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(Scientific American)   In the bourbon and whiskey business, the barrel is everything. That's why distillers are experimenting with new barrels and aging processes, including putting the barrels on a boat and letting them sail the seven seas for four years   (scientificamerican.com) divider line 112
    More: Cool, Makers, cellulose, low-pressures, straws, distillates, caramel  
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8058 clicks; posted to Main » on 19 Mar 2013 at 3:31 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-03-19 03:38:59 AM
1.bp.blogspot.com

YAARR, Me hearties! There be grog aplenty adrift in the drink. Swash yer buckles and grow some sea legs, there be plenty of booty for us all!
 
2013-03-19 03:39:21 AM
Trying to stave off the competition? harharharharhar
 
2013-03-19 03:39:53 AM
Where do I put in my resume to be "guy who drives a tugboat full of whiskey around the oceans". Because that sounds farking grand. I don't even drink, the booze would be safe with me!
 
2013-03-19 03:41:42 AM
I can't wait until the rum distiller's catch on to this and recreate the original Nelson's Blood small batch.

/if the seeaaaaa waaas whisky, and I was a diving duck...
//I'd swim to the bottom and I don't know if I'd come up
 
2013-03-19 03:45:43 AM
How cute, trying out one of the things that makes Norwegian akvavit so durn tasty.

http://www.norsk-akevitt.org/article.aspx?catID=1321&artID=3954
 
2013-03-19 03:49:18 AM
Side note for subby: "whiskey" is the term for any distilled beverage made (usually blended) from grain mash.  Bourbon is a type of whiskey.

You don't have to say "bourbon and whiskey", if you say "whiskey" by itself you convey the same information in fewer words.
 
2013-03-19 04:09:08 AM

Jim_Callahan: Side note for subby: "whiskey" is the term for any distilled beverage made (usually blended) from grain mash.  Bourbon is a type of whiskey.

You don't have to say "bourbon and whiskey", if you say "whiskey" by itself you convey the same information in fewer words.


Bourbon drinkers need things spelled out for them.
Whiskey drinkers don't like bourbon sullying their good name.

It's a win-win
 
2013-03-19 04:15:56 AM

AverageAmericanGuy: [1.bp.blogspot.com image 615x469]

YAARR, Me hearties! There be grog aplenty adrift in the drink. Swash yer buckles and grow some sea legs, there be plenty of booty for us all!


Done in one

/also where do I sign up?
 
2013-03-19 04:17:33 AM

WegianWarrior: How cute, trying out one of the things that makes Norwegian akvavit so durn tasty.

http://www.norsk-akevitt.org/article.aspx?catID=1321&artID=3954


Yep. Linie Aquavit is named after the tradition of sending oak barrels of akvavit on ships from Norway to Australia and back again, thereby passing the equator (Linie) twice before being bottled. http://www.linie.com/
 
2013-03-19 04:18:48 AM
People go to a lot of trouble to make yeast piss palatable.
 
2013-03-19 04:28:52 AM

Lenny_da_Hog: People go to a lot of trouble to make yeast piss palatable.


Indeed.

Well, back to enjoying my demucilaged, roasted, ground, brewed beverage.
 
2013-03-19 04:29:26 AM
And the next time you're going on about the ills of society I'm going to remind you that somebody is spending the time/money to do this instead of the time/money to help fix the problem...

And you're free to tell me to shut up because even though I don't drink this sounds like a grand idea... Then again I love experiments.
 
2013-03-19 04:31:57 AM

Delay: WegianWarrior: How cute, trying out one of the things that makes Norwegian akvavit so durn tasty.

http://www.norsk-akevitt.org/article.aspx?catID=1321&artID=3954

Yep. Linie Aquavit is named after the tradition of sending oak barrels of akvavit on ships from Norway to Australia and back again, thereby passing the equator (Linie) twice before being bottled. http://www.linie.com/


And aquavit is derived from the Latin 'Aqua Vitae' or 'Water of Life'. And, the word whisky is derived from the Gaelic version of the phrase 'Water of Life'.

It's all coming full circle now.

Or its just some random fact that's been stuck in my head for too many years.
 
2013-03-19 04:40:51 AM
It is another way of making drinkers a lot more drunk that usual. If Katy Perry and Rihanna drinks this, they would get so drunk they're gonna wish they were pornstars.
celeblowdown.com
 
2013-03-19 04:56:49 AM
IPW?
 
2013-03-19 05:16:34 AM
I like my Jack Daniels wood chips. They give things a nice flavor and they smell good even before you burn them.
 
2013-03-19 05:44:38 AM
A nice Boone's is good enough for me.
 
2013-03-19 06:09:42 AM
I'd like to take this opportunity to point out that commercial moonshine is improving.

/RIP Popcorn
 
GBB
2013-03-19 06:21:43 AM

Tobin_Lam: I like my Jack Daniels wood chips. They give things a nice flavor and they smell good even before you burn them.


Wood chips.... That give me an idea.  If they are looking for more surface area, why don't they use charred wood chips in the barrel?  Or perhaps peices of the staves floating around in there?
 
2013-03-19 06:29:08 AM

GBB: Tobin_Lam: I like my Jack Daniels wood chips. They give things a nice flavor and they smell good even before you burn them.

Wood chips.... That give me an idea.  If they are looking for more surface area, why don't they use charred wood chips in the barrel?  Or perhaps peices of the staves floating around in there?


According to the article, that's what Maker's Mark did, putting French oak staves inside American oak barrels for their 46 brand.

Also, bad subby: 1) nothing in the article about ships, and 2) that practice is only "new" if you think in geologic terms.
 
2013-03-19 06:48:27 AM

Jim_Callahan: Side note for subby: "whiskey" is the term for any distilled beverage made (usually blended) from grain mash.  Bourbon is a type of whiskey.

You don't have to say "bourbon and whiskey", if you say "whiskey" by itself you convey the same information in fewer words.


But if you want to really be inclusive, you should say "Whisky and whiskey".

Speaking of whisky, if anyone's interested, Compass Box is doing some cool stuff like this with their Scotch. Some of their products are downright fantastic, too.

3.bp.blogspot.com
 
2013-03-19 07:18:45 AM
Whisky and whiskey are fundamentally just "wood tea" made with vodak instead of water.
 
2013-03-19 07:20:33 AM

HotWingAgenda: I can't wait until the rum distiller's catch on to this and recreate the original Nelson's Blood small batch.

/if the seeaaaaa waaas whisky, and I was a diving duck...
//I'd swim to the bottom and I don't know if I'd come up


Came for Admiral Nelson, leaving drunk after tapping the keg paying my respects
 
2013-03-19 07:32:43 AM

TheWhoppah: Whisky and whiskey are fundamentally just "wood tea" made with vodak instead of water.


and vodka is just a mixture of ethanol, water an impurities. Your point being?
 
2013-03-19 07:36:18 AM

TheWhoppah: Whisky and whiskey are fundamentally just "wood tea" made with vodak instead of water.


Grain mash.  Vodka would be potatoes.  Also they're distilled and often blended, which is kind of the opposite of how tea works (tea goes from a concentrate to a dilute through its processing, whiskey goes the other way).

Also, on a similar note to my previous post, Whisky and Whiskey are just different transliterations of an old British Isles word for "water".  They aren't separate things and you can just write one or the other, like Hercules and Herakles when you're talking about Greek mythology.

//Aware that z-C already made the second point in the form of a joke, but some people are genuinely confused on the point and I'm feeling educational.
 
2013-03-19 07:39:11 AM
The liquid mingled with the wood, giving the bourbon it's color, taste and smell.

FFFFFFFFFFFFFUUUUUUUUUUUUU
 
2013-03-19 07:40:55 AM
SHUT UP AND TAKE MY MONEY
 
2013-03-19 08:10:48 AM

GBB: Tobin_Lam: I like my Jack Daniels wood chips. They give things a nice flavor and they smell good even before you burn them.

Wood chips.... That give me an idea.  If they are looking for more surface area, why don't they use charred wood chips in the barrel?  Or perhaps peices of the staves floating around in there?


Makers 46 does the staves floating in the barrel thing already.
 
2013-03-19 08:20:46 AM

GBB: Tobin_Lam: I like my Jack Daniels wood chips. They give things a nice flavor and they smell good even before you burn them.

Wood chips.... That give me an idea.  If they are looking for more surface area, why don't they use charred wood chips in the barrel?  Or perhaps peices of the staves floating around in there?


I have a friend who tried just that, some unaged 'moonshine' from the store in some mason jars with charred bits of hardwood for six months to a year.

It was drinkable, but the only non-alcohol flavor was the vanilla flavors from the wood. He thinks he charred the wood chunks too much.
 
2013-03-19 08:35:26 AM
www.ourcellar.com.au

last night's tipple
 
2013-03-19 08:49:34 AM
Damn foodie hipsters have invaded SciAm and are perverting science in the pursuit of their fleeting
hedonistic fancies.

In this case, though:  I'm all for it.
 
2013-03-19 08:53:17 AM

Zeno-25: GBB: Tobin_Lam: I like my Jack Daniels wood chips. They give things a nice flavor and they smell good even before you burn them.

Wood chips.... That give me an idea.  If they are looking for more surface area, why don't they use charred wood chips in the barrel?  Or perhaps peices of the staves floating around in there?

I have a friend who tried just that, some unaged 'moonshine' from the store in some mason jars with charred bits of hardwood for six months to a year.

It was drinkable, but the only non-alcohol flavor was the vanilla flavors from the wood. He thinks he charred the wood chunks too much.


Maybe filter before drinking.  Or was he in too much of a hurry since he couldn't wait the seven years.  Did also take into account that the brew isn't suppose to be in the light during the seven years either.  They maybe traditions, but they are traditions built on experimentation.
 
2013-03-19 08:54:14 AM

PunGent: Also, bad subby: 1) nothing in the article about ships,


Missed page 2?

For its Ocean-Aged Bourbon, Jefferson's Reserve placed several barrels on a 126-foot ship and let the casks cruise at sea for nearly four years. The increased oceanic air pressure (compared with its warehouse), along with the Panama Canal's extreme heat pushed the whiskey deeper inside the wood, causing the wood sugars to caramelize and add a rumlike black hue.

But really, sounds like a bunch of bullshiat.  We need a distillery in New Orleans so they can claim atmospheric pressures greater than measly sea-level oceanic ones!  I would suspect heat and motion the more likely case than small changes in pressure to get more distillate through the wood fibers
 
2013-03-19 08:57:11 AM

Z-clipped: Speaking of whisky, if anyone's interested, Compass Box is doing some cool stuff like this with their Scotch. Some of their products are downright fantastic, too.


Mmmm, yes. It's too bad the Scotch Whisky Association is such a bunch of stuck-in-the-muds. More than once they've nixed their novel aging techniques.

/finished off the last of my first-edition Spice Tree a couple months back
 
2013-03-19 08:57:59 AM

lack of warmth: Zeno-25: GBB: Tobin_Lam: I like my Jack Daniels wood chips. They give things a nice flavor and they smell good even before you burn them.

Wood chips.... That give me an idea.  If they are looking for more surface area, why don't they use charred wood chips in the barrel?  Or perhaps peices of the staves floating around in there?

I have a friend who tried just that, some unaged 'moonshine' from the store in some mason jars with charred bits of hardwood for six months to a year.

It was drinkable, but the only non-alcohol flavor was the vanilla flavors from the wood. He thinks he charred the wood chunks too much.

Maybe filter before drinking.  Or was he in too much of a hurry since he couldn't wait the seven years.  Did also take into account that the brew isn't suppose to be in the light during the seven years either.  They maybe traditions, but they are traditions built on experimentation.


My understanding was that distillers are already doing that for small, fast batches.  The idea was that you could get a similar flavor in less time by increasing the surface area of the wood.

Of course, there's certain chemical processes that still require the long years of aging, but it's a process dependent on speed.
 
2013-03-19 09:01:25 AM
I've had the ocean aged whiskey...

Look, I'm a bourbon fan, I have about 12 to choose from in my bar right now, I've done the Urban Bourbon Trail, and the Kentucky Bourbon Trail, I've been to tastings and done tours of distillers not on the "trail".


This stuff is foul, it's a blackish, cloudy color and the taste is the same.  Gimmicky bullshiat.

/I want some of the tornado-surviving stuff, I hear it is amazing.

http://whiskeyreviewer.com/2012/03/colonel-e-h-taylor-tornado-bourbo n- whiskey-review/
 
2013-03-19 09:06:28 AM
For those of you wanting to age your own bourbon further, or make your own out of White-dog, my friend from High School makes mini-barrels.    You can get all kinds of shiat engraved on them.

http://www.bluegrassbarrels.com/

or I guess you could do this.

www.i-byob.com
 
2013-03-19 09:11:22 AM

HotWingAgenda: I can't wait until the rum distiller's catch on to this and recreate the original Nelson's Blood small batch.

/if the seeaaaaa waaas whisky, and I was a diving duck...
//I'd swim to the bottom and I don't know if I'd come up


So long as it doesn't contain a dead body, I'm sure it will be fine.  That was the original original Nelson's Blood small batch.  The Battle of Trafalgar and stuff...
 
2013-03-19 09:15:37 AM

Fubegra: Z-clipped: Speaking of whisky, if anyone's interested, Compass Box is doing some cool stuff like this with their Scotch. Some of their products are downright fantastic, too.

Mmmm, yes. It's too bad the Scotch Whisky Association is such a bunch of stuck-in-the-muds. More than once they've nixed their novel aging techniques.

/finished off the last of my first-edition Spice Tree a couple months back


Man, when that stuff hit the market years ago, I bought a bottle and shelved it.  Then heard they were going to be shut down by the gov't, so I resolved not to touch it.   Then I saw that Spice Tree was back on the market, so "oh hell" and I opened it.  Didn't realize until I went to buy another bottle that the second batch was completely different.  *sad trombone*

Oh well, at least I had the pleasure of tasting that sweet spicy goodness.
 
2013-03-19 09:46:16 AM
There is a new distiller in Cleveland that has developed a process for rapid aging of bourbon.  They claim they can get the equivalent of 12 years of aging in 6 months.

I have a bottle of it, and it seems decent to me, but I'm not a bourbon connoisseur.  I haven't seen anyone do a blind taste test yet, which is the only thing I'd trust.

http://www.clevelandwhiskey.com
 
2013-03-19 10:05:11 AM
Can someone post a link to that company in Houston that makes small barrels?  I'm still curious, but can't find the site any more.
 
2013-03-19 10:11:08 AM

bourbonslurp: Can someone post a link to that company in Houston that makes small barrels?  I'm still curious, but can't find the site any more.


Never mind.  Found it.

deepsouthbarrels.com
 
2013-03-19 10:16:00 AM

Jim_Callahan: TheWhoppah: Whisky and whiskey are fundamentally just "wood tea" made with vodak instead of water.

Grain mash.  Vodka would be potatoes.  Also they're distilled and often blended, which is kind of the opposite of how tea works (tea goes from a concentrate to a dilute through its processing, whiskey goes the other way).


Vodka doesn't have to be made from a potato mash, and often isn't.

Also, I see what TheWhoppah is saying, which I think you missed.  The point is that the neutral spirit is absorbing its color and flavor from the charred wood - almost like a tea.
 
2013-03-19 10:19:52 AM

EponymousCowHerd: There is a new distiller in Cleveland that has developed a process for rapid aging of bourbon.  They claim they can get the equivalent of 12 years of aging in 6 months.


sounds like russian diamonds...
 
2013-03-19 10:21:53 AM

Girion47: For those of you wanting to age your own bourbon further, or make your own out of White-dog, my friend from High School makes mini-barrels.    You can get all kinds of shiat engraved on them.

http://www.bluegrassbarrels.com/

or I guess you could do this.

[www.i-byob.com image 400x400]


I've also had good experiences with these guys.  Their prices are a bit better, and they offer in a wider range of sizes.
 
2013-03-19 10:29:08 AM

EponymousCowHerd: There is a new distiller in Cleveland that has developed a process for rapid aging of bourbon.  They claim they can get the equivalent of 12 years of aging in 6 months.

I have a bottle of it, and it seems decent to me, but I'm not a bourbon connoisseur.  I haven't seen anyone do a blind taste test yet, which is the only thing I'd trust.

http://www.clevelandwhiskey.com


I have to say that that sounds about as delicious as imagining the "Steel Reserve" of whiskey. Just the name of the City taints all things that come from there. One envisions burning rivers, rampant pollution, organized crime and lots of rustbelt decay.

Really love Great Lakes Brewing Co. "Christmas Ale" though. Wonderful stuff.
 
2013-03-19 10:38:15 AM

wingnut396: PunGent: Also, bad subby: 1) nothing in the article about ships,

Missed page 2?

For its Ocean-Aged Bourbon, Jefferson's Reserve placed several barrels on a 126-foot ship and let the casks cruise at sea for nearly four years. The increased oceanic air pressure (compared with its warehouse), along with the Panama Canal's extreme heat pushed the whiskey deeper inside the wood, causing the wood sugars to caramelize and add a rumlike black hue.

But really, sounds like a bunch of bullshiat.  We need a distillery in New Orleans so they can claim atmospheric pressures greater than measly sea-level oceanic ones!  I would suspect heat and motion the more likely case than small changes in pressure to get more distillate through the wood fibers


My guess is it's mostly marketing, although back in sailing ship days, it may have sense to use whisky as ballast, since you had to carry SOMETHING down there...usually rocks.
 
2013-03-19 10:38:57 AM
I forgot the name but I saw a bottle of cognac that did this same thing. I actually had no idea that it actually did anything effective, I just assumed that it was some hokey gimmick.
 
2013-03-19 11:11:38 AM
Just tried some Kirkland brand 20year scotch whisky... Yeah don't laugh but it was quite good... Worth every penny..
 
2013-03-19 11:15:16 AM

taeodong: Just tried some Kirkland brand 20year scotch whisky... Yeah don't laugh but it was quite good... Worth every penny..


They sell that by the full cask at Costco then?
 
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