:48:58 PM
I think my old concentric.net email exists out there somewhere- named after a William Gibson character, natch!
 
2013-03-27 03:51:56 PM

GoldSpider: And so went the sad sunset on the heyday of the BBS.  Those were some fun times.


Sure was.  With the local boards we'd get together once a month "IRL"...was nice to actually meet people, make friends and find out who was behind the handles.  It was real motley group of people of all ages and personalities, probably one of the most diverse group of humans you'll ever find, since the normal social prejudices were gone as we were only text handles, no pictures.   There were drunken parties with plenty of good looking women, it wasn't just the stereotype 'nerd' logging on.  A lot of high school kids, and then an older set of working professionals in Silicon Valley.
 
2013-03-27 03:55:17 PM

harlock: Getting a kick out of this because I was a cameraman on that show.   It was the biggest computer show on television at the time, seen all over the world on PBS and other outlets.   Back when people got their computer information from that thar teevee thing.


Well, I liked the show. I got a lot of info from it. So, kudos!
 
2013-03-27 03:56:33 PM

SurfaceTension: I had a homepage in 1995 so I'm getting a kick...

/certain I'm not even close to the most experienced user on Fark


That takes me way back. My history on the net from that era is somewhat murky, but I do recall having an AIM account in 1997 about 6 months after they started up (still have it, though I use XMPP these days). I bought my domain in 1999 -- it's 14 years old now. Makes me feel old. :/

I remember playing the tank game Bolo on a Mac over LocalTalk networks (or was it AppleTalk?) back in the late 1980s.

It's remarkable to see how many of the actually useful (as opposed to profit-driven) stuff from back then is still online.
 
2013-03-27 04:02:20 PM
Phhhht. Amateurs.

www.azog.org

I was using Q-Link for the Commodore 128 and PC Pursuit back in 1988!

When the text of BBS messages were scrolling by faster than you could read them, you knew you were going at warp speed.
 
2013-03-27 04:03:43 PM

GoldSpider: And so went the sad sunset on the heyday of the BBS.  Those were some fun times.


This.  I remember when we were on FIDONet and they first connected to "that ARPA InterNet thing" and we surfed Caltech's website for porn stories.  I do miss the good old days of local BBSes and the door games.  Hour upon hour of Tradewars, and then I got involved with making rooms for the local MUD.  Eventually, I started telnetting to Medievia.  Wow, back when.
 
2013-03-27 04:05:26 PM

GoldSpider: And so went the sad sunset on the heyday of the BBS.  Those were some fun times.



My one and only BBS experience was some nice guy sending me scans of old Hustlers and then telling me about this new rooftop deck he built and how I should come over and sunbathe nude on it with him.


/I was 12

//And a dude

///I didn't, before you ask
 
2013-03-27 04:08:31 PM
I miss the multi-line BBS days. £inq was the big one I used in Montreal.
 
2013-03-27 04:08:47 PM
i.imgur.com
 
2013-03-27 04:11:16 PM
Starting around 1986, I went from using my dad's 300-baud acoustical-cup modem attached to a thermal printer (no screen), to an Apple IIc 1200 baud, to an Amiga 500 2400 baud.  Those were the days, for sure.  My friends and I would call random phone numbers to see if any computers picked up.  Good times.
 
2013-03-27 04:13:23 PM

RangerTaylor: GoldSpider: And so went the sad sunset on the heyday of the BBS.  Those were some fun times.

This.  I remember when we were on FIDONet and they first connected to "that ARPA InterNet thing" and we surfed Caltech's website for porn stories.  I do miss the good old days of local BBSes and the door games.  Hour upon hour of Tradewars, and then I got involved with making rooms for the local MUD.  Eventually, I started telnetting to Medievia.  Wow, back when.


FrontDoor was the beginning and the end for the "local" BBS.

Somewhere in NJ exists three Colorado tape backups of Death Star BBS - Edison, NJ. A Renegade board, naturally.

//also was on Medievia
///it's somehow still alive. and somehow still hasn't implemented any of the ridiculous "features" they claimed were coming... 10 years ago.
 
2013-03-27 04:14:16 PM

harlock: Sure was. With the local boards we'd get together once a month "IRL"...was nice to actually meet people, make friends and find out who was behind the handles. It was real motley group of people of all ages and personalities, probably one of the most diverse group of humans you'll ever find, since the normal social prejudices were gone as we were only text handles, no pictures.


I was an awkward teenager living in a relatively remote, sparse area.  It was my only link to the outside world.  This is the time period I suspect us old(er)-timers will reflect fondly upon when asked by our children and grandchildren about "the time before the Internet".
 
2013-03-27 04:16:40 PM
i86.photobucket.com
 
2013-03-27 04:18:11 PM
Ahh I miss playing Gemstone 3 sometimes
 
2013-03-27 04:18:30 PM

SurfaceTension: I had a homepage in 1995 so I'm getting a kick...


I ran a personal website in 1993.  That was back when "home page" meant "the page that your browser takes you to when you click the Home button", and not "your personal website".
 
2013-03-27 04:18:38 PM
I avoided computers in 1995 cause in that year, my GF of 4 years left me for someone she met...online.  The mere soud of a modem generated a wash of emotion.
I was convinced they were THE GOT-DAMN DEBIL! .


I was back by 1996, and working professionally in IT the next year.
Still have my 6 character yahoo address which I picked up in 97?

I was an early adopter of online banking.
I have a first initial last name username.  And my last name is common enough...

leet I am.
 
2013-03-27 04:20:13 PM
I was there and don't miss it at all, actually. Nostalgia is the cancer of memory.
 
2013-03-27 04:23:18 PM

Valiente: I was there and don't miss it at all, actually. Nostalgia is the cancer of memory.


I'm nostalgic for BBSes and Usenet; in both cases, I think some things were lost in the transition to the modern Web.  I'm not nostalgic for the early Web; it's been superseded.
 
2013-03-27 04:25:38 PM

harlock: Smoky Dragon Dish: Anastacya: I remember when my mother used Q-Link on a Commodore 64. Suck it, Facebook!

I used QLink on a C-64...  guess what QLink turned into....


AOL.

/Wondering if I ever saw your mother in Rabbit Jack's Casino.....

Few people remember the early history of AOL.    And QLink didn't actually turn into AOL.  AOL was a separate service started by the same company, Quantum Computer Services in Vienna VA for Apple and PC users.    The C=64 and Amiga centric Q-link went away.   Some people online have resurrected the server software along with an emulator.

Aside from Rabbitjacks (which was really cool for the time) remember Club Caribe?  The first real avatar based social environment.   Also seen on Q-Link was a very early implementation of Easy-SAABRE which became Yahoo Travel.

The biggest suck factor of those early networks including compuserve, GENIE etc. is that they were all pay per minute usage for their premium features.   I spent a lot of time on local multi-line BBS's instead.  (galaticomm based systems which ran on 386's with serial card expansions - some had up to 32 lines using the galactibox serial port expansions.)


Technically, yes.  I do remember getting a message on QLink asking about if we would support a QLink port to PCs, around 1989.  Although QLink didn't morph into AOL exactly, I give a lot of credit to QLink for at least kicking down the door for the AOL service.

I don't remember Club Carribe.  I may have gone to college by then... 1990.  By then, I had the internet to play with, mostly usenet and e-mail.
 
2013-03-27 04:27:02 PM

Ambitwistor: I'm nostalgic for BBSes and Usenet; in both cases, I think some things were lost in the transition to the modern Web.


Users of the "proto-Web" like us know better than anyone how good we have it now.
 
2013-03-27 04:27:06 PM

Frozboz: Starting around 1986, I went from using my dad's 300-baud acoustical-cup modem attached to a thermal printer (no screen), to an Apple IIc 1200 baud, to an Amiga 500 2400 baud.  Those were the days, for sure.  My friends and I would call random phone numbers to see if any computers picked up.  Good times.


War dialing.  I never tried it, since I would have killed my parents phone bill.
 
2013-03-27 04:32:32 PM

MrJesus: RangerTaylor: GoldSpider: And so went the sad sunset on the heyday of the BBS.  Those were some fun times.

This.  I remember when we were on FIDONet and they first connected to "that ARPA InterNet thing" and we surfed Caltech's website for porn stories.  I do miss the good old days of local BBSes and the door games.  Hour upon hour of Tradewars, and then I got involved with making rooms for the local MUD.  Eventually, I started telnetting to Medievia.  Wow, back when.

FrontDoor was the beginning and the end for the "local" BBS.

Somewhere in NJ exists three Colorado tape backups of Death Star BBS - Edison, NJ. A Renegade board, naturally.

//also was on Medievia
///it's somehow still alive. and somehow still hasn't implemented any of the ridiculous "features" they claimed were coming... 10 years ago.


I was a co-sysop on a Renegade board based out of central Oklahoma in the mid 90s.  There were about a dozen local boards I was on, and enjoyed immensely.  I remember finding people similar to me and my friends, which I didn't think existed, all over the state.  As the decade wore on, more people would make mention of getting internet access.  After a few weeks, they would drift off, and we'd never see them again.  It was like this black hole that stole a few users each week.

Then I found out why.  It was a nice bridge to cross, but I did miss playing LotRD and Falcon's Eye.  I miss trolling download zones and chatting with sysops and trading ASCII artwork.  But once you cross over, you lose the connection to the local boards.  It's just inevitable for most people.  Fond memories, though.
 
2013-03-27 04:35:02 PM
I wonder which amusingly archaic episode of "Computer Chronicles" Mental Floss will feature tomorrow...
 
2013-03-27 04:36:55 PM

SurfaceTension: I had a homepage in 1995 so I'm getting a kick...


Did it look like this:

upload.wikimedia.orgupload.wikimedia.orgupload.wikimedia.orgupload.wikimedia.org

?
 
2013-03-27 04:38:07 PM

Pick: Back in those days you were NOT cool, if you had an AOL or Compuserve email address. My first cool email was a hooked.net domain. Had to use Compuserves dial in numbers to get to it.


I always knew I wasn't cool.

/ganjs­mokr[nospam-﹫-backwards]lo­a*com
 
2013-03-27 04:39:04 PM

SurfaceTension: I had a homepage in 1995 so I'm getting a kick...

/certain I'm not even close to the most experienced user on Fark


I didn't put up a web page until 1997. I haven't updated it in a very long time.
 
2013-03-27 04:40:04 PM

Pick: Back in those days you were NOT cool, if you had an AOL or Compuserve email address. My first cool email was a hooked.net domain. Had to use Compuserves dial in numbers to get to it.


Netcom.com, biatches!
 
2013-03-27 04:40:05 PM

DVDave: SurfaceTension: I had a homepage in 1995 so I'm getting a kick...

Did it look like this:

[upload.wikimedia.org image 200x150][upload.wikimedia.org image 200x150][upload.wikimedia.org image 200x150][upload.wikimedia.org image 200x150]

?


Or this?

24.media.tumblr.com
 
2013-03-27 04:41:30 PM

Ambitwistor: Valiente: I was there and don't miss it at all, actually. Nostalgia is the cancer of memory.

I'm nostalgic for BBSes and Usenet; in both cases, I think some things were lost in the transition to the modern Web.  I'm not nostalgic for the early Web; it's been superseded.


Ahhhh, Usenet.  Fark before FARK came into being.
 
2013-03-27 04:42:02 PM

rumpelstiltskin: Ahhh, yes. The days when you would download a picture, and first her hair would appear, and then her forehead, and you would go make a sandwich and by the time you got back her eyes would be on the screen. Line by line your screen would fill up, and your anticipation would build up, until finally, GODAMMIT SHE'S GOT A PENIS! WHAT THE fark IS THIS BULLshiat?


My boss reads Fark? There goes my job.
 
2013-03-27 04:55:15 PM

tripleseven: I avoided computers in 1995 cause in that year, my GF of 4 years left me for someone she met...online.  The mere soud of a modem generated a wash of emotion.
I was convinced they were THE GOT-DAMN DEBIL! .


I was back by 1996, and working professionally in IT the next year.
Still have my 6 character yahoo address which I picked up in 97?

I was an early adopter of online banking.
I have a first initial last name username.  And my last name is common enough...

leet I am.


Hate to admit it, but I still have a 7 character Yahoo username...with a 4 digit password.
I use it to sign up for shiat and NOTHING else.
 
2013-03-27 04:59:23 PM

Rwa2play: Ambitwistor: Valiente: I was there and don't miss it at all, actually. Nostalgia is the cancer of memory.

I'm nostalgic for BBSes and Usenet; in both cases, I think some things were lost in the transition to the modern Web.  I'm not nostalgic for the early Web; it's been superseded.

Ahhhh, Usenet.  Fark before FARK came into being.


Not really. The really cool part of Usenet is that moderation was minimal. If I wanted to ask a question or start a discussion, I simply posted it. I don't ever remember having a post rejected. Today, that's not so easy. Yeah, we've got various web sites that try to do the same thing, but none of them are even remotely as useful as Usenet.
 
2013-03-27 05:00:13 PM
i.imgur.com
 
2013-03-27 05:01:30 PM

rumpelstiltskin: Ahhh, yes. The days when you would download a picture, and first her hair would appear, and then her forehead, and you would go make a sandwich and by the time you got back her eyes would be on the screen. Line by line your screen would fill up, and your anticipation would build up, until finally, GODAMMIT SHE'S GOT A PENIS! WHAT THE fark IS THIS BULLshiat?


ROFLMAO!  yer right
 
2013-03-27 05:08:17 PM

jehovahs witness protection: tripleseven: I avoided computers in 1995 cause in that year, my GF of 4 years left me for someone she met...online.  The mere soud of a modem generated a wash of emotion.
I was convinced they were THE GOT-DAMN DEBIL! .


I was back by 1996, and working professionally in IT the next year.
Still have my 6 character yahoo address which I picked up in 97?

I was an early adopter of online banking.
I have a first initial last name username.  And my last name is common enough...

leet I am.

Hate to admit it, but I still have a 7 character Yahoo username...with a 4 digit password.
I use it to sign up for shiat and NOTHING else.


Losers.

4 character Yahoo username.  Only used for spam possible login creations.
 
2013-03-27 05:16:54 PM
Interesting.  Apparently someone is using my yahoo username for their iTunes.  There are a bunch of receipts for songs purchased.

I wonder if I can do a password reset on her account.....naw.  That would be cruel.
 
2013-03-27 05:21:40 PM

BizarreMan: Interesting.  Apparently someone is using my yahoo username for their iTunes.  There are a bunch of receipts for songs purchased.

I wonder if I can do a password reset on her account.....naw.  That would be cruel.


Deleting all the contacts and important emails would be very cruel...
 
2013-03-27 05:31:18 PM
For me, the main thing online back then was Usenet. Man, I miss Usenet. B(

/have to use groups.google now, and it sucks
//hardly any posts these days anyway
 
2013-03-27 05:41:14 PM
I had a xoom site AND a geocities site.  Those sites had lots of important information on them, let me tell you.

/dancing baby.gif
 
2013-03-27 05:45:16 PM

Ambitwistor: Valiente: I was there and don't miss it at all, actually. Nostalgia is the cancer of memory.

I'm nostalgic for BBSes and Usenet; in both cases, I think some things were lost in the transition to the modern Web.  I'm not nostalgic for the early Web; it's been superseded.


The USENET still exists, its now part of the modern internet (instead of riding the ARPANET). Sadly very few ISPs offer USENET access anymore- you can thank its rise as a file sharing system for that.
 
2013-03-27 05:46:07 PM
I miss that sense of excitement.
 
2013-03-27 05:47:36 PM
Sadly, my first page from that era is gone.

It was on members.aol.com and it used frames.
 
2013-03-27 06:00:01 PM
www.webkinglasvegas.com
the old web still exists in some dark, remote corners. The fact that this guy actually has paying customers given his prices and FrontPage creations always blew me away.
 
2013-03-27 06:02:32 PM
LONG LIVE PIMP WARS
 
2013-03-27 06:04:13 PM
blogs.sfweekly.com
 
2013-03-27 06:06:55 PM

Rockstone: Ambitwistor: Valiente: I was there and don't miss it at all, actually. Nostalgia is the cancer of memory.

I'm nostalgic for BBSes and Usenet; in both cases, I think some things were lost in the transition to the modern Web.  I'm not nostalgic for the early Web; it's been superseded.

The USENET still exists, its now part of the modern internet (instead of riding the ARPANET). Sadly very few ISPs offer USENET access anymore- you can thank its rise as a file sharing system for that.


They don't offer it because they don't want to maintain the servers.  Every ISP has to have their own usenet servers if they want to serve  UUCP content, or they have to give money to someone else to use theirs.
 
2013-03-27 06:08:02 PM

Pick: Back in those days you were NOT cool, if you had an AOL or Compuserve email address. My first cool email was a hooked.net domain. Had to use Compuserves dial in numbers to get to it.


I met my wife in an AOL chat room.

harlock: GoldSpider: And so went the sad sunset on the heyday of the BBS.  Those were some fun times.

Sure was.  With the local boards we'd get together once a month "IRL"...was nice to actually meet people, make friends and find out who was behind the handles.  It was real motley group of people of all ages and personalities, probably one of the most diverse group of humans you'll ever find, since the normal social prejudices were gone as we were only text handles, no pictures.


Back in the days before profile pictures. It was nice. Then came the day when people (particularly girls) wouldnt chat with you without a picture.
 
2013-03-27 06:09:35 PM
People's homes had webpages?  Truly that was the halcyon age of the internet.
 
2013-03-27 06:10:19 PM

vegas_greaser: www.webkinglasvegas.com
the old web still exists in some dark, remote corners. The fact that this guy actually has paying customers given his prices and FrontPage creations always blew me away.


webkinglasvegas.com
webkinglasvegas.com
webkinglasvegas.com

LMAO
 
2013-03-27 06:10:31 PM
I wasted my life away on IRC

/#nyc
//jokemassdeop
 
2013-03-27 06:11:18 PM
So, the whole interweb looked like a birther web page?
 
2013-03-27 06:14:56 PM
Back in 96 I worked at a company that spoofed games with LAN connections to work over the Internet. We had Quake, Duke Nukem, Command & Conquer, Civ II and a few others. When we'd do server load testing with customers people would constantly ask "How the hell do you have a 25 millisecond ping time??" Sitting 20 feet from the server, FTW.

Those were good times.
 
2013-03-27 06:16:11 PM
www.digibarn.com

If you didn't use one of these, get off my lawn.
 
2013-03-27 06:31:15 PM

BizarreMan: jehovahs witness protection: tripleseven: I avoided computers in 1995 cause in that year, my GF of 4 years left me for someone she met...online.  The mere soud of a modem generated a wash of emotion.
I was convinced they were THE GOT-DAMN DEBIL! .


I was back by 1996, and working professionally in IT the next year.
Still have my 6 character yahoo address which I picked up in 97?

I was an early adopter of online banking.
I have a first initial last name username.  And my last name is common enough...

leet I am.

Hate to admit it, but I still have a 7 character Yahoo username...with a 4 digit password.
I use it to sign up for shiat and NOTHING else.

Losers.

4 character Yahoo username.  Only used for spam possible login creations.


5 here and still in use. Yes, I do suck
 
2013-03-27 06:31:52 PM
I liked AOL. I rarely had to buy any floppy disks because they must have sent me about 75 of them.
 
2013-03-27 06:33:30 PM

Mixolydian Master: [i.imgur.com image 480x324]


Version 3.0 was okay. Everything from 4.0 and up sucked major donkey balls.

/Former AOL tech support
//The horror...the horror...
 
2013-03-27 06:56:51 PM

harlock: GoldSpider: And so went the sad sunset on the heyday of the BBS.  Those were some fun times.

Sure was.  With the local boards we'd get together once a month "IRL"...was nice to actually meet people, make friends and find out who was behind the handles.  It was real motley group of people of all ages and personalities, probably one of the most diverse group of humans you'll ever find, since the normal social prejudices were gone as we were only text handles, no pictures.   There were drunken parties with plenty of good looking women, it wasn't just the stereotype 'nerd' logging on.  A lot of high school kids, and then an older set of working professionals in Silicon Valley.


 My best friend & I used to do that.
None of our parents seemed to think that two 14/15 year old girls meeting up with internet strangers (all guys) alone really late at night in some cafe was odd or a bad idea.  They would just drive up to the meeting place, drop us off and drive away.
 
2013-03-27 07:03:34 PM
NSTN. Packard Bell 486-SX (CURSE YOU, SX MODEL! SX = SUX). It was godlike, though. I remember it started you off in a pseudo-windows environment. Figured that crap out after a few days and moved into Windows 3.11. Remember Quarterdeck Mosaic, and scoffing Netscape 1.0 on disks from the library. Remember "Wiz" or something like that shareware on 3.5 floppies, had a wizard on it.

Very cool times.
 
2013-03-27 07:22:38 PM
www.cs.umd.edu

You have to admit, Yahoo! was pretty well organized back then.
 
2013-03-27 07:27:43 PM
also.kottke.org
 
2013-03-27 07:42:42 PM
I had a Jurassic Park BBS that did nothing.  Spent a lot of time MUD'ing on Star Wars MUD as a Twi'lek named Mott who built speeders.
 
2013-03-27 07:48:59 PM
i.imgur.com

/2013 Year of the Linux Desktop.
 
2013-03-27 07:56:54 PM
One of my sentimental posessions is a dot matrix printout of Mortal Kombat 2 movesets I got off some newsgroup.
I have one for Virtua Fighter as well.

When the vast majority of information was still stuck in video game magazines, which took a while to publish and ship, I was a God with my little booklet of directions.
Other kids had friends or sex or something, but I knew the real prize.
 
2013-03-27 07:57:49 PM

Sultan Of Herf: I met my wife in an AOL chat room.



I met a bunch of people's wives in AOL chatrooms... and occasionally in parking lots in the middle of the night, afterward.

A/S/L ?

What are you wearing?
 
2013-03-27 08:05:48 PM

penthesilea: harlock: GoldSpider: And so went the sad sunset on the heyday of the BBS.  Those were some fun times.

 My best friend & I used to do that.
None of our parents seemed to think that two 14/15 year old girls meeting up with internet strangers (all guys) alone really late at night in some cafe was odd or a bad idea.  They would just drive up to the meeting place, drop us off and drive away.


heh. I remember doing that. I remember my mom dropping me off everywhere, asking what time to come pick me up, and then driving off, not thinking twice about it. Mall, Library, random shopping center (village center) in the area, wherever.

2. Pimpwars. Food Fite, Tradewars, LORD. Some of the greatest games around. The original notsoMMOs.

3. Gemstone 3, started playing on GEnie, switched to Dragonrealms (still paying $6.95 an hour during primetime). I think Simutronics games going to a monthly flat fee was the real reason I was happy about the internet at the time.

4. ANSI Art. ACiD and iCE. The Art Scene. There was some really nice ANSI art back in the day. I think ACiD still has an archive up with their acidpacks. The drama of the art scene back in the day (not to mention the pirate groups) was hilarious.

5. BBSing. I LOVED customizing BBS software. Got started into BBSing with WWIV, then started playing with Renegade, then got into Celerity, Oblivion/2, and finally towards the end, PCBoard. I'd download them, mod the hell out of them, and never start a board with them. I'd just pick a different one and do it all over again.

6. FILE_ID.DIZ
 
2013-03-27 08:10:05 PM

FlashHarry: [blogs.sfweekly.com image 500x326]


DEE DA DEE DA DOO DA DOH DOH... DEE DA DEE DA DOO DA DOW...
 
2013-03-27 08:11:13 PM

Ambitwistor: Valiente: I was there and don't miss it at all, actually. Nostalgia is the cancer of memory.

I'm nostalgic for BBSes and Usenet; in both cases, I think some things were lost in the transition to the modern Web.  I'm not nostalgic for the early Web; it's been superseded.


My first time trolling was on some packet newsgroup Deadly Sins BBS picked up. Some UFO forum. I told long story about a space ship that landed in my backyard. It looked like an ASCII rendition of a tyderian shuttle. I claimed a 9 meter tall from thing was trapped in my basement. I actually got a few incredulous bites. I knew then that this internet thing was how i was going to get my jollies from fools.
 
2013-03-27 08:17:35 PM

tripleseven: I avoided computers in 1995 cause in that year, my GF of 4 years left me for someone she met...online.  The mere soud of a modem generated a wash of emotion.
I was convinced they were THE GOT-DAMN DEBIL! .


I was back by 1996, and working professionally in IT the next year.
Still have my 6 character yahoo address which I picked up in 97?

I was an early adopter of online banking.
I have a first initial last name username.  And my last name is common enough...

leet I am.


I had a 6 digit ICQ number...
 
2013-03-27 08:21:33 PM

Mantour: [www.cs.umd.edu image 551x613]

You have to admit, Yahoo! was pretty well organized back then.


Yahoo's homepage redesign sucks.

I had a three character geocities username. I had to move my homepage from lookup.com because they weren't offering free pages anymore.

angelfire, xoom... sucked.

I had 5000 hits on my collection of links webpage before 1996... I was pretty proud of that.
 
2013-03-27 08:37:09 PM

Magnanimous_J: GoldSpider: And so went the sad sunset on the heyday of the BBS.  Those were some fun times.


My one and only BBS experience was some nice guy sending me scans of old Hustlers and then telling me about this new rooftop deck he built and how I should come over and sunbathe nude on it with him.


/I was 12

//And a dude

///I didn't, before you ask


CSB:
That sound similar to my experience. Had not one, but two sysops call my house at very early hours in the morning, wanting to know if my parents were around and getting really cagey when I said "yes." Why they thought my parent wouldn't be standing right there when they called the house looking for me at 7:30 in the morning, I don't know, but it was pretty bizarro. One of 'em said "fark it" and started talking dirty to me anyways.

Mom didn't even have to tell me that the local BBS scene probably wasn't the best place for a 12-year old boy to make friends - I figured it out all on my lonesome.
 
2013-03-27 08:39:12 PM

tripleseven: I avoided computers in 1995 cause in that year, my GF of 4 years left me for someone she met...online.  The mere soud of a modem generated a wash of emotion.
I was convinced they were THE GOT-DAMN DEBIL! .


I was back by 1996, and working professionally in IT the next year.
Still have my 6 character yahoo address which I picked up in 97?

I was an early adopter of online banking.
I have a first initial last name username.  And my last name is common enough...

leet I am.


I own my own domain today that is my last name with dot com at the end. My email is firstnam­e[nospam-﹫-backwards]e­mantsal*co­m.  There can't be that many people who have that.

Funny that the guy streaming his band in that video said that would only be possible for a year or so "before the shutters come down" and no one would be allowed to do that any more. I wonder what he'd have thought if you told him about Youtube...
 
2013-03-27 08:40:27 PM

harlock: environment.   Also seen on Q-Link was a very early implementation of Easy-SAABRE which became Yahoo Travel.

The biggest suck factor of those early networks including compuserve, GENIE etc. is that they were all pay per minute usage for their premium features.


The money I spent on TAPCIS was probably some of the best $ I ever spent to manage my CI$ account. I can still pull up some old LISTSERV entries by searching that address. I think I opened that account in 1992 or 1993, with our external 14.4 25-pin serial modem. Surfing the early web using Spry was... painful.

Back when our office "computers" were all 3270 terminals, and the "network" was coax.

/Out of curiosity, i just checked. Google will not let me create a #####.####@ address, nor will aol, but it looks like outlook.com will.... Hmmmmm...
 
2013-03-27 08:46:18 PM
i18.photobucket.com

Anyone else?
 
2013-03-27 08:58:29 PM
There is a textfile I wrote in 1985 archived on textfiles.com, talk about made me feel old when I found it.

I have theflatline at all the major mail services, and have owned the domain since 1997.  I do nothing with it.
 
2013-03-27 09:06:45 PM
spinningflamingskull.com spinningflamingskull.com spinningflamingskull.com spinningflamingskull.com spinningflamingskull.com spinningflamingskull.com
 
2013-03-27 09:08:20 PM

Flint Ironstag: I own my own domain today that is my last name with dot com at the end. My email is firstnameemantsalcom.  There can't be that many people who have that.


Me! I had someone in Australia asking me about purchasing the domain off me quite a few years ago. Nothing else since.
 
2013-03-27 09:23:01 PM
lord.nuklear.org

cymonsgames.com

In 1995, I was playing these over a modem.  Didn't have internet at home.
 
kth
2013-03-27 09:36:47 PM
I remember going to the computer center after the bars closed with a buddy of mine in 1994. I know we used telnet to get to the OU server, and go to something called (either our name or the informal name or something) the Undernet. We'd go to some chat room. I remember my friend brought some girl to town that he met there and she looked just like his sister.  I was one of like five girls there.

It's where I learned to type fast.
 
2013-03-27 09:41:50 PM

Khellendros: MrJesus: RangerTaylor: GoldSpider: And so went the sad sunset on the heyday of the BBS.  Those were some fun times.

This.  I remember when we were on FIDONet and they first connected to "that ARPA InterNet thing" and we surfed Caltech's website for porn stories.  I do miss the good old days of local BBSes and the door games.  Hour upon hour of Tradewars, and then I got involved with making rooms for the local MUD.  Eventually, I started telnetting to Medievia.  Wow, back when.

FrontDoor was the beginning and the end for the "local" BBS.

Somewhere in NJ exists three Colorado tape backups of Death Star BBS - Edison, NJ. A Renegade board, naturally.

//also was on Medievia
///it's somehow still alive. and somehow still hasn't implemented any of the ridiculous "features" they claimed were coming... 10 years ago.

I was a co-sysop on a Renegade board based out of central Oklahoma in the mid 90s.  There were about a dozen local boards I was on, and enjoyed immensely.  I remember finding people similar to me and my friends, which I didn't think existed, all over the state.  As the decade wore on, more people would make mention of getting internet access.  After a few weeks, they would drift off, and we'd never see them again.  It was like this black hole that stole a few users each week.

Then I found out why.  It was a nice bridge to cross, but I did miss playing LotRD and Falcon's Eye.  I miss trolling download zones and chatting with sysops and trading ASCII artwork.  But once you cross over, you lose the connection to the local boards.  It's just inevitable for most people.  Fond memories, though.


Thanks for the memory! I was one of those people out there, similar to you and your friends. Same time frame, same shiat. I lived in Arkansas though, but there used to be so many good boards! There were 6-7 in my town alone, and many more just a phone call away.

I remember one time I called a board that I used to call all the time, but they had moved and changed their number. I didn't think much of it, until my parents confronted me with a $300 phone bill! I wouldn't change a thing though...I had a  sweetL.O.R.D. character.
 
2013-03-27 09:47:53 PM

rhiannon: Flint Ironstag: I own my own domain today that is my last name with dot com at the end. My email is firstnameemantsalcom.  There can't be that many people who have that.

Me! I had someone in Australia asking me about purchasing the domain off me quite a few years ago. Nothing else since.


Nobody's offered to buy mine!

I almost got my first name as a dot com as well, since it's fairly unusual but someone beat me to it.

On the other hand I can't get my name as a Twitter name because it's too long and they don't accept hyphens. Bastards.
 
2013-03-27 10:06:48 PM

whipbambucket: I had a 6 digit ICQ number...


Same.  Wonder if I still do.
 
2013-03-27 10:13:14 PM

GoldSpider: whipbambucket: I had a 6 digit ICQ number...

Same.  Wonder if I still do.


I remember they were still 6 digits back in the early 2000s. They made it to 4 later in the decade.
 
2013-03-27 10:35:02 PM

GoldSpider: whipbambucket: I had a 6 digit ICQ number...

Same.  Wonder if I still do.


Mine is 8280462...I had a 6-digit before that, but had to start a new one :(
 
2013-03-27 10:43:14 PM

23FPB23: GoldSpider: whipbambucket: I had a 6 digit ICQ number...

Same.  Wonder if I still do.

Mine is 8280462...I had a 6-digit before that, but had to start a new one :(


My last post, of course led me to wonder, 'Is ICQ still a thing? and does my old UIN still work? and can I retrieve the PW?"

Yes, yes, and yes lol!!!!
 
2013-03-27 10:43:26 PM

Ambitwistor: SurfaceTension: I had a homepage in 1995 so I'm getting a kick...

I ran a personal website in 1993.  That was back when "home page" meant "the page that your browser takes you to when you click the Home button", and not "your personal website".


uhh... That never actually changed.  The home page is still the page your browser takes you to when you click the home button...
 
2013-03-27 10:48:04 PM

Rockstone: rise as a file sharing system


For me that's all it ever was going back to late 94 when I first used it. I can still remember the day a buddy on IRC told me about these things called mp3s back in 97. I can still remember the first, or one of the first mp3's I ever downloaded, the Banana Splits theme song, the original.

kth: Undernet.


That was one of the IRC server networks.
 
2013-03-27 11:12:08 PM
About that time, I had a friend who had a surplus Sparc 1+ in his basement with two modems on it. I would dial in at 2400 baud, then start a ppp script to dial his isp. I had a Solaris shell account with pine, telnet, and newsfroups.
 
2013-03-27 11:18:32 PM

rhiannon: Flint Ironstag: I own my own domain today that is my last name with dot com at the end. My email is firstnameemantsalcom.  There can't be that many people who have that.

Me! I had someone in Australia asking me about purchasing the domain off me quite a few years ago. Nothing else since.


I have a domain that is my name.  I was very seriously offered 5k for it a few years back.  I probably could have talked them into 10k as they were a very large corporation (I didn't know at the time)


I kept it, it's cooler than 5k.
 
2013-03-27 11:49:47 PM

theflatline: There is a textfile I wrote in 1985 archived on textfiles.com, talk about made me feel old when I found it.

I have theflatline at all the major mail services, and have owned the domain since 1997.  I do nothing with it.


What, no link?
 
2013-03-27 11:50:52 PM

itharr: penthesilea: harlock: GoldSpider: And so went the sad sunset on the heyday of the BBS.  Those were some fun times.

 My best friend & I used to do that.
None of our parents seemed to think that two 14/15 year old girls meeting up with internet strangers (all guys) alone really late at night in some cafe was odd or a bad idea.  They would just drive up to the meeting place, drop us off and drive away.

heh. I remember doing that. I remember my mom dropping me off everywhere, asking what time to come pick me up, and then driving off, not thinking twice about it. Mall, Library, random shopping center (village center) in the area, wherever.

2. Pimpwars. Food Fite, Tradewars, LORD. Some of the greatest games around. The original notsoMMOs.

3. Gemstone 3, started playing on GEnie, switched to Dragonrealms (still paying $6.95 an hour during primetime). I think Simutronics games going to a monthly flat fee was the real reason I was happy about the internet at the time.

4. ANSI Art. ACiD and iCE. The Art Scene. There was some really nice ANSI art back in the day. I think ACiD still has an archive up with their acidpacks. The drama of the art scene back in the day (not to mention the pirate groups) was hilarious.

5. BBSing. I LOVED customizing BBS software. Got started into BBSing with WWIV, then started playing with Renegade, then got into Celerity, Oblivion/2, and finally towards the end, PCBoard. I'd download them, mod the hell out of them, and never start a board with them. I'd just pick a different one and do it all over again.

6. FILE_ID.DIZ


Completely forgot about the whole ANSI/ASCII art scene. Some of the scrolling logon stuff for warez BBSes were crazy.

I wish I could remember all the boards I was on, so l33t.
 
2013-03-27 11:54:54 PM
Played Star Trek with other kids in other schools over the school district's connected system...in 1977.
No monitor..needed to print out what was happening on a dot-matrix printer.
Phone in the cradle. Computer the size of an organ, with it's own room. Wide ties and sideburns.
Don't miss those days at all.
 
2013-03-28 01:59:54 AM

Ambitwistor: Valiente: I was there and don't miss it at all, actually. Nostalgia is the cancer of memory.

I'm nostalgic for BBSes and Usenet; in both cases, I think some things were lost in the transition to the modern Web.  I'm not nostalgic for the early Web; it's been superseded.


You may remember Jack Rickard, publisher of Boardwatch magazine.  He's pimping DIY electric cars now.

http://www.evtv.me/
 
2013-03-28 03:57:38 AM
 
2013-03-28 04:25:30 AM
Amazing to thing, really...
www.kevinandkell.com
Kevin & Kell (September 1995)

www.sluggy.com
Sluggy Freelance (August 1997)

/both still running. Daily no less.
 
2013-03-28 04:26:28 AM

I Ate Shergar: Amazing to thing


DAMMIT *think (FTFM)
 
2013-03-28 06:59:31 AM
Stumbled across this a while back, glad it's been saved(the rest of their site is great too):

http://www.hackcanada.com/blackcrawl/index.html
 
2013-03-28 06:59:40 AM

I Ate Shergar: Amazing to thing, really...
[www.kevinandkell.com image 590x385]
Kevin & Kell (September 1995)



He's a rabbot, his wife is a fox, his kid is a hedgehog, and his stepson is a rat?
What the fark is going on with that family?
 
2013-03-28 07:31:35 AM

Mantour: [also.kottke.org image 640x480]


Ah,y es. Good 'ol Netshiat, the app that taught me how to swear.
 
2013-03-28 08:56:41 AM
Heh, I actually owned Lawrence Co.'s Pennsylvania's first BBS and then full blown ISP (Went from Image Gallery BBS, to PCMS On-Line).. Had a 50 modem bank set up in my house, then for the non local call people I had forwarder lines set up in my mother's apartment... Heh
 
2013-03-28 09:08:14 AM

RatMaster999: [lord.nuklear.org image 367x215]

[cymonsgames.com image 486x200]

In 1995, I was playing these over a modem.  Didn't have internet at home.


Hermagerd...Usurper.  That's where I learned insence was a drug, and drug use gave good pernanent stats bonuses!  For a brief moment, I felt like I could only spend an hour online perday and tried to read as much Fark as possible.
 
2013-03-28 09:40:16 AM

MrJesus: Somewhere in NJ exists three Colorado tape backups of Death Star BBS - Edison, NJ. A Renegade board, naturally.


Sounds vaguely familiar.  Depending on whether the exchange was listed in the front of the phone book as free to call from my home in a neighboring town, those tapes may very well contain messages posted by the 15-year-old me.

If you find them, please destroy them thx
 
2013-03-28 11:26:24 AM

God-is-a-Taco: One of my sentimental posessions is a dot matrix printout of Mortal Kombat 2 movesets I got off some newsgroup.
I have one for Virtua Fighter as well.

When the vast majority of information was still stuck in video game magazines, which took a while to publish and ship, I was a God with my little booklet of directions.
Other kids had friends or sex or something, but I knew the real prize.


We may have the same printout. It may be at the bottom of a pile of papers, folded and tattered. Do you remember that the moves changed with the updates? I remember having to check which version mk2 was running @ different arcades. It's probably next to the hand drawn schematic metroid map some kid at scout camp drew from memory. Pirate maps had nothing on that.

Lord knows how many print outs I made of anarchist's cookbook and paladin press stuff on dot matrix. Not of it would be interesting to the law, since even a twelve year old could tell the BBS modified forms were handy ways to blow yourself up, judging from stoner 3leet speak that permeated them, have phun
 
2013-03-28 12:18:14 PM

Rockstone: The USENET still exists, its now part of the modern internet (instead of riding the ARPANET).


I know Usenet still exists; I used as part of the modern Internet up until 2000 or so.  But nobody uses it anymore, and it's not the one-stop-shop where all the real experts hang out anymore.
 
2013-03-28 12:19:57 PM

Maul555: Ambitwistor: SurfaceTension: I had a homepage in 1995 so I'm getting a kick...

I ran a personal website in 1993.  That was back when "home page" meant "the page that your browser takes you to when you click the Home button", and not "your personal website".

uhh... That never actually changed.  The home page is still the page your browser takes you to when you click the home button...


Yes, I know, but that's not how anyone uses the word "home page" anymore.  (Even in 1995, people were starting to use "home page" to mean "my personal website".)
 
2013-03-28 01:37:48 PM

Ambitwistor: Rockstone: The USENET still exists, its now part of the modern internet (instead of riding the ARPANET).

I know Usenet still exists; I used as part of the modern Internet up until 2000 or so.  But nobody uses it anymore, and it's not the one-stop-shop where all the real experts hang out anymore.


Nobody uses it anymore? Usenet has become a bastion of file sharing, and is enjoying a boom in users, last I had heard.
 
2013-03-28 02:05:14 PM
I made a Stone Cold Steve Austin website when I was 12 years old in 1998. It is still online and when you do a google search for my name it's like the first thing that comes up. LOL.
 
2013-03-28 03:11:28 PM

itharr: penthesilea: harlock: GoldSpider: And so went the sad sunset on the heyday of the BBS.  Those were some fun times.

 My best friend & I used to do that.
None of our parents seemed to think that two 14/15 year old girls meeting up with internet strangers (all guys) alone really late at night in some cafe was odd or a bad idea.  They would just drive up to the meeting place, drop us off and drive away.

heh. I remember doing that. I remember my mom dropping me off everywhere, asking what time to come pick me up, and then driving off, not thinking twice about it. Mall, Library, random shopping center (village center) in the area, wherever.

2. Pimpwars. Food Fite, Tradewars, LORD. Some of the greatest games around. The original notsoMMOs.

3. Gemstone 3, started playing on GEnie, switched to Dragonrealms (still paying $6.95 an hour during primetime). I think Simutronics games going to a monthly flat fee was the real reason I was happy about the internet at the time.

4. ANSI Art. ACiD and iCE. The Art Scene. There was some really nice ANSI art back in the day. I think ACiD still has an archive up with their acidpacks. The drama of the art scene back in the day (not to mention the pirate groups) was hilarious.

5. BBSing. I LOVED customizing BBS software. Got started into BBSing with WWIV, then started playing with Renegade, then got into Celerity, Oblivion/2, and finally towards the end, PCBoard. I'd download them, mod the hell out of them, and never start a board with them. I'd just pick a different one and do it all over again.

6. FILE_ID.DIZ


ACiD and iCE are still around in some capacities. Radman is still active and recently asked me if I had a particular Phluid music disk as he was trying to get the archive solidified. The last time I was actively tracking was in Phluid.


I had a bunch of local guys that were in iCE doing art for my old bbs. Good times.


I started out back od DooM BBS. people internationally called in to that place. I miss our old doomfest lan parties. "Does anyone have another terminator?!"
 
2013-03-28 04:45:19 PM

Elegy: Ambitwistor: Rockstone: The USENET still exists, its now part of the modern internet (instead of riding the ARPANET).

I know Usenet still exists; I used as part of the modern Internet up until 2000 or so.  But nobody uses it anymore, and it's not the one-stop-shop where all the real experts hang out anymore.

Nobody uses it anymore? Usenet has become a bastion of file sharing, and is enjoying a boom in users, last I had heard.


You heard wrong. It's pretty much dead at this point and riddled with malware, which is why WE DON'T TALK ABOUT THAT PLACE WHERE EYES CAN SEE.

I believe you get my point.
 
2013-03-28 08:25:10 PM
Had a 6 digit ICQ that started with a 1.
Robs-place.com
Still have my wowmail.com account from '95
not so fond memories of the 30 minute wait just to discover a penis
 
2013-03-28 09:20:19 PM

GanjSmokr: Pick: Back in those days you were NOT cool, if you had an AOL or Compuserve email address. My first cool email was a hooked.net domain. Had to use Compuserves dial in numbers to get to it.

I always knew I wasn't cool.

/ganjsmokr[[nospam-﹫-backwards] image 7x13]loa[* image 7x13]com


i sent you bie to that email.

enjoy
 
2013-03-29 05:31:27 AM

mochunk: itharr: penthesilea: harlock: GoldSpider: And so went the sad sunset on the heyday of the BBS.  Those were some fun times.

 My best friend & I used to do that.
None of our parents seemed to think that two 14/15 year old girls meeting up with internet strangers (all guys) alone really late at night in some cafe was odd or a bad idea.  They would just drive up to the meeting place, drop us off and drive away.

heh. I remember doing that. I remember my mom dropping me off everywhere, asking what time to come pick me up, and then driving off, not thinking twice about it. Mall, Library, random shopping center (village center) in the area, wherever.

2. Pimpwars. Food Fite, Tradewars, LORD. Some of the greatest games around. The original notsoMMOs.

3. Gemstone 3, started playing on GEnie, switched to Dragonrealms (still paying $6.95 an hour during primetime). I think Simutronics games going to a monthly flat fee was the real reason I was happy about the internet at the time.

4. ANSI Art. ACiD and iCE. The Art Scene. There was some really nice ANSI art back in the day. I think ACiD still has an archive up with their acidpacks. The drama of the art scene back in the day (not to mention the pirate groups) was hilarious.

5. BBSing. I LOVED customizing BBS software. Got started into BBSing with WWIV, then started playing with Renegade, then got into Celerity, Oblivion/2, and finally towards the end, PCBoard. I'd download them, mod the hell out of them, and never start a board with them. I'd just pick a different one and do it all over again.

6. FILE_ID.DIZ

ACiD and iCE are still around in some capacities. Radman is still active and recently asked me if I had a particular Phluid music disk as he was trying to get the archive solidified. The last time I was actively tracking was in Phluid.


I had a bunch of local guys that were in iCE doing art for my old bbs. Good times.


I started out back od DooM BBS. people internationally called in to that place. I miss our old doom ...


I was going to say check out Deviant Art's galleries of ASCII/ANSI art, but when I last checked, they were pretty much just scanned images ran through a generator.  Not too much that was manually block pushed like the good ol' days.
 
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