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(Popular Science)   Presenting the periodic table of booze   (popsci.com) divider line 6
    More: Cool, periodic table  
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11420 clicks; posted to Main » on 26 Mar 2013 at 12:54 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-03-26 01:20:03 PM
4 votes:
I have an issue with the way that the table is arranged.  The drinks on the far left (sitting in the alkali group) should be highly reactive (read:mixable) and rarely found alone.  Ciders are neither.  Additionally, the far right side of the table, where the noble gasses usually sit should have liquor that are rarely (if ever) mixed : Single Malt Scotch, Aquavit, etc.

The first period (row) should consist of the most basic drinks : Vodka on the far left and 2 buck chuck (Charles Shaw) on the far right.  The second period should consist of the most abundant liquors (tequila, dark rum, light rum, whiskey, gin, vermouth) sitting where carbon, oxygen, nitrogen generally sit.

Additionally, the Periodic table of Elements is universal.  I see a lot of douche frat-boy type short poured cocktails, but I don't see drinks that are more common outside of the dive bars they tend to frequent.

Elements were arranged in the periodic table because they share characteristics common characteristics   Going down a line increases the number of electron clouds, moving to the right increases the fulfillment of electron clouds.    Some random graphic artist separating drinks by their base mix might serve to sell some shiatty tee-shirts or posters but there is nothing periodic about it.
2013-03-26 01:15:08 PM
3 votes:
The the "periodic" table is periodic because of the way electron orbitals fill up in atoms -- it gives them properties that appear to repeat in a pattern as atomic number increases.  Very few other sets of items (drinks, for example) really share this characteristic, so there's nothing "periodic" about it.  Its just a table of booze.

/ curmudgeon-like typing detected, I know
2013-03-26 01:35:47 PM
2 votes:
I was hoping this table would help me determine which alcohols would mix best with each other, or specific gravity, or really just anything useful. This is just a frat-boy t-shirt.
2013-03-26 01:24:41 PM
1 votes:

ceebeecates4: I have an issue with the way that the table is arranged.  The drinks on the far left (sitting in the alkali group) should be highly reactive (read:mixable) and rarely found alone.  Ciders are neither.  Additionally, the far right side of the table, where the noble gasses usually sit should have liquor that are rarely (if ever) mixed : Single Malt Scotch, Aquavit, etc.

The first period (row) should consist of the most basic drinks : Vodka on the far left and 2 buck chuck (Charles Shaw) on the far right.  The second period should consist of the most abundant liquors (tequila, dark rum, light rum, whiskey, gin, vermouth) sitting where carbon, oxygen, nitrogen generally sit.


By any chance, do you have a newsletter to which I may subscribe? You put my thoughts into words more eloquently than I ever could.

//Or, colloquially, "this".
2013-03-26 01:04:44 PM
1 votes:
What kind of pussy makes a mint julep that's only 32% alcohol?
2013-03-26 12:58:39 PM
1 votes:
Needs to be printed upside down on a shirt.
 
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