If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(The Eagle Tribune)   Island residents trying to protect houses from ocean decide it is better to ask forgiveness than permission   (eagletribune.com) divider line 43
    More: Obvious, state Department of Environmental Protection, construction workers  
•       •       •

10886 clicks; posted to Main » on 19 Mar 2013 at 10:39 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



43 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

Archived thread
 
2013-03-19 09:57:21 AM  
Having watched the saga on the local news lately, the main thing I've taken away from all of this is, I wish I had the money to waste on these houses these fools have.
 
2013-03-19 10:44:14 AM  
Poseidon is not known for his forgiveness.
 
2013-03-19 10:44:37 AM  
My family has a house on Topsail in NC and man if you so much as even glance at a sand dune the wrong way someone is going to fine you. I couldn't imagine what the penalty for running a bucket on the beach would be.

That said, I suspect there is actually a lack of dunes in this location hence all the hastily constructed rock walls.
 
2013-03-19 10:46:36 AM  
FTFA:  "They haven't gotten permission," said Ed Coletta, a spokesman for DEP. "The homeowners are concerned about their properties and we aren't going to stop work from going on.  "When the storms are over for the year, we will be coming out to review what has been done. If the structures aren't in accord with regulations, they might have to take the walls down."

A reasonable, logical decision from the bureaucracy?  Color me shocked, SHOCKED!
 
2013-03-19 10:47:11 AM  
Eh, some of them will have been inherited; places that close, or actually IN, a seaside nature reserve don't come on the market often.

So I can see spending some dough to try to save them.
 
2013-03-19 10:47:54 AM  

GoldSpider: FTFA:  "They haven't gotten permission," said Ed Coletta, a spokesman for DEP. "The homeowners are concerned about their properties and we aren't going to stop work from going on.  "When the storms are over for the year, we will be coming out to review what has been done. If the structures aren't in accord with regulations, they might have to take the walls down."

A reasonable, logical decision from the bureaucracy?  Color me shocked, SHOCKED!


Yeah I'm pretty sure someone higher up will read that guy the riot act pretty soon but it was a shockingly candid and logical response.
 
2013-03-19 10:51:35 AM  

Fizpez: GoldSpider: FTFA:  "They haven't gotten permission," said Ed Coletta, a spokesman for DEP. "The homeowners are concerned about their properties and we aren't going to stop work from going on.  "When the storms are over for the year, we will be coming out to review what has been done. If the structures aren't in accord with regulations, they might have to take the walls down."

A reasonable, logical decision from the bureaucracy?  Color me shocked, SHOCKED!

Yeah I'm pretty sure someone higher up will read that guy the riot act pretty soon but it was a shockingly candid and logical response.


I'm surprised someone hasn't been sued over this.  in our society we sue for any or no reason at all.
 
2013-03-19 10:51:50 AM  
Mother nature still unimpressed.
 
2013-03-19 10:54:05 AM  
Federal government intervention in 5,4,3,2, .....
 
2013-03-19 11:03:17 AM  
The rocks they're using look awfully small compared to the seawall boulders found a couple of miles up the coast in New Hampshire.  Looking at photos of recent storms in that area, I can imagine some of those rocks becoming part of God's own sandblaster and doing a lot of damage to anything in their path.

farm7.staticflickr.com
 
2013-03-19 11:11:22 AM  
Anthrax Island? Shouldn't there be SWAT teams watching over people playing in the surf?
 
2013-03-19 11:13:23 AM  
Dumbasses, you built on the beach, beaches erode over time, quit farking with the environment at the detriment of others so you can feel smug about where you live.
 
2013-03-19 11:14:05 AM  
By Dyke Hendrickson

Seriously, where do they find people with names like this to write these articles?
 
2013-03-19 11:14:59 AM  

A Shambling Mound: My family has a house on Topsail in NC and man if you so much as even glance at a sand dune the wrong way someone is going to fine you. I couldn't imagine what the penalty for running a bucket on the beach would be.

That said, I suspect there is actually a lack of dunes in this location hence all the hastily constructed rock walls.


There's nothing, and I mean that almost literally.  The high tide line in regular weather is about 100 feet from the houses, which are about 10-15 feet above that mark.  Nobody does anything in Massachusetts to defer beach erosion anymore, mostly because of "environmental concerns." Which usually means that there's shore plovers in the area and you can't possibly fark with their nesting spots or else.

Personally, I live in a town which doesn't have that problem; we just have a road that's got about a quarter mile missing because it washed out almost 2 years ago during Irene and the town can't afford to fix it right.  (Mostly because of rich assholes and idiot farmers who refuse to raise taxes despite them being ridiculously low and there being almost no outside business in the town.  But I digress.)
 
2013-03-19 11:15:03 AM  
"symmetrical stone walls have been created at the high tide mark from about the center groin to the south end of Fordham Way "

What's a center groin? Maybe it's a common term amongst "beach people" but I've never heard it used this way. There is a joke in there somewhere but I can't come up with it.
 
2013-03-19 11:19:50 AM  
Meh, rich white folks problems.


likely bankers - trying but just can't get Care to come to a boil today- too bad.
 
2013-03-19 11:22:09 AM  
You know, it annoys me when news websites assume that everyone everywhere on the internet knows their local geography.  Would it kill them to put the name of the state in the byline, or possibly the hometown (city, state) of the newspaper under their logo?
 
2013-03-19 11:23:53 AM  
Back East, bridges usually disappear on Halloween when jokers set them on fire.

This article reminds me of the First Runner-Up in the World' Funniest Joke Contest held in the UK in 2003.

Here it is, from Wikipedia:


Sherlock Holmes and Dr Watson were going camping. They pitched their tent under the stars and went to sleep. Sometime in the middle of the night Holmes woke Watson up and said: "Watson, look up at the sky, and tell me what you see." Watson replied: "I see millions and millions of stars." Holmes said: "And what do you deduce from that?" Watson replied: "Well, if there are millions of stars, and if even a few of those have planets, it's quite likely there are some planets like Earth out there. And if there are a few planets like Earth out there, there might also be life." And Holmes said: "Watson, you idiot, it means that somebody stole our tent."


Love that joke.


Then again I love the world's stupidest joke:


Q. What's brown and sounds like a bell?


A. Dung!
 
2013-03-19 11:24:52 AM  

FriarReb98: A Shambling Mound: My family has a house on Topsail in NC and man if you so much as even glance at a sand dune the wrong way someone is going to fine you. I couldn't imagine what the penalty for running a bucket on the beach would be.

That said, I suspect there is actually a lack of dunes in this location hence all the hastily constructed rock walls.

There's nothing, and I mean that almost literally.  The high tide line in regular weather is about 100 feet from the houses, which are about 10-15 feet above that mark.  Nobody does anything in Massachusetts to defer beach erosion anymore, mostly because of "environmental concerns." Which usually means that there's shore plovers in the area and you can't possibly fark with their nesting spots or else.


Plovers are a different issue, and it's not even nesting season.  The problem here is, you CAN'T just put up a seawall or jetty without screwing someone else; google "longshore transport".
 
2013-03-19 11:27:23 AM  
Government always knows what's best. YOU don't.
 
2013-03-19 11:31:20 AM  

Ima_Lurker: You know, it annoys me when news websites assume that everyone everywhere on the internet knows their local geography.  Would it kill them to put the name of the state in the byline, or possibly the hometown (city, state) of the newspaper under their logo?


It's a local paper. Are you also upset that the local businesses that advertise there are irrelevant to you?

/you are not their target audience
 
2013-03-19 11:38:26 AM  
Asshats should not build on the beach.
 
2013-03-19 11:42:51 AM  
Plum Island is not the "nature reserve" is it made out to be.  It is an overbuilt sand bar that is destined to return to the sea.
 
2013-03-19 11:43:16 AM  

Ima_Lurker: You know, it annoys me when news websites assume that everyone everywhere on the internet knows their local geography.  Would it kill them to put the name of the state in the byline, or possibly the hometown (city, state) of the newspaper under their logo?


I've expressed this pet peeve myself many times. There are an enormous number of small newspapers in the US (in particular) and it would be most helpful if they at least had the name of the state and county in their banner. The US has over 3,600 counties IIRC. I like to know which county and state weird shiat happens in.

I know there's a Woodstock in Ontario, New Brunswick, New York, Connecticut, and Virginia. They are all named for one of several Woodstocks in the UK.

I took a long distance call once from a truck driver calling from one Woodstock who was confused: "Was I supposed to go to Woodstock (name of state) or Woodstock (name of another state)?"

He and his load were in the wrong town. Such mistakes can be costly. Especially since a lot of these truck drivers are small businessmen who own their own trucks and pay their costs out of pocket rather than having costs paid by the company which employs them

Disambiguate, pay-pul!

Oh, by the way. The Sears in Woodstock, New Brunswick, Canada, burned down this morning at 4:00 a.m.

There are (Wikipedia:   http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Woodstock_(disambiguation) at least three Woodstocks in Australia, three in the UK, one in New Zealand, and sixteen in the USA.

Without clarity, you end up with tourists accidentally going to Sydney, Nova Scotia, which is a dump because of the old coal mine tar ponds. It has happened. God preserve them all.

"The single biggest problem in communication is the illusion that it has taken place."
-- George Bernard Shaw
 
2013-03-19 11:45:15 AM  
I have zero sympathy for idiots who build/buy a house on a beach or along the banks of a river and then act surprised when Mother Nature takes back what's hers.
 
2013-03-19 11:47:34 AM  
YOU CAN'T STOP EROSION YOU FOOLS, AHAHAAHHHAHAAAHHHAHAAHA
 
2013-03-19 11:47:48 AM  
Mmmmmm. Rich, white, FAT people with fava beans and Chianti.  Will help Agent Starling with finding Buffalo Bill.

sexysassysorted.com
 
2013-03-19 11:52:38 AM  

AndreMA: Ima_Lurker: You know, it annoys me when news websites assume that everyone everywhere on the internet knows their local geography.  Would it kill them to put the name of the state in the byline, or possibly the hometown (city, state) of the newspaper under their logo?

It's a local paper. Are you also upset that the local businesses that advertise there are irrelevant to you?

/you are not their target audience


Annoyed, yes.  Upset, no.  Seems to me that back in the day when newspapers were actually physical things printed on paper that they would be proud of where they are from and list their hometown just below the name of the paper.  Now if they bother to tell you at all they put it in small print at the bottom of their website.  At least this website still uses by-lines so I have a chance to google and find out where they are talking about.
 
2013-03-19 11:54:40 AM  

Snort: Plum Island is not the "nature reserve" is it made out to be.  It is an overbuilt sand bar that is destined to return to the sea.


So is Jupiter Island, Florida. Expect your tax dollars to be put to work when it is threatened by the sea. It's worth over a billion dollars because it is the getaway of such notables as the Bush family and other millionaires. There is a small town with middle class residents at one end of the sand bar, but it is mostly private estates of the super-rich.

I always think of it when I think of President Bush 43's response to global warming--hey, we can always build sea walls to preserve the estates of the rich and near rich.

In other words, Bangladesh with its 70-140 million people in peril of the sea, can go fark itself. We'll look after Our Tribe, cost what it may, but poor people should be ready to swim or run to safety.

All of Florida is sandbar except for the place where it attaches to the continent. If the world's entire ice caps go, the highest point of land is something under 150 feet and would be washed away. Mind you, it'll take centuries for that to happen even if we trigger all of the feedback loops from thermal expansion of the oceans to the melting of the permafrost and the demise of the rainforests and corals.

It's a long shot, but Florida-haters can cross their fingers and pray to all their gods and goddesses if they've got them.

In the mean time, there is one weight and one measure for the poor and middle-classes, another for the upper-middles and the rich.

I saw a great graphic showing which cities we would lose at various sea level rises from under one meter to over 700 meters. From Alexandria, Egypt, and Venice, Italy (not to mention New Orleans, much of which is below sea level now), to cities such as St. Petersberg and London, there is a lot of the coast at risk, and it would cost more hundreds of billions to shore it up than giving up gasoline would cost now.

But politicians are not held responsible for future risks--only their term of office.

But you may be sure that Jupiter Island will not drown, even if it kills you. You specifically.
 
2013-03-19 11:55:24 AM  

bloatboy: Anthrax Island? Shouldn't there be SWAT teams watching over people playing in the surf?


There's more than one Plum Island. This is the other one.
 
2013-03-19 11:59:48 AM  

bloatboy: Anthrax Island? Shouldn't there be SWAT teams watching over people playing in the surf?


Damn.  Missed it by thaaaaaat much.

/I can smell your coont.
 
2013-03-19 12:00:27 PM  

Tillmaster: bloatboy: Anthrax Island? Shouldn't there be SWAT teams watching over people playing in the surf?

There's more than one Plum Island. This is the other one.


Kind of the point I was making.  There is even more than one paper in this country called "Eagle Tribune" as unique as that name seems to me: http://www.eagletribunenews.com/

/There is even a Tribune Eagle - http://www.wyomingnews.com/
 
2013-03-19 12:06:37 PM  

ReapTheChaos: I have zero sympathy for idiots who build/buy a house on a beach or along the banks of a river and then act surprised when Mother Nature takes back what's hers.


Can't find an image, but the Stamper House in Sometimes a Great Notion would like words with you.
 
2013-03-19 12:17:27 PM  

PunGent: FriarReb98: A Shambling Mound: My family has a house on Topsail in NC and man if you so much as even glance at a sand dune the wrong way someone is going to fine you. I couldn't imagine what the penalty for running a bucket on the beach would be.

That said, I suspect there is actually a lack of dunes in this location hence all the hastily constructed rock walls.

There's nothing, and I mean that almost literally.  The high tide line in regular weather is about 100 feet from the houses, which are about 10-15 feet above that mark.  Nobody does anything in Massachusetts to defer beach erosion anymore, mostly because of "environmental concerns." Which usually means that there's shore plovers in the area and you can't possibly fark with their nesting spots or else.

Plovers are a different issue, and it's not even nesting season.  The problem here is, you CAN'T just put up a seawall or jetty without screwing someone else; google "longshore transport".


Assateague Island Virginia/Maryland.

Ocean City Maryland is at the northern most tip of that island.

Several decades ago a hurricane cut the island off from the city. The residents od the city saw that this was a rather convenient problem because the new channel allowed for boaters on the bay side to get to the seaside easier. So they erected a sea wall to keep sand from filling the hole back up.

Result:

The sea wall created a new divergent current going down the shore. Now, the northern tip of Assateague island is sand starved and is "drifting" towards the mainland. Meanwhile, the southern tip of the island is getting all the sand and Toms Cove is turning into a lagoon.
The old coast guard life saving station down there has been useless for years.
 
2013-03-19 12:32:21 PM  

brantgoose: Snort: Plum Island is not the "nature reserve" is it made out to be.  It is an overbuilt sand bar that is destined to return to the sea.

So is Jupiter Island, Florida. Expect your tax dollars to be put to work when it is threatened by the sea. It's worth over a billion dollars because it is the getaway of such notables as the Bush family and other millionaires. There is a small town with middle class residents at one end of the sand bar, but it is mostly private estates of the super-rich.

I always think of it when I think of President Bush 43's response to global warming--hey, we can always build sea walls to preserve the estates of the rich and near rich.

In other words, Bangladesh with its 70-140 million people in peril of the sea, can go fark itself. We'll look after Our Tribe, cost what it may, but poor people should be ready to swim or run to safety.

All of Florida is sandbar except for the place where it attaches to the continent. If the world's entire ice caps go, the highest point of land is something under 150 feet and would be washed away. Mind you, it'll take centuries for that to happen even if we trigger all of the feedback loops from thermal expansion of the oceans to the melting of the permafrost and the demise of the rainforests and corals.

It's a long shot, but Florida-haters can cross their fingers and pray to all their gods and goddesses if they've got them.

In the mean time, there is one weight and one measure for the poor and middle-classes, another for the upper-middles and the rich.

I saw a great graphic showing which cities we would lose at various sea level rises from under one meter to over 700 meters. From Alexandria, Egypt, and Venice, Italy (not to mention New Orleans, much of which is below sea level now), to cities such as St. Petersberg and London, there is a lot of the coast at risk, and it would cost more hundreds of billions to shore it up than giving up gasoline would cost now.

But politicians are not held responsible for future risks--only their term of office.

But you may be sure that Jupiter Island will not drown, even if it kills you. You specifically.


I thought I read--and double-checked the math--that should the ice caps melt, MSL would rise about two meters. Which is still cause for concern, but a far cry from the ~50 meters you suggest. From whence comes that figure?
 
2013-03-19 12:51:36 PM  

AndreMA: Ima_Lurker: You know, it annoys me when news websites assume that everyone everywhere on the internet knows their local geography.  Would it kill them to put the name of the state in the byline, or possibly the hometown (city, state) of the newspaper under their logo?

It's a local paper. Are you also upset that the local businesses that advertise there are irrelevant to you?

/you are not their target audience


OP was correct, and you are an arrogant asshat.  We are their target audience, us, here, FARK, the internet.  Don't be daft ass well.  They put a site up on the internet. So they could get a wider audience.  They could have taken 5 seconds and actually made that audience welcome.  They failed to do so a their own peril.

You just expect them to fail because so many local newspapers are actually a joke that is far past it's funny stage.  That is, however, not a good reason to do things badly.  Nor should doing things badly ever be excepted without (at least) comment.
 
2013-03-19 12:55:42 PM  

TheOtherMisterP: "symmetrical stone walls have been created at the high tide mark from about the center groin to the south end of Fordham Way "

What's a center groin? Maybe it's a common term amongst "beach people" but I've never heard it used this way. There is a joke in there somewhere but I can't come up with it.


A groin is a structure built (usually) perpendicular to the shore that is designed to capture sand and prevent the nominal sand transport parallel along a beach front. They are often used in numbers over the distance that is trying to be protected.

This is not to be confused with a jetty. A similar looking structure (usually longer than a typical groin) that is designed to block sand transport from encroaching and depositing in a marine pathway. Jetties may be built singularly or in pairs depending on the local currents and any seasonal variation.
 
2013-03-19 01:13:50 PM  
I'll bet native Americans weren't dumb enough to build large buildings on the beach.
 
2013-03-19 02:11:34 PM  
Well, it IS Rule 18 for a reason...
 
2013-03-19 02:43:14 PM  

wambu: Asshats should not build on the beach.


80% of all mankind live within 60 miles of the ocean. 3/4 of all major cities are coastal.
 
2013-03-19 03:47:47 PM  

eggrolls: wambu: Asshats should not build on the beach.

80% of all mankind live within 60 miles of the ocean. 3/4 of all major cities are coastal.


Yes, but only stupid people build right at the waters's edge and don't expect the sea to encroach.
 
2013-03-19 04:35:45 PM  

eggrolls: 80% of all mankind live within 60 miles of the ocean.


By the same token, most of the Cascades are within 60 miles of the ocean. You can get high, fast.
 
2013-03-19 07:53:26 PM  

McGrits: A groin is a structure built (usually) perpendicular to the shore that is designed to capture sand and prevent the nominal sand transport parallel along a beach front. They are often used in numbers over the distance that is trying to be protected.


Aren't they "groynes" there? We have groins on our beachs, but they are normally hidden by lycra, and those which aren't should be.
 
Displayed 43 of 43 comments

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is archived, and closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »
On Twitter





In Other Media


  1. Links are submitted by members of the Fark community.

  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.

Report