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(Daily Mail)   All you ever wanted to know about stegosaurus mating   (dailymail.co.uk) divider line 40
    More: Interesting, Museum of Natural History, Brian Switek, adaptability, dinosaurs, soft tissues, Flinders University  
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2782 clicks; posted to Geek » on 25 Mar 2013 at 1:07 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-03-25 12:13:39 AM
Well, duh. There must have some way to reproduce despite it, or the thagomizer* would never have evolved.

*named after the late Thag Simmons
 
2013-03-25 01:20:33 AM
The T-Rex mating picture is something that'll likely haunt my dreams tonight
 
2013-03-25 01:23:26 AM
I know a paleontologist that I have diner with frequently, I'll have to print this one out to run past her. I doubt it's this week, the meet's too close to SMU this week and she really hates staying close to work after hours. Or maybe she just hates Trinity Hall.
 
2013-03-25 02:23:32 AM
Article includes helpful picture of what missionary position is NOT.
 
2013-03-25 02:30:17 AM

wildcardjack: I know a paleontologist that I have diner with frequently, I'll have to print this one out to run past her. I doubt it's this week, the meet's too close to SMU this week and she really hates staying close to work after hours. Or maybe she just hates Trinity Hall.


You're using your "out loud" voice again, WDJ....

:-)
 
2013-03-25 02:31:01 AM
WCJ...not WDJ....dammit!
 
2013-03-25 03:05:23 AM

cannonman1863: The T-Rex mating picture is something that'll likely haunt my dreams tonight


Yeah, that's not leaving my brain easily either unfortunately... Not to mention that, while probably a lot more realistic in the overall look, it still basically stabs my childhood in the kidneys repeatedly seeing fur on them.
 
2013-03-25 03:33:25 AM
My other books on dinosaur mating habits have much more detailed and enlarged illustrations of the genitals....

I am disappoint.
 
2013-03-25 04:33:10 AM

Iczer: cannonman1863: The T-Rex mating picture is something that'll likely haunt my dreams tonight

Yeah, that's not leaving my brain easily either unfortunately... Not to mention that, while probably a lot more realistic in the overall look, it still basically stabs my childhood in the kidneys repeatedly seeing fur on them.


Obligatory...

imgs.xkcd.com

To me, the more we figure out about them, the cooler they get. :D
 
2013-03-25 04:34:19 AM
Keep farking that dinosaur.
 
2013-03-25 08:23:39 AM
He ws my favorite dinosaur as a kid.  I would get all my plastic miniatures  taken away while playing with them at my desk

www.animalcabin.com

img0.etsystatic.com
 
2013-03-25 08:59:32 AM

Halfmast Trousers: Article includes helpful picture of what missionary position is NOT.


Shhhhhh..........don't say anything, I've been telling my wife that's missionary for years.
 
2013-03-25 09:06:04 AM
FTA: How did dinosaurs with spiky backs make love?


They didn't.  Dinosaurs did not have the concept of  'love'.  They farked like your mom during conjugal visits in prison.
 
2013-03-25 09:17:25 AM
The real real difficult one is how sauropods managed to mate.

It's like docking two barges with the combined IQ of potato.

/had a date like that once.
 
2013-03-25 09:59:36 AM
I'll bet the noble triceratops ladies never not to experience good cunnilingus. Sad.
 
2013-03-25 10:02:57 AM

Dinodork: The real real difficult one is how sauropods managed to mate.


Speaking of sauropods, what's the status on the "erect head" vs "low head" debate for long-necked species like diplodocus and brachiosaurus? A few years ago I read an article that said those dinosaurs probably couldn't be crown browsers because they'd have to have a blood pressure of 250 psi to get oxygen to their heads. I've always wondered whether that was resolved.

I suppose I could google it, of course, but it's more fun to ask Dinodork. : )
 
2013-03-25 10:10:21 AM
Obligatory.

pbfcomics.com
 
2013-03-25 10:12:27 AM

Uchiha_Cycliste: I'll bet the noble triceratops ladies never not to experience good cunnilingus. Sad.


That's why there were aardvarks. And they're still here today. Always a need for a mammal with a long tongue.

This also explains Gene Simmons.
 
2013-03-25 10:30:07 AM

dbirchall: Obligatory.

[pbfcomics.com image 450x680]


Rule 34, mutherfarkers.

No exceptions.
 
2013-03-25 11:55:01 AM
media.tumblr.com

Life, uh, finds a way...

/Seriously, I'm the first?
 
2013-03-25 12:34:01 PM
How about the post-coital cigarette?

s4.hubimg.com
 
2013-03-25 12:45:43 PM

mamoru: Well, duh. There must have some way to reproduce despite it, or the thagomizer* would never have evolved.

*named after the late Thag Simmons


You realise that Jurassic adult sites had categories for thagomizer porn.

/Triassic = three-way anal
//you're welcome
 
2013-03-25 01:28:17 PM

Muta: FTA: How did dinosaurs with spiky backs make love?


They didn't.  Dinosaurs did not have the concept of  'love'.  They farked like your mom during conjugal visits in prison.



You can't fool me!  My mom's not in prison.
 
2013-03-25 02:33:16 PM

theorellior: Dinodork: The real real difficult one is how sauropods managed to mate.

Speaking of sauropods, what's the status on the "erect head" vs "low head" debate for long-necked species like diplodocus and brachiosaurus? A few years ago I read an article that said those dinosaurs probably couldn't be crown browsers because they'd have to have a blood pressure of 250 psi to get oxygen to their heads. I've always wondered whether that was resolved.

I suppose I could google it, of course, but it's more fun to ask Dinodork. : )


I guess the correct answer is "yes..."

In the late Jurassic you basically have 3 morphotypes of saurpods/neck postures. You have Diplodocids with a straight out to low neck, Camarasaurs with a moderately erect neck and then Brachiosaurus being all freaky. Matt Wedel just published something on this recently, check out the SVPOW! blog. What this ends up doing is gives niche partitioning with regards to the diet and potential food sources for the various critters. They end up not really competing since they're going after different stuff.

As for the blood pressure, I think those estimates were made assuming that there was no backflow valves in the arteries like you see in giraffes. I think the presence of those valves (though we have not found evidence for them since sauropods don't really preserve as mummies) is more likely than a super high pressure circulatory system.
 
2013-03-25 04:42:14 PM
T-Rex coundn't jack off.
 
2013-03-25 05:06:23 PM

darth_badger: T-Rex coundn't jack off.


Deinonychus was really bad at footjobs.
 
2013-03-25 07:46:21 PM

theorellior: Dinodork: The real real difficult one is how sauropods managed to mate.

Speaking of sauropods, what's the status on the "erect head" vs "low head" debate for long-necked species like diplodocus and brachiosaurus? A few years ago I read an article that said those dinosaurs probably couldn't be crown browsers because they'd have to have a blood pressure of 250 psi to get oxygen to their heads. I've always wondered whether that was resolved.

I suppose I could google it, of course, but it's more fun to ask Dinodork. : )


Brachiosaurs still have their heads in the treetops. They have longer front legs for a reason, if they had to keep their heads low it would defeat the purpose.

Apatosaurs, diplodicus, and others are through to have kept their heads parallel to the ground, feeding on bushes and other browsing-level plants.
 
2013-03-25 08:42:28 PM

Dinodork: As for the blood pressure, I think those estimates were made assuming that there was no backflow valves in the arteries like you see in giraffes. I think the presence of those valves (though we have not found evidence for them since sauropods don't really preserve as mummies) is more likely than a super high pressure circulatory system.


Even with backflow valves, each heartbeat would still have to push hard enough to force blood up the entire neck.  That's a large column of liquid to lift.  But then again, the (very) distantly related birds have a far more efficient breathing system than mammals, I guess it's possible the sauropods had their own unique, unpreserved physiologic adaptations.  Maybe something similar to peristalsis in the carotid artery, which would be unlikely to show up in a fossil.
 
2013-03-25 10:07:04 PM

Erix: Dinodork: As for the blood pressure, I think those estimates were made assuming that there was no backflow valves in the arteries like you see in giraffes. I think the presence of those valves (though we have not found evidence for them since sauropods don't really preserve as mummies) is more likely than a super high pressure circulatory system.

Even with backflow valves, each heartbeat would still have to push hard enough to force blood up the entire neck.  That's a large column of liquid to lift.  But then again, the (very) distantly related birds have a far more efficient breathing system than mammals, I guess it's possible the sauropods had their own unique, unpreserved physiologic adaptations.  Maybe something similar to peristalsis in the carotid artery, which would be unlikely to show up in a fossil.


Could you imagine if an artery running at 250psi got nicked? The fountains of blood would make the Black Knight blush!
 
2013-03-25 10:27:57 PM

SnarfVader: Keep farking that dinosaur.


i759.photobucket.com

Yeah, it was a triceratops

/Uncle Beasley FTW
 
2013-03-26 10:21:21 AM

Erix: I guess it's possible the sauropods had their own unique, unpreserved physiologic adaptations. Maybe something similar to peristalsis in the carotid artery, which would be unlikely to show up in a fossil.


The article I read lo those many years ago postulated that alcoves in various sauropod neck vertebrae might have been auxiliary pumping muscles.
 
2013-03-26 02:50:56 PM

theorellior: Erix: I guess it's possible the sauropods had their own unique, unpreserved physiologic adaptations. Maybe something similar to peristalsis in the carotid artery, which would be unlikely to show up in a fossil.

The article I read lo those many years ago postulated that alcoves in various sauropod neck vertebrae might have been auxiliary pumping muscles.


We just have to be careful that we're inventing things to fit into the known morphology just to address a singular perceived physiological problem. Those alcoves (called pleurocoels) are present not only in  all types of sauropods in the necks (and dorsals and sometimes sacrals and caudals too) but also across the saurischia in the theropods too. Critters like Brachiosaurus also have pneumatic systems in their ribs, indicating that these were not just structural modifications to lighten the skeleton by reduced mass, but also  likely evidence of a super extensive air sac system like in modern avians.
 
2013-03-26 09:44:25 PM

Dinodork: theorellior: Erix: I guess it's possible the sauropods had their own unique, unpreserved physiologic adaptations. Maybe something similar to peristalsis in the carotid artery, which would be unlikely to show up in a fossil.

The article I read lo those many years ago postulated that alcoves in various sauropod neck vertebrae might have been auxiliary pumping muscles.

We just have to be careful that we're inventing things to fit into the known morphology just to address a singular perceived physiological problem. Those alcoves (called pleurocoels) are present not only in  all types of sauropods in the necks (and dorsals and sometimes sacrals and caudals too) but also across the saurischia in the theropods too. Critters like Brachiosaurus also have pneumatic systems in their ribs, indicating that these were not just structural modifications to lighten the skeleton by reduced mass, but also  likely evidence of a super extensive air sac system like in modern avians.


Do any other archosaurs (other than non-avian saurichians) have pleurocoels as well?  I know the efficient breathing system of birds is shared by crocodiles, so it must have been very basal in the archosaurs.  I guess the need to have a discrete inhale/exhale breathing cycle could theoretically limit the size of mammals in a way that it didn't limit dinosaurs.
 
2013-03-26 09:58:25 PM

Erix: Dinodork: theorellior: Erix: I guess it's possible the sauropods had their own unique, unpreserved physiologic adaptations. Maybe something similar to peristalsis in the carotid artery, which would be unlikely to show up in a fossil.

The article I read lo those many years ago postulated that alcoves in various sauropod neck vertebrae might have been auxiliary pumping muscles.

We just have to be careful that we're inventing things to fit into the known morphology just to address a singular perceived physiological problem. Those alcoves (called pleurocoels) are present not only in  all types of sauropods in the necks (and dorsals and sometimes sacrals and caudals too) but also across the saurischia in the theropods too. Critters like Brachiosaurus also have pneumatic systems in their ribs, indicating that these were not just structural modifications to lighten the skeleton by reduced mass, but also  likely evidence of a super extensive air sac system like in modern avians.

Do any other archosaurs (other than non-avian saurichians) have pleurocoels as well?  I know the efficient breathing system of birds is shared by crocodiles, so it must have been very basal in the archosaurs.  I guess the need to have a discrete inhale/exhale breathing cycle could theoretically limit the size of mammals in a way that it didn't limit dinosaurs.


John Hutchinson just came out with a paper on croc lungs today! I'm sure he'll get around to posting a link on his blog  http://whatsinjohnsfreezer.com/

Pterosaurs have limited pleurocoels, though they have totally pneumaticized bones. Working on skeletal reconstructions of a phytosaur and Postosuchus, and there is nothing elaborate about their verts. Then again, ornithischians are dinosaurs and they're very not elaborate (I can't think of one off the toop of my head that has anything remotely resembling a pleurocoel. They also totally lack gastralia, and do that weird ossified ligament basketwork too. I don't think they should be called dinosaurs. Stupid plant eaters.
 
2013-03-26 10:02:37 PM

Erix: I guess the need to have a discrete inhale/exhale breathing cycle could theoretically limit the size of mammals in a way that it didn't limit dinosaurs.


It didn't limit the blue whale from getting so big. However, it does limit the ceiling for flying mammals. Bats can't fly as high as birds because they can't get enough oxygen from the thin air.
 
2013-03-26 10:11:53 PM

theorellior: Erix: I guess the need to have a discrete inhale/exhale breathing cycle could theoretically limit the size of mammals in a way that it didn't limit dinosaurs.

It didn't limit the blue whale from getting so big. However, it does limit the ceiling for flying mammals. Bats can't fly as high as birds because they can't get enough oxygen from the thin air.


Good point on the whales.  I was thinking more about preventing mammals from converging with sauropods, and the length of the neck relative to the size of the body.  Although, Indricotherium was pretty darn close..
 
2013-03-26 10:25:21 PM

Dinodork: John Hutchinson just came out with a paper on croc lungs today! I'm sure he'll get around to posting a link on his blog http://whatsinjohnsfreezer.com/

Pterosaurs have limited pleurocoels, though they have totally pneumaticized bones. Working on skeletal reconstructions of a phytosaur and Postosuchus, and there is nothing elaborate about their verts. Then again, ornithischians are dinosaurs and they're very not elaborate (I can't think of one off the toop of my head that has anything remotely resembling a pleurocoel. They also totally lack gastralia, and do that weird ossified ligament basketwork too. I don't think they should be called dinosaurs. Stupid plant eaters.


Dammit, I shouldn't have clicked on that link.  Now I have two new books to buy..

I was just researching to get into a discussion on dinosaur cardiovascular systems, but I think I've gone over my procrastination limit for the evening.  Back to grading..
 
2013-03-26 11:44:22 PM
That reminds me, I need to see if Darren will be at SVP this year so I can ger a copy of "all yesterday's" autographed.

As for birds and mammals... We have bats here at my house, at 6700 feet. I think that the lack of diversity in flying mammals is both surprising and rooted somewhere deeper in their physiology. There is no gull or albatross equivalent. No soaring mammals at all....
 
2013-03-27 12:07:32 AM

Dinodork: That reminds me, I need to see if Darren will be at SVP this year so I can ger a copy of "all yesterday's" autographed.

As for birds and mammals... We have bats here at my house, at 6700 feet. I think that the lack of diversity in flying mammals is both surprising and rooted somewhere deeper in their physiology. There is no gull or albatross equivalent. No soaring mammals at all....


Birds had a pretty big head start on filling those niches.  I remember reading a paper a few years ago about the ecospace that birds, bats, and pterosaurs filled, and when the coexisted.

Actually, just found it.  McGowan & Dyke, 2007.  Don't have time to read it again now, unfortunately.
 
2013-03-27 08:33:28 PM

Dinodork: I think that the lack of diversity in flying mammals is both surprising and rooted somewhere deeper in their physiology. There is no gull or albatross equivalent. No soaring mammals at all....


Like Erix said, I think the fault is not the mammals' physiology, but the fact that the birds got there first.
 
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