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(National Post)   Jewish scholars debate one of the most pressing issues of our time: Is quinoa kosher?   (life.nationalpost.com) divider line 32
    More: Interesting, Jewish, Passover, Jews, students  
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3028 clicks; posted to Main » on 26 Mar 2013 at 9:05 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-03-26 09:11:31 AM  
What about Vegemite and Marmite?
 
2013-03-26 09:16:56 AM  
Is quinoa kosher?

So who would knowa?
 
2013-03-26 09:25:34 AM  
dumb dumb dumb dumb dumb
 
2013-03-26 09:27:35 AM  
Isn't this retarded? Why would quinoa even need to be certified as kosher? I'm sure Jewish people can eat pretty much any sort of vegetables or fruits or nuts without requiring each to be certified as kosher by some board of rabbis. Why would quinoa be any different?
 
2013-03-26 09:35:51 AM  
Right up there with bananas!
 
rpl
2013-03-26 09:36:50 AM  

RexTalionis: Isn't this retarded? Why would quinoa even need to be certified as kosher? I'm sure Jewish people can eat pretty much any sort of vegetables or fruits or nuts without requiring each to be certified as kosher by some board of rabbis. Why would quinoa be any different?


Their question isn't if it's kosher or not, but rather if it's kosher  for passover.
 
2013-03-26 09:36:55 AM  
I guess the answer will depend on which side Peru backs in the Middle East.
 
2013-03-26 09:53:44 AM  

rpl: RexTalionis: Isn't this retarded? Why would quinoa even need to be certified as kosher? I'm sure Jewish people can eat pretty much any sort of vegetables or fruits or nuts without requiring each to be certified as kosher by some board of rabbis. Why would quinoa be any different?

Their question isn't if it's kosher or not, but rather if it's kosher  for passover.


not only that, Kosher for passover for Ashkenazi Jews
 
2013-03-26 09:54:24 AM  
Kosher or not, we need to stop eating in here in America. It has become hip because it is delicious and healthful. It's popularity has caused the crop value to triple in a mere six years. The plant only grows in a small region and is a staple in the Andes and other impoverished parts of Central and South Americas. Price increases and exports to the US, Europe and Japan have created shortages. There is little chance of increasing production, since its growing conditions are quite narrow. As a result, the poor people who depend on the crop can no longer obtain enough of it, which is causing famine in the region.
 
2013-03-26 09:55:42 AM  
4.bp.blogspot.com
 
2013-03-26 10:08:42 AM  
FTA:

Passover, one of the most widely-observed Jewish holidays, is an eight day festival commemorating the exodus of Jews from Egypt. For the entirety of the holiday, observant Jews are forbidden from eating five grains explicitly listed in the bible: Wheat, spelt, barley, rye and oats.

Ashkenazi Jews - who form the majority of North American Jewry - take the tradition a step further with "kitniyot," a category of foods such as rice, corn and lentils that are banned simply because they look like grains.


I can settle this right now: rice and maize ("corn") are indeed grains and if the ancient rabbis had known about them they'd be banned for Passover too, but they're not mentioned in Scripture so a strict interpretationist would have to say "Chow down!" Lentils, OTOH, were known to the ancients and doubtless they knew they were beans, not grains. Quinoa ain't grain either -- "quinoa is closely related to species such as beets,spinach and tumbleweeds" -- and though it might be harder to tell it's not a grain it's still not specifically prohibited by G_d therefore it's allowed by default.

It's possible to carry things too far: building a fence around a fence around a fence a fence around the Torah makes the religion so difficult to follow that people are more likely to become Reform or "worse" seculars and Buddhists. The Quran says that kashrut was imposed on the Jews as a punishment; whether that's true or not it does seem that some people punish themselves above and beyond the call of kosher. It's too bad the Jews don't have a living Prophet & Revelator like the Mormons do who could solve such issues so nobody else has to connipt over it. Note that the Sephardim don't go that far, and I doubt the Karaites do either: my hunch is that not so many of them fall away from observance and go on to marry Gentiles and raise their children to be Randroids or something. Why do the Ashkenazi rabbis hate Judaism?

And this from an old goy atheist who got his GED in Judaism by reading Wikipedia. Of course my opinion can't be binding upon any Jew, but do I have hundreds of other bits of praeternatural wisdom that are not so restrictive in their application: yes O fellow Farkers, I can tell y'all how to get world peace, how to stop AIDS and how to make succotash without suffering if you'll only PLEDGE NOW!
 
2013-03-26 10:08:43 AM  

JackieRabbit: Kosher or not, we need to stop eating in here in America. It has become hip because it is delicious and healthful. It's popularity has caused the crop value to triple in a mere six years. The plant only grows in a small region and is a staple in the Andes and other impoverished parts of Central and South Americas. Price increases and exports to the US, Europe and Japan have created shortages. There is little chance of increasing production, since its growing conditions are quite narrow. As a result, the poor people who depend on the crop can no longer obtain enough of it, which is causing famine in the region.


t3.gstatic.com
 
2013-03-26 11:15:09 AM  

QuietMan: JackieRabbit: Kosher or not, we need to stop eating in here in America. It has become hip because it is delicious and healthful. It's popularity has caused the crop value to triple in a mere six years. The plant only grows in a small region and is a staple in the Andes and other impoverished parts of Central and South Americas. Price increases and exports to the US, Europe and Japan have created shortages. There is little chance of increasing production, since its growing conditions are quite narrow. As a result, the poor people who depend on the crop can no longer obtain enough of it, which is causing famine in the region.

[t3.gstatic.com image 126x117]


I'm very serious. Children in Peru and Bolivia are going hungry so that Americans can have their very expensive quinoa. My wife and I love it, but we read a news article a few months back about it. This isn't the article, but it is similar: Link
 
2013-03-26 11:17:00 AM  

JackieRabbit: Kosher or not, we need to stop eating in here in America. It has become hip because it is delicious and healthful. It's popularity has caused the crop value to triple in a mere six years. The plant only grows in a small region and is a staple in the Andes and other impoverished parts of Central and South Americas. Price increases and exports to the US, Europe and Japan have created shortages. There is little chance of increasing production, since its growing conditions are quite narrow. As a result, the poor people who depend on the crop can no longer obtain enough of it, which is causing famine in the region.


1/10
 
2013-03-26 12:14:28 PM  

Khazar-Khum: JackieRabbit: Kosher or not, we need to stop eating in here in America. It has become hip because it is delicious and healthful. It's popularity has caused the crop value to triple in a mere six years. The plant only grows in a small region and is a staple in the Andes and other impoverished parts of Central and South Americas. Price increases and exports to the US, Europe and Japan have created shortages. There is little chance of increasing production, since its growing conditions are quite narrow. As a result, the poor people who depend on the crop can no longer obtain enough of it, which is causing famine in the region.

1/10


I wouldn't expect someone that is telling the truth to get a very good troll grade, anyway.

/moran
 
2013-03-26 12:32:55 PM  
Who cares?  It tastes like feet.
 
2013-03-26 12:56:34 PM  

JackieRabbit: It's popularity


You know what isn't popular? Extra apostrophes. About as popular as quantum ones in space threads.
 
2013-03-26 01:00:40 PM  
So the upshot of that article is that according to the rules it's perfectly kosher, but a few - and by no means all - kosher certification boards have banned it anyway basically because they felt like it. Well, the actual reason they give is because someone might be "confused" by it, but that sounds pretty arbitrary anyway.
 
2013-03-26 01:16:52 PM  
Why can't these people just come to the obvious real answer?  The entire concept of "kosher" is completely made up with no objective basis in anything, and is an embarrassment to Judaism.
 
2013-03-26 01:58:11 PM  

van1ty: The entire concept of "kosher" is completely made up with no objective basis in anything, and is an embarrassment to Judaism.


Inasmuch as the rest of the Bible is. The restrictions on pork and shellfish are pretty explicitly described, no interpretation needed. Some laws of kashrut are...pretty insane, though.

// and Passover...boy, I dunno
 
2013-03-26 02:42:04 PM  

mongbiohazard: So the upshot of that article is that according to the rules it's perfectly kosher, but a few - and by no means all - kosher certification boards have banned it anyway basically because they felt like it. Well, the actual reason they give is because someone might be "confused" by it, but that sounds pretty arbitrary anyway.


The funniest of the "someone might be confused" is no poultry and cheese because of how it looks to goyim.  The law specifically states to not cook a kid in its mother's milk.  For a while poultry and milk was ok.  The rabbis forbade it because it might confuse the goyim, who looked at them eating milk and meat together and thought "wait, you said you can't have the two".  This was explained to me by an Orthodox Rabbi I worked for a number of years ago, so take as you will.

Then, the most amusing part of kosher, IMO, is what hechshers are acceptable.  There are lots of them, all with different rabbinical boards, or a single rabbi.  Some rabbis didn't allow some hechshers, so you had to check with your personal rabbi to see if your stuff was ok.
 
2013-03-26 02:49:36 PM  

Duck_of_Doom: The funniest of the "someone might be confused" is no poultry and cheese because of how it looks to goyim. The law specifically states to not cook a kid in its mother's milk. For a while poultry and milk was ok. The rabbis forbade it because it might confuse the goyim, who looked at them eating milk and meat together and thought "wait, you said you can't have the two". This was explained to me by an Orthodox Rabbi I worked for a number of years ago, so take as you will.


Also other Jews - that this type of rule ("what will the others think?") was adopted largely when Jews lived in insular communities (sometimes even by choice) lends credence to that idea. Many Jews did not have rigorous training (people have to eat, and a book only feeds you so long), so they often relied on what they saw others doing.

Mostly, the only times things change around you unwashed masses is when what is perfectly innocuous looks sinister. According to one opinion, the reason a tradition evolved as part of the seder where we open the door is to display that we're not killing any Christian children for use in the ceremonies.

// of course, that part happens around midnight, so no one's really looking
// as far as Judaism is concerned, everything we do looks weird to you people
 
2013-03-26 03:18:51 PM  

Dr Dreidel: // as far as Judaism is concerned, everything we do looks weird to you people


Not everything, but definitely certain snippets.
 
2013-03-26 03:27:13 PM  

Dr Dreidel: // of course, that part happens around midnight, so no one's really looking


Kinda late to be makin' the matza after the seder.  :)  On that note, some of the blood libel is itself humorous, in certain lights and only if you're an absurdist.  It is pure stupidity, but some of it you just have to shake your head and laugh.

// as far as Judaism is concerned, everything we do looks weird to you people

To be fair, anything not the norm in one's personal culture is either A) exotic, or B) weird.  I've had a Rabbi ask me to explain some Catholic traditions and beliefs, and still got the "that's weird" response.  For instance, St. Blaise's blessing of throats is weird no matter how you slice it.  The blessing, not the throats.
 
2013-03-26 03:27:34 PM  
Obvious:

farm9.staticflickr.com
 
2013-03-26 03:34:00 PM  
It's funny that an ALL POWERFUL GOD didn't think to include foods NOT OF YOUR LAND in the list of rules.
 
2013-03-26 05:53:41 PM  

van1ty: Why can't these people just come to the obvious real answer?  The entire concept of "kosher" is completely made up with no objective basis in anything, and is an embarrassment to Judaism.


Arbitrary practices and restrictions do serve the role of marking an "in group" from "out groups", and the violation of such brands an outsider. It is more socially acceptable to base such distinctions on observing eating habits rather than yanking down a man's pants to examine his penis.

Judaism is not a unified religion but is splintered into numerous sub sects each of which considers itself to be the only proper or reasonable form. One simple indicator of sect membership is just the hats they wear. Fights over kosherness (abandon, restrict, or enlarge) are really just fights between sub groups about which one defines "true Judaism" and thing such as kosher are just proxies in these fights.
 
2013-03-26 07:50:03 PM  
It tastes excellent with a side of bacon. I think they'd have a much easier time deciding if they gave it a try.
 
2013-03-27 02:12:12 AM  
Duck_of_Doom:

The funniest of the "someone might be confused" is no poultry and cheese because of how it looks to goyim.  The law specifically states to not cook a kid in its mother's milk.  For a while poultry and milk was ok.  The rabbis forbade it because it might confuse the goyim, who looked at them eating milk and meat together and thought "wait, you said you can't have the two".  This was explained to me by an Orthodox Rabbi I worked for a number of years ago, so take as you will.

An Orthodox layman straightened me out by saying "Where would I buy chicken or fish milk?" Surely I can't be the only smart goy around.

And what's worse, the Karaite Jews take things literally, according to the Karaite FAQ:

Do Karaites eat milk and meat together?

Yes. While there is a Biblical prohibition not to boil a young goat or sheep in its mother's milk, there is no such prohibition against eating milk and meat together.
 
2013-03-27 02:17:57 AM  
Dr Dreidel:

// as far as Judaism is concerned, everything we do looks weird to you people

AFAIC that fits just about any religion, from Satmar to Nichiren.

Grow up.
 
2013-03-27 06:25:19 AM  

The One True TheDavid: And what's worse, the Karaite Jews take things literally, according to the Karaite FAQ:


never heard of them, they're interesting.
 
2013-03-27 08:20:59 AM  
Of course Jews are allowed to eat grains during Passover: Matzoh!!!
 
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