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(Slate)   Is fifty year-old whiskey better than twenty year-old whiskey? Depends on how desperate you are, I suppose   ( slate.com) divider line
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7930 clicks; posted to Main » on 18 Mar 2013 at 6:48 PM (4 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



131 Comments     (+0 »)
 
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2013-03-18 06:52:48 PM  
What about 0 year old whiskey?
Sterno strained through a cheesecloth,add a couple slugs of maple syrup.
 
2013-03-18 06:53:00 PM  
It's not. Older whiskey (bourbon, scotch, rye) is almost always less flavorful than the younger stuff when you get to a brand of decent quality. It's just marketing.
 
2013-03-18 06:53:17 PM  
Maybe only if it was in the barrel the extra 30 years?
 
2013-03-18 06:53:57 PM  

Forsythe P. Jones: What about 0 year old whiskey?
Sterno strained through a cheesecloth,add a couple slugs of maple syrup.


Strained? Luxury.
 
2013-03-18 06:55:25 PM  

Forsythe P. Jones: Sterno strained


Wanna know how I know you're not a Hobo?
 
2013-03-18 06:55:47 PM  
I like my whiskey like I like my women. Sixteen years old and mixed up with coke.
 
2013-03-18 06:56:12 PM  
Ive had 18 year old whisky and it was smooth as silk and no hangover
 
2013-03-18 06:58:02 PM  
All I know is that I'd need a loooooooot of whiskey before I'd start "sucking up wood goodies."
 
2013-03-18 07:00:51 PM  
Yes.
 
2013-03-18 07:01:03 PM  
NOT a whisky connoisseur, but had friends visit recently and we had some 10 year old whisky that I really enjoyed called Eagle Rare that was suggested by a co-worker....I would certainly recommend it.
 
2013-03-18 07:01:05 PM  
americanhooch.files.wordpress.com

If whiskey sits around for 20 years, someone isn't thirsty enough.
 
2013-03-18 07:05:31 PM  
If you like it, drink it.
 
2013-03-18 07:05:36 PM  
Cleaned out a liquor cabinet of an old couple's house...they had whiskey and bourbon dating to the early 60s.  I tried each one, and was really unimpressed...the bottles were cool but most brand names I didn't recognize...for all I know I was drinking the equivalent to the stuff on the bottom shelf in a plastic bottle...after 50 years who really remembers what was good or bad anyway?
 
2013-03-18 07:10:10 PM  

Forsythe P. Jones: What about 0 year old whiskey?
Sterno strained through a cheesecloth,add a couple slugs of maple syrup.


Don't you like your whiskey 'chewy'?
 
2013-03-18 07:10:12 PM  

Iron Felix: Cleaned out a liquor cabinet of an old couple's house...they had whiskey and bourbon dating to the early 60s.  I tried each one, and was really unimpressed..


Booze doesn't age in the bottles like wine. Booze "ages" in barrels that have been charred inside for maximum chemical exchange.

That's why whiskey and vodka, which are basically the same thing at the time of manufacture, are so radically different in color and flavor. Whiskey is aged in barrels which gives it the tannin coloration and the woody flavor, vodka is not.

Finding bottles from the 60's means nothing, as the liquor inside hasn't been in contact with wood.
 
2013-03-18 07:10:38 PM  
"It's kaleidoscopic," another assessed. "It tastes like cigar tobacco and leather ... and then caramel and spice ... and then I taste oak ... and then ... " And finally: "It's been almost 10 minutes and I'm still tasting it!"

If reality TV was worth a damn, we'd have a show dedicated to performing double-blind's on beer/whiskey/wine snobs, audiophiles, foodies, etc, with the sole purpose of making them look foolish.
 
2013-03-18 07:11:37 PM  
Just throw some distilled water, Everclear, and a piece of oak plank in a blender, blast away for a couple of min, filter, and voila!

All this use a barrel stuff is a crock of poop.
 
2013-03-18 07:12:15 PM  
the inverse is true about women.
 
2013-03-18 07:16:51 PM  

jayhawk88: "It's kaleidoscopic," another assessed. "It tastes like cigar tobacco and leather ... and then caramel and spice ... and then I taste oak ... and then ... " And finally: "It's been almost 10 minutes and I'm still tasting it!"

If reality TV was worth a damn, we'd have a show dedicated to performing double-blind's on beer/whiskey/wine snobs, audiophiles, foodies, etc, with the sole purpose of making them look foolish.


Mythbusters tried that in one episode with the filtering vodka thing. IIRC, the professional taster nailed it, even with the filters.

Seriously, I can taste the differences. I grew up with good wine in the house and learning to sip and actually taste my liquor. If you're doing shots, no, you're not going to notice much, because the burn is going to be so overwhelming. But if you take little sips and taste, it's not all that difficult to pick the good stuff from the bad. And a 3 year old blended scotch will most certainly stand out as far inferior to a 30 year old single malt. Old Crow and Blantons are not anywhere close to equal quality. It's not marketing, you're just jealous of crap you can't afford. I can't afford it either, but I don't try to delude myself into thinking that the cheap stuff I do drink is as good as the good stuff.
 
2013-03-18 07:17:47 PM  
There isn't anything active once it is bottled right?  I would imagine cask aging is different than a bottle sitting on a shelf for 20 years.  A buddy of mine collected some old bottles of rum from an estate... Bacardi from pre-Castro Cuba.  It was not good... but it still worked.
 
2013-03-18 07:19:55 PM  

karmaceutical: There isn't anything active once it is bottled right?  I would imagine cask aging is different than a bottle sitting on a shelf for 20 years.  A buddy of mine collected some old bottles of rum from an estate... Bacardi from pre-Castro Cuba.  It was not good... but it still worked.


It can get somewhat worse, but it's not like wine where it'll get better. TFA is talking about barrel aging, not sitting in a bottle.
 
2013-03-18 07:21:40 PM  

Fonaibung: It's not. Older whiskey (bourbon, scotch, rye) is almost always less flavorful than the younger stuff when you get to a brand of decent quality. It's just marketing.


As a drinker of Johnny Walker Blue Label I have to totally disagree with you.  I've had their black, gold, green, and blue labels, and the blue is a 10.
 
2013-03-18 07:25:16 PM  
<b>doglover:</b> I left out the 'Tussin?
 
2013-03-18 07:25:46 PM  

doglover: Iron Felix: Cleaned out a liquor cabinet of an old couple's house...they had whiskey and bourbon dating to the early 60s.  I tried each one, and was really unimpressed..

Booze doesn't age in the bottles like wine. Booze "ages" in barrels that have been charred inside for maximum chemical exchange.

That's why whiskey and vodka, which are basically the same thing at the time of manufacture, are so radically different in color and flavor. Whiskey is aged in barrels which gives it the tannin coloration and the woody flavor, vodka is not.

Finding bottles from the 60's means nothing, as the liquor inside hasn't been in contact with wood.


I did not know that.
 
2013-03-18 07:27:33 PM  
once ya pour in the mountain dew does it really matter?
 
2013-03-18 07:32:30 PM  

Forsythe P. Jones: <b>doglover:</b> I left out the 'Tussin?


No, you added "strain"

If you're a real hobo, you just use your fingers or a rusty spoon.

Iron Felix: I did not know that.


Yeah. Fermented beverages like wine have all kinds of chemicals in, as they're only 12-16% alcohol usually. So they can react to themselves, and usually have a colony of yeast still living inside. Their flavor changes over time because it's still reacting and if you let it go too long it becomes vinegar.

The distilled stuff is boiled to vapor and thus is almost pure concentrated ethanol, then diluted back down with water. There's very little in un-aged booze and it's all uniform. No reactions take place in the bottle. Placing in a cask, on the other hand, lets you get all kinds of chemistry going on, but slowly. So 20 year old whiskey is indeed radically different from 2 year old whiskey. But 18 and 20 might not change that much, even if the price does.

Beer I guess could be aged, buy why?
 
2013-03-18 07:33:04 PM  

jayhawk88: "It's kaleidoscopic," another assessed. "It tastes like cigar tobacco and leather ... and then caramel and spice ... and then I taste oak ... and then ... " And finally: "It's been almost 10 minutes and I'm still tasting it!"

If reality TV was worth a damn, we'd have a show dedicated to performing double-blind's on beer/whiskey/wine snobs, audiophiles, foodies, etc, with the sole purpose of making them look foolish.


It would cost a fortune to isolate everyone involved from the tsunami of bribes that brewers/distillers/vinters/ and audio equipment manufacturers would hurl at them.
Food would be much easier: get a bunch of diva chefs mean-drunk and they'll say they hate everything, spitting and cursing as they go.
 
2013-03-18 07:34:52 PM  
as the proud owner of a brand new charred oak barrel, I'm getting a kick, etc...
 
2013-03-18 07:36:06 PM  

Iron Felix: Cleaned out a liquor cabinet of an old couple's house...they had whiskey and bourbon dating to the early 60s.  I tried each one, and was really unimpressed...the bottles were cool but most brand names I didn't recognize...for all I know I was drinking the equivalent to the stuff on the bottom shelf in a plastic bottle...after 50 years who really remembers what was good or bad anyway?


Once it's been bottled the aging process stops.

I'll take 18 yr old scotch over 12 yr old any day, but both are great.
 
2013-03-18 07:37:26 PM  

WHISKEY THREAD!!!!

global3.memecdn.com

 
2013-03-18 07:37:49 PM  
Wednesday after next, I will be at the Craft Brewers Conference  in Washington DC on this boat:

encrypted-tbn1.gstatic.com

being schmooozed by the Westfavalia corporation where there will be a Bourbon/scotch/ whiskey/ rye tasting panel

that's good

there will also be Cigar pairings... But I just stopped smoking ciggerettes and I don't want to risk a relapse

that would be bad :(


Alright... off to make a whiskey sour...
 
2013-03-18 07:41:00 PM  

Cerebral Knievel: Wednesday after next, I will be at the Craft Brewers Conference  in Washington DC on this boat:

[encrypted-tbn1.gstatic.com image 240x200]

being schmooozed by the Westfavalia corporation where there will be a Bourbon/scotch/ whiskey/ rye tasting panel

that's good

there will also be Cigar pairings... But I just stopped smoking ciggerettes and I don't want to risk a relapse

that would be bad :(


Alright... off to make a whiskey sour...



LUCKY!!
 
2013-03-18 07:42:26 PM  
faster horses, younger women, older whiskey
 
2013-03-18 07:49:58 PM  

Bruxellensis: as the proud owner of a brand new charred oak barrel, I'm getting a kick, etc...


Just harvested A bunch of beer we were aging on the wood last week... four barrels of Barley wine, the last of the stuff that was brewed year before last. It took the wood very well. nice and clear, and great notes ov vanilla and oak burbony goodness. got 10 HB kegs and 4 SB's out of it.

also nine barrels worth of our flagship Brown ale, for about 15 over all bbls worth that will be split between kegs and bombers. that also took very well to the wood. drink some I pigtailed from the tank right now. Really mellowed the stuff, the beer is smooth as it is but the barrel notes really define it. Seems to accentuate everything that is already going on with the brown ale and adds a bit of its own to the mix.

one more barrel each of our Dopplebock, and Hopfest, I haven't had a chance to taste off any of those after the wood yet.

Since
 
2013-03-18 07:51:47 PM  

jayhawk88: If reality TV was worth a damn, we'd have a show dedicated to performing double-blind's on beer/whiskey/wine snobs, audiophiles, foodies, etc, with the sole purpose of making them look foolish.


This might amuse you.
 
2013-03-18 07:51:58 PM  
Just tried a French whiskey called Bastille for the first time. Super light, almost reminiscent of brandy. It was pretty good. Only thing that turned me off was it was a little heavy on the cherry.
 
2013-03-18 07:54:32 PM  

jayhawk88: "It's kaleidoscopic," another assessed. "It tastes like cigar tobacco and leather ... and then caramel and spice ... and then I taste oak ... and then ... " And finally: "It's been almost 10 minutes and I'm still tasting it!"

If reality TV was worth a damn, we'd have a show dedicated to performing double-blind's on beer/whiskey/wine snobs, audiophiles, foodies, etc, with the sole purpose of making them look foolish.


I believe it was Penn and Teller that did an episode on organic foods, which ended with a taste test. Everyone said the organically grown food tasted better, even though there was no organically grown food. It was sections of fruit and vegetables taken from the same thing. It's mostly your perception that changes things. If you're told this one will be good, you will be more likely to  think it's good. If you're told it will be bad, you'll be more likely to think it's bad. If the test is completely blind, people might be able to pick out different qualities, but they'd probably fail if they were tested against false labels.
 
2013-03-18 08:04:17 PM  
Never had 50 year old whiskey but I have had 50 year old armagnac.  While it was certainly very good it wasn't OMFG!!!  Might have just been that particular bottle but like most everything else there's a certain point where the law of diminishing returns takes over.  Having tasted enough whiskey in my day I can't see spending the extra money for something that's 20 years old as opposed to a 12 year old version, let alone a 50 yo bottle.
 
2013-03-18 08:04:17 PM  

doglover: Beer I guess could be aged, buy why?


Well, I like big old barleywines, but am not a hophead. I find that letting sierra nevada bigfoot sit @ 35 d F for about 5-9 months mellows the hop bite. ymmv.
 
2013-03-18 08:06:38 PM  

alienated: doglover: Beer I guess could be aged, buy why?

Well, I like big old barleywines, but am not a hophead. I find that letting sierra nevada bigfoot sit @ 35 d F for about 5-9 months mellows the hop bite. ymmv.


Aww, isn't that cute.

gerbilsoft.soniccenter.org
 
2013-03-18 08:08:31 PM  
12-15 years of good aging is about right.

Anything over 20 will either have been stored in hand-carved barrels, in IAMFA-certified conditions or will be shiat.  Rot is a battle that time always wins.  If the whisky has been stored in clay or metal it may as well be 2 weeks old as 20 years.
 
2013-03-18 08:08:44 PM  

Cerebral Knievel: Bruxellensis: as the proud owner of a brand new charred oak barrel, I'm getting a kick, etc...

Just harvested A bunch of beer we were aging on the wood last week... four barrels of Barley wine, the last of the stuff that was brewed year before last. It took the wood very well. nice and clear, and great notes ov vanilla and oak burbony goodness. got 10 HB kegs and 4 SB's out of it.

also nine barrels worth of our flagship Brown ale, for about 15 over all bbls worth that will be split between kegs and bombers. that also took very well to the wood. drink some I pigtailed from the tank right now. Really mellowed the stuff, the beer is smooth as it is but the barrel notes really define it. Seems to accentuate everything that is already going on with the brown ale and adds a bit of its own to the mix.

one more barrel each of our Dopplebock, and Hopfest, I haven't had a chance to taste off any of those after the wood yet.

Since


There are very few styles of beer that don't take to barrel aging well.  I have yet to be disappointed with wood aging my beer.

My virgin charred oak will be reserved for something else first, then my beers will get their turn afterwards.
 
2013-03-18 08:09:46 PM  
I have a brand or rye and a brand of rum i like -- i think they both really only have 5 and 10 year versions.

Rye: Alberta Premium is a 5 year and Alberta Springs is its 10 year pal.

encrypted-tbn3.gstatic.com

Its actually pretty cheap cost wise (the 10 year is a buck or two more than the 5) and it tastes great. Its good enough to drink straight and cheap enough to mix with cola. Anyone know it? Like it?

As for the rum: One barrel and Three barrel rum from Belize? Anyone know it? So good. Soooooo good. Its hard to find outside of Belize but Canadian liquor stores seem to have it sometimes. (my bumfark town in nowhere alberta has it...)

I like rye most, bourbon is a bit sweet, Whiskey like crown or r&r are staples when no rye is around... I don't think i had a good scotch because my impressions of Ballantines was ass in a glass, and whatever Jack Daniels is it tastes like gasoline.  just so you know how i feel i guess?
 
2013-03-18 08:10:08 PM  

doglover: alienated: doglover: Beer I guess could be aged, buy why?

Well, I like big old barleywines, but am not a hophead. I find that letting sierra nevada bigfoot sit @ 35 d F for about 5-9 months mellows the hop bite. ymmv.

Aww, isn't that cute.

[gerbilsoft.soniccenter.org image 250x250]


What is your point to that ? Do you know more about aging beer than me ?
 
2013-03-18 08:10:20 PM  

Cerebral Knievel: Bruxellensis: as the proud owner of a brand new charred oak barrel, I'm getting a kick, etc...

Just harvested A bunch of beer we were aging on the wood last week... four barrels of Barley wine, the last of the stuff that was brewed year before last. It took the wood very well. nice and clear, and great notes ov vanilla and oak burbony goodness. got 10 HB kegs and 4 SB's out of it.

also nine barrels worth of our flagship Brown ale, for about 15 over all bbls worth that will be split between kegs and bombers. that also took very well to the wood. drink some I pigtailed from the tank right now. Really mellowed the stuff, the beer is smooth as it is but the barrel notes really define it. Seems to accentuate everything that is already going on with the brown ale and adds a bit of its own to the mix.

one more barrel each of our Dopplebock, and Hopfest, I haven't had a chance to taste off any of those after the wood yet.


Oh, and those beers you mention sound awesome.  I'm drooling over here.
 
2013-03-18 08:11:56 PM  

mikefinch: I have a brand or rye and a brand of rum i like -- i think they both really only have 5 and 10 year versions.

Rye: Alberta Premium is a 5 year and Alberta Springs is its 10 year pal.

[encrypted-tbn3.gstatic.com image 166x304]

Its actually pretty cheap cost wise (the 10 year is a buck or two more than the 5) and it tastes great. Its good enough to drink straight and cheap enough to mix with cola. Anyone know it? Like it?

As for the rum: One barrel and Three barrel rum from Belize? Anyone know it? So good. Soooooo good. Its hard to find outside of Belize but Canadian liquor stores seem to have it sometimes. (my bumfark town in nowhere alberta has it...)

I like rye most, bourbon is a bit sweet, Whiskey like crown or r&r are staples when no rye is around... I don't think i had a good scotch because my impressions of Ballantines was ass in a glass, and whatever Jack Daniels is it tastes like gasoline.  just so you know how i feel i guess?


Where do you buy Alberta Premium or Springs?  You must live in Canada, unless I'm unaware of an importer.
 
2013-03-18 08:15:11 PM  

jayhawk88: "It's kaleidoscopic," another assessed. "It tastes like cigar tobacco and leather ... and then caramel and spice ... and then I taste oak ... and then ... " And finally: "It's been almost 10 minutes and I'm still tasting it!"

If reality TV was worth a damn, we'd have a show dedicated to performing double-blind's on beer/whiskey/wine snobs, audiophiles, foodies, etc, with the sole purpose of making them look foolish.


Bring it.  I like doing blind taste tests just for the fun of it.
 
2013-03-18 08:16:13 PM  

Bruxellensis: mikefinch: I have a brand or rye and a brand of rum i like -- i think they both really only have 5 and 10 year versions.

Rye: Alberta Premium is a 5 year and Alberta Springs is its 10 year pal.

[encrypted-tbn3.gstatic.com image 166x304]

Its actually pretty cheap cost wise (the 10 year is a buck or two more than the 5) and it tastes great. Its good enough to drink straight and cheap enough to mix with cola. Anyone know it? Like it?

As for the rum: One barrel and Three barrel rum from Belize? Anyone know it? So good. Soooooo good. Its hard to find outside of Belize but Canadian liquor stores seem to have it sometimes. (my bumfark town in nowhere alberta has it...)

I like rye most, bourbon is a bit sweet, Whiskey like crown or r&r are staples when no rye is around... I don't think i had a good scotch because my impressions of Ballantines was ass in a glass, and whatever Jack Daniels is it tastes like gasoline.  just so you know how i feel i guess?

Where do you buy Alberta Premium or Springs?  You must live in Canada, unless I'm unaware of an importer.


Nevermind.  I should have read your whole post.

/care to do a trade via mail?
 
2013-03-18 08:21:28 PM  
I didn have a glass of oban a month or two back that cost me 10 bucks and while it was nice and woody it just didnt hit the right parts of my mouth.

I might be biased now though because i've been drinking gibsons and AB prem since i was like 12. Not much variety in an Alberta farm liquor cabinet. Rye whiskey and a cheap bottle of vodka for mix. Oh and Kahlua -- but thats moms. Dont touch it.
 
2013-03-18 08:21:49 PM  
My 42 year old lady tastes better now than she did when she was 41.
 
2013-03-18 08:23:31 PM  
Hey, a litre of Jameson is $20 at Sweetbay now.
 
2013-03-18 08:28:45 PM  

Glancing Blow: Fonaibung: It's not. Older whiskey (bourbon, scotch, rye) is almost always less flavorful than the younger stuff when you get to a brand of decent quality. It's just marketing.

As a drinker of Johnny Walker Blue Label I have to totally disagree with you.  I've had their black, gold, green, and blue labels, and the blue is a 10.


Maybe I just lack the fine tastes required, but I could barely tell the difference between Johnny Walker Black and Johnny Walker Blue.  Every year on my birthday (which is coming up on Wednesday, incidentally) I try a new $20/shot (the highest priced they have available) whiskey at my whiskey bar, and Johnny Walker Blue was one I tried a couple of years ago, after having regularly drank Johnny Walker Black for several months prior.  Of every $20/shot whiskey I've tried, that one was by far the most underwhelming, and the only one where I didn't feel like it would be worth it to ever get another one.

/My favorite was a 20 year old A. H. Hirsch bourbon that I had shortly before it disappeared from the face of the planet.  Soooooo gooooood...
//Wish I had invested in a few bottles before it disappeared, could have probably made back more than enough money to cover the initial investment and still have a couple bottles sitting around...
///I saw bottles of it selling on ebay for ~$500 that were probably $150-200 originally
 
2013-03-18 08:30:05 PM  

alienated: What is your point to that ?


You claim to be not a hophead, but you prefer jargons and indecipherably specific jargon with numbers. acronym.

You'd best start believing in hopheads, alienated, because you're in you are one.
 
2013-03-18 08:32:59 PM  

Bruxellensis: /care to do a trade via mail?


I might actually -- i gave you a colour and a note about sending you some booze. I'm moving for work soon and summer employments are spent without technology so pen palling someone regarding booze might be fun.

lemme figure out where im headed because any packages i get after this month will have to be addressed to a government office. I like the idea though.
 
2013-03-18 08:35:50 PM  

doglover: alienated: What is your point to that ?

You claim to be not a hophead, but you prefer jargons and indecipherably specific jargon with numbers. acronym.

You'd best start believing in hopheads, alienated, because you're in you are one.


Hmm. When I started brewing, i was a huge hophead. 20 years later, I no longer prefer the bitterness. I have always been a big beer type, so doppelbock was a natural way for me to go.Much more malty than bitter . I still like barleywine, but aged. And if one cannot understand what 35 degrees fahrenheit is expressed as 35 d F, thats too bad. Im not going to muck about looking for the degree keyboard character for one thread.
 
2013-03-18 08:36:36 PM  
I laid on many a sidewalk and barfed up some of the finest whiskey.  I was given many shots at a gay bar and passed out.  It was some rot gut and I don't know how but my asshole was killing me.
 
2013-03-18 08:38:57 PM  

Bored Horde: 12-15 years of good aging is about right.

Anything over 20 will either have been stored in hand-carved barrels, in IAMFA-certified conditions or will be shiat.  Rot is a battle that time always wins.  If the whisky has been stored in clay or metal it may as well be 2 weeks old as 20 years.


I think that's correct, based on my empirical observations. Seems that flavor and nose go up until about 16 years, then the price goes up exponentially, but the quality plateaus. I've seen that with Glenfarclas and Aberlour.
 
2013-03-18 08:40:31 PM  

alienated: doglover: alienated: What is your point to that ?

You claim to be not a hophead, but you prefer jargons and indecipherably specific jargon with numbers. acronym.

You'd best start believing in hopheads, alienated, because you're in you are one.

Hmm. When I started brewing, i was a huge hophead. 20 years later, I no longer prefer the bitterness. I have always been a big beer type, so doppelbock was a natural way for me to go.Much more malty than bitter . I still like barleywine, but aged. And if one cannot understand what 35 degrees fahrenheit is expressed as 35 d F, thats too bad. Im not going to muck about looking for the degree keyboard character for one thread.


I thought doglover just mistook hophead for a beer guy instead of someone who prefers hoppy beer.
 
2013-03-18 08:42:25 PM  
...to which the guy at the end of the bar responds, "Yeah... but how old am I?"
 
2013-03-18 08:43:22 PM  
What a great band name:

"Ladies and gentlemen -- Wood Goodies!"
 
2013-03-18 08:44:34 PM  

johnny_vegas: I thought doglover just mistook hophead for a beer guy instead of someone who prefers hoppy beer.


Is that what it means?

Hophead sounded to me like the equivalent of somnilier, somnelier, som- "professional wine snob" in French.

Does it just mean someone who likes hops?
 
2013-03-18 08:44:40 PM  

mikefinch: I don't think i had a good scotch because my impressions of Ballantines was ass in a glass, and whatever Jack Daniels is it tastes like gasoline. just so you know how i feel i guess?


Jack is a bourbon. Not a very good one, mind you, and they don't like to use the word because they like to pretend that "Tennessee Whiskey" is somehow different. In reality, it's legally defined as bourbon made in Tennessee where it's defined at all, the term is just marketing. There are other bourbons that do the charcoal filtering, and "sour mash" is a process, not a type of whiskey, and is used in nearly all bourbons and ryes.

As for Ballantines, it's not the worst blended scotch, but it's still a cheap blend. Try a real single malt, maybe even one with a bit of touch of smoke and peat, sometime. Your opinion may change radically.
 
2013-03-18 08:44:41 PM  

doglover: alienated: What is your point to that ?

You claim to be not a hophead, but you prefer jargons and indecipherably specific jargon with numbers. acronym.

You'd best start believing in hopheads, alienated, because you're in you are one.


But he stated that he wasn't a hop head and likes to age his big foot for 5-9 months to calm the hop bite?

If the dude was tossing around IBU numbers and what not... then maybe.. But over all? I like bigfoot, but it really is too hoppy for the style, particularly when its green. It should wait a year or two IMHO.. B-wines should be Malty. but they should start with an aggressive hop background to balance all the residual sugars.

The stuff we make in the beer mines goes through about 9 months of cold conditioning at 40F before we even package it. and even then, we'll only package half of it that year and hold the rest back for funky playing and additional aging. per my previous post, I JUST kegged up the last of the Barley wine that we made almost two years ago, and we aged it an additional 3 months on Bourbon barrels.

that stuff will probably be selectively metered out for another two years...
 
2013-03-18 08:44:49 PM  

martid4: I laid on many a sidewalk and barfed up some of the finest whiskey.  I was given many shots at a gay bar and passed out.  It was some rot gut and I don't know how but my asshole was killing me.


You had a happy St. Paddy's day then?
 
2013-03-18 08:46:11 PM  

Cerebral Knievel: But he stated that he wasn't a hop head and likes to age his big foot for 5-9 months to calm the hop bite?


Also likes aged big foot:

mantiseye.com
 
2013-03-18 08:48:40 PM  

doglover: Beer I guess could be aged, buy why?


Because it also mellows and changes flavor. Especially the stronger darker ones. Russian Imperial Stout, for example, is usually aged for months before it gets bottled. I just made a batch of RIP only fermented with a Trappist yeast strain. After fermentation is was really rough and unrefined. After two months in secondary it was smooth and the flavors really came together. All these underlying flavors of plum and dark cherry. Really nice. I plan to hold over half the batch to age it a year, brew the same recipe again next year, and then compare fresh and aged to see the stark differences.

So in short, the same reason you'd age whiskey.
 
2013-03-18 08:51:30 PM  

doglover: johnny_vegas: I thought doglover just mistook hophead for a beer guy instead of someone who prefers hoppy beer.

Is that what it means?

Hophead sounded to me like the equivalent of somnilier, somnelier, som- "professional wine snob" in French.

Does it just mean someone who likes hops?


pretty much... Hops, and really hoppy beer is analogous to those that like really spicy food. you can crank the hell out of the hops, and that can be good, if you are into that sort of thing.. but over all, going overboard with the hops, is kinda considered training wheel craft beer. it's easy for the brewer to make hop bombs and hide off flavors with a sub par beer, and then you have the entry level craft beer lovers who equate REALLY HOPPY! and REALLY BOOZY! with REALLY GOOD!

And hop bombs can be really good, if done correctly and with a good sense of balance. but a good way to mess with soebody trying to name all the hops in a imperial double I/APA, is to nod in agreement, correct or not,  and then ask them to name the malts and the yeast strain used.
 
2013-03-18 08:59:21 PM  
I've had a 25 year aged bottle of Glennmorangie once. Tasted like vomit and lighter fluid.
 
2013-03-18 09:00:20 PM  
I guess the key, as in most things in life, is to find the right balance between harsh alcohol notes and overly woody notes.

I know that in my own life I strive to be neither too alcoholic nor too woody. These two aspects do seem to work against each other. Too much alcohol means not much wood, and sensitive wood means not enough alcohol. Finding the right balance allows for enjoyment of both alcohol and wood.
 
2013-03-18 09:02:33 PM  

AverageAmericanGuy: Finding the right balance allows for enjoyment of both alcohol and wood.


Or you can just get off the bed and put some pillows on the floor.
 
2013-03-18 09:02:49 PM  

Munchkin City Coroner: [americanhooch.files.wordpress.com image 270x360]

If whiskey sits around for 20 years, someone isn't thirsty enough.


I have a jar of that stuff in my liquor cabinet.  Been there for 6 years.
 
2013-03-18 09:03:35 PM  

cptjeff: There are other bourbons that do the charcoal filtering, and "sour mash" is a process, not a type of whiskey, and is used in nearly all bourbons and ryes.


Yeah -- i bought some cheap jim beam bourbon and it was way better. I know they dont like calling JD bourbon -- but i feel like calling it anything but bling for rednecks is being gracious. Ugh.

I'll take a bottle of nice scotch out to the tower this summer and have a sip every couple of nights. I didnt waste that ballentines though -- i mixed it in to a bowl of eggs milk and sweetened condensed milk. Like baileys but with a scotch flavor instead of Irish...

Different. Good in coffee.
 
2013-03-18 09:05:48 PM  

Cerebral Knievel: I JUST kegged up the last of the Barley wine that we made almost two years ago, and we aged it an additional 3 months on Bourbon barrels.


I so wish that was bottled and distro'ed out here on the west coast .
If you folks do ever think of expanding this way- two words Wine Warehouse .
I get most of my really good indy / foreign beers from them, and they sell nicely.
 
2013-03-18 09:10:51 PM  

mikefinch: cptjeff: There are other bourbons that do the charcoal filtering, and "sour mash" is a process, not a type of whiskey, and is used in nearly all bourbons and ryes.

Yeah -- i bought some cheap jim beam bourbon and it was way better. I know they dont like calling JD bourbon -- but i feel like calling it anything but bling for rednecks is being gracious. Ugh.

I'll take a bottle of nice scotch out to the tower this summer and have a sip every couple of nights. I didnt waste that ballentines though -- i mixed it in to a bowl of eggs milk and sweetened condensed milk. Like baileys but with a scotch flavor instead of Irish...

Different. Good in coffee.


Does a good sour, too. I like the drier, barley flavor that a scotch or irish provides in a sour, but I ain't gonna waste any of my better blends or single malts on one.
 
2013-03-18 09:12:37 PM  
As for aging beer -- Unibroue has great beer for aging. They have kick ass beer -- tasty, strong, man sized bottle capped with a cork...

They even have a page about aging when you look up their beers. Caution -- Beer porn ahead. Their site is pretty cool. They make freaking great beer. 25 ounce bottle of strong dark tasty beer? Why yes i do feel like a man. Filter the yeast through your teeth like a boss.

http://www.unibroue.com/en/beers/18/aging
 
2013-03-18 09:13:23 PM  

Cerebral Knievel: is kinda considered training wheel craft beer. it's easy for the brewer to make hop bombs and hide off flavors with a sub par beer


I've often touted this theory to others as to why, in the mid 90s craft beer boom, it seemed every brewery's first beer to hit the market was an IPA. Seemed to me like an easy way to work out the kinks while immediately getting something out there for sale. Great to hear someone in the industry have a similar take. Likewise, in recent years with the Imperial hop bombs, I was entirely against them at first because they just went for huge IBUs and ABV with complete disregard for malt. You still need a malt backbone to build off of no matter what. I don't know if you can get Wachusett's "Larry" IPA down your way, but that's a great example of Imperial IPA done right.
 
2013-03-18 09:15:28 PM  

Pribar: once ya pour in the mountain dew does it really matter?


What kind of farking heathen pours pop into whisky
 
2013-03-18 09:18:47 PM  

mikefinch: As for aging beer -- Unibroue has great beer for aging. They have kick ass beer -- tasty, strong, man sized bottle capped with a cork...

They even have a page about aging when you look up their beers. Caution -- Beer porn ahead. Their site is pretty cool. They make freaking great beer. 25 ounce bottle of strong dark tasty beer? Why yes i do feel like a man. Filter the yeast through your teeth like a boss.

http://www.unibroue.com/en/beers/18/aging


Great story: I was at a beer festival in Boston a few years back and one of the brewers from Unibroue was there. He let me sample a specialty limited edition ale brewed for some celebration that was so strong it almost sat me down. I told him it was really strong for my tastes, and he said, "HA! zat ees only what we geev to za cheeldren!"
 
2013-03-18 09:19:08 PM  

doglover: AverageAmericanGuy: Finding the right balance allows for enjoyment of both alcohol and wood.

Or you can just get off the bed and put some pillows on the floor.


That doesn't always work, I have been so drunk that if it wasn't for my death grip on the rug I might have fallen through the wall


/or the ceiling
 
2013-03-18 09:20:09 PM  

doglover: alienated: What is your point to that ?

You claim to be not a hophead, but you prefer jargons and indecipherably specific jargon with numbers. acronym.

You'd best start believing in hopheads, alienated, because you're in you are one.




Mmmmm hops. I dig the rounding effect of the alcohol buzz.
 
2013-03-18 09:20:22 PM  

master luthier: Pribar: once ya pour in the mountain dew does it really matter?

What kind of farking heathen pours pop into whisky


Everyone knows that just disturbs the carbonation. You pour the whisky into the Mt Dew.

And I only use vintage Mt Dew held in storage since the 80s or Mt Dew Throwback in a pinch.
 
2013-03-18 09:32:55 PM  
Glancing Blow:

As a drinker of Johnny Walker Blue Label I have to totally disagree with you.  I've had their black, gold, green, and blue labels, and the blue is a 10.

Word. Buying a bottle tomorrow, it s been a while.
 
2013-03-18 09:36:28 PM  

AverageAmericanGuy: What kind of farking heathen pours pop into whisky

My 2 cents:
Heres what i do when im mixing: pack the glass with ice. Like full with ice cubes. Pour your first shot in and then pour half your pop in - then your next shot and the rest of the pop and another shot if you want one. The booze on the ice melts it down just enough to smooth the ice surface so your pop doesn't loose its carb when you pour it over -- the surface of the ice is already melted and it wont fizz. Also the ice melts a bit and waters down the pop. Also your booze can distribute across your drink quickly without having to mix it.I love cola but I drink it on tons of ice cause its almost like its to thick sometimes. Like its to syrupy.
 
2013-03-18 09:51:52 PM  

AverageAmericanGuy: master luthier: Pribar: once ya pour in the mountain dew does it really matter?

What kind of farking heathen pours pop into whisky

Everyone knows that just disturbs the carbonation. You pour the whisky into the Mt Dew.

And I only use vintage Mt Dew held in storage since the 80s or Mt Dew Throwback in a pinch.


I know you are being superfluous here.. but I gotta say, that whenever I am trying to recreate a vintage cocktail that calls for Cola, I will use Pepsi throwback, Mexican coke*, or Boylans Cane Cola to hopefully get an "authentic" flavor, along with some Bacardi Superior and a squeeze of key lime juice for what I think a turn of the century Cuba Libre would taste like.

If Coke Cola ever decided to make a cane sugar sweetened version of their product in regular production again, I would be glad to use it.


Sorry.. been a professional brewer for the past 15 odd years, been sneaking into the world of spirits for a bit and have been researching the origions of classic cocktails for a while now.  I'm too old to be a hipster...


*Mexican coke, may or may not be sweetened with cane sugar, they use what is ever cheaply available at the time of manufacture.
 
2013-03-18 10:06:12 PM  

cptjeff: mikefinch: I don't think i had a good scotch because my impressions of Ballantines was ass in a glass, and whatever Jack Daniels is it tastes like gasoline. just so you know how i feel i guess?

Jack is a bourbon. Not a very good one, mind you, and they don't like to use the word because they like to pretend that "Tennessee Whiskey" is somehow different. In reality, it's legally defined as bourbon made in Tennessee where it's defined at all, the term is just marketing. There are other bourbons that do the charcoal filtering, and "sour mash" is a process, not a type of whiskey, and is used in nearly all bourbons and ryes.

As for Ballantines, it's not the worst blended scotch, but it's still a cheap blend. Try a real single malt, maybe even one with a bit of touch of smoke and peat, sometime. Your opinion may change radically.


I agree JD is over-hyped, mass marketed crap, no better than an average Bourbon. All I want to add is try George Dickel before you write off all Tennessee whiskeys. It's fine stuff, quite distinct from bourbon, and very sippable. Get the 12 yr, not the 8yr.
 
2013-03-18 10:11:28 PM  

Cerebral Knievel: Wednesday after next, I will be at the Craft Brewers Conference  in Washington DC on this boat:

[encrypted-tbn1.gstatic.com image 240x200]

being schmooozed by the Westfavalia corporation where there will be a Bourbon/scotch/ whiskey/ rye tasting panel

that's good

there will also be Cigar pairings... But I just stopped smoking ciggerettes and I don't want to risk a relapse

that would be bad :(


Alright... off to make a whiskey sour...


Need someone to carry your bags onboard for you sir?

/Oh hell. Looks like fun. Drink one for me.
 
2013-03-18 10:17:01 PM  

Cerebral Knievel: AverageAmericanGuy: master luthier: Pribar: once ya pour in the mountain dew does it really matter?

What kind of farking heathen pours pop into whisky

Everyone knows that just disturbs the carbonation. You pour the whisky into the Mt Dew.

And I only use vintage Mt Dew held in storage since the 80s or Mt Dew Throwback in a pinch.

I know you are being superfluous here.. but I gotta say, that whenever I am trying to recreate a vintage cocktail that calls for Cola, I will use Pepsi throwback, Mexican coke*, or Boylans Cane Cola to hopefully get an "authentic" flavor, along with some Bacardi Superior and a squeeze of key lime juice for what I think a turn of the century Cuba Libre would taste like.

If Coke Cola ever decided to make a cane sugar sweetened version of their product in regular production again, I would be glad to use it.


Sorry.. been a professional brewer for the past 15 odd years, been sneaking into the world of spirits for a bit and have been researching the origions of classic cocktails for a while now.  I'm too old to be a hipster...


*Mexican coke, may or may not be sweetened with cane sugar, they use what is ever cheaply available at the time of manufacture.



Kosher Coke.
 
2013-03-18 10:21:55 PM  
enemy of the state:

Need someone to carry your bags onboard for you sir?

/Oh hell. Looks like fun. Drink one for me.


I shall!

dang... the flyer for the evening is nice... Live sushi bar, Prime rib, whiskey et all. A dozen kegs on board,one of them ours... heading out at 6:30 pm, getting back to port midnight'ish.. A bunch of industry folks on board, including some heavy hitters and some legends.. ride to and from the hotel...

yeah. that should not suck at all..
 
2013-03-18 10:22:32 PM  
"Yeah. Fermented beverages like wine have all kinds of chemicals in, as they're only 12-16% alcohol usually. So they can react to themselves, and usually have a colony of yeast still living inside. Their flavor changes over time because it's still reacting and if you let it go too long it becomes vinegar.

The distilled stuff is boiled to vapor and thus is almost pure concentrated ethanol, then diluted back down with water. There's very little in un-aged booze and it's all uniform. No reactions take place in the bottle. Placing in a cask, on the other hand, lets you get all kinds of chemistry going on, but slowly. So 20 year old whiskey is indeed radically different from 2 year old whiskey. But 18 and 20 might not change that much, even if the price does.

Beer I guess could be aged, buy why?"

Almost all commercial wine is centrifuged, filtered in multiple stages down to .5 or .1 microns, then sulfited and/or sorbated (if it's back sweetened or just a sweeter wine - to prevent "re-fermentation"). So  the wine ageing process is independent of yeast. However, there are reaction relating to several other factors. For example, alcohol, phenols, aldehydes and ester reactions, oxidation reactions, settling of tannins oe proteins etc to the bottom of the bottle (hence the need to decant some older wines). Beer has many of the same reactions but often beer is less protected by alcohol (but there are some exceptions - ie Barely Wines, Russian Imperials etc). Hops IBU's will drop out and potentially under go some esterification (be perceived as sweeter vs bitter). Some harsh phenols and higher alcohols can be converted to various aldehydes and/ or esters. Further - many beers are actually bottled with some yeast to aid in carbonation and or preservation but no so much (if done skillfully) to cause autolysis ( yeast break down leading to off-flavors such as "shrimp-like or rubbery).
 
2013-03-18 10:23:30 PM  
Morans.  It stops aging once you bottle it.  After 18 yrs aging, it's all snobbish bullshiat. No difference.  You can't taste it after two shots anyway. Tastebuds go numb.
 
2013-03-18 10:26:10 PM  
StoPPeRmobile:


Kosher Coke.

only really available during passover, if you can get it before it's sold out. unfortunately.. if yer trying to run a bar that specializes in such things... it's not really a viable option.

fortunately, I'm not trying to run a bar like that. or.. run a bar period.. I'm just a beer miner. :D
 
2013-03-18 10:31:45 PM  
I'm getting a drunk because I'm whisky kick.
 
2013-03-18 10:42:07 PM  

StoPPeRmobile: Hey, a litre of Jameson is $20 at Sweetbay now.


Go slum somewhere else :) (wife hid the bottle of BlackBush after bangers and mash last night and I be thankin' her now)
 
2013-03-18 10:44:34 PM  

NightOwl2255: jayhawk88: If reality TV was worth a damn, we'd have a show dedicated to performing double-blind's on beer/whiskey/wine snobs, audiophiles, foodies, etc, with the sole purpose of making them look foolish.

This might amuse you.


As well as a section of this episode http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0662400/
 
2013-03-18 10:50:46 PM  

Rivetman1.0: StoPPeRmobile: Hey, a litre of Jameson is $20 at Sweetbay now.

Go slum somewhere else :) (wife hid the bottle of BlackBush after bangers and mash last night and I be thankin' her now)




lulz.
 
2013-03-18 10:53:32 PM  

Cerebral Knievel: only really available during passover, if you can get it before it's sold out. unfortunately.. if yer trying to run a bar that specializes in such things... it's not really a viable option.

fortunately, I'm not trying to run a bar like that. or.. run a bar period.. I'm just a beer miner. :D


This is a bit off/on topic but i just recently figured it out and i like to share:

Dr Pepper makes crappy mix -- but WHY?  Its got such a cool cola like flavour it should go great with booze right? But it doesnt. Its kinda gross. Heres why:

Dr pepper is booze flavoured already. Its a combo of cherry, vanilla, caramel, a few other minor tweaks -- and the big one you only notice once its pointed out? RUM. Dr pepper has a very definite rum note to it. The reason it doesn't mix well is the rum flavour screws with anything else you put in there. It works best with amber rum and only as a single or weaker.

\Last time i threw up at a party i drank all my booze and decided that i was drunk enough to put up with the taste of gin and dr pepper. I wasn't. I dont think i ever will be.
\\I had an epiphany about DR Pepper and i had to share. Sorry.
 
2013-03-18 11:06:33 PM  

mikefinch: Cerebral Knievel: only really available during passover, if you can get it before it's sold out. unfortunately.. if yer trying to run a bar that specializes in such things... it's not really a viable option.

fortunately, I'm not trying to run a bar like that. or.. run a bar period.. I'm just a beer miner. :D

This is a bit off/on topic but i just recently figured it out and i like to share:

Dr Pepper makes crappy mix -- but WHY?  Its got such a cool cola like flavour it should go great with booze right? But it doesnt. Its kinda gross. Heres why:

Dr pepper is booze flavoured already. Its a combo of cherry, vanilla, caramel, a few other minor tweaks -- and the big one you only notice once its pointed out? RUM. Dr pepper has a very definite rum note to it. The reason it doesn't mix well is the rum flavour screws with anything else you put in there. It works best with amber rum and only as a single or weaker.

\Last time i threw up at a party i drank all my booze and decided that i was drunk enough to put up with the taste of gin and dr pepper. I wasn't. I dont think i ever will be.
\\I had an epiphany about DR Pepper and i had to share. Sorry.


well, that's the whole thing... Dr Pepper is classified as a Cherry Cola. It's TOO sweet to work right with most things, the reason that lemon lime sodas work well is because they are, in a way, creating a shortcut to make many "sour" drinks. whiskey sour, margarita etc.. which usually use a harsh sour citrus, and simple syrup to cut on top of the associated booze to balance.
Dr. Pepper just overwhelms everything in its residual sweetness to let any thing work.. and like you said.. kinda rummy...

It could work with a high and white rum like 151 but only as a cut, not as an active ingredient, spiced rum like morgans or sailer jerry is right out.. .

like everything.. you are looking for balance...


Gin an Dr. Pepper? really? how drunk were you to think that was a good Idea and are you fifteen years old?

/just farksnark ;)
 
2013-03-18 11:13:53 PM  

mikefinch: Last time i threw up at a party i drank all my booze and decided that i was drunk enough to put up with the taste of gin and dr pepper. I wasn't. I dont think i ever will be.
\\I had an epiphany about DR Pepper and i had to share. Sorry.


jesus. that sounds revolting. my condolences.
 
2013-03-18 11:26:07 PM  

Cerebral Knievel: Gin an Dr. Pepper? really? how drunk were you to think that was a good Idea and are you fifteen years old?

/just farksnark ;)


Oh it was a good night. Forestry tech school party. I must insist that i didnt think it was a 'good' idea -- i just thought it would keep me drunk. I really did just pour the last quarter from a twosix into a half drunk two litre bottle and and started to swig away. One good chug in and my face kept making that 'gack fark no! what are you doing?' twitch and I wandered out to the back bushes to regret some stuff and chat with jesus a bit. I wasn't feeling the slightest bit queasy before that stuff hit my lips.

\Question Mr beer expert... If i was bottling a beer this summer in a bunch of growlers, could i add birch shavings to the growler to simulate having been in a barrel? I know you can do it for spirits but can you do it for beer?
 
2013-03-19 12:09:31 AM  

mikefinch: As for the rum: One barrel and Three barrel rum from Belize? Anyone know it? So good. Soooooo good. Its hard to find outside of Belize but Canadian liquor stores seem to have it sometimes. (my bumfark town in nowhere alberta has it...)


I've had the One Barrel a couple of times (my friend's parents have a time share in Belize and they used to bring bottles of it back). It's f'ing great stuff.
 
2013-03-19 12:13:43 AM  
Dammit.  Yamazaki 18 has already doubled in price in the last 2 years.. Can we stop showing articles about good whiskey?
 
2013-03-19 12:16:51 AM  

enry: I have a jar of that stuff in my liquor cabinet. Been there for 6 years.


4.bp.blogspot.com
 
2013-03-19 12:35:02 AM  

mikefinch: Cerebral Knievel: only really available during passover, if you can get it before it's sold out. unfortunately.. if yer trying to run a bar that specializes in such things... it's not really a viable option.

fortunately, I'm not trying to run a bar like that. or.. run a bar period.. I'm just a beer miner. :D

This is a bit off/on topic but i just recently figured it out and i like to share:

Dr Pepper makes crappy mix -- but WHY?  Its got such a cool cola like flavour it should go great with booze right? But it doesnt. Its kinda gross. Heres why:

Dr pepper is booze flavoured already. Its a combo of cherry, vanilla, caramel, a few other minor tweaks -- and the big one you only notice once its pointed out? RUM. Dr pepper has a very definite rum note to it. The reason it doesn't mix well is the rum flavour screws with anything else you put in there. It works best with amber rum and only as a single or weaker.

\Last time i threw up at a party i drank all my booze and decided that i was drunk enough to put up with the taste of gin and dr pepper. I wasn't. I dont think i ever will be.
\\I had an epiphany about DR Pepper and i had to share. Sorry.




Almond. It's farking almond, damnit! At least that what I always thought. Same thing with Southern Comfort.
 
2013-03-19 12:38:04 AM  

Cerebral Knievel: mikefinch: Cerebral Knievel: only really available during passover, if you can get it before it's sold out. unfortunately.. if yer trying to run a bar that specializes in such things... it's not really a viable option.

fortunately, I'm not trying to run a bar like that. or.. run a bar period.. I'm just a beer miner. :D

This is a bit off/on topic but i just recently figured it out and i like to share:

Dr Pepper makes crappy mix -- but WHY?  Its got such a cool cola like flavour it should go great with booze right? But it doesnt. Its kinda gross. Heres why:

Dr pepper is booze flavoured already. Its a combo of cherry, vanilla, caramel, a few other minor tweaks -- and the big one you only notice once its pointed out? RUM. Dr pepper has a very definite rum note to it. The reason it doesn't mix well is the rum flavour screws with anything else you put in there. It works best with amber rum and only as a single or weaker.

\Last time i threw up at a party i drank all my booze and decided that i was drunk enough to put up with the taste of gin and dr pepper. I wasn't. I dont think i ever will be.
\\I had an epiphany about DR Pepper and i had to share. Sorry.

well, that's the whole thing... Dr Pepper is classified as a Cherry Cola. It's TOO sweet to work right with most things, the reason that lemon lime sodas work well is because they are, in a way, creating a shortcut to make many "sour" drinks. whiskey sour, margarita etc.. which usually use a harsh sour citrus, and simple syrup to cut on top of the associated booze to balance.
Dr. Pepper just overwhelms everything in its residual sweetness to let any thing work.. and like you said.. kinda rummy...

It could work with a high and white rum like 151 but only as a cut, not as an active ingredient, spiced rum like morgans or sailer jerry is right out.. .

like everything.. you are looking for balance...


Gin an Dr. Pepper? really? how drunk were you to think that was a good Idea and are you fifteen years old?

/just far ...


Ginger ale and whiskey. Add lime if you you like mixologist shiat.
 
2013-03-19 12:42:52 AM  

Munchkin City Coroner: enry: I have a jar of that stuff in my liquor cabinet. Been there for 6 years.

[4.bp.blogspot.com image 250x242]


I knew a biker turned weapons tech, that worked on the stealth fighter before the public knew about them, do that after a few visits to my dorm room. It sat on the shelf unopened for about 2 months. Yeah, he took it.

farking Captain Morgan Spiced Rum.

Dude got farked up.

/AF is a bunch of drunks
 
2013-03-19 12:48:15 AM  
Cerebral Knievel get a bigger brewery.

Bruxellensis you too.

/you's both favorited in a nice pale straw color ;)
 
2013-03-19 12:54:06 AM  

StoPPeRmobile: Almond. It's farking almond, damnit! At least that what I always thought. Same thing with Southern Comfort.


Almond is a weird taste though -- i do get it a bit in Dr pepper. Interesting to note that although amaretto tastes really almondy it actually never comes in contact with nuts... Its made with apricots. Weird huh? Maybe the slight taste/smell of over ripe fruit?
 
2013-03-19 12:54:42 AM  

jayhawk88: "It's kaleidoscopic," another assessed. "It tastes like cigar tobacco and leather ... and then caramel and spice ... and then I taste oak ... and then ... " And finally: "It's been almost 10 minutes and I'm still tasting it!"

If reality TV was worth a damn, we'd have a show dedicated to performing double-blind's on beer/whiskey/wine snobs, audiophiles, foodies, etc, with the sole purpose of making them look foolish.


Penn & Teller's Bullshiat is pretty much all about making people look foolish. Occasional double blinds to boot!
 
2013-03-19 01:03:25 AM  

crotchgrabber: I like my whiskey like I like my women. Sixteen years old and mixed up with coke.


10 years old and fruit punch?
 
2013-03-19 01:25:11 AM  

jayhawk88: "It's kaleidoscopic," another assessed. "It tastes like cigar tobacco and leather ... and then caramel and spice ... and then I taste oak ... and then ... " And finally: "It's been almost 10 minutes and I'm still tasting it!"

If reality TV was worth a damn, we'd have a show dedicated to performing double-blind's on beer/whiskey/wine snobs, audiophiles, foodies, etc, with the sole purpose of making them look foolish.


I did that once with beer. The guys at work were always bragging about their "taste" for beer.
I bought a keg, they guessed, everything but  Leinenkugel
 
2013-03-19 01:28:17 AM  
Anything from nine to ninety, blind, crippled or crazy............OH sorry, talking about whiskey here.
 
2013-03-19 01:35:16 AM  

mikefinch: StoPPeRmobile: Almond. It's farking almond, damnit! At least that what I always thought. Same thing with Southern Comfort.

Almond is a weird taste though -- i do get it a bit in Dr pepper. Interesting to note that although amaretto tastes really almondy it actually never comes in contact with nuts... Its made with apricots. Weird huh? Maybe the slight taste/smell of over ripe fruit?


Cyanide smells like almonds too. Yep it's weird.

And fark you demon cilantro!
 
2013-03-19 03:10:09 AM  
I had a bottle of a four year old highland scotch. An off brand bottling where they bottle a younger whiskey and sell it for a bit less. If was interesting, not bad, just different, a little more sharp than it's older cousins.
I get the feeling if it comes out of the still as swill, 18 years in the barrel isn't going to make it much better.
 
2013-03-19 04:48:07 AM  

gibbon1: I had a bottle of a four year old highland scotch. An off brand bottling where they bottle a younger whiskey and sell it for a bit less. If was interesting, not bad, just different, a little more sharp than it's older cousins.
I get the feeling if it comes out of the still as swill, 18 years in the barrel isn't going to make it much better.


aye
 
2013-03-19 04:49:42 AM  
It does beg the question though- Do you know what good Scotch tastes like coming from the malt cook ?
 
2013-03-19 05:11:03 AM  
I just discovered Balvenie Doublewood (12 year) at my sister's last Christmas and loved it. $60 - $70 a bottle up in Seattle. Back home in LA I found that Trader Joe's sells it for $40! One of these days I'll splurge on their 21 year old whiskey just to try it but I'm very happy with the 12 year old variety.
 
2013-03-19 09:43:38 AM  

Cerebral Knievel: doglover: johnny_vegas: I thought doglover just mistook hophead for a beer guy instead of someone who prefers hoppy beer.

Is that what it means?

Hophead sounded to me like the equivalent of somnilier, somnelier, som- "professional wine snob" in French.

Does it just mean someone who likes hops?

pretty much... Hops, and really hoppy beer is analogous to those that like really spicy food. you can crank the hell out of the hops, and that can be good, if you are into that sort of thing.. but over all, going overboard with the hops, is kinda considered training wheel craft beer. it's easy for the brewer to make hop bombs and hide off flavors with a sub par beer, and then you have the entry level craft beer lovers who equate REALLY HOPPY! and REALLY BOOZY! with REALLY GOOD!


You nailed it, brother.  I 100% agree.  That trendy hop bomb abomination crap is drinkable, but laughable from the better respected brewers.  You're going for the cake if you make that shiat, plain and simple.

And hop bombs can be really good, if done correctly and with a good sense of balance. but a good way to mess with soebody trying to name all the hops in a imperial double I/APA, is to nod in agreement, correct or not,  and then ask them to name the malts and the yeast strain used.

Exactly right again.  I brew the kind of IPA that requires close consideration of malts, body, flavor, balance, and hop bitterness vs. flavor/aroma.  I rarely brew an IPA over 55 IBU, but they are bursting with the aroma of a fresh hop bouquet, and flavor that balances the moderate but balanced malt backbone.  I like to include a tad of honey malt in the grist.  It doesn't make the beer sweet, but gives a unique flavor that compliments the hops, not competes with them.  I can't keep these beers on tap for very long; they are quite popular.
 
2013-03-19 09:46:11 AM  

WinoRhino: Cerebral Knievel: is kinda considered training wheel craft beer. it's easy for the brewer to make hop bombs and hide off flavors with a sub par beer

I've often touted this theory to others as to why, in the mid 90s craft beer boom, it seemed every brewery's first beer to hit the market was an IPA. Seemed to me like an easy way to work out the kinks while immediately getting something out there for sale. Great to hear someone in the industry have a similar take. Likewise, in recent years with the Imperial hop bombs, I was entirely against them at first because they just went for huge IBUs and ABV with complete disregard for malt. You still need a malt backbone to build off of no matter what. I don't know if you can get Wachusett's "Larry" IPA down your way, but that's a great example of Imperial IPA done right.


Two other examples of IIPAs done right: Bell's Hopslam, Founder's Double Trouble
 
2013-03-19 09:51:07 AM  

Luminiferous Aether: Cerebral Knievel get a bigger brewery.

Bruxellensis you too.

/you's both favorited in a nice pale straw color ;)


Cheers!
 
2013-03-19 11:29:56 AM  
No
 
2013-03-19 12:07:32 PM  

Bruxellensis: I like to include a tad of honey malt in the grist.


YES! I have a recipe opened in front of me in Beersmith at this moment for a nice spring IPA that has honey malt in it. I thought it would make for an interesting flavor. Glad to see I am on the right path!
 
2013-03-19 12:11:22 PM  

Bruxellensis: Two other examples of IIPAs done right: Bell's Hopslam, Founder's Double Trouble


I have a great store up here where I am pretty sure I can get the Founders. Not sure about the Hopslam. But thanks-- I'll have a look. My local watering hole has a few barrels of Nugget Nectar on tap right now. I like that one too. I recently found out it has a very similar malt base to their Hopback Amber which I really enjoy.
 
2013-03-19 12:21:06 PM  

WinoRhino: Bruxellensis: I like to include a tad of honey malt in the grist.

YES! I have a recipe opened in front of me in Beersmith at this moment for a nice spring IPA that has honey malt in it. I thought it would make for an interesting flavor. Glad to see I am on the right path!


Definitely.  Just don't overdo it.  It should compliment the hops, and help showcase the flavor and aroma with a sweet-like flavor to ride on.  I use about 3 or 4% in the mash.
 
2013-03-19 12:52:20 PM  

Bruxellensis: Definitely. Just don't overdo it. It should compliment the hops, and help showcase the flavor and aroma with a sweet-like flavor to ride on. I use about 3 or 4% in the mash.


I have 5% in there now. I'm probably okay with that, I imagine.
 
2013-03-19 12:58:17 PM  

WinoRhino: Bruxellensis: Definitely. Just don't overdo it. It should compliment the hops, and help showcase the flavor and aroma with a sweet-like flavor to ride on. I use about 3 or 4% in the mash.

I have 5% in there now. I'm probably okay with that, I imagine.


Yeah, that's a bit on the high side for my taste, but that will also depend on your hop bill.  Are you going for 70 IBU or higher?  5% honey malt in that case might be about right.
 
2013-03-19 01:10:49 PM  
So all this talk about single malts, but nobody pointed out there is a single page version of the article that subby could have linked?
 
2013-03-19 11:16:13 PM  
hmm.. got several sacks of unused honey malt I'm getting ready to off load on some home brewers in a a "come n' git it out of here!" arrangement.

also victory malt.. some special caramunich.. and far, far too much yellow flaked maize..

we wont speak of the maize.. I told the boss man to take it home and feed it to his chickens.. the boss man is not to be confused with fearless leader..

Maybe I can toss it with some simple syrup and sell it off as organic frosted flakes cereal? same damn thing really..

fun times bringing in the and orginizing the quartletly specialty grain shipment.. the base malt comes in twice a month in 50,000lb drops to fill the silo.. everything else comes in in 50lb sacks on a couple of semi trucks... and of course.. the city is doing sewer line work up the main road and directing traffic up the one way side road that is basicly our loading dock...

almost got t-boned on the forklift three times that day by jackasses flying down the wrong way down the one way road the day I was doing non wet work.. this one jack ass actually got beligernet with me for his fark up.. all but flipped me off and was air cussing me out of the window of Beamer for DARING to come out of the hole to grab another pallet of grain as he was FLYING down the wrong way of a one way road..

shouldve put the forks through the windshield and put his car... somewhere.. but.. alas.. I am too much of a nice guy.. I just flipped him off and told him to go fark himself for getting pissed off at me for getting in the way of him breaking the law..

alright.. got that off my chest..

carry on good people.
 
2013-03-20 01:15:37 PM  

doglover: That's why whiskey and vodka, which are basically the same thing at the time of manufacture, are so radically different in color and flavor. Whiskey is aged in barrels which gives it the tannin coloration and the woody flavor, vodka is not.


You may know this, but it's important to note that whiskey is distilled fewer times and to a lower proof than vodka. Vodka is generally ethanol and water with very few "impurities" remaining. Bourbon, for example, can't be distilled to higher than 80% abv, so at least 20% of the spirit is whatever is left from the grain and yeast (not impurities, but flavor; the same things that flavor bread and beer). Bourbon is generally distilled twice, while vodka is usually distilled many times over.
 
2013-03-20 01:31:12 PM  

cptjeff: Jack is a bourbon. Not a very good one, mind you, and they don't like to use the word because they like to pretend that "Tennessee Whiskey" is somehow different. In reality, it's legally defined as bourbon made in Tennessee where it's defined at all, the term is just marketing. There are other bourbons that do the charcoal filtering, and "sour mash" is a process, not a type of whiskey, and is used in nearly all bourbons and ryes.


Many bourbons are filtered, yes, but after barreling. JD filters the white dog. Also, straight bourbon can have no flavor added that isn't grain, yeast, water, or charred oak. JD uses sugar maple charcoal.
 
2013-03-20 02:35:30 PM  

FDR Jones: cptjeff: Jack is a bourbon. Not a very good one, mind you, and they don't like to use the word because they like to pretend that "Tennessee Whiskey" is somehow different. In reality, it's legally defined as bourbon made in Tennessee where it's defined at all, the term is just marketing. There are other bourbons that do the charcoal filtering, and "sour mash" is a process, not a type of whiskey, and is used in nearly all bourbons and ryes.

Many bourbons are filtered, yes, but after barreling. JD filters the white dog. Also, straight bourbon can have no flavor added that isn't grain, yeast, water, or charred oak. JD uses sugar maple charcoal.


Plenty of bourbons filter the white dog. That's not all that unusual, nor is it in any way determinative of the definition of the whiskey. And the charcoal "mellowing" doesn't affect it being bourbon at all- Jack Daniels pretends that it does, but The US Government has looked at it and shrugged- it doesn't count as additional flavoring, it counts as filtering. It fits every element of the legal definition of bourbon, and when we make trade deals (NAFTA, for example), we protect the term "Tennessee Whiskey" as a subcategory of bourbon.

It's glitz. It's Marketing. Jack is overpriced bourbon. If you like it, whatever. More power to ya. But recognize that they're not actually as special as they pretend to be.
 
2013-03-21 02:29:38 AM  

cptjeff: It's glitz. It's Marketing. Jack is overpriced bourbon. If you like it, whatever. More power to ya. But recognize that they're not actually as special as they pretend to be.


its not bourbon. but other than that yer right.
 
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