If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(ESPN FC)   USA defeats Mexico 0-0   (espnfc.com) divider line 311
    More: Cool, Klinsmann, USA, corner kicks, Tri, Mexico, World Cup qualifying, centre back, penalty kicks  
•       •       •

10964 clicks; posted to Main » on 27 Mar 2013 at 10:18 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



311 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

Archived thread

First | « | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | » | Last | Show all
 
2013-03-27 04:01:13 PM

Oldiron_79: A game with a 0-0 tie... that sounds about as entertaining as watching paint dry.


It's soccer.  I don't think even removing the goalies would improve things much.
 
2013-03-27 04:02:23 PM

literaldeluxe: The Southern Dandy: Raging Whore Moans: literaldeluxe: Nana's Vibrator: low scoring of hockey

Both the NHL and NCAA have changed a number of hockey rules over the last several years with the specific intentions of increasing scoring and reducing the number of ties, in order to maintain or increase their audiences. Soccer may need similar changes to catch on in the US.

[cdn3.mocksession.com image 850x478]

Except soccer already has the largest audience of any sport in the world, so why would they want to change the rules?

2011 Revenue for US sports
NFL: $11.0 billion
MLB: $7.0 billion
NBA: $4.3 billion
NHL: $3.3 billion
MLS: $0.3 billion
Source

If MLS caught up to hockey in the US, it would mean an additional $3 billion in revenue per year, 11 times the current amount. If team/league owners thought they could do that, they'd forget about any international standards in an instant.


If they ever got to NBA or MLB levels of revenue, you could see a serious race brewing bet. MLS and European clubs to sign the top stars in the game.
 
2013-03-27 04:10:50 PM

rka: I don't think pro Soccer failed in the 70's because of TV. It failed because it was fundamentally a poorly run enterprise. Over-expansion, poor business practices, greedy owners looking to cash in quick.


You're dead on. In fact, if you look at how the MLS is run, it's almost a direct result of the 1970's NASL. MLS would rather grow slowly but sustainably than have a huge growth spurt and then stagnate.

The downside is that it's going to probably take at least a decade before MLS is even mentioned anywhere near the same breath as a mid-level European league.

Then again, if you'd told someone in 1988 that, in 25 years, boxing would be virtually dead- heavyweight boxing especially- and "mixed martial arts" would be the combatative sport of choice...
 
2013-03-27 04:11:14 PM

ScouserDuck: This text is now purple: Lee's_Austin: I have to go back and rewatch, but if memory serves it was the networks that killed soccer here in the US in favor of promoting the domestic American Football as it was truly American.

In the US, American football promotes itself. There are 12 college football stadiums larger than the largest pro stadium.

Hell, there's only one stadium in the world larger than what U-M, PSU, OSU, Tennessee, Alabama, and Texas pull down 7-8 times per season.

The Big 10 puts more butts in seats than the EPL does.

Because all of England is smaller than the state of AZ.. Imagine if Ohio had 100 college teams with 20 of them playing in NCAA div 1. If that was the case the shoe wouldn't be half the size it is now. As it stands, the entire state of Ohio supports 1 team... Of course they can put butts in the seats.


Arizona has 55M people?
 
2013-03-27 04:16:23 PM

You're the jerk... jerk: ScouserDuck: This text is now purple: Lee's_Austin: I have to go back and rewatch, but if memory serves it was the networks that killed soccer here in the US in favor of promoting the domestic American Football as it was truly American.

In the US, American football promotes itself. There are 12 college football stadiums larger than the largest pro stadium.

Hell, there's only one stadium in the world larger than what U-M, PSU, OSU, Tennessee, Alabama, and Texas pull down 7-8 times per season.

The Big 10 puts more butts in seats than the EPL does.

Because all of England is smaller than the state of AZ.. Imagine if Ohio had 100 college teams with 20 of them playing in NCAA div 1. If that was the case the shoe wouldn't be half the size it is now. As it stands, the entire state of Ohio supports 1 team... Of course they can put butts in the seats.

Arizona has 55M people?


I think he meant land area.  Which is important when you are discussing how many people follow certain sports.
 
2013-03-27 04:19:20 PM

Gonz: Then again, if you'd told someone in 1988 that, in 25 years, boxing would be virtually dead- heavyweight boxing especially- and "mixed martial arts" would be the combatative sport of choice...


speaking of boxing/mma i think it's possibility that the head trauma awakening will change where the youth talent flows to in this nation, which over a generation will change were the elite sport talent lies.  as a nation america might be approaching a tipping point where much of the population decides that their children will not be playing football.  the question is what do they play instead?

/and yes i'm aware of the studies of heading a soccer ball.
 
2013-03-27 04:24:34 PM
Gosling: What I'm getting from the international community is that MLS is seen as kind of this whole separate entity from the rest of the leagues, in a sense. We're not the top league and never will be, but the combination of disdain for ties, leaguewide parity (more than four teams capable of winning? The hell you say!) and rough physical play as a matter of course seems to have positioned us as kind of soccer's mosh pit. 'Hey, man, let's ditch this scene and I'll show you where the REAL party is.'

Am I getting that about right?


I don't think there's any need to compare at this stage - if the international community want to be snobbish about it (and the international community may very well want to do that), that's their business - there's always likely to be a bit of resentment at the US because we've got a lot of other things going for us. And the MLS is still years away from producing the same level of soccer or the rabid fans that you see in European Soccer - but when I say years, I mean something on the order of 10 years, not 100. What I'm saying is that those folks who say the MLS needs to change to allow for more scoring to "catch on" are wrong.  It is right behind the Italian League in so far as attendance goes, 3rd in US Sports attendance per event (in front of the NBA) and 4th in revenues (right behind the NBA). It's growing and it will continue to do so. Yeah, an open system where money wins is popular in Europe, but that's always a matter of opinion; US sports leagues have ALWAYS championed parity (even if it doesn't always work out that way).  The US Men's team doesn't seem to be impacted by a disdain for ties in the domestic league - if they want to quibble about that, I see it as a minor issue.  But the league itself will continue to develop as more revenue is on the table - and it's growing steadily.  And talent will continue to chase the money - so it's a matter of time.  Other than that, time will tell.
 
2013-03-27 04:25:16 PM

A Fark Handle: Gonz: Then again, if you'd told someone in 1988 that, in 25 years, boxing would be virtually dead- heavyweight boxing especially- and "mixed martial arts" would be the combatative sport of choice...

speaking of boxing/mma i think it's possibility that the head trauma awakening will change where the youth talent flows to in this nation, which over a generation will change were the elite sport talent lies.  as a nation america might be approaching a tipping point where much of the population decides that their children will not be playing football.  the question is what do they play instead?

/and yes i'm aware of the studies of heading a soccer ball.


Were those studies about the old leather-based soccer ball or the newer, lighter models?
 
2013-03-27 04:27:07 PM
It's hard to watch the US Men's National Team play soccer. Those guys look like an Army intramural team, not professional athletes. If Reggie Bush played striker his whole life, LeBron played goalie, etc. the USA would be the favorite to win every year. They are not a good representation of American athletes.
 
2013-03-27 04:30:15 PM

A Fark Handle: speaking of boxing/mma i think it's possibility that the head trauma awakening will change where the youth talent flows to in this nation


what you're missing is that it is fighting that's less popular, it's boxing that's less popular. MMA absorbed the people who got fed up with boxing's ridiculous corruption and fragmentation.
 
2013-03-27 04:31:25 PM

A Fark Handle: Gonz: Then again, if you'd told someone in 1988 that, in 25 years, boxing would be virtually dead- heavyweight boxing especially- and "mixed martial arts" would be the combatative sport of choice...

speaking of boxing/mma i think it's possibility that the head trauma awakening will change where the youth talent flows to in this nation, which over a generation will change were the elite sport talent lies.  as a nation america might be approaching a tipping point where much of the population decides that their children will not be playing football.  the question is what do they play instead?

/and yes i'm aware of the studies of heading a soccer ball.


Well, I hope they take up soccer.

tylerdurden217: It's hard to watch the US Men's National Team play soccer. Those guys look like an Army intramural team, not professional athletes. If Reggie Bush played striker his whole life, LeBron played goalie, etc. the USA would be the favorite to win every year. They are not a good representation of American athletes.


Yep.  American soccer does not draw our best athletes.  Not even close.
 
2013-03-27 04:32:48 PM

FLMountainMan: You're the jerk... jerk: ScouserDuck: This text is now purple: Lee's_Austin: I have to go back and rewatch, but if memory serves it was the networks that killed soccer here in the US in favor of promoting the domestic American Football as it was truly American.

In the US, American football promotes itself. There are 12 college football stadiums larger than the largest pro stadium.

Hell, there's only one stadium in the world larger than what U-M, PSU, OSU, Tennessee, Alabama, and Texas pull down 7-8 times per season.

The Big 10 puts more butts in seats than the EPL does.

Because all of England is smaller than the state of AZ.. Imagine if Ohio had 100 college teams with 20 of them playing in NCAA div 1. If that was the case the shoe wouldn't be half the size it is now. As it stands, the entire state of Ohio supports 1 team... Of course they can put butts in the seats.

Arizona has 55M people?

I think he meant land area.  Which is important when you are discussing how many people follow certain sports.


Good point. Explains why Alaska is big in professional sports.
 
2013-03-27 04:32:53 PM

FLMountainMan: You're the jerk... jerk: ScouserDuck: This text is now purple: Lee's_Austin: I have to go back and rewatch, but if memory serves it was the networks that killed soccer here in the US in favor of promoting the domestic American Football as it was truly American.

In the US, American football promotes itself. There are 12 college football stadiums larger than the largest pro stadium.

Hell, there's only one stadium in the world larger than what U-M, PSU, OSU, Tennessee, Alabama, and Texas pull down 7-8 times per season.

The Big 10 puts more butts in seats than the EPL does.

Because all of England is smaller than the state of AZ.. Imagine if Ohio had 100 college teams with 20 of them playing in NCAA div 1. If that was the case the shoe wouldn't be half the size it is now. As it stands, the entire state of Ohio supports 1 team... Of course they can put butts in the seats.

Arizona has 55M people?

I think he meant land area.  Which is important when you are discussing how many people follow certain sports.


It does when sport allegiances are divided geographically. There are what? 4 EPL teams in the London city limits alone (Chelsea, arsenal, QPR, spurs....am I missing anyone?). If there was only 1-2 London teams, imagine how big their stadia could be. That doesn't even include the lower league teams.
 
2013-03-27 04:37:01 PM

tylerdurden217: It's hard to watch the US Men's National Team play soccer. Those guys look like an Army intramural team, not professional athletes. If Reggie Bush played striker his whole life, LeBron played goalie, etc. the USA would be the favorite to win every year. They are not a good representation of American athletes.


No they wouldn't. See the earlier posts about just how young they play seriously (as in - signed to a major team) in other countries. The US does not develop players that way.

Also world class at one sport does not always mean world class at another. You think Messi would be successful in the NFL?
 
2013-03-27 04:43:27 PM

This text is now purple: A Fark Handle: speaking of boxing/mma i think it's possibility that the head trauma awakening will change where the youth talent flows to in this nation

what you're missing is that it is fighting that's less popular, it's boxing that's less popular. MMA absorbed the people who got fed up with boxing's ridiculous corruption and fragmentation.


no, i would say that all fighting is less popular, at least i feel like it is.  sure some people switched over to mma, but even mma fights are not the mass sports culture events that they once were.  heavyweight title fights were much more like a super bowl.  yes plenty of people watched ufc xxx.  granted i haven't researched it, but it feels as if the percentage of the population watching any of the forms of sports fighting has dropped.  (anyone have numbers handy?)  and that's just who is watching, never mind the decline in youth participation in the various forms of sports fighting.  mom's don't put their babies in the ring.
 
2013-03-27 04:44:07 PM

ScouserDuck: FLMountainMan: You're the jerk... jerk: ScouserDuck: This text is now purple: Lee's_Austin: I have to go back and rewatch, but if memory serves it was the networks that killed soccer here in the US in favor of promoting the domestic American Football as it was truly American.

In the US, American football promotes itself. There are 12 college football stadiums larger than the largest pro stadium.

Hell, there's only one stadium in the world larger than what U-M, PSU, OSU, Tennessee, Alabama, and Texas pull down 7-8 times per season.

The Big 10 puts more butts in seats than the EPL does.

Because all of England is smaller than the state of AZ.. Imagine if Ohio had 100 college teams with 20 of them playing in NCAA div 1. If that was the case the shoe wouldn't be half the size it is now. As it stands, the entire state of Ohio supports 1 team... Of course they can put butts in the seats.

Arizona has 55M people?

I think he meant land area.  Which is important when you are discussing how many people follow certain sports.

It does when sport allegiances are divided geographically. There are what? 4 EPL teams in the London city limits alone (Chelsea, arsenal, QPR, spurs....am I missing anyone?). If there was only 1-2 London teams, imagine how big their stadia could be. That doesn't even include the lower league teams.


New York has two professional baseball teams, two professional basketball teams, two professional football teams, two professional hockey teams, and one professional soccer team.
 
2013-03-27 04:44:40 PM
F*ck Mexico
 
2013-03-27 04:46:48 PM

born_yesterday: Forward holds it...HOLDS IT....HOLDS IT!!!!


t1.gstatic.com
 
2013-03-27 04:52:23 PM

FLMountainMan: ScouserDuck: FLMountainMan: You're the jerk... jerk: ScouserDuck: This text is now purple: Lee's_Austin: I have to go back and rewatch, but if memory serves it was the networks that killed soccer here in the US in favor of promoting the domestic American Football as it was truly American.

In the US, American football promotes itself. There are 12 college football stadiums larger than the largest pro stadium.

Hell, there's only one stadium in the world larger than what U-M, PSU, OSU, Tennessee, Alabama, and Texas pull down 7-8 times per season.

The Big 10 puts more butts in seats than the EPL does.

Because all of England is smaller than the state of AZ.. Imagine if Ohio had 100 college teams with 20 of them playing in NCAA div 1. If that was the case the shoe wouldn't be half the size it is now. As it stands, the entire state of Ohio supports 1 team... Of course they can put butts in the seats.

Arizona has 55M people?

I think he meant land area.  Which is important when you are discussing how many people follow certain sports.

It does when sport allegiances are divided geographically. There are what? 4 EPL teams in the London city limits alone (Chelsea, arsenal, QPR, spurs....am I missing anyone?). If there was only 1-2 London teams, imagine how big their stadia could be. That doesn't even include the lower league teams.

New York has two professional baseball teams, two professional basketball teams, two professional football teams, two professional hockey teams, and one professional soccer team.


A) New York City has 0 football teams. They're both New Jersey teams. B) New York City had a larger population than London. If they actually had 4 teams in the city limits...their attendance per team would go down significantly which directly supports my original point that having significantly more teams in a smaller geographic area lowers attendance per team.
 
2013-03-27 04:59:14 PM

FLMountainMan: ScouserDuck: FLMountainMan: You're the jerk... jerk: ScouserDuck: This text is now purple: Lee's_Austin: I have to go back and rewatch, but if memory serves it was the networks that killed soccer here in the US in favor of promoting the domestic American Football as it was truly American.

In the US, American football promotes itself. There are 12 college football stadiums larger than the largest pro stadium.

Hell, there's only one stadium in the world larger than what U-M, PSU, OSU, Tennessee, Alabama, and Texas pull down 7-8 times per season.

The Big 10 puts more butts in seats than the EPL does.

Because all of England is smaller than the state of AZ.. Imagine if Ohio had 100 college teams with 20 of them playing in NCAA div 1. If that was the case the shoe wouldn't be half the size it is now. As it stands, the entire state of Ohio supports 1 team... Of course they can put butts in the seats.

Arizona has 55M people?

I think he meant land area.  Which is important when you are discussing how many people follow certain sports.

It does when sport allegiances are divided geographically. There are what? 4 EPL teams in the London city limits alone (Chelsea, arsenal, QPR, spurs....am I missing anyone?). If there was only 1-2 London teams, imagine how big their stadia could be. That doesn't even include the lower league teams.

New York has two professional baseball teams, two professional basketball teams, two professional football teams, two professional hockey teams, and one professional soccer team.


There are 6 EPL teams in London, 3 Championship teams, 2 League one teams and 3 league 2 teams - 14 teams of professionals (big wage disparity though) and a lot more semi pro teams.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Football_in_London

There are 92 professional teams in England - although the lower league teams may well have semi pro players. Allegiances are a lot more local than NFL teams. The same goes for a lot of the big cities - in fact I think just about every city in the UK will have multiple professional soccer teams.
 
2013-03-27 05:09:04 PM

fo_sho!: tylerdurden217: It's hard to watch the US Men's National Team play soccer. Those guys look like an Army intramural team, not professional athletes. If Reggie Bush played striker his whole life, LeBron played goalie, etc. the USA would be the favorite to win every year. They are not a good representation of American athletes.

No they wouldn't. See the earlier posts about just how young they play seriously (as in - signed to a major team) in other countries. The US does not develop players that way.

Also world class at one sport does not always mean world class at another. You think Messi would be successful in the NFL?


Right, and in my post, I said if Reggie Bush played his whole life. Look, I'm pretty certain that Bush could have started in middle school and still been better than nearly any soccer player you can think of. No, I don't think Messi would be good at American Football, but that's my point. You could build 10 teams of soccer players from American Football and Basketball that would dominate soccer on a world level. Imagine Adrian Peterson, Jamaal Charles, Chris Johnson, Reggie Bush, Robert Griffin III, Calvin Johnson, Wes Welker, Julio Jones, Mike Wallace, Dez Bryant... And that's just the NFL and I'm just getting started. Each and every one of these guys is a better athlete than any soccer player from any country that you can name. Now of course you would need to have played the sport and have some decent coaching, but the USA would dominate.

I watch the USA now and expect them to lose because they are not good athletes. Period. It's our 6th rate (or worse) against the best that everyone else has to put on the pitch... and we still compete pretty well.
 
rka
2013-03-27 05:09:57 PM

ScouserDuck: B) New York City had a larger population than London.


Wikipedia puts their greater metro area populations at 18 million for NYC to 15 million for London. Their city populations are almost identical at 8 million.
 
2013-03-27 05:17:28 PM

A Fark Handle: no, i would say that all fighting is less popular, at least i feel like it is.  sure some people switched over to mma, but even mma fights are not the mass sports culture events that they once were.


Honestly, as much as boxing is on life support, it seems the big fights are more talked about than the big MMA fights. Pacquiao/Marquez was still a huge, bigger than UFC's last major fight (was it Sonnen/Silva?).

/still a boxing fan despite all the problems it has outside of the actual sport itself.
 
2013-03-27 05:19:31 PM

Wicked Chinchilla: StRalphTheLiar: bearcats1983: I'm really loving Guzan after these last few games. I was nervous with Howard being out due to injury, but Guzan is an awesome alternative.


GK is the only position I have never worried about for the US.

Why is that?
As much as our national teams have truly suffered in international competition the general rule is that our Goal Keepers are outstanding.  Its a rather odd curiosity of US Soccer.


It's not an odd curiosity at all.  Youth in most of the world that takes soccer seriously only ever grow up playing soccer.  American youth, at least when this generation and the Kasey Keller, Brad Friedel, Jurgen Sommer, Tony Meola generation were growing up played football, basketball, baseball, soccer, etc.  Those sports ALL prepare a person mentally and physically to play goalkeeper.

Tim Howard was an accomplished basketball player and could have played D1 college ball if he'd wanted to.
 
2013-03-27 05:20:38 PM

hdhale: Soccer is meant to be played, not watched.  There is a reason why most every stadium filled with soccer fans is drunk off their ass, fighting, or both.


You can't get drunk off your ass at a Real Salt Lake game or at a men's or women's US national team game in Rio Tinto Stadium in Sandy, Utah.

I think that the 1% in the luxury boxes can get wine or hard liquor but the rest of us get 4% beer.

Not many fights, because most fans have 3 hours of church the next day and they don't want to spend time making bail after the game.
 
rka
2013-03-27 05:24:03 PM

tylerdurden217: Each and every one of these guys is a better athlete than any soccer player from any country that you can name. Now of course you would need to have played the sport and have some decent coaching, but the USA would dominate.



And if none of them could creatively handle a soccer ball in traffic it wouldn't matter one bit. "Decent coaching"? You're going to need more than decent coaching,  world class athletes or not. It takes DECADES of coaching, generations even. From an early age. And it takes a massive feeder infrastructure to find, funnel and train those kids.

The US doesn't lag the world class soccer countries because we don't have the athletes playing, that's absurd. We lag because we don't have an entire infrastructure dedicated to finding, nurturing and training those kids that show an aptitude at the levels other countries do. Kid gets good in soccer here in the US he still has to run the gauntlet of his local HS coach (maybe someone's dad volunteering) and local rules on the amount of games played and time to practice, maybe he finds some traveling all-star team with a better coach, maybe not. And then where does he go? College? Again, rules on number of games played, practice time, GPAs to maintain. Plus, name me a soccer factory College powerhouse on par with an Alabama or Miami for football. By the time a US player gets to a MLS team his counterpart in Europe has already been playing pro, with pro level coaching, for years.

The closest thing the US has to the soccer factories elsewhere is maybe Junior Hockey, where you take a kid at 16 and send him to play a much tougher schedule than he'd ever see in high school, or even college. But in soccer terms as defined by the countries that are really serious, 16 is already too late to really start.
 
2013-03-27 05:26:05 PM

A Fark Handle: no, i would say that all fighting is less popular, at least i feel like it is. sure some people switched over to mma, but even mma fights are not the mass sports culture events that they once were. heavyweight title fights were much more like a super bowl.


I completely agree. I'm probably dating myself here, but I remember when Mike Tyson was at the peak of his popularity. His fight against Michael Spinks was must-see TV. Everybody made plans to watch that. And I was living in a small town in Kentucky at the time. The PPV was like $50, so you'd have 10 people get together and chip in $5 each to cover it.

Boxing used to be HUGE. And when it died, it died really quick. And, yes, even if Mayweather and Pacquiao fight, I'm still calling boxing dead. It's a shell of its former self.
 
2013-03-27 05:28:16 PM

tylerdurden217: fo_sho!: tylerdurden217: It's hard to watch the US Men's National Team play soccer. Those guys look like an Army intramural team, not professional athletes. If Reggie Bush played striker his whole life, LeBron played goalie, etc. the USA would be the favorite to win every year. They are not a good representation of American athletes.

No they wouldn't. See the earlier posts about just how young they play seriously (as in - signed to a major team) in other countries. The US does not develop players that way.

Also world class at one sport does not always mean world class at another. You think Messi would be successful in the NFL?

Right, and in my post, I said if Reggie Bush played his whole life. Look, I'm pretty certain that Bush could have started in middle school and still been better than nearly any soccer player you can think of. No, I don't think Messi would be good at American Football, but that's my point. You could build 10 teams of soccer players from American Football and Basketball that would dominate soccer on a world level. Imagine Adrian Peterson, Jamaal Charles, Chris Johnson, Reggie Bush, Robert Griffin III, Calvin Johnson, Wes Welker, Julio Jones, Mike Wallace, Dez Bryant... And that's just the NFL and I'm just getting started. Each and every one of these guys is a better athlete than any soccer player from any country that you can name. Now of course you would need to have played the sport and have some decent coaching, but the USA would dominate.

I watch the USA now and expect them to lose because they are not good athletes. Period. It's our 6th rate (or worse) against the best that everyone else has to put on the pitch... and we still compete pretty well.


BS. I've heard this argument time and again (mostly relating to rugby) and it doesn't hold water. Different sports require different skillsets, there is no one "master athlete" who could excel at any sport if they just focused on it - unless you're talking about power based track and field or some other similar subset. The ability to dribble a ball is a lot different than evading tackles with footwork. Breakaway speed is different to being able to curl a 30 yard shot into the top corner.

 There have been plenty of examples of professional sports stars who excelled despite being unathletic. The "intangibles" that will lead to a QB prospect being drafted higher than his stats dictate play a much greater role in soccer than in football due to the open, less scripted nature of the game.

If Michael Jordan had devoted his life to playing baseball would he have been a hall of famer? I highly doubt it. US Football, above almost all team sports, is obsessed with size and stats because athleticism is more important than talent for a lot of positions. In soccer the case is pretty much reversed. Diego Maradonna, George Best, Paul Gascoigne, Ronaldo (not Christiano) - none of them were particularly gifted athletes but they were all world class talents.
 
2013-03-27 05:32:30 PM

Gonz: Boxing used to be HUGE. And when it died, it died really quick. And, yes, even if Mayweather and Pacquiao fight, I'm still calling boxing dead. It's a shell of its former self.


I still think there's a fanbase for it though, the problem is that there's no organization and too much corruption. If they set it up like the UFC I think they could make somewhat of a comeback, it's not like there aren't good fighters (both veterans and up and comers), but the setup of the sport is just atrocious. I think something they could do to improve the sport would be to add another weight division so guys like the Klitschko brothers couldn't totally dominate the heavyweight division. 200 being the minumum is outdated with the way modern athletes are.
 
2013-03-27 05:34:06 PM

ScouserDuck: FLMountainMan: ScouserDuck: FLMountainMan: You're the jerk... jerk: ScouserDuck: This text is now purple: Lee's_Austin: I have to go back and rewatch, but if memory serves it was the networks that killed soccer here in the US in favor of promoting the domestic American Football as it was truly American.

In the US, American football promotes itself. There are 12 college football stadiums larger than the largest pro stadium.

Hell, there's only one stadium in the world larger than what U-M, PSU, OSU, Tennessee, Alabama, and Texas pull down 7-8 times per season.

The Big 10 puts more butts in seats than the EPL does.

Because all of England is smaller than the state of AZ.. Imagine if Ohio had 100 college teams with 20 of them playing in NCAA div 1. If that was the case the shoe wouldn't be half the size it is now. As it stands, the entire state of Ohio supports 1 team... Of course they can put butts in the seats.

Arizona has 55M people?

I think he meant land area.  Which is important when you are discussing how many people follow certain sports.

It does when sport allegiances are divided geographically. There are what? 4 EPL teams in the London city limits alone (Chelsea, arsenal, QPR, spurs....am I missing anyone?). If there was only 1-2 London teams, imagine how big their stadia could be. That doesn't even include the lower league teams.

New York has two professional baseball teams, two professional basketball teams, two professional football teams, two professional hockey teams, and one professional soccer team.

A) New York City has 0 football teams. They're both New Jersey teams. B) New York City had a larger population than London. If they actually had 4 teams in the city limits...their attendance per team would go down significantly which directly supports my original point that having significantly more teams in a smaller geographic area lowers attendance per team.


Aren't both baseball teams, both hockey teams and both basketball teams inside the city?
 
2013-03-27 05:45:13 PM

seumasokelly: Aren't both baseball teams, both hockey teams and both basketball teams inside the city?


MLB - Yankees, Mets
NFL - Giants, Jets
NHL - Rangers, Islanders, Devils
NBA - Knicks, Nets

All but the Islanders within 15 miles of midtown Manhattan and easily accessible by mass transit in less than an hour.
 
2013-03-27 05:48:07 PM
userserve-ak.last.fm
rudsoccers.com
Yes, let's try to emulate the Euro leagues! Great idea!
/the Euro leagues will resemble the NFL before MLS adopts promotion/relegation
 
2013-03-27 05:51:27 PM

rka: The US doesn't lag the world class soccer countries because we don't have the athletes playing, that's absurd. We lag because we don't have an entire infrastructure dedicated to finding, nurturing and training those kids that show an aptitude at the levels other countries do. Kid gets good in soccer here in the US he still has to run the gauntlet of his local HS coach (maybe someone's dad volunteering) and local rules on the amount of games played and time to practice, maybe he finds some traveling all-star team with a better coach, maybe not. And then where does he go? College? Again, rules on number of games played, practice time, GPAs to maintain. Plus, name me a soccer factory College powerhouse on par with an Alabama or Miami for football. By the time a US player gets to a MLS team his counterpart in Europe has already been playing pro, with pro level coaching, for years.

The closest thing the US has to the soccer factories elsewhere is maybe Junior Hockey, where you take a kid at 16 and send him to play a much tougher schedule than he'd ever see in high school, or even college. But in soccer terms as defined by the countries that are really serious, 16 is already too late to really start.


I'm calling BS. If it was true that we " lag because we don't have an entire infrastructure dedicated to finding, nurturing and training those kids that show an aptitude at the levels other countries do" then why is it the the USMNT is actually decent? We don't have a system like that in the USA, but we can compete and win against countries that do have such a system? Sounds like the system isn't as important as you say. Clint Dempsey is one of the best on the US team and he grew up in Nacogdoches, Texas. I don't know if you have been there or not, I have, and I can tell you that they lack the system that you are talking about. Somehow in 2010, they managed to lead their group... again, with inferior athletes.

I lived in Germany, and witnessed this system you are talking about... no doubt, it creates a larger number of above average amateur players, but it isn't a pipeline to superior athleticism.

If all things were the same for someone like Clint Dempsey and Reggie Bush (not a huge Reggie Bush fan, just trying to stay with the same example) then Reggie would be a far superior soccer player. He would dominate soccer on an international level, as would at least 50 NFL and NBA players.
 
2013-03-27 05:54:45 PM

Yanks_RSJ: seumasokelly: Aren't both baseball teams, both hockey teams and both basketball teams inside the city?

MLB - Yankees, Mets
NFL - Giants, Jets
NHL - Rangers, Islanders, Devils
NBA - Knicks, Nets

All but the Islanders within 15 miles of midtown Manhattan and easily accessible by mass transit in less than an hour.


The giants and jets are in New Jersey.
 
2013-03-27 05:55:49 PM

ScouserDuck: The giants and jets are in New Jersey.


You should learn to read for context.
 
2013-03-27 06:01:06 PM

Yanks_RSJ: ScouserDuck: The giants and jets are in New Jersey.

You should learn to read for context.


No..you're right..opening a fan base to an extra 8 million people has no bearing in the original conversation (eye roll)

None of the points counter the arguement that more teams (in the same sport) in a geographic area reduces each team's fan base.
 
2013-03-27 06:01:10 PM

fo_sho!: If Michael Jordan had devoted his life to playing baseball would he have been a hall of famer?


Absolutely! Did you ever see Bo Jackson? That dude was dominant at track and field, baseball, and football. Had MJ dedicated his life to baseball, he would absolutely have been a hall of famer. If MJ had dedicated his life to sand volleyball, he would have dominated that too. There is absolutely NO substitute for pure athleticism. I can play basketball my entire life and at age 33 (same as Kobe Bryant I think) I would get embarrassed by a decent High School player, just based on his athleticism.

Here's a better example than MJ: Hakeem Olajuwon did not play basketball until he was 15, in Nigeria. He was previously a soccer player. He came to the USA to play basketball for the University of Houston, hopefully you know the rest. He is one of the best basketball players in the history of the game, and it wasn't because of his early coaching. He was a superior athlete. Of course, his body type is suited well for basketball, he is 7 feet tall. In my examples, I purposely listed people who were between 6' and 6'4" ... I even through in LeBron as a goalie.
 
2013-03-27 06:03:30 PM

tylerdurden217: ... I even through in LeBron as a goalie.


threw in... jeez that's one of my pet peeves and I did it.
 
2013-03-27 06:04:09 PM

ScouserDuck: Yanks_RSJ: ScouserDuck: The giants and jets are in New Jersey.

You should learn to read for context.

No..you're right..opening a fan base to an extra 8 million people has no bearing in the original conversation (eye roll)

None of the points counter the arguement that more teams (in the same sport) in a geographic area reduces each team's fan base.


Moving the goalposts a little.
 
2013-03-27 06:06:39 PM

seumasokelly: ScouserDuck: Yanks_RSJ: ScouserDuck: The giants and jets are in New Jersey.

You should learn to read for context.

No..you're right..opening a fan base to an extra 8 million people has no bearing in the original conversation (eye roll)

None of the points counter the arguement that more teams (in the same sport) in a geographic area reduces each team's fan base.

Moving the goalposts a little.


What? How? The whole conversation started with the Big 10 being able to fill more seats than the EPL. It was entirely American football vs. English soccer..single sport comparisons. Nobody moved any goalposts.
 
2013-03-27 06:08:30 PM

ScouserDuck: Yanks_RSJ: ScouserDuck: The giants and jets are in New Jersey.

You should learn to read for context.

No..you're right..opening a fan base to an extra 8 million people has no bearing in the original conversation (eye roll)


FFS. The Meadowlands is easier to get to from Manhattan than other places "in the city". Link

Herald Square to The Meadowlands can be done in under a half hour.
 
2013-03-27 06:09:08 PM

ScouserDuck: seumasokelly: ScouserDuck: Yanks_RSJ: ScouserDuck: The giants and jets are in New Jersey.

You should learn to read for context.

No..you're right..opening a fan base to an extra 8 million people has no bearing in the original conversation (eye roll)

None of the points counter the arguement that more teams (in the same sport) in a geographic area reduces each team's fan base.

Moving the goalposts a little.

What? How? The whole conversation started with the Big 10 being able to fill more seats than the EPL. It was entirely American football vs. English soccer..single sport comparisons. Nobody moved any goalposts.


(eye roll)
 
2013-03-27 06:12:54 PM
6 years ago, this was a fun website. Now it is nothing but a bunch of god damn trolls. Stupid farkers don't know how to live life without being a god damn idiot
 
2013-03-27 06:13:24 PM
Ironically it was Americans that crossed into Mexico to do work
 
2013-03-27 06:16:48 PM

seumasokelly: FFS. The Meadowlands is easier to get to from Manhattan than other places "in the city". Link

Herald Square to The Meadowlands can be done in under a half hour.


Using that same logic, it would also mean that it is easier for people in the northern Jersey suburbs to get there as well, thus opening up the fanbase.
 
2013-03-27 06:29:44 PM

YonderScott: 6 years ago, this was a fun website. Now it is nothing but a bunch of god damn trolls. Stupid farkers don't know how to live life without being a god damn idiot


welcometofark.jpg.


(it's been this way for a decade)
 
2013-03-27 06:30:37 PM
A 0-0 tie? How unusual and exciting
 
2013-03-27 06:31:43 PM
tylerdurden217
I lived in Germany, and witnessed this system you are talking about...


Until the last 10-15 years or so, Germany's soccer training system was a laughing stock for other (even amateur) sports and for sport students looking at training sessions.
But things changed and that's why Germany finally has good players again - and why they're so young.

The "professional" coaches were usually former pros who needed a job, proceeded to sleep through some course to get a training license and then used their name to teach and train kids the same way they themselves were taught 20-30 years earlier.
For crying out loud, leading up to World Cup 2006 in Germany, Klinsmann was both mocked and considered revolutionary for hiring a couple of fitness coaches, creating individual exercise plans ("they have to do homework, hurr-durr!") and for getting advice from Germany's national field hockey coach (field hockey probably being Germany's most constantly successful team sport despite its amateur status).
He even wanted to install the former national field hockey coach to help implement his ideas, but having someone without a soccer history in an official capacity was a bit too much for the old boys club running the German football association, so they rejected Klinsmann's request and installed ex-pro Matthias Sammer in that position instead.
 
2013-03-27 06:32:57 PM

tylerdurden217: fo_sho!: If Michael Jordan had devoted his life to playing baseball would he have been a hall of famer?

Absolutely! Did you ever see Bo Jackson? That dude was dominant at track and field, baseball, and football. Had MJ dedicated his life to baseball, he would absolutely have been a hall of famer. If MJ had dedicated his life to sand volleyball, he would have dominated that too. There is absolutely NO substitute for pure athleticism. I can play basketball my entire life and at age 33 (same as Kobe Bryant I think) I would get embarrassed by a decent High School player, just based on his athleticism.

Here's a better example than MJ: Hakeem Olajuwon did not play basketball until he was 15, in Nigeria. He was previously a soccer player. He came to the USA to play basketball for the University of Houston, hopefully you know the rest. He is one of the best basketball players in the history of the game, and it wasn't because of his early coaching. He was a superior athlete. Of course, his body type is suited well for basketball, he is 7 feet tall. In my examples, I purposely listed people who were between 6' and 6'4" ... I even through in LeBron as a goalie.


He's right. The US is ranked in the mid-20's in soccer. They would be a lot higher if the development system wasn't so scatter-shot. The more elite players, eventually that trickles up to more pros.
 
2013-03-27 07:01:11 PM

rka: nwave: hdhale: Soccer is meant to be played, not watched.  There is a reason why most every stadium filled with soccer fans is drunk off their ass, fighting, or both.

And yet whatever sport you like to watch will never be watched by even half as many people as soccer, while soccer will go on being the most watched spectator sport that ever existed.

Funny how things worked out huh?

Something, something Spice Girls.


More like:

Something, something Beatles.

Soccer wasn't a 5 year trend. Its been dominant over all other spectator sports for over 50 years. Your favorite spectator sport has never had, and likely never will have, as many viewers as soccer does today.
 
Displayed 50 of 311 comments

First | « | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | » | Last | Show all

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is archived, and closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »






Report