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(Sports Illustrated)   If the courts rule that the B1G must share television revenue with student athletes, commissioner Jim Delany warns that the league could drop down to Division III instead. Who doesn't want to see Baldwin-Wallace at the Horseshoe?   (sportsillustrated.cnn.com) divider line 52
    More: Stupid, Jim Delany, B1G, Ed O'Bannon, student athlete, Big Ten Network, Tom Izzo, DeLoss Dodds, athletic scholarships  
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1248 clicks; posted to Sports » on 19 Mar 2013 at 12:33 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-03-21 12:15:53 AM  

A Fark Handle: skrame: That means those areas boast more cable subscribers who, Big Ten leaders hope, will soon have to pay more than $1 a month to their cable or satellite provider for the Big Ten Network -- whether they actually want that programming or not.

This is bullshiat. And that's all I have to say about that.

it might be bullshiat, but it's the entire reason maryland and rutgers were added to the conference.  and if you're upset about that dollar, you're going to be really pissed when you learn that espn (and that's just espn, not espn2, espnu, or the ocho) is costing you over $5 a month on your basic cable bill.


I'm upset that I pay $13 a month for stations that are broadcast over the air, because Comcast internet service was cheaper if I bundled the OTA stations with my service. I don't even get any "cable" channels.
 
2013-03-21 02:40:26 PM  

cleveralthere: 2 sides of the coin here. 1) Many of the players are compensated for their efforts in the form of a full scholarship to an institute of higher learning, many of them flagship state programs or well respected private institututions.  You would have to be very foolish not to take advantage of that opportunity (which sadly, many players are).  2)  The amount that the players are compensated vs the amount of revenue generated by their activity is orders of magnitude lower than they would be paid at the professional level.  It particularly bothers me that coaches at the NCAA level make millions of dollars while the players are only getting room bored and tuition.

draw your own conclusions


student athletes get a lot more than that, especially if they are in the basketball or football programs.
On top of tuition and fees and housing costs covered, they get things like unlimited meal plans, often times with private cafeterias with special food menus, sometimes catered to each individuals dietary plan as set up by team trainers and dietitians. Free one on one tutoring whenever they want it, weekly doctor visits, and generally more access to university resources than normal students. Oh, and lets not forget the cash they already get, upwards of $2,500 a semester to do what they please with.
With everything they are given in exchange for their playing a sport, there is no reason for these people to not get a 4 year degree. When everything is totaled up, and depending on the school, these poor disadvantaged students can get upwards of $100,000 per year in tangible benefits from their school.
 
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