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(Mother Nature Network)   "Though I've been a vegetarian for 20 years, I don't have a problem with bug consumption and I've always been interested in eating insects"   (mnn.com) divider line 13
    More: Strange, Fear Factor, entrees, vegetarians, accompaniment  
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1979 clicks; posted to Main » on 27 Mar 2013 at 10:16 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-03-27 10:37:48 AM  
2 votes:

swankywanky: dv-ous: Then you're not a vegetarian.


this - get particularly perturbed at vegetarians who are only driven by the "cuteness" factor of what they will / will not consume

//a lot of the rest bug me as well (ha!) but at least it's an ethos, man


Well, you could make an argument from mental complexity (insects don't have a nervous system in the same sense that a human or other vertebrate or mammal does).  So insects and spiders and lobsters would be fine, but cows and pigs and snakes would not be.  i.e. the same argument that most of us use to justify eating cows and dogs and turtles, but not other humans, but with the line in a different place as far as how broad you're willing to call "one of yours".

You could also make an argument from bio-contamination.  Cows can carry human-communicable prion disorders, and mammalian meat is prone to e. coli infection and lots of other stuff with human-infection potential.  As you move out to fowl this is less true, and by the time you get to fish-level metabolic differences there's not a lot of diseases that a human can get.  Contaminants/toxic materials, yes, but you risk that with basically everything.  Insects (and fish, and most reptiles) would be fine here too.

Or you could be vegetarian for ecological reasons, e.g. you hate the environment with a passion and are aware that the raising of plants displaces much more of the natural world and screws over mother nature much more than the raising of animals.  In this case, some animals dying as a side effect is a good thing.

Basically, there are a number of more-or-less arbitrary diets of widely varying philosophy that adherents just call "vegetarian" so that they don't have to spend half an hour explaining to their date why they're having a salad instead of the ribs.

//Above aside, I get pretty stabby when I hear the "I don't eat anything that has a face" reasoning, too.  And I am a fan of bringing up the planetary surface usage: calorie ratio if anyone's being a dick about it, I'm actually kind of impressed how many people I've made feel genuinely bad about their life choices by going over the basic arithmetic.  Albeit, don't do that to someone you'd like to talk to again in the future, and make sure they were a dick about it first, because it tends to make the conversation... unrecoverable outside of the internet.
Ant
2013-03-27 10:33:04 AM  
2 votes:
Bug
encrypted-tbn2.gstatic.com

Bugs
southernnationalist.com

Bugs
www.ivars.com

Yeah, I think I could eat bugs too.
2013-03-27 10:19:42 AM  
2 votes:
Shouldn't this *technically* be in the Geek tab?

/just sayin'
2013-03-27 08:54:47 PM  
1 votes:

cptjeff: rustypouch: This is why my respect for vegetarians isn't that high. They pick and choose what to eat, based on malleable morals.

Vegans, although it's not my thing, I have respect for. They take a stand, and stick with it.

I've known "vegans" who eat fish. And it makes much less sense to me than vegetarianism. Okay, not killing a chicken I get. But how does eating an egg that's never been fertilized harm a damn thing? It's not like you're hurting the species, chickens aren't in any danger of going extinct.


Many people who are vegetarians/vegans for moral reasons don't necessarily mind the death of the animal so much as the suffering they undergo before hand. Fish, for example, tend to be eaten more because they are often caught naturally and then killed. (No/little pre-death discomfort.) Pigs, chickens, cows, etc., on the other hand, often endure ridiculously brutal conditions.

As for unfertilized eggs being moral? Egg-laying eggs are kept in batterie cages that don't provide enough room for the hens to stand up/turn around, along with plenty of other things. So, that's not really about the eggs, it's about the way those eggs were produced.

/vegan myself, unless I catch the fish myself or get eggs from my own chickens. Not much of a hunter.
//also, in vegetarians' defense, being vegan is a teensy bit difficult. Cut 'em some slack.
2013-03-27 07:09:53 PM  
1 votes:
If you're going to eat or not eat something for personal reasons... go for it. There are some things I won't eat because I don't like the way they taste - as good a reason as any.

What I don't like is people thinking they can insulate themselves from moral or ethical culpability by making such changes to trivial things.

Example: Fruititarians... on perhaps the highest of high horses, only eating fruits, nuts, that kind of thing. Well you know what? Look up some OSHA violation cases and read some stuff about the plight of the migrant fruit pickers. You're supporting that.

Now obviously that line of reasoning is largely nonsense.... no one consumer is driving the entire industry. It's still that the attempt is made to segueu diet into some kind of laudable thing. Hindus who are vegan and jewish people who keep kosher don't brag about it, it's just something they do. But talk to a vegan who isn't hindu and I'm sure they're replete with all kinds of nonsense to talk about.

I don't know... safe food, safe food workers, those are my priorities. The rest is just metaphysical dick waving.
2013-03-27 12:44:47 PM  
1 votes:
I just can't get past the creepy crawlies being my lunch. I don't eat seafood, either. I think it is because 1) you have to break into the animal at the table to eat the meat inside, and 2) they look like they did when they were alive. Cow, venison, buffalo, elk,... even if I kill them  myself, the end product doesn't resemble the animal.

Yea, call me a wuss. Seafood just gags me. The flaky meat and having to crack open a lobster... uck, making me queasy.
2013-03-27 12:12:25 PM  
1 votes:

capt.hollister: I never quite understood people's revulsion to eating what is a lean and healthy source of protein.


I understand it perfectly. It's a culturally conditioned response in most of the West to find bugs "icky" or unclean. It's an irrational food belief of the same variety as not having a cheeseburger or drinking a beer because God said so. One that we should probably get over ASAP since we insist on bringing people into the world in an unchecked manner.

Jim_Callahan: Or you could be vegetarian for ecological reasons, e.g. you hate the environment with a passion and are aware that the raising of plants displaces much more of the natural world and screws over mother nature much more than the raising of animals. In this case, some animals dying as a side effect is a good thing.


By now you're probably aware that this is an idiotic statement, although you didn't get nearly enough derision for it IMO. I'll just wait here for the inevitable "b-b-but free range chickens".
2013-03-27 11:41:03 AM  
1 votes:

rustypouch: Vegans, although it's not my thing, I have respect for. They take a stand, and stick with it.


sometimes
2013-03-27 11:17:59 AM  
1 votes:

dersk: Jim_Callahan:
Or you could be vegetarian for ecological reasons, e.g. you hate the environment with a passion and are aware that the raising of plants displaces much more of the natural world and screws over mother nature much more than the raising of animals.  In this case, some animals dying as a side effect is a good thing.

Except in the real world, where 90% of livestock are raised on farmed plants.

/Have eaten crickets
//Went vegetarian since
//But yeah, insects sure as hell aren't vegetarian


Raising livestock is much more ecologically damaging than raising crops of plants. Essentially there's a lot of energy wasted between growing feed for livestock, the livestock consuming it, and the nutritional value of the food derived from said livestock. Even insects waste energy compared to plants, and plants waste energy compared to fungi. From the point of view of feeding a human population while maximizing natural space, we're better off with fungus.
2013-03-27 10:38:17 AM  
1 votes:
www.allaboutpuertovallarta.com
Ewww, grody.

www.youjustmademylist.com
Oh yeah.
2013-03-27 10:34:02 AM  
1 votes:
They've got cricket tacos at a Mexican place in midtown NYC that I've tried. They were pretty tasty. But I definitely wouldn't call myself a vegetarian.
2013-03-27 10:20:40 AM  
1 votes:

dv-ous: Then you're not a vegetarian.



this - get particularly perturbed at vegetarians who are only driven by the "cuteness" factor of what they will / will not consume

//a lot of the rest bug me as well (ha!) but at least it's an ethos, man
2013-03-27 10:18:08 AM  
1 votes:
Then you're not a vegetarian.

That said, bug parts are in everything, so you might as well get used to the idea.
 
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