If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Pop Matters)   How ten songs from 1967 shaped prog rock   (popmatters.com) divider line 95
    More: Cool, Heroes and Villains, Moody Blues, The Doors, stairway to heaven, art rocks, Dead Sea Scrolls, Heroes, acid trips  
•       •       •

7360 clicks; posted to Entertainment » on 21 Mar 2013 at 1:14 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



95 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

Archived thread

First | « | 1 | 2 | » | Last | Show all
 
2013-03-21 10:21:16 AM

Killer Cars: karmaceutical: The Doors but no Velvet Underground?

I have no earthly idea how VU's debut album isn't on the list. I realize 1967 was a pretty loaded year for great albums, but you can easily make the case Lou Reed and gang made the most influential and daring one of all.

Christ, a song like "Heroin" would've still been considered visionary if not released until 10 years later.


my guess is that TFA's definition of Prog Rock has more to do with Yes, ELP, King Crimson, etc. than any strain of Prog Rock VU would've influenced.
 
2013-03-21 10:25:10 AM

rhiannon: Oh cool. A list of 10 random songs from 1967.


If that's true, then it only reinforces what an high water mark that year was.
 
2013-03-21 10:25:31 AM

puckrock2000: Neil Young would, of course, go in entirely different directions (ranging from the folk-rock of his solo debut to garage-band glory with Crazy Horse to the acoustic stylings of After the Gold Rush and the perfection, if not invention, of country-rock on Harvest

[upload.wikimedia.org image 400x400]

Disagree.


Came in to say this, glad to see you've got that covered.  There was a lot of "I don't know anything about this stuff, but I'll write about it anyway" going on there.  Waterloo Sunset is an absolute classic, has nothing to do with prog at all.   Country Joe and The Fish?  Really?
 
2013-03-21 10:29:20 AM

KingKauff: I like the list and am a huge Pink Floyd fan, but Interstallar Overdrive is pure dreck.


THIS 1000 times!

/screaming face from The Wall tattoo on my back.
 
2013-03-21 10:29:53 AM
5 singles.

blogs.houstonpress.com
 
2013-03-21 10:33:23 AM

tlchwi02: I don't care what anyone says, the moody blues were awesome. saw them with my mom on a whim about 10 years ago and they were still kicking it


i saw them last week...they may be older than my dad, but they've still got it!
 
2013-03-21 10:54:36 AM

FeedTheCollapse: Killer Cars: karmaceutical: The Doors but no Velvet Underground?

I have no earthly idea how VU's debut album isn't on the list. I realize 1967 was a pretty loaded year for great albums, but you can easily make the case Lou Reed and gang made the most influential and daring one of all.

Christ, a song like "Heroin" would've still been considered visionary if not released until 10 years later.

my guess is that TFA's definition of Prog Rock has more to do with Yes, ELP, King Crimson, etc. than any strain of Prog Rock VU would've influenced.


I would argue that VU influenced them as well.  VU's influence is incredible (rivaled only by Bowie).  You ask any artist from prog rock, punk, metal, alternative, grunge, they will invariably name VU and/or David Bowie.

One of my favorites, R.E.M., have several B-sides that are covers of VU songs.  Bowie, in his 80's revival, helped introduced Stevie Ray Vaughn to a larger audience.
 
2013-03-21 11:05:57 AM
The Red Telephone was never played on Top 40 radio. It would have been played on underground radio stations. I had the first two Love albums, so I got this the day it come out and heard the song.
 
2013-03-21 11:07:07 AM

RyansPrivates: FeedTheCollapse: Killer Cars: karmaceutical: The Doors but no Velvet Underground?

I have no earthly idea how VU's debut album isn't on the list. I realize 1967 was a pretty loaded year for great albums, but you can easily make the case Lou Reed and gang made the most influential and daring one of all.

Christ, a song like "Heroin" would've still been considered visionary if not released until 10 years later.

my guess is that TFA's definition of Prog Rock has more to do with Yes, ELP, King Crimson, etc. than any strain of Prog Rock VU would've influenced.

I would argue that VU influenced them as well.  VU's influence is incredible (rivaled only by Bowie).  You ask any artist from prog rock, punk, metal, alternative, grunge, they will invariably name VU and/or David Bowie.

One of my favorites, R.E.M., have several B-sides that are covers of VU songs.  Bowie, in his 80's revival, helped introduced Stevie Ray Vaughn to a larger audience.


for the longest time i thought "pale blue eyes" was an rem song. i still like it better than the original, but i've always liked stipe and never really cared much for lou reed. vu/lr covers are usually really good, so the songcraft is there, but there's something about lr that turns me off
 
2013-03-21 11:08:45 AM

RyansPrivates: I would argue that VU influenced them as well.  VU's influence is incredible (rivaled only by Bowie).  You ask any artist from prog rock, punk, metal, alternative, grunge, they will invariably name VU and/or David Bowie.


I agree, though I think VU's impact on Prog was more along the lines of the Krautrock strain (i.e. faust, can, Neu!, etc.) rather than the typical Yes, Genesis, King Crimson, etc. Prog-Rock that the article seems to be leaning towards.
 
2013-03-21 11:09:57 AM

puckrock2000: Neil Young would, of course, go in entirely different directions (ranging from the folk-rock of his solo debut to garage-band glory with Crazy Horse to the acoustic stylings of After the Gold Rush and the perfection, if not invention, of country-rock on Harvest

[upload.wikimedia.org image 400x400]

Disagree.


Also disagrees:

991.com
 
2013-03-21 11:31:20 AM

FirstNationalBastard: puckrock2000: Neil Young would, of course, go in entirely different directions (ranging from the folk-rock of his solo debut to garage-band glory with Crazy Horse to the acoustic stylings of After the Gold Rush and the perfection, if not invention, of country-rock on Harvest

[upload.wikimedia.org image 400x400]

Disagree.

Also disagrees:

[991.com image 500x494]


That's a fun record. "Well, we're gonna take a short intermission, ma friends, and we'll be back, right after you turn the record over." I've heard other bands doing tracks like that, from the Sesame Street cast to Tom Petty, but none predate Nez.
 
2013-03-21 11:40:56 AM

vudukungfu: t's nature's way of telling you...


Something's wrong
 
2013-03-21 11:58:00 AM

FeedTheCollapse: RyansPrivates: I would argue that VU influenced them as well.  VU's influence is incredible (rivaled only by Bowie).  You ask any artist from prog rock, punk, metal, alternative, grunge, they will invariably name VU and/or David Bowie.

I agree, though I think VU's impact on Prog was more along the lines of the Krautrock strain (i.e. faust, can, Neu!, etc.) rather than the typical Yes, Genesis, King Crimson, etc. Prog-Rock that the article seems to be leaning towards.


This is a valid point.  I guess there is some disconnect between what the write is calling Prog and what some of us are calling Prog.

And I think it should be okay to hate on the Beach Boys.  They were playing second or third fiddle to The Beatles their entire career.  The pressure to do so nearly killed them all, and there is nothing left but nostalgia.  Their music is finely crafted pop, no doubt... but there is no shortage of that in the world.
 
2013-03-21 12:04:43 PM

Crewmannumber6: The real watershed moment came two years later
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8Ubc5_owhl0


This +1,000
Author is really stretching to pull significance from 1967. Agree with crewmannumber6 - real influence started in '69.

/Prog Head
//Chapman Stick player
 
2013-03-21 12:09:47 PM
Prog is about two things:
The virtuosity of instrumental performance and the reflective, classical idealism of the lyrics.
It is not to be confused with psychedelia, but they can play well together.

/sez me
//but not just me
 
2013-03-21 12:22:32 PM

karmaceutical: FeedTheCollapse: RyansPrivates: I would argue that VU influenced them as well.  VU's influence is incredible (rivaled only by Bowie).  You ask any artist from prog rock, punk, metal, alternative, grunge, they will invariably name VU and/or David Bowie.

I agree, though I think VU's impact on Prog was more along the lines of the Krautrock strain (i.e. faust, can, Neu!, etc.) rather than the typical Yes, Genesis, King Crimson, etc. Prog-Rock that the article seems to be leaning towards.

This is a valid point.  I guess there is some disconnect between what the write is calling Prog and what some of us are calling Prog.

And I think it should be okay to hate on the Beach Boys.  They were playing second or third fiddle to The Beatles their entire career.  The pressure to do so nearly killed them all, and there is nothing left but nostalgia.  Their music is finely crafted pop, no doubt... but there is no shortage of that in the world.


I could rank the BBs sheer singing ability above the Beatles'.  Even on their earliest records, it was like
listening to the angels sing.  And I also truly believe that there has not been a musical prodigy of
Brian Wilson's calibre since Mozart, and that we will not see his like again for at least another century.

You are right, though, that coming out of the pop music sausage factory of the early 1960s did burn up
their artistic energy far too soon, especially in Brian Wilson's case.
 
2013-03-21 12:24:44 PM
Prog rock is boring. This is a fact.
 
2013-03-21 12:35:14 PM

DjangoStonereaver: karmaceutical: FeedTheCollapse: RyansPrivates: I would argue that VU influenced them as well.  VU's influence is incredible (rivaled only by Bowie).  You ask any artist from prog rock, punk, metal, alternative, grunge, they will invariably name VU and/or David Bowie.

I agree, though I think VU's impact on Prog was more along the lines of the Krautrock strain (i.e. faust, can, Neu!, etc.) rather than the typical Yes, Genesis, King Crimson, etc. Prog-Rock that the article seems to be leaning towards.

This is a valid point.  I guess there is some disconnect between what the write is calling Prog and what some of us are calling Prog.

And I think it should be okay to hate on the Beach Boys.  They were playing second or third fiddle to The Beatles their entire career.  The pressure to do so nearly killed them all, and there is nothing left but nostalgia.  Their music is finely crafted pop, no doubt... but there is no shortage of that in the world.

I could rank the BBs sheer singing ability above the Beatles'.  Even on their earliest records, it was like
listening to the angels sing.  And I also truly believe that there has not been a musical prodigy of
Brian Wilson's calibre since Mozart, and that we will not see his like again for at least another century.

You are right, though, that coming out of the pop music sausage factory of the early 1960s did burn up
their artistic energy far too soon, especially in Brian Wilson's case.


OldManDownDRoad: FlashHarry: karmaceutical: The effing Beach Boys??  Pass.

GAT_00: #1 Beach Boys *closes list*


the beach boys - especially their 1966 release "pet sounds" - were every bit as important, musically speaking, as the beatles.

Ab-so-farkin'-lutely. McCartney and Lennon both have said that "Pet Sounds" had a lot to do with "Sgt Pepper." Even George Martin has mentioned how closely he listened to Brian Wilson's studio techniques. It's a shame that the surviving members of the band have become cartoons, much in the way that Elvis did in his last years. But the current caricatures shouldn't obscure their contributions. I'm just sad their "Holland" tour was never filmed, as far as I can tell. I saw it in a mid-sized auditorium and was blown away at how excellent it was. While the rest of the country was listening to mellow Southern California country rock, these guys were still pushing boundaries. Donald Fagen, never one to lavish praise, has said that tour had a lot to do with the direction he was pushing the early Steely Dan.


That is kind of a weird endorsement.  The king of over-produced commercial art pop giving a nod to the originators of over-produced commercial art pop.

/hates steely dan
 
2013-03-21 12:42:54 PM

FeedTheCollapse: my guess is that TFA's definition of Prog Rock has more to do with Yes, ELP, King Crimson, etc. than any strain of Prog Rock VU would've influenced.


True, and admittedly I sorta glossed over the word "prog" in the headline, focused more on "rock" and "1967" and unleashed my rant.

Still, VU are one of the bands that, while not every song of theirs was good, swung for the fences every time and are influential in modern music for many genres. And, I also think Lou Reed is kind of an asshole and not someone I'd want to meet, so I totally understand his "turnoff" factor.
 
2013-03-21 12:43:27 PM
Seems obvious to me, if you try to look like very old composer or even older troubadour, you're progressive, if you try something new, you're not
/See also Punk Rock = New Wave
 
2013-03-21 12:47:42 PM

barefoot in the head: Prog is about two things:
The virtuosity of instrumental performance and the reflective, classical idealism of the lyrics.
It is not to be confused with psychedelia, but they can play well together.

/sez me
//but not just me


Nah man.  Prog is about notes.  You've got to play a lot of notes.  Every instrumentalist gets a chance to totally wank out on their instrument, or someone else's if the piece calls for it.  You've got to have more notes than The Velvet Underground ever recorded packed into a single 6:45 prelude to a electric orchestral suite.
 
2013-03-21 12:52:11 PM

Propain_az: alan parsons project ?


Years active    1975-1990  (according to wikipedia)

But yes,  a very influential "band" close to that era
And as for songs I think Games People Play ranks right alongside Nights in White Satin coming from two of my favorite albums.
 
2013-03-21 12:53:38 PM

bugmn99: Prog rock is boring. This is a fact.


Only if done properly.
 
2013-03-21 12:56:50 PM

Propain_az: alan parsons project ?


Difficulty:  From 1967.
 
2013-03-21 01:21:44 PM
 
2013-03-21 01:47:59 PM

Martstar: CruiserTwelve: CaptSacto: Snotnose: I never heard of The Red Telephone, and I was 9 years old in 1967.   But yeah, as one who's first memories of music are Stairway to Heaven and School's Out, I'm ok with this list.

/ except I'd call it "songs that made music better"

I'd never heard of that one, either, and I was seriously into music in those days. Probably got lost in the Sgt. Pepper summer

I third that. I was 16 in 1967 and listened to music constantly but I never heard of either the song or the band.

As someone born 11 years after 1967, I obviously didn't experience any of it the firs time around, but I've noticed this album has become something of a favorite forgotten gem among music geeks, and ironically one of the most "popular" obscure albums of the period, over the last maybe 5-10 years.

But it's no wonder a lot of stuff got lost in the shuffle back then.  I actually find myself digging deep into music of the late '60s and early '70s and finding lots of obscure bands that were still doing really good stuff.


You might want to check out this book:
Unknown Legends of Rock'N Roll:Psychedelic Unknowns, Mad Geniuses, Punk Pioneers, Lo-Fi Mavericks & MoreThe title explains it pretty well. The book covers many genres of music. I just wrote down every band/artist name and then looked them up on the youtube and found lots of great music as well as not so great andjust plain weird stuff.
 
2013-03-21 01:57:39 PM

DjangoStonereaver: I could rank the BBs sheer singing ability above the Beatles'.


you're right. listen to THIS.
 
2013-03-21 03:00:06 PM

FlashHarry: DjangoStonereaver: I could rank the BBs sheer singing ability above the Beatles'.

you're right. listen to THIS.


GOD ONLY KNOWS is Paul McCartney's favourite song.

That should about say it all.
 
2013-03-21 03:13:24 PM
FTFA:  "Jim Morrison's stream of consciousness Götterdämmerung will incite debates until the sacred cows come home, but there can be no quarrel with the music. Ray Manzarek and Robby Krieger do some of their finest-if understated-work here, but it is John Densmore's passive-aggressive percussion that represents (certainly at the time of its recording) an apotheosis of sorts."

Who farking writes like this?
 
2013-03-21 03:17:14 PM

Mr_Fabulous: FTFA:  "Jim Morrison's stream of consciousness Götterdämmerung will incite debates until the sacred cows come home, but there can be no quarrel with the music. Ray Manzarek and Robby Krieger do some of their finest-if understated-work here, but it is John Densmore's passive-aggressive percussion that represents (certainly at the time of its recording) an apotheosis of sorts."

Who farking writes like this?


music critics have been writing pretentious drivel like this for years.
 
2013-03-21 03:38:49 PM

FlashHarry: Mr_Fabulous: FTFA:  "Jim Morrison's stream of consciousness Götterdämmerung will incite debates until the sacred cows come home, but there can be no quarrel with the music. Ray Manzarek and Robby Krieger do some of their finest-if understated-work here, but it is John Densmore's passive-aggressive percussion that represents (certainly at the time of its recording) an apotheosis of sorts."

Who farking writes like this?

music critics have been writing pretentious drivel like this for years.


I know.... rhetorical. But that blurb is a beaut.
 
2013-03-21 03:55:01 PM
10. The Kinks - "Waterloo Sunset"

Of course, this song, and the Kinks, were/are much less popular and appreciated in the States...

Not me, I LOVE The Kinks.Everything is different from the song before, and it's really amazing over the yeas how much has made it to the radio at one point or another. For reasons that I am completely unclear on, Come Dancing is my favorite, but the list of Kinks songs I like is pretty long.
 
2013-03-21 03:57:39 PM
How ten pieces from 1767 shaped classical music...

Pfft. Easy to find 10 examples of any musical form in any year that "shaped" any musical form that followed. In 1767, It was Mozart, the Haydns, Gluk, Arne, CPE Bach, and Sacchini that paved the way for the romanticists. So, in '66, bands like Jefferson Airplane (Jefferson Airplane Takes Off), Frank Zappa (Freak Out), The Seeds (A Web of Sound), 13th Floor Elevators (The Psychedelic Sounds...), The Beach Boys (Pet Sounds), and Donovan (Sunshine Superman) didn't have any influence on the prog-rock movement that came after? 1967 was a cool year, to be sure, but trying to make it the artistic nexus of the travesty called prog rock that came later is bullshait.
 
2013-03-21 05:08:57 PM

DjangoStonereaver: karmaceutical: FeedTheCollapse: RyansPrivates: I would argue that VU influenced them as well.  VU's influence is incredible (rivaled only by Bowie).  You ask any artist from prog rock, punk, metal, alternative, grunge, they will invariably name VU and/or David Bowie.

I agree, though I think VU's impact on Prog was more along the lines of the Krautrock strain (i.e. faust, can, Neu!, etc.) rather than the typical Yes, Genesis, King Crimson, etc. Prog-Rock that the article seems to be leaning towards.

This is a valid point.  I guess there is some disconnect between what the write is calling Prog and what some of us are calling Prog.

And I think it should be okay to hate on the Beach Boys.  They were playing second or third fiddle to The Beatles their entire career.  The pressure to do so nearly killed them all, and there is nothing left but nostalgia.  Their music is finely crafted pop, no doubt... but there is no shortage of that in the world.

I could rank the BBs sheer singing ability above the Beatles'.  Even on their earliest records, it was like
listening to the angels sing.  And I also truly believe that there has not been a musical prodigy of
Brian Wilson's calibre since Mozart, and that we will not see his like again for at least another century.

You are right, though, that coming out of the pop music sausage factory of the early 1960s did burn up
their artistic energy far too soon, especially in Brian Wilson's case.


To me the Beach Boys have always been, as has been alluded to, the pinnacle of pop.  I don't mean that to sound like a slam.  Pop serves a good purpose; it is music you don't think about and directly inspired (or was rebelled against) a lot of good music.  The Ramones, one of my favorites, skewer pop mercilessly, while borrowing some of the "vernacular".
 
2013-03-21 05:12:12 PM

Chainsaw Turd Elf: Martstar: CruiserTwelve: CaptSacto: Snotnose: I never heard of The Red Telephone, and I was 9 years old in 1967.   But yeah, as one who's first memories of music are Stairway to Heaven and School's Out, I'm ok with this list.

/ except I'd call it "songs that made music better"

I'd never heard of that one, either, and I was seriously into music in those days. Probably got lost in the Sgt. Pepper summer

I third that. I was 16 in 1967 and listened to music constantly but I never heard of either the song or the band.

As someone born 11 years after 1967, I obviously didn't experience any of it the firs time around, but I've noticed this album has become something of a favorite forgotten gem among music geeks, and ironically one of the most "popular" obscure albums of the period, over the last maybe 5-10 years.

But it's no wonder a lot of stuff got lost in the shuffle back then.  I actually find myself digging deep into music of the late '60s and early '70s and finding lots of obscure bands that were still doing really good stuff.

You might want to check out this book:
Unknown Legends of Rock'N Roll:Psychedelic Unknowns, Mad Geniuses, Punk Pioneers, Lo-Fi Mavericks & MoreThe title explains it pretty well. The book covers many genres of music. I just wrote down every band/artist name and then looked them up on the youtube and found lots of great music as well as not so great andjust plain weird stuff.


Cool, thanks for the tip. I added that to my amazon list.

Meanwhile, my own method has been to go through issues of this magazine from the UK and look for the as many things as I can on Spotify. I have several issues in digital form on my iPad (cheaper than retail cost of imported issues), so it's just a matter of clicking back and forth any time something peaks my interest. A dangerous rabbit hole to go down when I should be doing something more productive....
 
2013-03-21 05:13:46 PM

Martstar: Meanwhile, my own method has been to go through issues of this magazine from the UK and look for the as many things as I can on Spotify. I have several issues in digital form on my iPad (cheaper than retail cost of imported issues), so it's just a matter of clicking back and forth any time something peaks my interest. A dangerous rabbit hole to go down when I should be doing something more productive....


For some reason the filter threw away my link, the name of the magazine is Shindig!
 
2013-03-21 05:56:26 PM
rhiannon is right. Just random songs. Nothing to do with prog rock. If I am incorrect, however, then we need a new genre where to put the Moody Blues, because as far as I'm concerned I thought they pretty much were prog rock incarnate.
 
2013-03-21 06:23:44 PM

FeedTheCollapse: Killer Cars: karmaceutical: The Doors but no Velvet Underground?

I have no earthly idea how VU's debut album isn't on the list. I realize 1967 was a pretty loaded year for great albums, but you can easily make the case Lou Reed and gang made the most influential and daring one of all.

Christ, a song like "Heroin" would've still been considered visionary if not released until 10 years later.

my guess is that TFA's definition of Prog Rock has more to do with Yes, ELP, King Crimson, etc. than any strain of Prog Rock VU would've influenced.


I SEE WHAT YOU DID THERE
 
2013-03-21 06:34:57 PM

Gordon Bennett: CaptSacto: Snotnose: I never heard of The Red Telephone, and I was 9 years old in 1967.   But yeah, as one who's first memories of music are Stairway to Heaven and School's Out, I'm ok with this list.

/ except I'd call it "songs that made music better"

I'd never heard of that one, either, and I was seriously into music in those days. Probably got lost in the Sgt. Pepper summer

Love are definitely an unfairly forgotten band. I wouldn't have known about them myself had The Damned not covered one of their songs:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nYVDN27CrOo


It makes me happy that people under 35 or so really don't understand why Love wasn't huge in the middle 60's, and a little sad that people over 45 still know exactly why.
 
2013-03-21 08:14:47 PM

MFAWG: a little sad that people over 45 still know exactly why.


it's sad we cannot explain it to them.
 
2013-03-21 11:01:44 PM
DjangoStonereaver: And I also truly believe that there has not been a musical prodigy of
Brian Wilson's calibre since Mozart, and that we will not see his like again for at least another century.


Oh please, Brian Wilson wrote pleasant pop music and for about 18 months while making Pet Sounds and SMiLE he had *IT*. You want a real prodigy, here's your kid:

media.web.britannica.com

Erich Wolfgang Korngold was born in 1897, and by the time he was 13, he had already written the music, in a lush late-romantic style, for a theater piece that was produced in Vienna. He was so talented so young that Mahler, Strauss, Puccini and others were amazed at what he was doing. He ended up writing a great opera, Die Tote Stadt, when he was 19-21 and some great orchestral pieces. He fled the Nazis and ended up helping invent film music after he settled in Hollywood (Toluca Lake, actually). His film scores are incredible, I especially love The Sea Wolf.

Brian Wilson, please.

/Love Pet Sounds and Good Vibrations and some of the BB's singles
 
2013-03-22 12:37:42 AM

Entity79: List fails. Where's The Nice? Or Zappa's King Kong? Or the Soft Machine?


Kind of surprised also to not see The Nice considering that Emerson was in ELP.  I picked up a Nice album about 15 years ago just because I saw Emerson's name on it.  I was such a bizarre album.  A song would start out as 60's bubble gum pop until the keyboard solo, then it would turn into some epic classical thing and then go back to the pop for the ending.  It was just all over the place stylistically.  Interesting to listen to though.  Here's a link to one of their songs if anyone's interested.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Lo7Ru9dLP_o
 
2013-03-22 01:52:43 AM

MFAWG: Gordon Bennett: CaptSacto: Snotnose: I never heard of The Red Telephone, and I was 9 years old in 1967.   But yeah, as one who's first memories of music are Stairway to Heaven and School's Out, I'm ok with this list.

/ except I'd call it "songs that made music better"

I'd never heard of that one, either, and I was seriously into music in those days. Probably got lost in the Sgt. Pepper summer

Love are definitely an unfairly forgotten band. I wouldn't have known about them myself had The Damned not covered one of their songs:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nYVDN27CrOo

It makes me happy that people under 35 or so really don't understand why Love wasn't huge in the middle 60's, and a little sad that people over 45 still know exactly why.


I'm under 35, and I'm somewhat sure why they weren't  huge in the middle 60's..... they were a combination of catchy mainstream hooks and "out there" psychedelicism, suite-songs, etc. Too folky for the psych crowd, too psych for the folk crowd.

So, tell me what the over 45 people know......... "exactly why" did they not massively succeed?
 
2013-03-22 06:11:17 PM

Martstar: CruiserTwelve: CaptSacto: Snotnose: I never heard of The Red Telephone, and I was 9 years old in 1967.   But yeah, as one who's first memories of music are Stairway to Heaven and School's Out, I'm ok with this list.

/ except I'd call it "songs that made music better"

I'd never heard of that one, either, and I was seriously into music in those days. Probably got lost in the Sgt. Pepper summer

I third that. I was 16 in 1967 and listened to music constantly but I never heard of either the song or the band.

As someone born 11 years after 1967, I obviously didn't experience any of it the firs time around, but I've noticed this album has become something of a favorite forgotten gem among music geeks, and ironically one of the most "popular" obscure albums of the period, over the last maybe 5-10 years.

But it's no wonder a lot of stuff got lost in the shuffle back then.  I actually find myself digging deep into music of the late '60s and early '70s and finding lots of obscure bands that were still doing really good stuff.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i2NXyxDESm0

you might like this.
 
Displayed 45 of 95 comments

First | « | 1 | 2 | » | Last | Show all

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is archived, and closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »






Report