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(Mental Floss)   How to buy a computer...1993 edition   (mentalfloss.com) divider line 128
    More: Amusing, OS/2, time machines  
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9755 clicks; posted to Geek » on 26 Mar 2013 at 8:33 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-03-26 08:04:12 AM  
From the "where are they now?" files:

That freaky lady at 5:35 is Lisa Biow.  She gave up computers and is now a certified rolfer.
 
2013-03-26 08:16:49 AM  
I see your 1993 video and raise you with Bits & Bytes, circa 1983.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7VaBYw3swyg
 
2013-03-26 08:42:51 AM  
In 1993, I was in high school and doing techie service work on PCs so I could afford one of my own. That year for my birthday I bought myself a dual 486DX/50 (two CPUs and none of that clock multiplied bullshiat), 8MB RAM, a 1768MB SCSI2 drive and a 17" monitor.  That rig was a hair under $4500. I ran OS/2 on it, but I switched to Linux in early 1995 because it was easier to do my CS homework that way.
 
2013-03-26 08:43:23 AM  
This "computer" thing is an interesting fad. I don't think it'll catch on, though. There's no reason for anyone to have a computer in their home.

=Smidge=
 
2013-03-26 08:47:57 AM  

Babwa Wawa: That freaky lady at 5:35 is Lisa Biow.  She gave up computers and is now a certified rolfer.


I read that as 'Blow' and had an entirely different interpretation of what 'rolfing' was.
 
2013-03-26 08:49:53 AM  

likefunbutnot: In 1993, I was in high school and doing techie service work on PCs so I could afford one of my own. That year for my birthday I bought myself a dual 486DX/50 (two CPUs and none of that clock multiplied bullshiat), 8MB RAM, a 1768MB SCSI2 drive and a 17" monitor.  That rig was a hair under $4500. I ran OS/2 on it, but I switched to Linux in early 1995 because it was easier to do my CS homework that way.


Woah there, rich man!

It was probably around the same time I bought my first PC, a 486DX33 w/ 4MB of RAM and a 130MB hard drive.  The one-upsmanship game against my brother had begun!
 
2013-03-26 08:52:58 AM  
Think I got my first PC around then.  A 486DX2/50, 4MB RAM, 170MB hard drive and a 1MB VESA local bus video card.  Hot stuff and set me back about £2000 when I threw in a Sound Blaster Pro, joystick, Civilization and X-wing.  Good times.
 
2013-03-26 08:55:06 AM  
386 CPUs were already obsolete by 1993. If you were buying an entry-level PC, you were getting at least a 486SX-25, and paying at least $1000 for it.
 
2013-03-26 08:58:56 AM  

GoldSpider: It was probably around the same time I bought my first PC, a 486DX33 w/ 4MB of RAM and a 130MB hard drive. The one-upsmanship game against my brother had begun!


I had pretty much the same configuration as my first non-hand-me-down PC. (And geez, what a step up from the 286 I had been using.) It was actually pulled form my college fund; since my parents realized that said fund might pay for about a half-semester of college in 1992, thy just invested about $2200 (ouch) of it into a computer instead. Given that pretty much everyone else on my floor had the college-leased (Steven's Tech required early on that every student have a computer) 386SX,  it was pretty much the last time I actually had something that could run circles around my friends' computers.
 
2013-03-26 09:01:55 AM  
Ah yes, memories of my first PC.

Magnavox 386SX 16mhz (with turbo!)
1 MB of RAM (upgraded to 5 MB two years later)
40 MB Hard Drive (doubled with Stacker eventually!)
DOS 5.0 and Windows 3.0
Added a VGA card later and a 14.4 baud modem

Spend countless hours on that thing.  Gamed, learned to program, ran a BBS, etc, etc.  It served me well from '91 to '94.
 
ZAZ [TotalFark]
2013-03-26 09:11:36 AM  
In 1993 (plus or minus a little) I spent way too much money for a fast x86 system to run Unix. Had to write the SCSI driver myself, or at least hack it up. Sold it, used an older Unix workstation for a while, used a less old Sun workstation for a while, bought an expensive used high end Sun off eBay that served me well for many years, bought a used Sun, and now have an AMD based system.
 
2013-03-26 09:23:11 AM  

likefunbutnot: In 1993, I was in high school and doing techie service work on PCs so I could afford one of my own. That year for my birthday I bought myself a dual 486DX/50 (two CPUs and none of that clock multiplied bullshiat), 8MB RAM, a 1768MB SCSI2 drive and a 17" monitor.  That rig was a hair under $4500. I ran OS/2 on it, but I switched to Linux in early 1995 because it was easier to do my CS homework that way.


I was an engineer working for a large defense contractor and we bought a computer very similar to this for a black project that I was working on.  We had to keep the computer in a special room and only those working on the project could touch the computer.
 
2013-03-26 09:24:44 AM  

YodaBlues: Babwa Wawa: That freaky lady at 5:35 is Lisa Biow.  She gave up computers and is now a certified rolfer.

I read that as 'Blow' and had an entirely different interpretation of what 'rolfing' was.


I read it as "rofling", the reality left me disappointed.
 
2013-03-26 09:25:13 AM  
In 1993 Iwas about to go off to college so I bought my my 1st computer from CompUSA a Compudyne 486 SX25 with 8 MB of Ram, 4 MB Video Card, 170 MB Hard Drive 5.25 AND 3.5 High Density Floppy Drives 14 inch Super VGA Monitor, 9600 Baud modem and was running DOS 5.0 and Windows 3.1.  I think I paid around $1700 for that set up and it was a huge step up from the hand me down  XT clone with a 40 MB hard drive, 512k ram, CGA monitor 5.25 and 3.5 Double Density Floppy Drives that my brother bought  had bought in 1989 when he went off to college
 
2013-03-26 09:29:24 AM  
I didn't get a computer until 1994.  486SX, 4speed CDROM, 400MB HDD, 2MB of RAM, I forget the monitor size.  Back then that was kick ass.

Comparing the stats of those computers and their prices compared to the laptop I have now and what I paid for it, it's almost comical.
 
2013-03-26 09:29:50 AM  

Joe_diGriz: I had pretty much the same configuration as my first non-hand-me-down PC. (And geez, what a step up from the 286 I had been using.) It was actually pulled form my college fund; since my parents realized that said fund might pay for about a half-semester of college in 1992, thy just invested about $2200 (ouch) of it into a computer instead. Given that pretty much everyone else on my floor had the college-leased (Steven's Tech required early on that every student have a computer) 386SX, it was pretty much the last time I actually had something that could run circles around my friends' computers.


Man, what heady days those were!  Kids these days just don't appreciate the joy of getting a weird sound card to work by farking around in autoexec.bat and config.sys, or the balancing act that was futzing with QEMM between making a game work vs. playable...
 
2013-03-26 09:50:48 AM  
Here you go.

www.amigahistory.co.uk

Problem solved.
 
2013-03-26 09:52:38 AM  
I went to college with a 486-66 in 1993. 250mb hard drive -- would've been another $300 to go up to a 540mb. Before I graduated, I spent less money on a 1.6gb hard drive.

Only guy on my floor with a computer in the dorm room even my sophomore year. Which is also when we noted the cleats on the window frame and the strdy coat road in the closet, and strung a hammock between the cleat and the coat road. If you swung the hammock far enough, you could open the fridge on the first swing, get a beer off the door with the second, and keep writing.
 
2013-03-26 10:02:37 AM  

likefunbutnot: In 1993, I was in high school and doing techie service work on PCs so I could afford one of my own. That year for my birthday I bought myself a dual 486DX/50 (two CPUs and none of that clock multiplied bullshiat), 8MB RAM, a 1768MB SCSI2 drive and a 17" monitor.  That rig was a hair under $4500. I ran OS/2 on it, but I switched to Linux in early 1995 because it was easier to do my CS homework that way.


I didn't know a 486 could do SMP.  Did OS/2 (2.1?) support it?
 
2013-03-26 10:02:52 AM  
It's been a while since I thought about how much Look Around You (second series) looked like old tech programs.
 
2013-03-26 10:02:55 AM  
pfft! My 1st computer. 16k of RAM and I had to hack a cassette tape deck for storage.

/whats a cassette?

encrypted-tbn1.gstatic.com
 
2013-03-26 10:08:12 AM  
Thanks to hindsight, that $2000 invested in a PC in 1993 should have been put into MSFT, which traded around $2.50 that year. It's split five times since then and paid dividends since 2003...

Not as great as if you'd spent $2k on MSFT in 1986. You could live a nice life on that one. Now everyone IPO's their stock as overvalued companies that'll never justify their opening price and the only way to make good money in the market is taking options on who they'll crash next.

/Okay, maybe the cynical note's from a pulled muscle.
 
2013-03-26 10:17:22 AM  

wildcardjack: Thanks to hindsight, that $2000 invested in a PC in 1993 should have been put into MSFT, which traded around $2.50 that year. It's split five times since then and paid dividends since 2003...

Not as great as if you'd spent $2k on MSFT in 1986. You could live a nice life on that one. Now everyone IPO's their stock as overvalued companies that'll never justify their opening price and the only way to make good money in the market is taking options on who they'll crash next.

/Okay, maybe the cynical note's from a pulled muscle.


But you couldn't play Wolfenstein 3d on a stock certificate, priorities man.
 
2013-03-26 10:18:46 AM  
packard bell 486 DX4-100

$3000

yes, I bought it
 
2013-03-26 10:19:07 AM  

FaygoMaster: I didn't know a 486 could do SMP. Did OS/2 (2.1?) support it?


It did, actually. So did NT 3.1, actually, though I didn't have enough RAM to make NT run (NT needed 12MB RAM, even back then).

FreeBSD didn't have SMP at that time, but I was probably an early tester for Linux SMP kernels. I remember being REALLY excited at getting an 80% performance improvement with gcc on two CPUs.

One of the guys I went to college with still has his 486 and I think he still submits code for keeping Linux 2.4 running on it.

GoldSpider: Woah there, rich man!


If it makes you feel any better, I spent about three years saving up for that machine. It's just that I was doing it back when people would hand me $50 to type in CHS data so their hard drives would be recognized by their BIOS or, as previously mentioned, configure config.sys so they could have a working sound card AND modem AND serial mouse.
 
2013-03-26 10:19:39 AM  
Had a 486dx 33mhz, 4 meg. Helped roommate build a 16meg machine and we were excited that we could load Ultima Underworld completely into ram.
 
2013-03-26 10:22:14 AM  
i837.photobucket.com
 
2013-03-26 10:22:43 AM  
I bought my first PC upon my return from the First Gulf War. With the cash, I got a 386DX, 33Mhz, math co-processor, 4 MB RAM and a whopping 42 MB HD. Got it for flight sim stuff. Spent many hours playing X-Wing and Falcon 3.0.
 
2013-03-26 10:26:36 AM  

I_Am_Weasel: I see your 1993 video and raise you with Bits & Bytes, circa 1983.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7VaBYw3swyg


Big bonus for Luba Goy and Billy Van.

When that series aired, I was just about on my 2nd computer- I started with an apple ][ clone (orange) that I self-assembled and had plastic velcro panels for a case.  It was roughly equivalent to a 2 plus in horsepower (4k 6502 8 bit processor, 64k ram).  I would upgrade to an Apple //c the following year.  By the time 1993 rolled around, I was on computer #4 or 5, somewhere between my SX25 and DX40.

/NERDS!
 
2013-03-26 10:36:58 AM  
In '93 or thereabouts my dad bought our first real computer, an Acer 486 SX/25 with 4MB of RAM and a 140ish MB drive.

Within a year, he spent $200 doubling the RAM to 8MB so Doom and SimCity 2000 would run better.
 
2013-03-26 10:43:40 AM  

sammyk: pfft! My 1st computer. 16k of RAM and I had to hack a cassette tape deck for storage.

/whats a cassette?

[encrypted-tbn1.gstatic.com image 295x171]


My dad brought one of these home from K-Mart in the early 80's and that was one of the happiest memories of my childhood.  Learned BASIC on that thing and played the hell out of 4 or 5 cartridge games we had.  Munch Man FTW!
 
2013-03-26 10:53:18 AM  

sammyk: pfft! My 1st computer. 16k of RAM and I had to hack a cassette tape deck for storage.

/whats a cassette?



The scary part about the TI-99 you see there.  That's what my family WAS running circa 1993.  And, yes, you're remembering things correctly... TI pulled out of the computer market in 1984.
The fact that the machine was orphaned meant that my dirt-poor (but nerdy) folks could get one for around $100 in '84 and the disk-drive expansion box for $100 (used) in '85.

After that, until about 1994 or so, we were in a weird Galapagos Island (or Japanese war holdout) end of computers.  There were a few thousand TI-99 people who were still writing software, holding conventions, doing fairly intense desktop publishing and graphics, all on ten-year-defunct weird old machines.  We didn't have the money to upgrade, were in a small town (largely disconnected from the broader computer culture), and so just kept plugging away at the miserable beastie.

Computer Chronicles was a PBS show, so we'd watch it.  All the talk about megabytes of RAM and CD-ROM drives were just sorta mythical... like North Koreans who believe that the rest of the world is rich, but don't even really understand what that means.
 
2013-03-26 10:57:31 AM  
csdb.dk
 
2013-03-26 10:57:48 AM  
IIRC, we got our first pc right around this time (may have been late '92). 386 dx40, 4 megs of ram, and a whopping 210 mb hd. It was eventually upgraded to a 486 chipset with 8 megs of ram and 720 mb hd (right about the time that IDE hds broke the 1GB barrier). It was a good starter (actually, my starter was an XT that was so ancient that it had a 20 mb hard card and 640k of RAM.. my grandma got it at a surplus sale at work in the early 90s).

A few years later, my grandma got me a monster gateway system that I no longer remember the specs for, but I do know that it cost like $3500. It actually was in service longer than any of the machines since then.
 
2013-03-26 10:58:32 AM  
Don't you even think about stepping on my lawn.

www.vintage-computer.com
 
2013-03-26 11:00:49 AM  

FuturePastNow: Within a year, he spent $200 doubling the RAM to 8MB so Doom and SimCity 2000 would run better.


Funny you say that, because I remember finally convincing my dad to upgrade our PC to 8MB of ran so SimCity 2000 would run too! First real machine we had was a 486 33MHz, 4MB RAM, 120MB HD, 5.25"/3.5" drives, and a 14" monitor.

//The day we upgraded to an AMD K5-133 / 32MB / 800MB was unbelievable like "who needs this much computer??"
 
2013-03-26 11:10:04 AM  
jscustom.theoldcomputer.com
 
2013-03-26 11:11:50 AM  
The PC Jr II.  My first childhood experience with computers.  Had one of those big floppy disks for Megaman 3. It would run in black and white at a snails pace.  What power.
 
2013-03-26 11:11:59 AM  

dukeblue219: //The day we upgraded to an AMD K5-133 / 32MB / 800MB was unbelievable like "who needs this much computer??"


I'm really sorry... early AMD x86 processors were notoriously temperamental.
 
2013-03-26 11:19:27 AM  
My first computer was a 386SX-16 4MB Ram 30MB hard drive. I still have it up in the attic. I have no idea if it would still boot up.
 
2013-03-26 11:24:48 AM  
It is interesting how the computers we own define the generation. The leaps in performance and how long we will tolerate/cling to what we know and are comfortable with. For me it is:
1983 - Apple 2e  - this still runs after 30 years
1989 - Amiga 2000  - this still runs after 23 years
1995 - 133mhz Pentium (dead - lightning)
1998 - K6-2 400mhz (dead)
2000 - K7 Thunderbird (obscenely overclocked, given away)
2007 - Core2 duo @3.5ghz (using right now)

I usually get about 6 years out of main computer (I don't count the laptops, tablets, and net-tops I also own, but use occasionally). Probably time to build a new one.
 
2013-03-26 11:26:14 AM  
toastytech.com
 
2013-03-26 11:26:44 AM  

Lawnchair: sammyk: pfft! My 1st computer. 16k of RAM and I had to hack a cassette tape deck for storage.

/whats a cassette?


The scary part about the TI-99 you see there.  That's what my family WAS running circa 1993.  And, yes, you're remembering things correctly... TI pulled out of the computer market in 1984.
The fact that the machine was orphaned meant that my dirt-poor (but nerdy) folks could get one for around $100 in '84 and the disk-drive expansion box for $100 (used) in '85.

After that, until about 1994 or so, we were in a weird Galapagos Island (or Japanese war holdout) end of computers.  There were a few thousand TI-99 people who were still writing software, holding conventions, doing fairly intense desktop publishing and graphics, all on ten-year-defunct weird old machines.  We didn't have the money to upgrade, were in a small town (largely disconnected from the broader computer culture), and so just kept plugging away at the miserable beastie.

Computer Chronicles was a PBS show, so we'd watch it.  All the talk about megabytes of RAM and CD-ROM drives were just sorta mythical... like North Koreans who believe that the rest of the world is rich, but don't even really understand what that means.


To this day my Mom says its the best $100 she ever spent. Both my brother and I have very successful IT careers and it all goes back to that primitive little device we got when we were 14-15. We were at the perfect age brimming with curiousity and all we wanted to do is see how far we could push that thing. My childhood hobby became my career and I have not truely worked a day of my life.
 
2013-03-26 11:29:41 AM  
In 1993 I had a 286 with two 5" floppy drives, no hard drive. Boot from an OS floppy, then remove, put in application floppy, save files to second floppy. I ran Word, various programming languages and a bullshiat spreadsheet app called VP Planner.
 
2013-03-26 11:33:13 AM  

sammyk: To this day my Mom says its the best $100 she ever spent. Both my brother and I have very successful IT careers and it all goes back to that primitive little device we got when we were 14-15. We were at the perfect age brimming with curiousity and all we wanted to do is see how far we could push that thing. My childhood hobby became my career and I have not truely worked a day of my life.


Which explains why I have never dealt with an IT person that does anything right or knows their own systems and networks better than me and I just work in finance.
 
2013-03-26 11:37:04 AM  
1993 was right around the time my family got its first computer.  It was a Compaq desktop running Windows 3.1 that we bought at Computer City.

Then in 1999, I got my second computer to take to college with me.  A Gateway laptop running Windows 98 (huge 4 GB hard drive) that I got at the Gateway Country store.

When I graduated college in 2003, I was fed up with dealing with Windows blue-screens for the previous four years.  OS X had been out for a year or so at that point, so I switched over to Mac and never looked back.
 
2013-03-26 11:46:40 AM  

H31N0US: In 1993 I had a 286 with two 5" floppy drives, no hard drive. Boot from an OS floppy, then remove, put in application floppy, save files to second floppy. I ran Word, various programming languages and a bullshiat spreadsheet app called VP Planner.


I miss the simple days of booting up a computer via 5"s and having to do everything in DOS command.  Though I still remember being excited about getting a hard drive.
 
2013-03-26 11:47:38 AM  
 
2013-03-26 11:49:34 AM  

wildcardjack: [toastytech.com image 765x533]


I had a slow-ass 386SX PC that I suffered with. Used it for school stuff that required a PC. Seriously took like 15 minutes to boot up.

Bought an Apple Mac Classic II through my school for $1800 at student pricing, and I thought was a steal. Used it for word processing mainly. Our school had two Apple laser printers hidden in a downstairs lab and around the back of a partition. I was like the only person turning in papers printed with a laser printer while everyone else was still using typewriters or dot matrix printers.

/Dig me, I'm cool.
 
2013-03-26 11:55:40 AM  

madgonad: sammyk: To this day my Mom says its the best $100 she ever spent. Both my brother and I have very successful IT careers and it all goes back to that primitive little device we got when we were 14-15. We were at the perfect age brimming with curiousity and all we wanted to do is see how far we could push that thing. My childhood hobby became my career and I have not truely worked a day of my life.

Which explains why I have never dealt with an IT person that does anything right or knows their own systems and networks better than me and I just work in finance.


Which explains why I moved my career to infrastructure. It's a real pain in the ass talking to finance guys that think they know something because they figured out how to setup a home wifi.

What makes everyone think they can do the IT guys job? I've been doing this shiat for +30 years. I forgotten more than you will ever know about computer technology.
 
2013-03-26 11:57:29 AM  

poot_rootbeer: 386 CPUs were already obsolete by 1993. If you were buying an entry-level PC, you were getting at least a 486SX-25, and paying at least $1000 for it.


That's exactly what my first PC was in 1993. Leading Edge WinPro486. SX-25 processor, 3-button mouse, hard drive just over 100MB, 1MB VGA video card, 2MB RAM, 3.5 HD floppy disk. In 1994, added 250MB drive, external 2400 baud modem to get onto Prodigy, 2 more MB of RAM, Sound Blaster Pro card, and 2X CD-ROM. Watched grainy videos on the interactive encyclopedia in very small windows.

/played a ton of Gorillas in Qbasic
//windows startup/shutdown sounds
 
2013-03-26 11:58:41 AM  

sammyk: Which explains why I moved my career to infrastructure. It's a real pain in the ass talking to finance guys that think they know something because they figured out how to setup a home wifi.


Try dealing with software engineers.
 
2013-03-26 12:00:33 PM  
I recall experiencing excitement at having a home computer capable of more than CGA graphics.

I feel old.
 
2013-03-26 12:03:16 PM  
The very first system that was actually mine was an IBM Portable PC (where "portable" meant "weighs 30 pounds and is the size of a small suitcase"). It was basically a PC/XT motherboard in a special case with an amber CGA monitor. If I wanted to actually play games, I had to run a TSR called NOCOLOR to turn the vertical stripes into greyscale. As built, it had 256K RAM and two floppy drives, and it was being sold to students for the fire sale price of $1200. By the time I was done with it, it was 640K with serial and parallel ports, a hard drive (first 32 MB, then a whopping 65 MB), and a 286 accelerator card.

I've gone through so many different systems, and sometimes changed out motherboards, that it's hard to keep track of them all... only four of them actually died, while others simply became too obsolete to use.

All of the dead motherboards succumbed to capacitor plague: a Shuttle SN21G5 (loved the case, but it's not practical to use it with anything other than a Shuttle mobo), the infamous Abit KT7-RAID (one of the earlier boards to suffer from bad caps), and two Intel-branded boards. The scary thing is that both of the Intel boards had Japanese capacitors (assuming they weren't fakes) and they still puffed up like marshmallows. I can't help but wonder how many billions of dollars worth of electronic gear has ended up on the scrap heap because of bad capacitors.

I still use the case that first housed the KT7-RAID for one of my systems.
 
2013-03-26 12:08:35 PM  
My first PC was issued by USMA. I think it was a 486/8Mb/10G Compaq. We actually picked these things up from Washington basement during Reorgy week if I remember correctly. It wasn't much of a computer but at the time usma.edu had just launched and the Internet as it existed was almost entirely unregulated. This led to a lot of cadets developing online relationships with folks well before social networking was blowing up. I remember using PowWow to talk to a girl from Stanford, a girl I completely did not know.
 
2013-03-26 12:15:10 PM  

Smidge204: This "computer" thing is an interesting fad. I don't think it'll catch on, though. There's no reason for anyone to have a computer in their home.

=Smidge=


If only information processing required very little energy and materials and we could make it so cheap and small that even poor people could have several of them, sometimes even without knowing it...

Now 747s on the other hand....
 
2013-03-26 12:15:43 PM  
My first PC was a 486 something or other. That's nearly 20 years ago, so I can't remember a damn thing about it other than I was very good at freecell.
 
2013-03-26 12:20:59 PM  
Emerson 286 12 Mhz with a monocrome monitor.  MS DOS 4.0

Procomm software to run the 1200 baud modem.

Ran a 3 line BBS running TAG software and my most popular door game was LORD (Legend of the Red Dragon)

/off to find TAG and LORD to see how it runs on my Alienware

http://soundcloud.com/windytan-1/dial-up-modem-noises Takes me back.
 
2013-03-26 12:21:56 PM  
LOL.... 'With a PC, you have to mess around with autoexec.bat and config.sys, dip switches and jumpers, IRQ's, stuff like that'.

Jesus dude, even with early versions of Windows you didn't have to fark around THAT bad unless you really wanted to, and if you didn't add anything to the computer itself, you didn't have to  do it at all. What an Apple shill...
 
2013-03-26 12:27:44 PM  
 
2013-03-26 12:40:46 PM  
http://www.michaelv.org/

If you need a Windows 3.1 fix
 
2013-03-26 12:44:14 PM  
I had a 486/33 that I bought through Computer Shopper.

The most awesome feature is that it had a TURBO button next to the RESET button.

/really
 
2013-03-26 12:51:00 PM  
So what were you driving in 1993?

I don't know, it was my roommate's computer, but I could play some games on it and check out basic porn, was there really anything else I needed to do at the time? I was unsophisticated, and AOL was all I needed...
 
2013-03-26 12:52:00 PM  
My first family computer was an Apple IIgs. The first PC that was actually mine was a Compaq Presario I got for my high school graduation in 1995. A friend and I had gone to a Microsoft presentation on Windows 95. I ended up getting a PC instead of a Mac because of that.

Pentium 75
8 megs RAM
725mb HD
Quad-Speed CD-ROM

Later that same year I bought another 8...cost me almost $400. But afterwards it ran extremely well.
 
2013-03-26 01:04:21 PM  

sammyk: madgonad: sammyk: To this day my Mom says its the best $100 she ever spent. Both my brother and I have very successful IT careers and it all goes back to that primitive little device we got when we were 14-15. We were at the perfect age brimming with curiousity and all we wanted to do is see how far we could push that thing. My childhood hobby became my career and I have not truely worked a day of my life.

Which explains why I have never dealt with an IT person that does anything right or knows their own systems and networks better than me and I just work in finance.

Which explains why I moved my career to infrastructure. It's a real pain in the ass talking to finance guys that think they know something because they figured out how to setup a home wifi.

What makes everyone think they can do the IT guys job? I've been doing this shiat for +30 years. I forgotten more than you will ever know about computer technology.


It is so cute how indispensable it monkeys think they are.
 
2013-03-26 01:12:28 PM  

Mikey1969: So what were you driving in 1993?

I don't know, it was my roommate's computer, but I could play some games on it and check out basic porn, was there really anything else I needed to do at the time? I was unsophisticated, and AOL was all I needed...


Amiga 3000 with 12M of RAM (2M chip RAM W00T!), 120M of SCSI HD goodness (thanks to Chico for getting me a decent price), Opalvision 24 bit graphics buffer, 386 Bridgeboard (an actual PC on a card to run PC software), a Mac emulator, video capture thingy (Digi View gold?) and a B/W camera, external 14.4 modem, 24 pin printer, multisync monitor and hooked up to the stereo.

I was doing morphing and image stuff and running some sort of fractal landscape generator and I animated a F-15 wireframe going into a canyon. I was also big into the local "warez doodz" thing and had shiatloads of floppies in many donut boxes.

Why the hell didn't I continue that instead of going into electronics??? I was the only idiot in college who handed in papers all printed out, other people were still hand-drawing their oscilloscope waveforms, I took pictures of my scope CRT and tossed them into the word processor. No one laughed at my Amiga after that...

/How the hell did I even get all that money?
//Why the hell do I even remember all this shiat?
///Why didn't I put as much effort into women???
 
2013-03-26 01:14:42 PM  
Darn kids......

I bought a 286 16 MHz from Gateway when they advertised in Computer Shopper with the slogan "Computers From Iowa?" 40M HDD, 2M of RAM and real VGA graphics. The build slip for it was hand written.

Before that it was a VIC20 with a 16K cartridge, then a Commodore 128.
 
2013-03-26 01:23:12 PM  

flaminio: Don't you even think about stepping on my lawn.

[Atari 800 pic]


+1. I still have my working 800. Still programming it just for shiats and giggles. Finally learned assembler after all these years.
 
2013-03-26 01:23:49 PM  

lilplatinum: sammyk: madgonad: sammyk: To this day my Mom says its the best $100 she ever spent. Both my brother and I have very successful IT careers and it all goes back to that primitive little device we got when we were 14-15. We were at the perfect age brimming with curiousity and all we wanted to do is see how far we could push that thing. My childhood hobby became my career and I have not truely worked a day of my life.

Which explains why I have never dealt with an IT person that does anything right or knows their own systems and networks better than me and I just work in finance.

Which explains why I moved my career to infrastructure. It's a real pain in the ass talking to finance guys that think they know something because they figured out how to setup a home wifi.

What makes everyone think they can do the IT guys job? I've been doing this shiat for +30 years. I forgotten more than you will ever know about computer technology.

It is so cute how indispensable it monkeys think they are.


Don't hate just because we make more money than you.

If it was easy everyone would do it because pays freaking great.
 
2013-03-26 01:25:02 PM  

StoPPeRmobile: [csdb.dk image 384x271]


so many nights with this, a box of 5 1/4 disks and the double side cutter.
 
2013-03-26 01:25:52 PM  

flaminio: Don't you even think about stepping on my lawn.

[www.vintage-computer.com image 400x252]

centipede on this was insane.
 
2013-03-26 01:32:05 PM  

Quantum Apostrophe: /How the hell did I even get all that money?
//Why the hell do I even remember all this shiat?
///Why didn't I put as much effort into women???


My problem is that after 3 years of programming in High School(Graduated in '88, so it was BASIC), I fell  off the radar for the most part with computers for the entire 90's. I am now hopelessly behind as far as programming goes, although I plan to go back to school to rectify that, but I still missed out on some major changes throughout the 90's. All I really used computers for during that decade was surfing and games.

/I DID have a roommate who developed mapping software for USGS that is probably what led to Google Earth, so that's pretty cool...  https://oracleus.activeevents.com/connect/speakerDetail.ww?PERSON_ID= 3 A6795BFDAEA6377BF1FF65AF4473129
 
2013-03-26 01:39:25 PM  

GoldSpider: dukeblue219: //The day we upgraded to an AMD K5-133 / 32MB / 800MB was unbelievable like "who needs this much computer??"

I'm really sorry... early AMD x86 processors were notoriously temperamental.


A friend of mine has a triangular scar from the corner of one of those. Damn they ran hot.
 
2013-03-26 01:41:38 PM  
I had an Packard Bell 486/50 of some type for my first machine, it came with Windows 3.11 for workgroups. I was ready to chuck it out the window when I attempted to install a 33.6k modem in it. It was a good learning experience though. Don't remember the exact cost but it wasn't cheap.

My second machine was a Gateway Pentium Pro 200, for a stripped down machine and monitor it was $2200.. I remember dropping another $450 for two 4.3GB drives.

Sad thing is I just built an i7 based machine for $750..
 
2013-03-26 01:42:45 PM  
Ah, memories of the good ol' days .

To add to the CSB fest, I'll tell my own story...
( warning, long CSB follows )

In '93 I was a couple of years into my first home built box: a 386SX-20. I originally had 1MB of ram 4x256Mbit SIMMs  though I had a combo board that supported another bank of 4 rows of  1Mx9 DRAMs... (don't forget parity!)  and a 40MB Plus Hardcard that my grandfather gave me when he got rid of his old IBM XT.  I remember freaking out at the pricetag for hardcard.. he payed $1200 for the drive (in 1987ish). Almost the same price  as my whole barebones system.

By '90 IDE hard drive price wars were on  and the average price/ MB had already plummeted... I bought a 120MB Quantum IDE drive (Fastest around with 8ms average access access time... funny how one remembers stuff like that! ) for something like $250.   ( I do appreciate the irony that last year I accidentally dropped a 2GB micro SD card on the floor of my car and left it there for several weeks because "meh..." )

Somewhere along the line I upgraded to my motherboard's max of 8MB of RAM. My motherboard allowed you to adjust the timing of your memory, and the ISA BUS timing freely... which resulted in hours and hours to find the sweet spot in overclocking. I had read about CPU overclocking on BBS's, but I would have had to solder a new clock for my board so that was out of the  question.

Thanks to Stacker and a pirated copy of QEMM, I was able to keep playing all the awesome video games out there at the time ( Ah the glory days of  video games with the Roland MT-32  and with Soundblaster combo ... Wing commander II, Rise of the Dragon, Space Quest 4   )

But 1993 killed all of it... DOOM.  Suddenly my 256KB no name VGA card  was worthless. I was able to play at the tiniest screen resolution ( physically 320x240, but rendered with borders so the play area was something like 200x180 )

I was rescued by a 1MB ATI Mach 32 that I got from a guy selling them on Usenet. He wanted $180. I offered him $120. He took the offer. Immediately after I sent the check, my heart sank and I thought I was suckered.. (they were going for around $200 at the time), but he sent a package.  After opening the box assuming it would be a dead card, I was shocked to find out it was completely NIB and working. ( and in retrospect I think was probably stolen.)

I kept that box for years and years after it was past its prime.  Used to run FreeBSD on it and use it as just an X Server workstation to connect to other stuff. It met its end in 2003 when I gave up all my computer junk  ( got married )

I still have the motherboard pin layout and dip switch poster on my wall in my office at home.

/Good times.
 
2013-03-26 01:54:19 PM  

huntercr: funny how one remembers stuff like that! )


Tell me about it. I can still picture the stupid HD in my mind's eye and how I bought it. It was a time when SCSI was already starting to feel the pinch from ATA and drives were getting harder to find. Had to track down a specialized store. I still walk by the place that had the store in it.

It's a whey protein store now.
 
2013-03-26 02:00:04 PM  

huntercr: Ah the glory days of video games with the Roland MT-32 and with Soundblaster combo


I once shelled out close to $300 on a Mediatrix Audiotrix Pro sound card for that reason.  I had no idea it was a professional MIDI sound card; I didn't care; General MIDI on games that supported it sounded freaking amazing!
 
2013-03-26 02:03:56 PM  

asciibaron: flaminio: Don't you even think about stepping on my lawn.

[www.vintage-computer.com image 400x252]
centipede on this was insane.


i, still, have a working atari 1200xl. all the games for these machines were insane. circa 1983
 
2013-03-26 02:05:38 PM  
i.imgur.com

Well, one thing hasn't changed in 20 years, the Middle Aged White Guy Business Casual Uniform: Khakis, blue button-up shir, dress belt and shiny watch.  Steve Ballmer has three closets full of these.
 
2013-03-26 02:10:54 PM  

What_Would_Jimi_Do: asciibaron: flaminio: Don't you even think about stepping on my lawn.

[www.vintage-computer.com image 400x252]
centipede on this was insane.

i, still, have a working atari 1200xl. all the games for these machines were insane. circa 1983


High fives all the way around! Do you have a SIO2USB interface for it? You hook it up to your pc and the Atari thinks it's talking to a disc drive.
 
2013-03-26 02:11:38 PM  
Ahh another my first computer thread.

Spectrum 48k, Atari ST 520FM, 386sx33. Pentium 166, K62-300, K8-800 Athlon XP 1700+, Pentium 4M laptop, C2D laptop, MacBook Pro, Hackintosh.

I don't generally ride the bleeding edge of anything and if I'm honest the Atari ST is the longest serving machine I've owned... it's still in use.
 
2013-03-26 02:13:40 PM  
Oh, and for posterity my "first computer" was a Commodore 64; above was just my first x86 PC, I suppose you could say.
 
2013-03-26 02:16:06 PM  
"We're going to a COMPUSA store with an expert..."
Whoa, whoa, whoa.  Stop right there.
 
2013-03-26 02:26:45 PM  
First computer was a VIC 20 Christmas gift. Didn't take me too long to figure out a C64 was much better. Didn't have the money at the time, but I managed to buy just a C64 main board with a missing sound chip. It didn't need it to power up, just the paddles wouldn't work. So I shoved that into the VIC's case. I think I got more VICs after that, and painted the case bright orange. I actually hauled a VIC to school as the PCs in the hardware lab had CGA monitors that displayed NTSC video just fine. I used the VICs 8 bit IO user port to make all kinds of junk with the DAC chips we were given to play with.

The VIC was the Arduino of the time. I remember writing a few lines of BASIC that poked 256 values into RAM (for t = 0 to 255: poke ram + t,sin(t): next*) and then hand coding a loop in assembler that read the bytes out to the user port. Instant digital function generator. Then I hooked up the DAC to an op amp to control the REF pin of a linear voltage regulator. Instant digital controlled power supply.

*well, it needed some converting between radians and my addressing, and converting the -1 to 1 range to -127 to 128, you get the idea...
 
2013-03-26 02:29:29 PM  

Do the needful: What_Would_Jimi_Do: asciibaron: flaminio: Don't you even think about stepping on my lawn.

[www.vintage-computer.com image 400x252]
centipede on this was insane.

i, still, have a working atari 1200xl. all the games for these machines were insane. circa 1983

High fives all the way around! Do you have a SIO2USB interface for it? You hook it up to your pc and the Atari thinks it's talking to a disc drive.


had no clue about that. i haven't had mine hooked up in many years. i have like 40 games for it tho
 
2013-03-26 02:48:18 PM  

Gordon Bennett: Here you go.

[www.amigahistory.co.uk image 506x359]

Problem solved.


Most Amiga guys were abandoning it by '93. My oldest brother wrote Terminus for Amiga and still has the emails of all the broken hearted Amiga fan-boys when he abandoned the platform.
 
2013-03-26 02:54:04 PM  
First computer was a wang my dad got at Walmart around that time don't remember the specs on it but I do remember 2 weeks after he got it he signed up for compuserve I went to boysout camp for a month came home computer was gone because my brother ran up a 3000 phone bill with it
 
kth
2013-03-26 03:00:27 PM  
286 PC. I don't recall any detail except for the dot-matrix printer. I was an English major (then law school). You would finish your paper, tell it to print, and then leave the house for beers. If you were lucky, it didn't get off track while you were gone.  But it was too loud to be used in a house with people.
 
2013-03-26 03:03:10 PM  

likefunbutnot: In 1993, I was in high school and doing techie service work on PCs so I could afford one of my own. That year for my birthday I bought myself a dual 486DX/50 (two CPUs and none of that clock multiplied bullshiat), 8MB RAM, a 1768MB SCSI2 drive and a 17" monitor.  That rig was a hair under $4500. I ran OS/2 on it, but I switched to Linux in early 1995 because it was easier to do my CS homework that way.


A nearly 2GB hard drive in 1993?  Sure that wasn't 768MB?
 
2013-03-26 03:22:27 PM  

Quantum Apostrophe: If only information processing required very little energy and materials and we could make it so cheap and small that even poor people could have several of them, sometimes even without knowing it...


Wow. I didn't think you'd even show up in this thread, let alone take the bait. Rest assured this quote will haunt you at every opportunity.


DanZero: //windows startup/shutdown sounds


Holy damn they got a lot of use out of that trumpet sound.
=Smidge=
 
2013-03-26 03:23:34 PM  

stovepipe: sammyk: pfft! My 1st computer. 16k of RAM and I had to hack a cassette tape deck for storage.

/whats a cassette?

[encrypted-tbn1.gstatic.com image 295x171]

My dad brought one of these home from K-Mart in the early 80's and that was one of the happiest memories of my childhood.  Learned BASIC on that thing and played the hell out of 4 or 5 cartridge games we had.  Munch Man FTW!


Hunt the Wumpus!!!
 
Ant
2013-03-26 03:25:18 PM  
In 1993 I was still using the IBM XT that some guy gave me. It had CGA graphics and a 10 MB hard drive!
 
2013-03-26 03:26:25 PM  

Gordon Bennett: Here you go.

[www.amigahistory.co.uk image 506x359]

Problem solved.


Not really.  The Amiga 1200 was a woefully underpowered computer.  It would have been cutting edge in late '89, but by late '92 it was something of a joke.  There are several accounts of how Commodore farked up the design of two chipsets (Ranger and AAA) prior to the release of AA/AGA, which was nothing more than a quick and dirty design to keep the platform alive.

It also didn't help that Commodore allowed an ecosystem of bad software to develop.  A lot of software would break on anything other than a 7.1MHz 68000 for the simple fact that Commodore never offered anything else for the previous seven years, save for their high end systems.  And I remember a handful of games for AGA systems that could only be played from a floppy disk since so few A1200 owners opted for a hard drive.

Just before the end in '94, Commodore was working with HP to design a replacement that was centered on the HP PA-7150/125.  It could do 1280×1024×24bpp with 3D rendering on par with the Playstation.  That would have been interesting against PPC Macs and Pentium systems.
 
2013-03-26 03:28:48 PM  

Smidge204: Wow. I didn't think you'd even show up in this thread, let alone take the bait. Rest assured this quote will haunt you at every opportunity.


Haunted by truth and reality. How ever will I cope. Tell me, do you see any lightspeed 747s around you?
 
2013-03-26 03:31:40 PM  

flaminio: Don't you even think about stepping on my lawn.

[www.vintage-computer.com image 400x252]


www.s100computers.com

Step down, noob.
 
2013-03-26 03:34:00 PM  

Quantum Apostrophe: Smidge204: Wow. I didn't think you'd even show up in this thread, let alone take the bait. Rest assured this quote will haunt you at every opportunity.

Haunted by truth and reality. How ever will I cope. Tell me, do you see any lightspeed 747s around you?


www.trilobite.org
Pathetic troll is pathetic.
 
2013-03-26 03:36:42 PM  

Rhames: The PC Jr II.  My first childhood experience with computers.  Had one of those big floppy disks for Megaman 3. It would run in black and white at a snails pace.  What power.


A friend of mine had a PC Jr. What a feculent bucket of hyena offal.
 
2013-03-26 03:43:22 PM  

huntercr: I do appreciate the irony that last year I accidentally dropped a 2GB micro SD card on the floor of my car and left it there for several weeks because "meh..."


Just realizing that even my crappy old J2ME-based cell phone (never mind the shiny new Android smartphone!) has vastly more computing power and storage than any early PCs makes me laugh. 32 gigs or more in a card the size of my pinky fingernail is just insane.

Buried in storage at work, there's an old 486 system with a full-height SCSI hard drive and a VL-Bus graphic card. When it was last in service, it was running Windows 95 on a coax Ethernet... I'll have to fire it up and see if it still works.

Coax Ethernet sucked, especially when the boss insisted that 93-ohm RG-62 cable for IBM 3270 applications would work just fine (it even has the same connectors!) when thinnet is really supposed to use 50-ohm RG-58AU. Even with proper cable it sucked; nothing like having the entire network go blooey because of a badly-crimped connector or adding/removing a system. UTP was a godsend.
 
2013-03-26 03:59:55 PM  

Ed Grubermann: Rhames: The PC Jr II.  My first childhood experience with computers.  Had one of those big floppy disks for Megaman 3. It would run in black and white at a snails pace.  What power.

A friend of mine had a PC Jr. What a feculent bucket of hyena offal.


How dare you insult hyena offal like that. You apologize.
 
2013-03-26 04:15:30 PM  

Ed Grubermann: Quantum Apostrophe: Smidge204: Wow. I didn't think you'd even show up in this thread, let alone take the bait. Rest assured this quote will haunt you at every opportunity.

Haunted by truth and reality. How ever will I cope. Tell me, do you see any lightspeed 747s around you?

[www.trilobite.org image 400x220]
Pathetic troll is pathetic.


Legitimate question. You nuts think that because electronics got better that everything got better by the same amount. So, how fast do 747s fly compared to the first one from 1969?
 
2013-03-26 04:44:48 PM  

FuturePastNow: In '93 or thereabouts my dad bought our first real computer, an Acer 486 SX/25 with 4MB of RAM and a 140ish MB drive.

Within a year, he spent $200 doubling the RAM to 8MB so Doom and SimCity 2000 would run better.


wow, I did the same thing for the same reasons (plus to play Master of Magic) around the same time during my first year of grad school
 
2013-03-26 04:58:37 PM  

Quantum Apostrophe: Ed Grubermann: Quantum Apostrophe: Smidge204: Wow. I didn't think you'd even show up in this thread, let alone take the bait. Rest assured this quote will haunt you at every opportunity.

Haunted by truth and reality. How ever will I cope. Tell me, do you see any lightspeed 747s around you?

[www.trilobite.org image 400x220]
Pathetic troll is pathetic.

Legitimate question. You nuts think that because electronics got better that everything got better by the same amount. So, how fast do 747s fly compared to the first one from 1969?


No we don't.  And we've told you so often enough that you'd think that fact would pierce that skull of yours. You really do need professional help. You obsession is unhealthy.
 
2013-03-26 05:03:16 PM  

Quantum Apostrophe: Ed Grubermann: Quantum Apostrophe: Smidge204: Wow. I didn't think you'd even show up in this thread, let alone take the bait. Rest assured this quote will haunt you at every opportunity.

Haunted by truth and reality. How ever will I cope. Tell me, do you see any lightspeed 747s around you?

[www.trilobite.org image 400x220]
Pathetic troll is pathetic.

Legitimate question. You nuts think that because electronics got better that everything got better by the same amount. So, how fast do 747s fly compared to the first one from 1969?


How fast does the same design fly now as compared to into the past? I don't think you thought your question all the way through,
 
2013-03-26 05:17:56 PM  
My first was a 386sx/33 w. 750k ram and 60mb hd although I think it was around 91/92 timeframe.  It ran DR DOS under Win 3.1.

CSB
Bought Ultima 7 to play on it but didn't look at the requirements which was 486dx2 and 2mb ram and of course being 14 no money so I configured the hell out of it stripped everything nonessential and made a custom boot disk to run it.  It ran with no problems but had an issue where the keys in your pack would disappear randomly so I called up Origin and the tech called bullshiat on my computer stats but would send a patch to fix the issue anyways.  A few hours later someone from the company called me back and I spent about 3 hours describing what I did to get the game to run and offered me a job which i then told him I was 14 so couldn't really take it.  About 2 weeks later I got a big box in the mail from them with a lot of swag and a bunch of games along with a few betas (one was Descent which was my first beta).

/surprisingly didn't give a shiat about computers then as I only played with them when it was raining and couldn't skate
//yep work in IT now lol
 
2013-03-26 05:26:53 PM  
My first pc in 1993 was a:

8088
640K ram
20 meg hd
5.25 floppy
3.5 floppy
2400 baud modem
and a 16 color monitor of which the video only supported 4 colors.
Dot matrix printer

I only paid 150 bucks for it but at the time it ran a good word processor which let me write my papers and would play some rudimentary games. It also let me get on the bbs and telnet into a couple of MUDs. I played on toril and duris

By 95 I was up to a 486/66 with proper color and a 14.4 modem. That is when I discovered what the internet was for.
 
2013-03-26 05:33:02 PM  

animal900: A nearly 2GB hard drive in 1993? Sure that wasn't 768MB?


I'm quite sure. It was a Micropolis Half-Height 5400rpm SCSI2 drive. As I recall, I paid about $800 for it and thought I was getting a fantastically good deal. A "huge" IDE drive at that point was probably 420MB. I thought it would be unfillable, but then I discovered alt.binaries.* and it was full by the summer of 1994. I believe I still have that drive. Last time I checked it, maybe five years ago, it still worked.
 
2013-03-26 06:07:30 PM  
I remember my first machine 266mhz.  My parents where too cheap to buy me a computer growing up so I saved and got my first one at about 14.  I think I had Ceasar as my first pc game.  I remember when  I bought my first 3d Accelerator so I could play Star Wars the Phantom Menace.  I saw the blocky characters and thought that graphics could never get more perfect than that.
 
2013-03-26 06:34:39 PM  
My first machine was a laptop, a Toshiba Satalite 486DX2/50 with 4 megs of ram and 250MB HDD, and a 9" monochrome LCD. I later upgraded to 8MB of ram and a 14.4kbps PCMCIA modem(with built in retractable phone jack!).
 
2013-03-26 06:51:51 PM  
It's amazing how far computers have come in 20 years:

In 1992, my grandparents bought a:
- 386DX/33 Desktop (with Turbo button)
- 4MB RAM
- 100MB HDD
- VGA graphics
- No sound card
- No CD-ROM
- No modem
- MS-DOS 5.0/Windows 3.1
for about ~$1500-2000 (I'm not sure of the exact cost, I was 11 at the time)

Last week, I bought:
- Core i7 Quad-Core 2.4Ghz notebook
- 12GB RAM
- 1TB HDD
- Blu-ray
- Windows 8
for $800

In other words, I was able to buy a portable computer that would run circles around what was available in 1992 for 1/2 the price.
 
2013-03-26 06:53:37 PM  
My first computer was an IBM Personal Computer 5150 that really was the 'family' computer but in reality after only a couple of months, it became mine as the rest of the family lost all interest in it. It also planted the seed that grew into a major interest and then all-consuming passion for technology.

After 3-4 years, it was replaced by a newer IBM and my parents put this in the garage so it would go out with the garbage the next morning.

oldcomputers.net


in 2003, I returned home to help a friend of the family do some spring cleaning and happened to find this stuffed in a corner of the garage with some very old playboys and a faded mountain dew case. \ The family friend said I should ask my folks about it, so I did and my mother explained she knew how much I loved that first computer and had a feeling that she should hang on to it for me. Maybe one day I would like to have my first computer back in my hands. It was put into the family friend's garage when my parents did some remodeling and it was forgotten about.

Sure it was completely obsolete and it wouldn't even power up (let alone boot) but it brought back many memories. So, I decided I was going to fix it. A friend of mine who restored cars also was a major computer nut. We did some computer case modding and we had been kicking around the idea of a computer case mod based on a car. The night after I found my old PC, I was watching cable TV and caught the movie "Christine" while surfing the channels. The next day I stopped over to his house and we came up with this case mod idea.

sphotos-a.xx.fbcdn.net

Work log here if you are interested.
I still have this case and a new Core i7 "engine" is going to be dropped inside her in the next couple of months.
 
2013-03-26 07:54:54 PM  
Amiga 500 - 1MB Chip Ram, 3.5MB Fast Ram.  Think that was the year I upgraded to a 1GB SCSI drive.  Took 14 or 15 seconds from power on to fully useable workbench.

BMR68:

Please thank your brother for me, I remember using Terminus to access the local Freenet to get onto my favorite M.U.D. Death's Domain.


Most Amiga guys were abandoning it by '93. My oldest brother wrote Terminus for Amiga and still has the emails of all the broken hearted Amiga fan-boys when he abandoned the platform.
 
2013-03-26 07:59:36 PM  

flaminio: Don't you even think about stepping on my lawn.

[www.vintage-computer.com image 400x252]


Don't  you even think about stepping on  my lawn!
www.willegal.net
 
2013-03-26 08:34:19 PM  
I was a Commodork starting with the Vic-20 in '82.  By the time 1993 rolled around I was still rocking my Amiga 2000HD with the 52MB SCSI drive and far better games than any PC owner could hope for.  My Vic-20, C64 and A2000HD and all associated hardware still work just fine.
 
2013-03-26 08:52:43 PM  
: Smith Corona/Acer 286 with a color 12" screen and 2mb ram and DOS with a 9600 baud modem.

2nd: Hewlett Packard 486/DX my dad go for free by signing up for Prodigy for 12 months.
 
2013-03-26 09:10:19 PM  

dustman81: It's amazing how far computers have come in 20 years:

In 1992, my grandparents bought a:
- 386DX/33 Desktop (with Turbo button)
- 4MB RAM
- 100MB HDD
- VGA graphics
- No sound card
- No CD-ROM
- No modem
- MS-DOS 5.0/Windows 3.1
for about ~$1500-2000 (I'm not sure of the exact cost, I was 11 at the time)

Last week, I bought:
- Core i7 Quad-Core 2.4Ghz notebook
- 12GB RAM
- 1TB HDD
- Blu-ray
- Windows 8
for $800

In other words, I was able to buy a portable computer that would run circles around what was available in 1992 for 1/2 the price.


What's more amusing is that I'm fairly sure that computer you just bought would kick the ass of the one I'm typing on right now, which I bought in 2011 for nearly 1k. It's only an i5, runs W7, has 8GB RAM, came with 500GB of storage which I upgraded to half of that in SSD, standard DVD, and with 1GB independent vid RAM on a crap ATI chipset. It would probably still be fine for my needs if my now ex-wife didn't purposefully spill cranberry juice on the thing. I can't believe I saved it. I now have to run it with an external keyboard, mouse and the DVD drive is toast. Lots of other random glitches since then too, such as the LCD turning blue at times.

/Wish I had 800 bucks that wasn't going for rent...
 
2013-03-26 09:51:44 PM  
My first computer was a ten-year-old Apple IIe that my school first let the gifted program use and then sold to my folks when they upgraded to Windows. How I loved it!

Of course, in 1993, I was seven years old, so even the IIe felt like some amazing awesomeness. I used to run floppy-disk programs like Rocky's Boots and The Children's Writing and Publishing Center on it, and eventually taught myself to program a little. I printed out my homework on a dot-matrix printer for ages, and while the family had a better computer that I got to use a lot, the IIe was mine and therefore special. Then a few years later, my mom and dad saw the movie 'Hackers' with Angelina Jolie, assumed that was the sort of thing I was becoming capable of, and helped me fund the building of a much, much better machine.

My mother eventually gave my old Apple friend to my little cousin sometime in the late Nineties, thinking the kid would get into tech-geekery like I had and stop being a screwup, but cousin hated how old and slow it was and, I think, traded it for drugs in high school.

It's a shame. I'd love to have that old computer back, if only to use its' case for future kid's first PC.
 
2013-03-26 09:57:18 PM  

dustman81: In other words, I was able to buy a portable computer that would run circles around what was available in 1992 for 1/2 the price.


More like a third the price, adjusting for inflation.
 
2013-03-26 11:31:28 PM  
I was on a Mac LCIII.

OVer time, i had the ram upgraded to 20GB, got an external CD rom drive (which neede you to put the disc into a holder/cassette thing first), and got a SyQuest drive to use for storage needs


www.applerescueofdenver.com


www.piezography.com
 
2013-03-26 11:42:17 PM  

wildcardjack: [toastytech.com image 765x533]


Fark never dissapoints.
 
2013-03-27 12:44:02 AM  
Well, that led down the rabbit hole.

I can remember having a TI99 in the house when I was growing up.  I'm not sure my parents actually owned any games for the thing, or even let me actually do anything with it, but I seem to recall playing with it a lot.  I think this was right around the time that we got a rotating TV antenna, which was big news in the coasterdigi household.

Then we upgraded to a blazing fast 286 from Laser.  ...with a math co-processor.  Hot.

Kids today.  No idea what they've got.  Sheesh.

/CSB
//get off my lawn
 
2013-03-27 02:59:59 AM  

DarwiOdrade: flaminio: Don't you even think about stepping on my lawn.

[www.vintage-computer.com image 400x252]

Don't  you even think about stepping on  my lawn!
[www.willegal.net image 500x428]


Yeah, that was my lawn too.  That sucker had stunningly excellent longevity.  I actually only got rid of it a couple of years ago, but still have a bunch of the 5.25" floppies for some reason.

IIRC, around '93 I was using an Amiga still, but had some cobbled together PC sitting around too.  The only thing of note that PC had in it was a belt driven hard drive by Carter or something like that.  I can't remember any longer.  However, whomever thought that a belt drive was a good idea was the dumbest motherfarker on Earth at the time.
 
2013-03-27 03:28:51 AM  
486 dx266 if I remember right

Dad let me get Doom at that was that. He also let us get a dial up modem as even our small town got a local ISP. Figured out internet porn and was pretty popular with friends, even if it took forever to download. Upgraded to cable internet when it came around, Napster etc. Got a CD burner with my own cash from working through high school, but having a write go wrong sucked, since that ended up an expensive coaster.
 
2013-03-27 03:29:40 AM  
And if anyone remembers Gemstone III, thats how I explain to everyone how I can type so fast, when they ask. But no one ever knows what I am talking about.
 
2013-03-27 04:25:35 AM  

Smidge204: This "computer" thing is an interesting fad. I don't think it'll catch on, though. There's no reason for anyone to have a computer in their home.

=Smidge=


Not now maybe. But wait til they're twice as powerful and 1,000 times as large. Even some of the poorer kings of Europe will want those.
 
2013-03-27 07:28:29 AM  

machodonkeywrestler: How fast does the same design fly now as compared to into the past? I don't think you thought your question all the way through,


Ah but the first thing the nuts point out is that it's not the same design. So even *better* technology can't go much faster than what we have now. So how do the Space Nutters plan on colonizing the universe? Space 747s?
 
2013-03-27 08:22:22 AM  
EyeForgot
That actually is a pretty CSB.

Bschott007
That thing is just awesome.
 
2013-03-27 03:16:35 PM  
Man.. I'm old.  I used to love watching Computer Chronicles!  I actually watched this episode in 1993.
 
2013-03-27 08:33:15 PM  
funk_soul_bubby:

Bschott007
That thing is just awesome.


Thanks Funk Soul Bubby
 
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