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(8 News Now)   Man found actually innocent after spending 20 years in prison for murder. Now Florida wants him to serve three years for violating his parole 22 years ago   (8newsnow.com) divider line 82
    More: Florida, innocent, federal public defender, Earth Hour, Golden Bears, 100 metre running deer, Judicial District Court, HOV, evidentiary hearing  
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10291 clicks; posted to Main » on 22 Mar 2013 at 6:14 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-03-22 06:15:17 PM
So, what's your point?
 
2013-03-22 06:16:35 PM
time way served, biatches.
 
2013-03-22 06:18:48 PM
shiatty situation, but Florida didn't wrongly convict him. After 20 years, 3 should be a walk in the park.
 
2013-03-22 06:20:54 PM
Sounds about right the way things go anymore.  They might want to look into charging him for 20 years of room and board and the interest on his nonpaid bills.  Has he used a TV or internet service while in prison and how about laundry service?
 
2013-03-22 06:22:24 PM
Not only is Florida set on screwing him some more, the deal he entered into just to get out of prison also screwed him. He pleads to second-degree murder and can't sue.

This world needs more and better defense attorneys.
 
2013-03-22 06:22:28 PM
Those for profit prison donations to the GOP have to come from somewhere.
 
2013-03-22 06:22:38 PM
Florida: Come here on vacation and leave on probation.
 
2013-03-22 06:22:38 PM
What did he do to violate his parole? 'Not murder' anyone else when he got out out of prison?!

/drtfa
 
2013-03-22 06:23:58 PM
brandtstandard.files.wordpress.com
 
2013-03-22 06:24:37 PM
Time served. If Florida does not grant him that... well, you know what? I wouldn't begrudge this guy one bit if he DID decide "f*ck it, I'm killing somebody tonight."
 
2013-03-22 06:26:36 PM
This is why you should always A) Hire the best lawyer you can and B) Be white and wealthy at all times.
 
2013-03-22 06:27:00 PM
Nevermind. With the plea deal this guy was probably coaxed or forced into signing by crooked lawyers on both his side and the side of the government, I won't begrudge him if he does it regardless of what happens in Florida.
 
2013-03-22 06:27:26 PM
But Steese yet to breathe air on the outside.

No, but the writer got a shorter sentence.
 
2013-03-22 06:29:18 PM
If the statute of limitations says the boston art heist criminals are technically free to go, Why the F isn't "Failure to appear" limited? Seriously, if a car thief had stolen a bugatti veyron at the time he didn't report, they'd be scot free if they came forward today.

//this is why prison has nothing to do with justice, and only serves to turn good men bitter and rotten, and to harden once-petty criminals.
 
2013-03-22 06:32:20 PM
If he had simply been executed, none of this would matter.
 
2013-03-22 06:33:27 PM
This kind of shiat is why I'm against the death penalty. It's not that some people don't deserve to die but our system is too inept to be given the power of life and death.
 
2013-03-22 06:36:53 PM

swahnhennessy: Not only is Florida set on screwing him some more, the deal he entered into just to get out of prison also screwed him. He pleads to second-degree murder and can't sue.

This world needs more and better defense attorneys.


Contract signed under duress?
 
2013-03-22 06:40:06 PM

swahnhennessy: Not only is Florida set on screwing him some more, the deal he entered into just to get out of prison also screwed him. He pleads to second-degree murder and can't sue.

This world needs more and better defense attorneys.


IDK if it would work, but I would try to void that part of the deal on the grounds of duress.  Probably some statute bars such arguments in cases like this.

Florida is doing the most batshiat insane thing it can, as usual.
 
2013-03-22 06:41:07 PM
Wait, this guy has pled guilty to a crime he says he didn't commit to become free instead of demand a new trial that might exonerate him. Seems to me that something is fishy.
 
2013-03-22 06:43:30 PM

LordOfThePings: But Steese yet to breathe air on the outside.

No, but the writer got a shorter sentence.


Hardy har har
 
2013-03-22 06:44:41 PM
Well he was wrongfully imprisoned in NV where he served that time wrongly. It is a long established legal precident going all the way to the SCOTUS that another state or the feds doesn't have to recognize time served to someone besides your state, so FL has no legal reasoning to recognize the 20 years served in NV. So what is happening is TECHNICALLY correct, the best kind of correct.
 
2013-03-22 06:46:13 PM

BarkingUnicorn: Florida is doing the most batshiat insane thing it can, as usual.


The batshiat insane thing would be to actually have him transported. Having Nevada hold him until the deadline is just plain mean.

WayneKerr: Hardy har har


I know, sorry. Best I could do.
 
2013-03-22 06:52:44 PM

swahnhennessy: Not only is Florida set on screwing him some more, the deal he entered into just to get out of prison also screwed him. He pleads to second-degree murder and can't sue.

This world needs more and better defense attorneys.


It has them - he, you and I just can't afford them.

www.grudge-match.com
 
2013-03-22 06:52:52 PM

Popcorn Johnny: shiatty situation, but Florida didn't wrongly convict him. After 20 years, 3 should be a walk in the park.


The article isn't clear, but it seems that the reason he couldn't clear up the parole violation was because of the wrongful conviction. If that's the case, I would hope that mitigating circumstances would be put into consideration.
 
2013-03-22 06:55:01 PM

swahnhennessy: Not only is Florida set on screwing him some more, the deal he entered into just to get out of prison also screwed him. He pleads to second-degree murder and can't sue.

This world needs more and better defense attorneys.


Being a defense attorney is not profitable unless you represent the wealthy. Therefore, no one wants to be a defense attorney and the state ends up with those who JUST BARELY passed the bar.

IMO, ALL lawyers past and present must serve the state for 4 years before they can open their own practice.
 
2013-03-22 06:55:29 PM
i fought the law...
 
2013-03-22 06:56:09 PM

nmemkha: This world needs more and better defense attorneys.

It has them - he, you and I just can't afford them.


It's my experience that any lawyer who isn't functionally retarded isn't a public defender.
 
2013-03-22 06:56:35 PM

ajgeek: IMO, ALL lawyers past and present must serve the state for 4 years before they can open their own practice.


Dibs on zombie Lincoln.
 
2013-03-22 07:01:40 PM

ajgeek: swahnhennessy: Not only is Florida set on screwing him some more, the deal he entered into just to get out of prison also screwed him. He pleads to second-degree murder and can't sue.

This world needs more and better defense attorneys.

Being a defense attorney is not profitable unless you represent the wealthy. Therefore, no one wants to be a defense attorney and the state ends up with those who JUST BARELY passed the bar.

IMO, ALL lawyers past and present must serve the state for 4 years before they can open their own practice.


Nice, but then we get only the most inexperienced attorneys.  How about X cases per year for your entire career?  Don't bar associations strongly encourage pro bono work?
 
2013-03-22 07:02:08 PM
Sure glad I support prison rape, because this guy totally had it coming.
 
2013-03-22 07:03:30 PM
I understand he has some overdue library books and a big fine waiting for him in Texas.
 
2013-03-22 07:10:50 PM

swahnhennessy: Not only is Florida set on screwing him some more, the deal he entered into just to get out of prison also screwed him. He pleads to second-degree murder and can't sue.

This world needs more and better defense attorneys.


I read that as "better defense monkeys"

Probably right either way.
 
2013-03-22 07:13:00 PM

red5ish: I understand he has some overdue library books and a big fine waiting for him in Texas.


He owed me $5.00. With interest that works out to be...

$5,342,186.49
 
2013-03-22 07:13:11 PM
LordOfThePings: ajgeek: IMO, ALL lawyers past and present must serve the state for 4 years before they can open their own practice.

Dibs on zombie Lincoln.


He was killed by a gunshot to the head, so Zombie Lincoln is not possible.

I call dibbs on Zombie Johnnie Cochran.
 
2013-03-22 07:17:04 PM

Oldiron_79: He was killed by a gunshot to the head, so Zombie Lincoln is not possible.

I call dibbs on Zombie Johnnie Cochran.


Damn! Then dibs on zombie Clarence Darrow.
 
2013-03-22 07:20:53 PM
Her ruling was based in large part on new evidence that Steese was out-of-state at the time of the murder.

How the fark wasn't that original evidence?
 
2013-03-22 07:24:48 PM

Some 'Splainin' To Do: The article isn't clear, but it seems that the reason he couldn't clear up the parole violation was because of the wrongful conviction. If that's the case, I would hope that mitigating circumstances would be put into consideration.


I think he skipped town and then got caught up in this mess. Had he stayed in Florida and lived up to his obligation, he would have never found himself wrongly convicted in Nevada.
 
2013-03-22 07:27:34 PM

swahnhennessy: Not only is Florida set on screwing him some more, the deal he entered into just to get out of prison also screwed him. He pleads to second-degree murder and can't sue.

This world needs more and better defense attorneys.


Except he entered the plea under duress. That whole death or life in prison deal.
 
2013-03-22 07:29:57 PM

ajgeek: swahnhennessy: Not only is Florida set on screwing him some more, the deal he entered into just to get out of prison also screwed him. He pleads to second-degree murder and can't sue.

This world needs more and better defense attorneys.

Being a defense attorney is not profitable unless you represent the wealthy. Therefore, no one wants to be a defense attorney and the state ends up with those who JUST BARELY passed the bar.

IMO, ALL lawyers past and present must serve the state for 4 years before they can open their own practice.


i think i speak on behalf of all lawyers when i say, "what reasoning did you use to come up with that idea?"
 
2013-03-22 08:04:13 PM
I wonder what about the murder made it a capitol crime?

In 1992, a jury convicted Steese for the murder of Gerard Soules, a Las Vegas Strip entertainer with a poodle act at the Circus Circus.

Oh...never mind.
 
2013-03-22 08:13:38 PM

Some 'Splainin' To Do: Popcorn Johnny: shiatty situation, but Florida didn't wrongly convict him. After 20 years, 3 should be a walk in the park.

The article isn't clear, but it seems that the reason he couldn't clear up the parole violation was because of the wrongful conviction. If that's the case, I would hope that mitigating circumstances would be put into consideration.



I agree. But, if he skipped Florida, violated his parole by going to Nevada (where he was subsequently charged with murder), then he still owes Florida some jail time.
 
2013-03-22 08:16:18 PM

swahnhennessy: Not only is Florida set on screwing him some more, the deal he entered into just to get out of prison also screwed him. He pleads to second-degree murder and can't sue.

This world needs more and better defense attorneys.


In some states, committing a felony that resulted in murder would get you lethal injection. He's lucky to be out, and if he commits another robbery they should make him prison librarian til he dies.
 
2013-03-22 08:18:14 PM

Somaticasual: If the statute of limitations says the boston art heist criminals are technically free to go, Why the F isn't "Failure to appear" limited? Seriously, if a car thief had stolen a bugatti veyron at the time he didn't report, they'd be scot free if they came forward today.

//this is why prison has nothing to do with justice, and only serves to turn good men bitter and rotten, and to harden once-petty criminals.


Perhaps you missed the Florida tag.
 
2013-03-22 08:18:32 PM

Animatronik: swahnhennessy: Not only is Florida set on screwing him some more, the deal he entered into just to get out of prison also screwed him. He pleads to second-degree murder and can't sue.

This world needs more and better defense attorneys.

In some states, committing a felony that resulted in murder would get you lethal injection. He's lucky to be out, and if he commits another robbery they should make him prison librarian til he dies.


I just realized I confused this with a different wrongly convicted murderer who just got released after 20 years. Who knew?
 
2013-03-22 08:26:23 PM
I am basing this on the what's in the article only, I'm sure there's a lot more to this. BUT...

While jail sucks, I don't feel bad for him, because his actions (and his lawyers...) got himself into this mess.

Let's see what happened:

1) He did something in Florida, and got put on probation.
2) He went to Vegas while on probation.
3) He pleaded guilty to first degree murder, and sentenced to life without parole, hoping that it would eventually come out that he wasn't even in the state. (His lawyer might have come in helpful here...)
4) It came out that he was out of state, and instead of taking it to trial, be pleaded guilty to second degree murder. (His new lawyer might have come in helpful here...)

Maybe he killed the guy in Vegas, maybe he didn't. However, the guilty pleas (the old one and the new one) means that in the eyes of the law, he committed murder. So as far as Florida (and Nevada, for that matter) are concerned, he's committed the crime of murder, and served a 7,545 day sentence for it. He was NOT found innocent. While Florida should look at the entirety of the situation and use appropriate discretion, it is within their right to require him to finish the Florida sentence.

Now, on to the real culprits: The DAs in Nevada who pursued these charges, based on this evidence, and the judges who accepted his pleas...
 
2013-03-22 08:35:33 PM

Mugato: nmemkha: This world needs more and better defense attorneys.

It has them - he, you and I just can't afford them.

It's my experience that any lawyer who isn't functionally retarded isn't a public defender.



Then I take it your experience is extremely limited.  PD's are often the best lawyers in a courthouse, which isn't really surprising since they do criminal defense work 24/7, and usually took the job because they are passionate and into their work.

Where a PD struggles isn't their ability, but their caseload.  When I was assigned counsel I usually had 70-80 cases at any given time.  When I went private I carried about half that.

/Can't count the number of times I saw outstanding assigned counsel replaced by some guy in a better suit who mostly did real estate.
 
2013-03-22 09:10:01 PM
Let the guy go. What's the point of this? Are they trying to get themselves some horrible PR?
 
2013-03-22 09:13:54 PM

YouPeopleAreCrazy: Her ruling was based in large part on new evidence that Steese was out-of-state at the time of the murder.

How the fark wasn't that original evidence?


It was.

The 1998 appellate decision (960 P2d 321) recounts in detail the evidence before the court.  Steese went to trial and submitted an alibi defense.  3 witnesses testified that he was in Idaho, and he submitted employment and social service applications he alleged were filled out in Idaho when the murder was committed.  Steese was a drug addict with mental health issues (he stole a truck to drive back to Nevada from Idaho, did speedballs the whole way and tried to argue that his mental health issues made his subsequent confession unreliable), and his alibi witnesses didn't sound great (one got his name wrong, another initially failed to identify him).  He was found guilty by a jury, and then stipulated to 2 consecutive life sentences in exchange for the prosecution not seeking the death penalty (which explains the article's nonsensical statement that he plead guilty thinking he could win on appeal later).

Despite the article's language I doubt the court found him "innocent" since courts don't generally do that.  He was looking at a new trial, and rather than risk it took the no contest plea and time served. I highly doubt his lawyer pressured him into it - this is the same lawyer that successfully overturned the initial conviction by filing habeus writs and then appealing those decisions when they didn't go his client's way.  The plea was understandable - guaranteed freedom on one side against a small risk of a life in prison on the other.

Oh, and for all of you dissing court appointed counsel, the lawyer that got him sprung was the Nevada Federal Public Defender office.
 
2013-03-22 09:14:28 PM
With any luck he'll get a large settlement for his time served in Nevada which will then be confiscated by the state of Florida to cover the cost of his incarceration.
 
2013-03-22 09:29:21 PM
If he had been in shiathole Florida doing his probation he wouldn't have been convicted in Nevada, amirite?
 
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