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(Japan Times)   On the face of it, fish faces a problem, so an EU ban on discarding fish faces questions   (japantimes.co.jp) divider line 27
    More: Obvious, fisheries management, Javier Lopez, economic cost  
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1248 clicks; posted to Politics » on 25 Mar 2013 at 3:27 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-03-25 03:33:01 PM
i2.asntown.net

Who you callin' fish face?
 
2013-03-25 03:35:04 PM
www.sitcomsonline.com
 
2013-03-25 03:41:39 PM
Speaking of fish face:

abcnews.go.com
 
2013-03-25 03:53:18 PM
So they're complaining because they're going over-limit, and then just wasting the shiat they went over on? Here's a novel thing I practiced when I was but a wee lad, I'm sure it will work in the big-picture scheme of things: DON'T CATCH MORE THAN THE LIMIT.
 
ZAZ [TotalFark]
2013-03-25 03:55:16 PM
Regulators may be institutionally incapable of regulating the industry well. In New England they tried a rule that encouraged fishermen to die in storms because once they returned to port, with or without a catch, they couldn't return to sea. And then there's the "scientific" whaling exception.
 
2013-03-25 03:55:25 PM
Tough shiat.  Learn to do your job better or prepare to pay the fines.
 
2013-03-25 04:01:59 PM

ZAZ: Regulators may be institutionally incapable of regulating the industry well.


Utter bullshiat.
 
2013-03-25 04:07:10 PM

Dwight_Yeast: ZAZ: Regulators may be institutionally incapable of regulating the industry well.

Utter bullshiat.


Oh, they are indeed regulating the industry well. You wouldn't believe the paperwork needed to drill an industry well.
 
2013-03-25 04:18:00 PM
Banning duck face would be welcome.
 
2013-03-25 04:23:58 PM

ZAZ: Regulators may be institutionally incapable of regulating the industry well. In New England they tried a rule that encouraged fishermen to die in storms because once they returned to port, with or without a catch, they couldn't return to sea. And then there's the "scientific" whaling exception.


Yeah....and we also banned the harvest of any Striped Bass for a bunch of years and the stocks rebounded.

...then they let the Comms at it again and the numbers start dropping.

The only way we got the ban was out of spite because the Recs got the press on their side so the Comms played chicken and thought they'd back down.  They didn't.

When the Comms run the regulating bodies guess what's going to happen?  They'll fish a stock to the edge of extinction and only then will they consider any sort of action.

So, in short, tough shiat.  Learn to do your job better.  Being part of the industry should mean being a responsible steward.  And being responsible doesn't entail dumping some of your catch because you may be over  limit or "high grading."
 
2013-03-25 04:28:44 PM
Well, you farks, don't discard them.  Eat them up. Yum.
 
2013-03-25 04:56:19 PM
Roly poly

farm4.staticflickr.com
 
2013-03-25 05:19:59 PM

jaytkay: Roly poly


FISH HEADS
FISH HEADS
ROLY POLY FISH HEADS
FISH HEADS
FISH HEADS
EAT THEM UP
YUM

leaving satisifed
 
2013-03-25 05:26:04 PM
Plenty of tilapia, basa, catfish and farm-raised shrimp for the masses. Cobia, tuna, and salmon will all be joining the salt-water aquaculture industry in earnest over the next few years. Wild stocks of striped bass, cod, red snapper, yellowfin tuna fished to nearly unsustainable levels. Pollack, hake and haddock will likely soon join the depleted ranks of the cod the commercial fisheries used to target. Redfish were almost wiped out because of the popularity of of one man's recipe (Paul Prudhomme's Blackened Redfish). A recent poll here in Florida estimated that as much as 31% of ALL of our seafood was 'mislabeled'. There is a one in three chance that the 'red snapper' you ordered is either mingo, mutton, or orange roughy. Bluefin tuna is reserved for only the elite sushi establishment or high-end restaurants... You're eating yellowfin, blackfin no matter what it says on the menu or what your server is telling you. Guess what else? There is all-time high levels of pressure on South American salt-water species where the regulation is even dodgier. You know what else sucks green-donkey-dicks?  Several years ago a Florida fishing charter meant you'd head out for a day of snapper, grouper, amberjack and trigger fish. Now days, these same charters are targeting king mackerel, spanish mackerel, mingos, and rock fish or are opting for inshore trips targeting sheephead, speckle trout and redfish.

Anybody that actually dives, snorkels, or fishes has noted this trend for years. Each year it gets worse. Wild caught seafood will be reserved for only those that live near the sea or for those that can afford the price difference between fresh caught and farm-raised. Climate change-deniers. anti-abortionists, pro-corporate/anti-regulatory, anti-environmental/pro-pollution are not only short-sighted living in complete denial, they are also self-centered, stupid and hellbent on destruction.
 
2013-03-25 05:31:11 PM
images3.wikia.nocookie.net

You guys are slipping
 
2013-03-25 05:31:53 PM
dammit
 
2013-03-25 06:00:30 PM
damn you bob saget
 
2013-03-25 06:00:37 PM
www.doomsteaddiner.org
 
2013-03-25 06:25:10 PM
An Europe?
 
2013-03-25 07:17:52 PM
Gee, that's a Deep One, Mr. Lovecraft...
 
2013-03-25 07:31:21 PM
So nutritious, and putting a smile on your face!

geek-news.mtv.com
 
2013-03-25 09:58:24 PM
Damnit, someone beat me to it.  So I'll just post this alternate instead.
 
2013-03-25 10:00:25 PM
fc07.deviantart.net

I do want.
 
2013-03-26 12:01:04 AM
On the face of it, fish faces a problem

prima fishy
 
2013-03-26 01:59:12 AM

ZAZ: Regulators may be institutionally incapable of regulating the industry well. In New England they tried a rule that encouraged fishermen to die in storms because once they returned to port, with or without a catch, they couldn't return to sea. And then there's the "scientific" whaling exception.


This is actually true. It is institutionally set up so that every regulation must be compromised in favor of the fishers, so any quota set by science is undermined. So, a quota that scientists determine to be sustainable is argued down, which obviously means that you still have a constant reduction of fishing stocks until there is a collapse and possible closing of the fishery. Additionally, destructive fishing practices are supported by the sector of the fishing industry that makes money off of them, to the detriment of all - bottom trawling is a notable example. To add to all that, almost none of the ocean is set aside as no-take marine reserves, so fish have no sanctuary, and often those places that ARE set aside as reserves are distant and not open to public recreation (Papahanaumokuakea), so the public is unable to understand the value of the reserves. Those open to the public often suffer the converse problem of overly lax rules.

So yeah, regulators fail, over and over again, because they don't have the power to make regulations that would effectively save fish. Fishers have more political power and a higher profile than regulators and conservationists, and most of the public does not dive or snorkel so has no way to SEE what it looks like. The biggest sector of the population that deals with sea life is... fishers, recreational and commercial, who block protection of sea life. If you RTFA, you see that a giant hole was cut in the no-dumping rule right away. Before it's even come into effect it has been undermined.

The additional issues of habitat destruction (damming of rivers, dredging of canals, filling in wetlands, etc), pollution and ocean acidification are just more straws on the camel's back. Fishers point to these when stocks collapse, refusing to see their part in it.

I do snorkel, and I've seen the difference. Even very small no-take zones attract lots of fish and lead to the growth of larger fish, even in degraded areas - there is a part of Waikiki that is protected, which despite having an ugly and degraded reef still has many fish (and is one of my favorite spots because of this). I've seen "healthier" unprotected reefs elsewhere on the island that had very few fish and no large fish.
 
2013-03-26 02:04:56 AM

Fish face guy freaks me out.

i.imgur.com

 
2013-03-26 10:47:13 AM

Guuberre: [images3.wikia.nocookie.net image 254x318]

You guys are slipping


Guess you missed the second post. . .
 
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