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(IT World)   Google engineers: smarter than 5th graders, not smarter than Vietnamese 11th graders   (itworld.com) divider line 39
    More: Interesting, Vietnamese 11th, Google, Vietnamese, Google engineers, United States, U.S. universities, google engineer, computing  
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3300 clicks; posted to Geek » on 27 Mar 2013 at 9:28 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-03-27 09:35:08 AM  
How does one f*ck up a headline THAT bad?
 
2013-03-27 09:36:18 AM  

babygoat: How does one f*ck up a headline THAT bad?


Fixing it is part of the Google interview process
 
2013-03-27 09:36:18 AM  
Pascal? Pfft.
Do it in C.
 
2013-03-27 09:39:19 AM  

Rockstone: Pascal? Pfft.
Do it in C.


Could have done it in both when in college.  Now...not so much.

And have those Vietnamese kids add the most basic but accurate documentation to their code...*that's* a real challenge for them.
 
2013-03-27 09:41:47 AM  
I hate to say it, but the last thing this world needs is a bunch of people who lack the aptitude to be pushed into programming because it's the "hot new thing".
You've either got it, or you don't. If you've got it, you know it. If you don't got it, don't try to get it.

/Excuse me while I go fix the monumental fark-up caused by a self-proclaimed "programming genius"
 
2013-03-27 09:44:30 AM  

UberDave: Rockstone: Pascal? Pfft.
Do it in C.

Could have done it in both when in college.  Now...not so much.

And have those Vietnamese kids add the most basic but accurate documentation to their code...*that's* a real challenge for them.


Same here, maybe.  Though, as an engineer, our basic programming class was well under that level.  Impressive stuff.

Now, if we could only get kids in the US off of facebook.
 
2013-03-27 09:52:25 AM  
That is one of the worst interview questions ever.
I'm glad companies like Google have refined the art of hiring people who are adept at going to glassdoor.com and memorizing all the interview questions anybody has posted, and their optimal solutions.
 
2013-03-27 09:53:51 AM  

WhippingBoy: I hate to say it, but the last thing this world needs is a bunch of people who lack the aptitude to be pushed into programming because it's the "hot new thing".
You've either got it, or you don't. If you've got it, you know it. If you don't got it, don't try to get it.

/Excuse me while I go fix the monumental fark-up caused by
I am a self-proclaimed "programming genius"


Very impressive.
 
2013-03-27 09:58:06 AM  

babygoat: WhippingBoy: I hate to say it, but the last thing this world needs is a bunch of people who lack the aptitude to be pushed into programming because it's the "hot new thing".
You've either got it, or you don't. If you've got it, you know it. If you don't got it, don't try to get it.

/Excuse me while I go fix the monumental fark-up caused by I am a self-proclaimed "programming genius"

Very impressive.


That did come across pretty self-congratulatory, didn't it? I feel shame now.
But my point still stands... the industry has too many incompetents already. We don't need to artificially create more.
 
2013-03-27 10:08:58 AM  

WhippingBoy: babygoat: WhippingBoy: I hate to say it, but the last thing this world needs is a bunch of people who lack the aptitude to be pushed into programming because it's the "hot new thing".
You've either got it, or you don't. If you've got it, you know it. If you don't got it, don't try to get it.

/Excuse me while I go fix the monumental fark-up caused by I am a self-proclaimed "programming genius"

Very impressive.

That did come across pretty self-congratulatory, didn't it? I feel shame now.
But my point still stands... the industry has too many incompetents already. We don't need to artificially create more.


Counter-point: The more students that try their hand at programming, the more talent the industry will have in the long run.  Maybe then companies wouldn't have to hire incompetents.
 
2013-03-27 10:26:28 AM  

babygoat: WhippingBoy: babygoat: WhippingBoy: I hate to say it, but the last thing this world needs is a bunch of people who lack the aptitude to be pushed into programming because it's the "hot new thing".
You've either got it, or you don't. If you've got it, you know it. If you don't got it, don't try to get it.

/Excuse me while I go fix the monumental fark-up caused by I am a self-proclaimed "programming genius"

Very impressive.

That did come across pretty self-congratulatory, didn't it? I feel shame now.
But my point still stands... the industry has too many incompetents already. We don't need to artificially create more.

Counter-point: The more students that try their hand at programming, the more talent the industry will have in the long run.  Maybe then companies wouldn't have to hire incompetents.


this.  Teaching computer science in schools isn't going to encourage kids who are bad at it to do it professionally.  If it worked that way, I'd be working several different jobs as a historian, biologist, chemist, etc, and I'd be terrible at most of them.

/ If anything, it will weed the incompetents out at an earlier age.  I knew quite a few who had never written a line of code in their lives until they got to college.  When they realized they didn't like it, some dropped out, some switched majors, some decided to stick it through because they'd paid that farking tuition and they're going to get the education, by god.
 
2013-03-27 10:27:29 AM  

serial_crusher: That is one of the worst interview questions ever.
I'm glad companies like Google have refined the art of hiring people who are adept at going to glassdoor.com and memorizing all the interview questions anybody has posted, and their optimal solutions.


That's what I'm saying.  But it's Google so they can be forgiven for it.  Those who can't be forgiven are the droves of companies and small businesses who *think* they are Google.  The problem with a lot of IT folks is they think what they do is awesome, edgy, and is difficult to do.  Bullshiat.  Most programming jobs out there are data handling - be it presenting data or moving it from point A to point B.  There's always a myriad of ways to organize the business logic and a myriad of ways to code it.  Someone who does that doesn't need to know how to code a bubble sort from scratch in 30 minutes or know the textbook definition of a clustered index.  If they have the drive and determination to learn the business well and code a solution that's relatively easy to maintain and works well, then that is awesome.  I couldn't care less if they were ripping their code off of stackoverflow.
 
2013-03-27 10:34:14 AM  
Third grade? Ppfftt. I just started teaching my 6 year old daughter LOGO because she wants to make a My Little Pony web game, and I figure it's a better place to start than throwing her directly into Python or JS/HTML5. The great thing about LOGO is that even though a lot of people thought it was outdated and useless for the last decade and a half, it's a great first step to mastering the new canvas tag. I feel like we could have a production something or other live online before she turns 7.

/Don't like to brag, unless it's about my genius daughter
 
2013-03-27 10:37:12 AM  
UberDave:
That's what I'm saying.  But it's Google so they can be forgiven for it.  Those who can't be forgiven are the droves of companies and small businesses who *think* they are Google.  The problem with a lot of IT folks is they think what they do is awesome, edgy, and is difficult to do.  Bullshiat.  Most programming jobs out there are data handling - be it presenting data or moving it from point A to point B.  There's always a myriad of ways to organize the business logic and a myriad of ways to code it.  Someone who does that doesn't need to know how to code a bubble sort from scratch in 30 minutes or know the textbook definition of a clustered index.  If they have the drive and determination to learn the business well and code a solution that's relatively easy to maintain and works well, then that is awesome.  I couldn't care less if they were ripping their code off of stackoverflow.

I've done a lot of interviews at my company, and we ask similar questions. For us though (and I don't know if this is the same at Google) getting the correct answer is not the most important thing. We want you to explain to us your problem solving method. In fact, if you tell us "this data needs to be sorted, and I don't know the algorithm off the top of my head, so I would look online for an example" then that is a perfectly good answer. You'd be surprised how many people either don't realize the data needs to be sorted, or have no idea that there are established algorithms to do it.
 
2013-03-27 10:45:20 AM  

Lusiphur: Third grade? Ppfftt. I just started teaching my 6 year old daughter LOGO because she wants to make a My Little Pony web game, and I figure it's a better place to start than throwing her directly into Python or JS/HTML5. The great thing about LOGO is that even though a lot of people thought it was outdated and useless for the last decade and a half, it's a great first step to mastering the new canvas tag. I feel like we could have a production something or other live online before she turns 7.


I know some of the people who have worked on Alice, I haven't used it myself, but I believe the original conception was to get grade school and middle school kids interested in programming.
 
2013-03-27 10:55:04 AM  

StRalphTheLiar: UberDave:
That's what I'm saying.  But it's Google so they can be forgiven for it.  Those who can't be forgiven are the droves of companies and small businesses who *think* they are Google.  The problem with a lot of IT folks is they think what they do is awesome, edgy, and is difficult to do.  Bullshiat.  Most programming jobs out there are data handling - be it presenting data or moving it from point A to point B.  There's always a myriad of ways to organize the business logic and a myriad of ways to code it.  Someone who does that doesn't need to know how to code a bubble sort from scratch in 30 minutes or know the textbook definition of a clustered index.  If they have the drive and determination to learn the business well and code a solution that's relatively easy to maintain and works well, then that is awesome.  I couldn't care less if they were ripping their code off of stackoverflow.

I've done a lot of interviews at my company, and we ask similar questions. For us though (and I don't know if this is the same at Google) getting the correct answer is not the most important thing. We want you to explain to us your problem solving method. In fact, if you tell us "this data needs to be sorted, and I don't know the algorithm off the top of my head, so I would look online for an example" then that is a perfectly good answer. You'd be surprised how many people either don't realize the data needs to be sorted, or have no idea that there are established algorithms to do it.


I also interview the potential coders at my company.  I usually ask questions to ascertain problem solving capabilities but I steer away from overly technical questions.  I do ask some basic technical questions for entry level but they are quite simple and mostly to get a feel for the person's ability to do SQL and that they know the languages they put on their resumes.  I get a lot of information by asking interviewees to explain the programs they've coded in the past (then asking specific questions based on what they say).

A while back, a coder friend/acquaintance of mine wanted me to come in and interview at his company.  He wouldn't give me any information about the interview.  So I go in and get asked nothing but textbook right-out-of-college questions.  There was zero interest in anything I've done or currently did at my current job.  I tried to work descriptions of my projects in.  At one point, I gave extreme detail on a multi-threaded application I took over and how the original programmer used backgroundworker threads in a case where he should have used simple threads without registering events and used wait handles or sleep timers to synchronize everything.  The very next instant, the dude asked me "what is a thread".  That told me what idiots they were - if you hear someone describe multithreading in detail, that's when you cross the "what is a thread" question off your list.
 
2013-03-27 11:10:04 AM  
I had a company ask how to reverse a string in .Net without declaring any additional variables. I was no longer interested by that point and couldn't get past my confusion as to why you would ever do that.

Anyway, the answer is string.ToArray().Reverse().ToString().

The stupid part is that this solution doesn't really solve anything. Sure, you are not explicitly defining new variables, but that doesn't keep new memory from being allocated internally. I guess I need to stop thinking in C++ when answering these stupid questions.
 
2013-03-27 11:16:46 AM  

UberDave: The very next instant, the dude asked me "what is a thread".


Hah! Tell him your previous job was as a tailor and see where he goes from there.
 
2013-03-27 11:26:08 AM  

GameSprocket: I had a company ask how to reverse a string in .Net without declaring any additional variables. I was no longer interested by that point and couldn't get past my confusion as to why you would ever do that.

Anyway, the answer is string.ToArray().Reverse().ToString().



You should have said, "Do a Google search on 'C# reverse string'..."
 
2013-03-27 11:35:20 AM  

UberDave: serial_crusher: That is one of the worst interview questions ever.
I'm glad companies like Google have refined the art of hiring people who are adept at going to glassdoor.com and memorizing all the interview questions anybody has posted, and their optimal solutions.

That's what I'm saying.  But it's Google so they can be forgiven for it.  Those who can't be forgiven are the droves of companies and small businesses who *think* they are Google.  The problem with a lot of IT folks is they think what they do is awesome, edgy, and is difficult to do.  Bullshiat.  Most programming jobs out there are data handling - be it presenting data or moving it from point A to point B.  There's always a myriad of ways to organize the business logic and a myriad of ways to code it.  Someone who does that doesn't need to know how to code a bubble sort from scratch in 30 minutes or know the textbook definition of a clustered index.  If they have the drive and determination to learn the business well and code a solution that's relatively easy to maintain and works well, then that is awesome.  I couldn't care less if they were ripping their code off of stackoverflow.



It's a big problem in my experience that the vocational component of being a software developer is almost completely ignored in schooling.  I meet so many college grads who had a java class in year one and a database class in year 3, but never learned how to build a solution through the stack.  The information is too fragmented and they don't get enough practice.
 
2013-03-27 11:41:41 AM  

UberDave: GameSprocket: I had a company ask how to reverse a string in .Net without declaring any additional variables. I was no longer interested by that point and couldn't get past my confusion as to why you would ever do that.

Anyway, the answer is string.ToArray().Reverse().ToString().


You should have said, "Do a Google search on 'C# reverse string'..."


Yeah. Actually I feel kind of bad about it, but I really don't care that much about the technical details of any particular language. My time is spent at the business logic level and any technical issue I run into I just solve with a Google search. Between trying to manage requirements, assign resources, track progress, maintain quality controls, and so on, I just can't manage to care that much about coding tricks.

In fact, I go out of my way to not be "clever" while coding. I try to make everything I write completely transparent. Not great for interviews, though. I guess I need to accept that I am moving out of coding and into project management.
 
2013-03-27 11:46:37 AM  

Fubini: I know some of the people who have worked on Alice, I haven't used it myself, but I believe the original conception was to get grade school and middle school kids interested in programming.


Thanks for the tip. Right now we're mostly just playing around with the turtle, but I was thinking of giving Scratch a try. There is a shocking lack of products for K-5 kids to learn how to code. I'm seriously thinking about writing a children's book, but I've never written for kids and the prospect sort of terrifies me.

Anyone have any suggestions on what I should start with ? I can't quite decide whether it should be mostly focused on theory, or if it should be very practical, or if maybe some weird combination of the two? Anyone here ever written a children's book?
 
2013-03-27 12:02:33 PM  

UberDave: The very next instant, the dude asked me "what is a thread". That told me what idiots they were - if you hear someone describe multithreading in detail, that's when you cross the "what is a thread" question off your list.


To be fair, one of the smartest guys at my company does that to interview candidates.  I ridicule him for it, but he still does it.  In his case it's just a sign that he's a bad interviewer.

There are also cases where you do have to test for people using something without really understanding what it is or how it works.
I got sent to interview some lady who had a particularly weak resume, but it had the term "DHTML/AJAX" on it, so I started there.  "Tell me what AJAX is" and she gave me an example of how she had worked on an AJAX application and used jQuery (and in a few other web development related buzzwords).  Didn't specify where AJAX fit into the picture, just that it was in there somewhere.  "ok, so that doesn't answer my earlier question.... How about I be more specific: how does an AJAX request differ from a regular page load?"  deer in headlights look.

/ But yeah, if you gave the same description in the interview as you did in your post, I would have checked off the threading question.
 
2013-03-27 12:07:23 PM  

GameSprocket: UberDave: GameSprocket: I had a company ask how to reverse a string in .Net without declaring any additional variables. I was no longer interested by that point and couldn't get past my confusion as to why you would ever do that.

Anyway, the answer is string.ToArray().Reverse().ToString().


You should have said, "Do a Google search on 'C# reverse string'..."

Yeah. Actually I feel kind of bad about it, but I really don't care that much about the technical details of any particular language. My time is spent at the business logic level and any technical issue I run into I just solve with a Google search. Between trying to manage requirements, assign resources, track progress, maintain quality controls, and so on, I just can't manage to care that much about coding tricks.

In fact, I go out of my way to not be "clever" while coding. I try to make everything I write completely transparent. Not great for interviews, though. I guess I need to accept that I am moving out of coding and into project management.



You and I are on the exact same page.  Some IT people are heroes because of how well they know the business.  It's not anything spectacular and you don't have to be a genius - but you need to be willing to take the time to learn an understand a very intricate business practice.  I've learned the business end of things so well that I can often tell IT people doing data migration at client sites what their own data is doing or what it represents.  It's just being diligent.

And as far as going out of the way not to be clever, I was explaining to some team members the difference between this:


CustomADOWrapClass.AddParameterInput(command, "@Param", DataTypes.Int32, null, somenullableint == null ? 0 : somenullableint);


And this:

if(somenullableint == null)
  CustomADOWrapClass
 .AddParameterInput(command, "@Param", DataTypes.Int32, null, 0);
else
  CustomADOWrapClass
 .AddParameterInput(command, "@Param", DataTypes.Int32, null, somenullableint );



Yeah, the first one using an inline condition is more sleek and compact.  But the condition statement is easier to freaking read.  There's no noticeable performance difference between the two so guess which we go with?
 
2013-03-27 12:15:13 PM  

UberDave: But the condition statement is easier to freaking read.  There's no noticeable performance difference between the two so guess which we go with?


Lots of great info in this thread, but this is especially true.  Just because you can get by with using one sleek statement doesn't mean you *should*.  This code will have to be maintained probably by someone other than you, so make it more readable, comment it, clean it up.  I'd much rather work with a team that can do this efficiently than play the "how few lines of code can we use" game.

Going on almost 20 years now of professional software development, and I would so much rather work with common-sense programmers who work well in a team than super-duper lone wolf "my way is the best" experts.  Of course, everything has its place.  I'm sure outside the business-IT landscape you need the ubergeeks to survive.  It's just not practical in most business settings.
 
2013-03-27 12:15:31 PM  
When I interview programmers, I tell them to "write a program for blue dress". If they can't do that, I hand them a wooden mallet, a femur, and a coconut, and say "milk that coconut". Then tell them "not as smart as you think you are! There are plenty more where you came from!
 
2013-03-27 12:21:13 PM  

UberDave: if(somenullableint == null)
CustomADOWrapClass .AddParameterInput(command, "@Param", DataTypes.Int32, null, 0);
else
CustomADOWrapClass .AddParameterInput(command, "@Param", DataTypes.Int32, null, somenullableint );


Yeah, the first one using an inline condition is more sleek and compact. But the condition statement is easier to freaking read. There's no noticeable performance difference between the two so guess which we go with?


I'd argue you're opening yourself up for bad maintenance down the line with that particular example.  Somebody's going to change that third parameter to something non-null, but only hit one of those cases.  I'd go with
int value = 0;
if (somenullableint != null){
    value = somenullableint.Value;
}
CustomADOWrapClass .AddParameterInput(command, "@Param", DataTypes.Int32, null, value);
 
2013-03-27 12:48:40 PM  
"Consider the following programming test: this data file defines a maze with diagonal walls made up of sections with a length the square root of 2. In 45 minutes, design and implement a solution in Pascal to count the number of enclosed areas and the area of the largest enclosed space. "

Why would you ever ask anyone to do this? I don't care that you can solve some abstract math problem. Big freaking deal. How about you solve a real world issue we see in the industry every day?
 
2013-03-27 12:50:21 PM  

UberDave: And as far as going out of the way not to be clever, I was explaining to some team members the difference between this:


CustomADOWrapClass.AddParameterInput(command, "@Param", DataTypes.Int32, null, somenullableint == null ? 0 : somenullableint);


And this:

if(somenullableint == null)
CustomADOWrapClass .AddParameterInput(command, "@Param", DataTypes.Int32, null, 0);
else
CustomADOWrapClass .AddParameterInput(command, "@Param", DataTypes.Int32, null, somenullableint );


Yeah, the first one using an inline condition is more sleek and compact. But the condition statement is easier to freaking read. There's no noticeable performance difference between the two so guess which we go with?


Second advantage of 2nd form is ease of adding breakpoints fro debugging. Having said that if there were a whole series of calls I'd use the compact form, so the bigger coding picture can be seen on screen. Horses for courses.
 
2013-03-27 12:59:07 PM  

GameSprocket: In fact, I go out of my way to not be "clever" while coding. I try to make everything I write completely transparent. Not great for interviews, though. I guess I need to accept that I am moving out of coding and into project management.


This is usually my approach, but that stems largely from the fact that I'm entirely self-taught and was never shown any fancy clever tricks. So whenever I need to write something that does X, I wre the simplest, most basic way to achieve X, then once it's up and running, I go through and identify components of the program and search google/stackoverflow and replace components one at a time until I get something that still does X but does it better. Meanwhile I have a good friend working on a startup who has not shipped a single working product in 3 years because he is obsessed with optimizing everything as he's writing it.

My way isn't "right", and I can see how in some applications you would need it to operate as well as possible from go, but there's a lot to be said for coding quickly and simply and then either optimizing later piece by piece or bringing in a dedicated person just to turn my mess into something that runs quicker and smoother.
 
2013-03-27 01:29:09 PM  
Programmers. They're that special blend of intelligent and arrogant about it.

The priorities of the United States have shifted, whether for better or worse is simply an opinion at this point, and most folks have nothing better then an educated guess. I, for one, fully believe the United States is lagging behind in the sciences and we need to up our educational standards. With that said, I don't see it necessary to teach all our youth the basics of certain topics unless they show interest in them.

I graduated in 2003 from a shiatty little public school in Smallville, Indiana and even back then we had a C/C++ class for those interested in the topic. The class was small, because a very small percentage of people can mentally "click" with programming and understand it. We all have multiple strengths in various topics.

I've worked with people ranging from Nuclear Scientists, Energy Scientists, Military Personal, Politicians to Accountants, Attorneys all the way down to paper-running interns. Some of these people were so smart at their jobs I couldn't even begin to understand what they do. But a lot of those same brilliant people ... had no clue how to even turn on a computer.
 
2013-03-27 01:32:55 PM  
But can those kids swallow a lit cigarette?


/obscure?  Think Coen Bros.
 
2013-03-27 03:56:34 PM  
serial_crusher:
I'd argue you're opening yourself up for bad maintenance down the line with that particular example.  Somebody's going to change that third parameter to something non-null, but only hit one of those cases.  I'd go with
int value = 0;
if (somenullableint != null){
    value = somenullableint.Value;
}
CustomADOWrapClass .AddParameterInput(command, "@Param", DataTypes.Int32, null, value);


I'm missing it.  The third parameter indicates the datatype of the database field (that will be translated by the provider of course).  The fourth parameter is null but it will never be not null as it is a field size indicator and numeric fields do not need it for this command.

I do see the point but from my perspective that pre-condition would add some unnecessary declarations.  I do want to "un-sleek" the code but not that much. :)

Also, my "somenullableint" is like:

int ? a;  //nullable data type
 
2013-03-27 04:06:04 PM  

UberDave: I'm missing it. The third parameter indicates the datatype of the database field (that will be translated by the provider of course). The fourth parameter is null but it will never be not null as it is a field size indicator and numeric fields do not need it for this command.


Sorry, I counted wrong.  Don't have all the ADO classes memorized either, so was treating that param as some arbitrary junk.

UberDave: Also, my "somenullableint" is like:

int ? a; //nullable data type


you can evidently just do somenullableint.GetValueOrDefault() which doesn't throw a null reference exception because of magic.
somenullableint ?? 0 also works and is more readable.
 
2013-03-27 07:09:23 PM  
the real headline here is that the Google engineer is the presumed genius. For the majority of my time in school, these articles would have been written comparing person X to a Microsoft engineer.
 
2013-03-27 07:30:48 PM  

UberDave: And as far as going out of the way not to be clever, I was explaining to some team members the difference between this:

CustomADOWrapClass.AddParameterInput(command, "@Param", DataTypes.Int32, null, somenullableint == null ? 0 : somenullableint);

And this:

if(somenullableint == null)
CustomADOWrapClass .AddParameterInput(command, "@Param", DataTypes.Int32, null, 0);
else
CustomADOWrapClass .AddParameterInput(command, "@Param", DataTypes.Int32, null, somenullableint );

Yeah, the first one using an inline condition is more sleek and compact. But the condition statement is easier to freaking read. There's no noticeable performance difference between the two so guess which we go with?


If you really want reading clarity, compactness, and intent you should go with a locally scoped variable:

let (zi = somenullableint == null ? 0 : somenullableint)
 CustomADOWrapClass.AddParameterInput(command, "@Param", DataTypes.Int32, null, zi);


If you go with 2 calls to the same function inside an "if" then you have visually compare them to see what is different.

Then again lots of people don't understand the difference between local binding and say assignment much less how to properly use them and what they signify.
 
2013-03-28 06:24:56 AM  

amundb: Why would you ever ask anyone to do this? I don't care that you can solve some abstract math problem. Big freaking deal. How about you solve a real world issue we see in the industry every day?


Why are you assuming this is just an abstract problem with no practical application?

It could be that edge detection logic is used in network packet routing, or for analysis of web link topography (how pages are connected to each other, rather than just the content of individual pages. It's google, hint hint ).  Or it could be simply to see how you approach a new type of problem that you may have never seen before (problem analysis) as opposed to regurgitating something you read in a textbook.

In any case, they feel they have a reason to ask the question.  It's probably not smart to second guess the interviewer about the applicability to their work.

I remember one time when I asked a candidate to solve a simple problem in C, any flavor of assembly,  or pseudocode.  He looked at it for a minute and then petulantly said something like "This is not even worth doing.  If you had bothered to read my resume, you would see this is way below my level."  Without batting an eye I stood up and politely thanked him for his interest in our organization, and asked if he had any more questions before we conclude the interview.

Thankfully, my current employer now uses a psychological examination administered by a third party as part of the hiring process.
 
2013-03-28 06:44:37 AM  

serial_crusher: That is one of the worst interview questions ever.
I'm glad companies like Google have refined the art of hiring people who are adept at going to glassdoor.com and memorizing all the interview questions anybody has posted, and their optimal solutions.


Yes, I'm sure people at google aren't aware of things being posted on the web.  :-)
 
2013-03-28 11:50:22 AM  
FTA: While the decision to start teaching computer science at an early age is relatively recent in Vietnam, it already puts them well ahead of the average student in the United States, which Fraser bemoans. In fact, he goes on to paint a pretty bleak picture of computer science education in the United States, saying that eleventh grade students in the U.S. have trouble with HTML tags.

*sigh*

Some top Vietnamese students can out-program the average US student. The data suggest that as a whole, we do a lot better job of educating our students than they do.

Basic literacy rates in the US: 99% for males, 99% for females.
Basic literacy rates in Vietnam: 96% for males, 92% for females.
Data from CIA World Factbook - Fark didn't like the link.
 
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