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(The Daily Beast)   The verdict is in: courting the hipster "creative class" only serves to improve the lives of hipsters themselves. Now if you'll excuse me, I have to be at the artisanal cheese chop in 26 minutes   (thedailybeast.com) divider line 35
    More: Interesting, Richard Florida, Joel Kotkin, Alec MacGillis, bike paths, metropolitan areas by population, Raleigh-Durham, mid-life crises, Jennifer Granholm  
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7227 clicks; posted to Main » on 20 Mar 2013 at 5:43 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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Archived thread
2013-03-20 04:46:22 PM
7 votes:
Look, we can make fun of hipsters all you want, and I frequently do, but lets not make fun of excellent cheese, ok?
2013-03-20 06:26:07 PM
3 votes:
Ferndale, Michigan is a good example of what can happen if you open a town to a certain demographic. A couple decades ago Ferndale was a stinky little corner of the Detroit Metro area. It was basically urban sprawl; Ugly, grey, and damned near lifeless. Cruddy-looking houses that weren't particularly well cared-for dotted the landscape, intermingled with some barely-surviving shops and restaurants and empty buildings.

A while back, a new Mayor of Ferndale made it publicly known that Ferndale welcomed the LGBT community with open arms. In a few short years, the houses all began to look better as they were improved by new residents, shops opened that catered to a higher income bracket and more artistic tastes, and businesses sprang up with Ferndale as their home address. The town suddenly looked better than it had in a long time. The people became friendlier. It ceased being urban sprawl and became more of a Detroit village with demographics somewhere between Hamtramk's middle-class urbanites and Royal Oak's upper class yuppie types. It became a nice(r) place to live.

The lower class folks began to move out, too. One suspects it was a homophobic response, because they didn't like living next to fabulous houses full of fabulous people, but whatever the case, the negative elements started to leave and were replaced by people who were, by and large, better educated and employed in higher-paying jobs or at least involved in intellectual or artistic pursuits.

I'm not sure how the place looks now, as the last time I was there was about 8 years ago, but I'm certain it has to be better than it was in the late 1980s and early 1990s, even if  this boom declined or slowed in recent years.

So the moral of the story: If you want to model your town around a certain demographic that is perceived to be "hip", don't aim for the hipsters because they're not a terribly productive segment of society. Aim for the LGBT community, because they tend to be hard-working, artistic, and intelligent, and they like their town to be nice.
2013-03-20 06:09:38 PM
3 votes:

spicorama: So did anyone actually read all that BS and care to summarize it for the rest of us?

/tldr


Liberals find to their surprise that their own version of supply-side economics works just as good as the conservative version.
2013-03-20 06:01:02 PM
3 votes:

spicorama: So did anyone actually read all that BS and care to summarize it for the rest of us?

/tldr


When the "creative class", as hipsters are referred to in the article, moves in and gentrifies an area, the cost of living skyrockets offsetting any other gains which would have been had. Furthermore, the creative class probably won't be convinced to move into your sh*tty rust-belt city just because you built a bike path.

/At least that's what it would have said if I'd read it. Collapsing wavefunctions is so mainstream.
2013-03-20 05:48:58 PM
3 votes:
come on, what did you expect? the guy's name is FLORIDA.
2013-03-20 07:25:44 PM
2 votes:
I think "hipster" has become the modern equivalent of "witch". If you dislike, or envy, or are made to feel vaguely inferior by someone, you just call them a "hipster".
Since, like "witch", it has no real-world criteria, you can't be rebutted easily, and you can feel better about yourself for a brief instant, until the world slaps you upside the head, once again, with the reality of what a pitiful, pathetic mediocrity you actually are.
Have a nice day! :)
2013-03-20 06:49:19 PM
2 votes:

Girion47: This is the same guy that wrote an article about how not having children means you hate America.


Citation needed.  Got a link?


fark this old dirt-bag and his anti-youth rants.   He's just pissed the younger generation has become more wise than his old selfish boomer ass.

And herein lies the problem with the younger generation.  Poor reading comprehension and an undeserved attitude of superiority.
2013-03-20 06:17:15 PM
2 votes:
I discovered one day that I liked the coffee from the cheerful little indie shop where everyone is friendly and the coffee is marked with which faraway land it came from better than Office Folgers.

I started to worry, thinking that I was turning into a hipster, and then I remembered how the cheerful little indie shop employees will also make you a nice sandwich if you forgot your lunch, remember your name and preferences, plus if you like the music that's playing, they'll tell you who it's by and from which album so you can get it, not scorn you into the middle of next week for not knowing it. So I went back and asked the barista.

"Chris," I said, because his name is Chris and we've discussed stuff before, "does coming here make me a hipster?"

"I don't think so," Chris replied. "I think everyone is a hipster of something. Even your tax accountant probably has opinions on which software and deductions are the best ones and biatches about how the Earned Income Tax Credit was cooler before everyone started claiming it." I laughed, because I could totally picture Bob the Tax Accountant saying exactly that. "This place is not so much a hipster establishment as a place where people come to be reassured of what, exactly, their hipster specification is and thus restore self-esteem."

"So if everyone is a hipster...I must not be that bad."

"I d'know, Spidey. Wearing a Steely Dan t-shirt after 1973 is pretty awful."

"But it goes with my Nyan Cat scarf."

"That's another thing. You own a Nyan Cat scarf, and I notice that your Chuck Taylors have Tetris blocks painted on them."

"...Which also go with the Nyan Cat scarf," I sighed, looking sadly at my Bag of Holding with the 20d on the zipper pull.

"You come here on days that you work, don't you? These are your office clothes."

"Yep," I agreed, feeling very sad.

"...I think you may actually not be a hipster. You have gone so far into hipster territory that it looped around into normal. Where do you even work?" I then gave him the business card of the tech-support place. "Oh. I see. You are actually a tremendous geek who uses hipster plumage to conceal your actual self. That makes you a Stealth Hipster."

"Is that better, then?"

"You're two Decemberists concert tickets away from actual coolness. Also, here is your coffee and sandwich."

"Thank you, Chris. I appreciate the identity alignment."

"De nada, Spidey. See you tomorrow."

And as I left, I heard Chris the Barista confirming to a nice lady with a baby-snuggly on that 'hipster mom' was a thing, and a cool thing indeed, but that if she drank espresso while breastfeeding the kid would be up all night and it was probably best to let the baby get knitted hats out of its' system now.

Hipsters, I think, are people whose health insurance doesn't cover actual therapy and who have resorted to baristas instead.
2013-03-20 06:06:03 PM
2 votes:
Yes if you city is shiatty already making it more hip is not going to help. BUT I think if you have a city that is already ok and has things like good colleges  and educated work force, doing this things will improve your city and make it a place people want to work and come to.

The idea of a city circling the drain can get out of it by giving to the arts, making hip districts etc., is stupid.

/Getting a kick of this because I live in "hipster capital"
2013-03-20 05:50:36 PM
2 votes:
So did anyone actually read all that BS and care to summarize it for the rest of us?

/tldr
2013-03-20 04:23:52 PM
2 votes:
That really needs the Ironic tag.
2013-03-21 12:09:02 AM
1 votes:
the main problem I see with all of this is the underlying assumption that all people who put on outward displays associated with the bohemian hipster stereotype are all creative people.  I highly doubt this is the case.  I'd wager that maybe 5% of those who would be judged based on appearance as "hipsters" are actually creative people.  The other 95% are imitators of the creative ones.  Some choose to be more subtle in their imitations, yet others choose to dress like 1890's prospectors - is that loose leaf chewing tobacco you've go in organic? - you bet.   Its sort of that SAT question - if some hipsters are creatives, and some normally dressed people are creatives as well, therefore all creative people are hipsters, like such as.  Its like they rule out all together the possibility of a person being creative and choosing to wear normal farking clothes...outrageous.

But I will grant them that at least some people who dress like hipsters are, in fact, creative.  They are creative about how they dress, which is all well and good.  But at a fundamental level it is pretty narcissistic and vain, so chasing these people around the country trying to get them to turn cities into utopias seems like it might be doomed right from the start.  But in the long run I think they had a reasonable idea - just based it on a fairly flawed assumption right out of the gates.  I'd much rather stuff like this be handled by sociologists than the vermin we put into congress these days.
2013-03-20 08:50:14 PM
1 votes:
I am now in the mood for an artisanal cheese & Charcuterie plate and a craft beer.
2013-03-20 08:13:37 PM
1 votes:

YouPeopleAreCrazy: SpiderQueenDemon: Hipsters, I think, are people whose health insurance doesn't cover actual therapy and who have resorted to baristas instead.

well. Now that we've changed the rules, that would be 'sucking off the parental paid health insurance teat up to the age of 26'


The cohort that got through school right before the up-to-26 rule change is probably worse off than the newbies coming up behind them. I have a classmate who's 40K in medical debt on top of her student loans because she got cancer at age 24, whereas her younger sister got tested just a year later, was covered under the rule change and paid off her treatment with her own HSA contributions. Being on one's folks' policy doesn't mean one doesn't pay for it, it just means one can work one's way up to a job with benefits without risking financial ruin or death in the starting-out phase. Even when I was on my folks' plan, I had Dad add up what I was costing in premiums and I either paid him and Mom in cash or came home on my days off to do extra chores around the house until it was 'paid off.' (Usually it was the latter, as I was really broke then, but Mom got all new kitchen cabinets, a tile floor and a really nice table I got from Craigslist and restored for her by hand.)

I'm 27 and have been off my parents' policy since age 23. Weeks after my birthday, I had a serious illness and wound up almost 20K in the hole. I couldn't afford that, so over the course of a year, I paid off my medical debt by taking debt collectors to small-claims court for infractions of the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act. I literally paid them all off with the proceeds from snarking on the ones who broke the law and said something actionable. (About 2/3rds of them did. If you ever get a call from a debt collector, RECORD IT. Trust me. It is ALWAYS in your best interests.)

This is what a broken system does to society. Some struggle through, others manage to avoid it by not having a problem until after a progressive fix or temporary-patch-job is put in place, and others find new, sometimes horrible ways to get by that may, in the end, turn them into genuinely awful people. I'm ridiculously litigious now and have developed an alarming habit of abusing loopholes and consciously winning people over to my side, even against their employers or families' opinion.

About 80% of one's success in small-claims court is based on appearing to be the most reasonable person in the room and being polite and friendly to overworked bureaucrats. Sticking up for a bureaucrat who was trying to process a lot of people's paperwork against a verbally abusive fellow citizen got me a friend for life and a lot of help at a particular courthouse, and I realized that just being nice, knowing the rules and sticking up for the people who A. need sticking up for and B. can be useful will get one whatever one wants in life.

I started applying this attitude to ALL my interactions, first with workers in the service industries and then to everyone, and damned if it doesn't pay off. I've gotten everything from comped drinks to special treatment to suggestions that I run for office from this behavior, and after awhile, I ran for, won, and served in a small, local office for a two-year term, then got my current job via the contacts I'd made there. I may be running for a more serious office soon, simply because people think I am nice and smart and they've asked me to.

The broken healthcare and debt-collection system turned me into a politician.

NOW do you want to fix it?! I was nice before the system got ahold of me, and now...well..

I have the horrible feeling I'm just clinging to my frivolous Nyan Cat scarf and Tetris-pattern Chucks to prevent anyone else taking me seriously enough to put me into a position that could have even more power over other people's lives. It used to be that I was nice for being nice's sake, but now I can feel the smile and the learning-people's-names starting to become a game where my personality and capabilities are building social capital for me to use. I'm aware of my own capacity to make people think I am worth following, and I find that I somehow can't turn it off, no matter how young I act or how stupid my clothes get, and it scares the hell out of me. I just want to be a twenty-something kid again, not 'the darling of the youth and senior voting bloc.' (I don't know why, but grandma-aged people liked me a lot more than my last opponent, who was my father's age.) I have no idea if I'm even technically a good person anymore, because while I'm trying to do good things, I'm also very aware that I am persuading people to do things they might not otherwise do and that's really an alarming power to have.

Is it any wonder letting a barista inform me that I am geeky and almost-cool makes me feel better? I'd go to a high school and let the popular kids tease me to feel normal, except that the school board has already pointed me out as a damn role model.

Oh, well. Time to get off the Internet and put my smile back on.
2013-03-20 08:09:50 PM
1 votes:
I work in RE development and study urban planning as a hobby. The problem with Florida's ideas was the whole "branding" concept of hipness versus working on the urban structures that attract the youth as well as businesses. He was right in a lot of ways - however, he seemed to confuse "creative" class with entrepeneurial class and really many of his ideas were far reaches from the get go.

Starting your own business in anything from a tech start up to a restaurant is a lot different than being an "artist" for a living. Starting your own business requires ease of transportation, location, affordability, etc. Attracting intelligent workers is more than having cool cafes and the arts, it is being near a good college to draw talent from. This is where Florida is wrong, wrong.

But so much in this article is complete BS:

 Between 2000 and 2010, notes demographer Wendell Cox, the urban core areas of the 51 largest metropolitan areas-within two miles of the city's center-added a total of 206,000 residents. But the surrounding rings, between two and five miles from the core, actually lost 272,000. In contrast to those small gains and losses, the suburban areas-between 10 and 20 miles from the center -experienced a growth of roughly 15 million people.

NYC alone gained over 200k people in the past 2 years ALONE. In the past 10 years, upscale suburban towns with no direct train lines in upscale counties such as Nassau and Bergen have seen elementary school enrollment (young couples with children) drop as much as 10%.  Cox's assertion is compete BS. The fact is, people are moving back into cities in droves because that is where the jobs are. And the suburbs that are maintaining their values the best are not the super high end suburbs necessarilly, but the ones with good schools and easy access to the city - and these suburbs also tend to be more "urban". Kolko's assertion is also supreme BS and using CHICAGO of all places as an example of people leaving the cities???? WTF? Chicago has seen over 35% increase in populations within 2 miles of city center over the past 10 years (btw he used the same study to dismiss rises in urban population the PARAGRAPH BEFORE) and added approx 10k people to the entire population in the past year alone. YES, the population was decreasing over the years but NOT in areas that had good transportation and were close to jobs (and sure as hell not in the city center) - they were losing populations in the more suburban neighborhoods.

Another problem with Florida's economic assertion is that he assume the "creative" class maintains its "hipness"  - when a hipster grows up, does he leave his new hip area? The article touches on this: When you have children, you often have to let go of your bohemian fantasies; it's hard to imagine being a parent in a place like San Francisco where there are a raging debates about the right of people to walk around naked. WTF is that BS? Yes, because no person has ever raised their child in SF or NYC or Portland or where ever else. Obviously its "hard to imagine" since this author obviously has no clue about urban living. The fact is, those areas that have maintained their value the best during the crash were areas where not only were there hip people but the neighborhood also could carry the elderly and families. Park Slope didn't fall badly, Williamsburg did.

Yes, Houston, Dallas, etc enjoyed high growth. Again, this is about jobs and not the creative classes and for that point the article is right. But I don't know anyone who moves to Dallas, Houston etc for lifestyle. They move there for jobs. Which is fine, I'm not bashing that. The article however makes the argument that due to this, "oh people are moving to the suburbs again!" because the population growth in Houston/Dallas/etc is centered upon the suburban. That's because all of the cities he listed are a sorry excuse for urban planning and perfect examples of crap sprawl - these are cities built around cars and they don't even have the option of urbanity unless you start from scrap. Land is cheap out there and zoning is terrible. You add that with people who don't have a problem with gas guzzling SUV's and 5000sf tacky McMansions and you end up with exurbs with an 2 hour commute to work. Really though, I don't blame the people of these cities to opt for suburban housing. Their cities are gawddamn awful.

We can argue for the pros and cons of gentrification and urban sprawl all day but this article is so FING self-selective, biased, useless, and the worst urban planning article I've ever seen.

The author uses one study (I'm familiar with most of his studies) to prove a point but he nitpicks his info and then refutes the whole point of the study in the next sentence.

I realize I'm rambling but I could write a gawddamn book refuting this article.
2013-03-20 07:48:52 PM
1 votes:

andychrist420: Girion47: andychrist420: GAT_00: andychrist420: Citation needed. Got a link?

How farking lazy do you have to be to not click on the author's name and see it's the second article on the page Mr. I Know Better Than You?

So I'm supposed to research your hyperbolic claim?  I'll concede the argument if you can produce a quote that he said, "if you don't have children, you hate America"  I'll wait.

Seriously, go to the article, the one I'm referring to is in the sidebar.

Or, you could post a link to back up your moronic claim, but I'm the lazy one.  You made an obviously exaggerated Claim which leads me to question the source.  All I asked for was a link. Ever heard of the concept of supporting one's argument?   And no, I don't want to go searching around a crappy website to find evidence of your claim.  I'll just keep believing you lack basic reading comprehension skills.


http://www.thedailybeast.com/newsweek/2013/02/18/why-the-choice-to- be-childless-is-bad-for-america.html
2013-03-20 07:34:46 PM
1 votes:

YouPeopleAreCrazy: meat0918: But fixing your own plumbing, minor house repairs? Hipsters got that covered (in glitter and using salvaged or reused parts a lot of time). That is THE hip thing right now, self-sustainability.

Yeah, they might reference a blog instead of a Chilton repair manual, but the point is do it yourself is a necessity for many younger folks, cause they're broke man. They're broke.

What I see in that space is 'lack of problem solving'. Any 'hands on' section of StackExchange is full of them.
"I am adding a room to my home, the contractor poured a concrete slab for the addition and it slopes toward the existing house and it is now raining and water is coming under my floors. Is the slope of the poured slab correct? "

WTF? No, that's not right, you fool.

"My bedroom has a very nice looking flush mounted ceiling light with a glass dome. However, all the bulbs have gone out and I cannot get the glass out to replace them."

WTF? Get a step ladder!

Seemingly simple problems are not solved, but begged for the solution. Yes, eventually they may fix the physical issue themselves. But good grief...how hard it it to figure out you need a step ladder if you are too short? Do you really need to ask that?


Selection bias is pretty easy to come across online, especially in those type of advice forums.  Problem solvers figure it out themselves and may never go online to post about their success(barring their inane Facebook post), but those people that are stumped jump online and ask a question that in the past they might ask their neighbor or I dunno, call the goddamn contractor.
2013-03-20 07:15:46 PM
1 votes:
Did anyone point out that hipsters suck?
2013-03-20 06:52:08 PM
1 votes:

EnglishMan: ZeroCorpse

One suspects it was a homophobic response, because they didn't like living next to fabulous houses full of fabulous people, but whatever the case, the negative elements started to leave and were replaced by people who were, by and large, better educated and employed in higher-paying jobs or at least involved in intellectual or artistic pursuits.

Or they were socially cleansed by rising costs of living which meant they had to move into an even more run-down location. But you know, come up with whatever lets you feel happy about poor people being forced to live in ghettos.


These were middle class and lower middle class white folks, mostly. I don't think the white folks moved to the ghettos. Most likely, they moved to Hamtramk. The poor people were in Detroit, and they've pretty much stayed there for the past 75 years.

But you know, come up with whatever lets you feel morally superior to strangers on the Internet.
2013-03-20 06:47:37 PM
1 votes:
ZeroCorpse

One suspects it was a homophobic response, because they didn't like living next to fabulous houses full of fabulous people, but whatever the case, the negative elements started to leave and were replaced by people who were, by and large, better educated and employed in higher-paying jobs or at least involved in intellectual or artistic pursuits.

Or they were socially cleansed by rising costs of living which meant they had to move into an even more run-down location. But you know, come up with whatever lets you feel happy about poor people being forced to live in ghettos.
2013-03-20 06:45:59 PM
1 votes:

HoratioGates: Notice how the author cites New York, then in the next paragraph leaves it out when he mentions the vanillaness of many of these cities, or that he sites the focus of money on the artistic class at the same time noting the increase in spending on the poor?  Or that he confuses correlation and causation?  Look, I hate hipsters almost as much as Cartman hates hippies, but rust belt cities were often built on their closeness to key resources.  If your coal runs out, your city may go to crap.  Ironically, the highway system may have doomed Detroit.  When you need the Great Lakes and rail to ship stuff, Detroit was great.  So was Buffalo.  What do they have now that you can't accomplish by road?  Cheap labor?  You can find that anywhere, and probably someplace sunnier.  Towns that are doing well?  They have international seaports, resources (oil), or great weather, or some combination of those things.  (Okay, Chicago sort of breaks those rules, but most cities follow those rules.)  If you don't have one of those things, you make up for it with a lot of social spending.


Chicago has a huge financial sector and is still a major stop for shipping good whether by rail or road or even via the Great Lakes.

The automobile built and destroyed Detroit.  First it brought the wealth, then it allowed an easy means to live in a nicer place while still working in the city itself.
2013-03-20 06:42:39 PM
1 votes:
Notice how the author cites New York, then in the next paragraph leaves it out when he mentions the vanillaness of many of these cities, or that he sites the focus of money on the artistic class at the same time noting the increase in spending on the poor?  Or that he confuses correlation and causation?  Look, I hate hipsters almost as much as Cartman hates hippies, but rust belt cities were often built on their closeness to key resources.  If your coal runs out, your city may go to crap.  Ironically, the highway system may have doomed Detroit.  When you need the Great Lakes and rail to ship stuff, Detroit was great.  So was Buffalo.  What do they have now that you can't accomplish by road?  Cheap labor?  You can find that anywhere, and probably someplace sunnier.  Towns that are doing well?  They have international seaports, resources (oil), or great weather, or some combination of those things.  (Okay, Chicago sort of breaks those rules, but most cities follow those rules.)  If you don't have one of those things, you make up for it with a lot of social spending.
2013-03-20 06:35:24 PM
1 votes:
Hipsters were supposed to save us? Who knew?
2013-03-20 06:25:05 PM
1 votes:

spicorama: So did anyone actually read all that BS and care to summarize it for the rest of us?

/tldr


"I'm a grumpy old Republican advocating suburban sprawl, low-wage jobs and ironically overusing ironic quotes to refer to hipsters."
2013-03-20 06:15:12 PM
1 votes:

spicorama: So did anyone actually read all that BS and care to summarize it for the rest of us?

/tldr


Trickle down economic theory of a Hipster-based economy (one where everyone is creative, an individual, and paid a lot for doing almost nothing) doesn't work as originally thought, due to the cost of living increases and having to pay a lot for "unique" goods and "unique" services in these areas.  This was compared to the trickle down economic theory of a MegaCorp-based economy, where you don't make as much money as an employee, but your cost of living is relatively less because the goods and services are megacorped.
2013-03-20 06:07:48 PM
1 votes:
A whole community of people who reject mass produced products and prefer small independent shops and used goods? Yea fark those guys. In America we buy cheap crap from China and we like it.
2013-03-20 06:06:53 PM
1 votes:
Isn't this just a rant about gentrification in general?

Especially this part -"The rewards of the "creative class" strategy, he notes, "flow disproportionately to more highly-skilled knowledge, professional and creative workers," since the wage increases that blue-collar and lower-skilled workers see "disappear when their higher housing costs are taken into account."  "
2013-03-20 06:06:13 PM
1 votes:

spicorama: So did anyone actually read all that BS and care to summarize it for the rest of us?

/tldr


Spending money to accommodate the "creative class" only helps them.

And he would be right if the money was tax breaks for fixie shops, or free parking for ironic mustaches.  But what he actually chose to call out (bike paths, open to gays etc) does benefit everyone.
2013-03-20 06:05:30 PM
1 votes:

poorjon: spicorama: So did anyone actually read all that BS and care to summarize it for the rest of us?

/tldr

When the "creative class", as hipsters are referred to in the article, moves in and gentrifies an area, the cost of living skyrockets offsetting any other gains which would have been had. Furthermore, the creative class probably won't be convinced to move into your sh*tty rust-belt city just because you built a bike path.

/At least that's what it would have said if I'd read it. Collapsing wavefunctions is so mainstream.


You forgot to mention the parental subsidies.  It's one of the few wealth transfers from old to young.
2013-03-20 05:58:21 PM
1 votes:

spicorama: So did anyone actually read all that BS and care to summarize it for the rest of us?

/tldr


No.  It got too long-winded.
2013-03-20 05:48:56 PM
1 votes:

Spiralmonkey: What constitutes an artisanal cheese chop?  Do they use hand made guillotines lubricated with the armpit secretions of 80 year old French nuns?  Is it somewhere you can take your own home-made caboc and they'll cut it into daisy-shaped rounds that fit exactly onto your hand-pressed oatcakes seasoned with lavender?  Do they make motorbikes out of matured Wensleydale?


Actually, in my experience, they seem to be utterly bereft of any cheese at all.
2013-03-20 05:48:24 PM
1 votes:
Couldn't be bothered reading this.  Or rather could care less.  Rather hear about lesbian jello wrestlers.
2013-03-20 05:48:09 PM
1 votes:

Spiralmonkey: What constitutes an artisanal cheese chop?  Do they use hand made guillotines lubricated with the armpit secretions of 80 year old French nuns?  Is it somewhere you can take your own home-made caboc and they'll cut it into daisy-shaped rounds that fit exactly onto your hand-pressed oatcakes seasoned with lavender?  Do they make motorbikes out of matured Wensleydale?


A true hipster cheese shop doesn't sell cheese.
2013-03-20 04:46:10 PM
1 votes:
yeah, because SF became a bastion of the creative workforce over night.
2013-03-20 04:35:32 PM
1 votes:
Artisanal Snake Oil Salesman.
 
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