If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Slate)   Why do schools keep using suspension as a punishment when all the little bastards want to do is go home in the first place?   (slate.com) divider line 174
    More: Stupid, do schools, youth courts, middle schools, truancy, Sandy Hook, punishments, throw in, toy gun  
•       •       •

7219 clicks; posted to Main » on 18 Mar 2013 at 7:08 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



174 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

Archived thread

First | « | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | » | Last | Show all
 
2013-03-19 01:34:11 AM  

SubBass49: StoPPeRmobile: SubBass49: StoPPeRmobile: SubBass49: I've been teaching for 11 years in an urban low-income school, and the amount of shiat it takes to actually EARN a suspension is ridiculous. The suspension isn't so much about teaching the asshat kid a lesson, as it is about allowing the rest of the class a few days without their negative influence in the classroom. Case in point, one of my loudest & most annoying students was suspended today, and a class period that is usually loud & off task was magically transformed into a hard-working and calm room. This info has been stored away, and I will not hesitate to request 2-day suspensions of said student in the future (max we can request & automatically be granted).

The other students are afraid, dear leader. Should make for good citizens.

Good job.

[i.qkme.me image 360x268]

Your only a teacher, no wonder.

You're a resident of the only state moronic enough to have it's own Fark tag, so you've got that going for you, which is nice.

Here's wagering I outscored you on the GRE analytical writing section.  Most likely right now you're thinking to yourself, "what's the GRE?"  If by some miracle you actually know what it is, and have miraculously taken the exam, then post your score.  Mine was a 6 out of 6.




Still can't figure out a way to get down here, eh professor?
 
2013-03-19 01:47:04 AM  

Pinnacle Point: I got in a fist fight with my best friend my 8th grade year, but he was smart enough to bring a knife from art class and cut me.  We both got a one day suspension.  I had to spend the whole day playing in the back yard with my pet beagle, and it was one of my fondest memories.   Life is weird, time to chill out is important, you know.


Thats a really cute story. With the amount of pressure put on students these days with constant testing, farked up school system, yes, a day to chill out is probably healthy and needed for all.
 
2013-03-19 02:12:30 AM  
Does anyone else feel like cluing stoppermobile in on how he must have misread that?  The kids weren't afraid of their teacher, they were relieved that the asshat kid had been suspended? And now he has entered into some kind of bizarre pissing contest where he sounds less rational each time he posts? Nevermind, it's late AND it's fark...
 
2013-03-19 02:24:34 AM  

StoPPeRmobile: SubBass49: StoPPeRmobile: SubBass49: StoPPeRmobile: SubBass49: I've been teaching for 11 years in an urban low-income school, and the amount of shiat it takes to actually EARN a suspension is ridiculous. The suspension isn't so much about teaching the asshat kid a lesson, as it is about allowing the rest of the class a few days without their negative influence in the classroom. Case in point, one of my loudest & most annoying students was suspended today, and a class period that is usually loud & off task was magically transformed into a hard-working and calm room. This info has been stored away, and I will not hesitate to request 2-day suspensions of said student in the future (max we can request & automatically be granted).

The other students are afraid, dear leader. Should make for good citizens.

Good job.

[i.qkme.me image 360x268]

Your only a teacher, no wonder.

You're a resident of the only state moronic enough to have it's own Fark tag, so you've got that going for you, which is nice.

Here's wagering I outscored you on the GRE analytical writing section.  Most likely right now you're thinking to yourself, "what's the GRE?"  If by some miracle you actually know what it is, and have miraculously taken the exam, then post your score.  Mine was a 6 out of 6.

Still can't figure out a way to get down here, eh professor?




Why is it always the people who complain about teachers, who are the ones completely unwilling to do the jobs themselves?

Put up, or shut up.
 
2013-03-19 05:40:33 AM  
All schools should be like military schools and have students collect demerits. You can work them off doing various chores, with the worst chores reserved for whoever has the highest number. Plus maybe extra automatic demerits for anyone morbidly obese. That would fix the problem real fast, and you could save on janitorial staff, who would mainly be overseers.
 
2013-03-19 06:19:19 AM  
We used to have a system where a teacher would point to a student and say "principal's office" and that was it.  No explanation needed and if they were questioned in the hall, they better be heading to the admin office.  I'm guessing 95% of the kids sent there were the repeat offenders doing the same stupid stuff and it didn't waste the time of the other students or teachers.  We also had after school detention that would often be held by a good teacher who could stand in for just about any class.  If you were sent there, you would get a lecture about some topic and you might just learn something too.
 
2013-03-19 09:44:31 AM  

INeedAName: StoPPeRmobile: SubBass49: StoPPeRmobile: SubBass49: StoPPeRmobile: SubBass49: I've been teaching for 11 years in an urban low-income school, and the amount of shiat it takes to actually EARN a suspension is ridiculous. The suspension isn't so much about teaching the asshat kid a lesson, as it is about allowing the rest of the class a few days without their negative influence in the classroom. Case in point, one of my loudest & most annoying students was suspended today, and a class period that is usually loud & off task was magically transformed into a hard-working and calm room. This info has been stored away, and I will not hesitate to request 2-day suspensions of said student in the future (max we can request & automatically be granted).

The other students are afraid, dear leader. Should make for good citizens.

Good job.

[i.qkme.me image 360x268]

Your only a teacher, no wonder.

You're a resident of the only state moronic enough to have it's own Fark tag, so you've got that going for you, which is nice.

Here's wagering I outscored you on the GRE analytical writing section.  Most likely right now you're thinking to yourself, "what's the GRE?"  If by some miracle you actually know what it is, and have miraculously taken the exam, then post your score.  Mine was a 6 out of 6.

Still can't figure out a way to get down here, eh professor?

Why is it always the people who complain about teachers, who are the ones completely unwilling to do the jobs themselves?

Put up, or shut up.




I see you don't like being challenged, eh, Mr. Ad hominem. Our youth are in good hands.
 
2013-03-19 09:49:02 AM  

weasil: Does anyone else feel like cluing stoppermobile in on how he must have misread that?  The kids weren't afraid of their teacher, they were relieved that the asshat kid had been suspended? And now he has entered into some kind of bizarre pissing contest where he sounds less rational each time he posts? Nevermind, it's late AND it's fark...




images.inquisitr.com
 
2013-03-19 11:29:19 AM  

Day_Old_Dutchie: DON.MAC: The punishment that worked in Catholic  school was the paddle. If it was serious, they brought out the "Board of Education". .

Gotta see The Penguin.
[s15.postimage.org image 300x169]
Memories.


Came for this, leaving happy

/oblig
 
2013-03-19 12:25:21 PM  

Ablejack: theguyyousaw: /Dropped out in 8th grade, can't say I'm worse off.

I empathize with your difficulty. It must be frustrating not to be able to express yourself for lack of education.
/just kidding of course


Stupidity is truly exhausting, I assure you.
 
2013-03-19 12:58:19 PM  

jmr61: digitalrain: My oldest is a real piece of work when it comes to school. The kid is a genius but has absolutely
zero ambition. He goes to school because I drag his ass out of bed @ 5:30 every morning. He
gets on the bus, goes to class and does nothing. Sometimes he sleeps, sometimes he goofs off.

They used to suspend him out of school for it until I put my foot down. I told the school admins
that he *wanted* to be sent home and that suspending him out of school did nothing but give him
what he wanted. So they started sending him to in-school suspension. He stopped falling asleep
in class after that.

Sorry sweetheart but little Johnny is FAR from a genius given your description of him. But you and hubby keep telling yourself that and allowing him to go all the way through school sleeping. He'll make quite an adult.


Actually, Johnny sounds like SO MANY boys I knew in High School, including my own brother. (Some smart, some not-so-smart).

Does he never do his homework as well but gets A's on most of the tests so he's barely passing?

I have NO CLUE why so many boys do this, and it's always boys for some reason. It typically takes them flunking out of college in the first semester for them to go "huh, I should do my homework and I'm NOT as smart as I think I am".

/Seen it so many times, makes me ragey
//I call 15-25 "the stupid years" for men
///I think girls do something similar in middle school, but it isn't as drastic
 
2013-03-19 01:16:14 PM  

Dingleberry Dickwad: Video games? What kind of parent would let their kid sit at home playing video games if they're suspended? My kid isn't the age where he'd get suspended just yet, but if I get a call from the school that he'd been suspended I explain to my boss what happened and go pick that boy up from school, bring him home and have him gather up the power cables for his game systems and computer and throw them in my trunk and give him a list of chores to get done.


Yeah, I was discussing worst-case scenario of parental involvement. This helps too.
 
2013-03-19 01:49:05 PM  

PsiChick: Dingleberry Dickwad: Video games? What kind of parent would let their kid sit at home playing video games if they're suspended? My kid isn't the age where he'd get suspended just yet, but if I get a call from the school that he'd been suspended I explain to my boss what happened and go pick that boy up from school, bring him home and have him gather up the power cables for his game systems and computer and throw them in my trunk and give him a list of chores to get done.

Yeah, I was discussing worst-case scenario of parental involvement. This helps too.


There is a long story of suspensions that led to my mom simply removing me from school at 13. Then I was free! Not only that but a few of my slacker friends also dropped out!

Man it was great, the herd would move house to house on grocery days. We would sit around play video games or go ride bikes!

I did a lot of crazy shiat, lots.
Then everyone else got out of high-school and life moved on.


/csb
 
2013-03-19 01:50:14 PM  

Kimothy: SubBass49: Kimothy: I was at a conference for Dean's and Assistant Principals last week. In a conversation about school discipline, one dean stood up and said that he needed more help because he'd had to expel 83 of the school's 800 students. No lie. He was  bragging about it. I don't care if your school is in Attica prison, expelling ten percent of your student body is ridiculous.

My school has expelled  three students in the last seven years and suspended less than ten. We don't see the discipline problems that our surrounding schools do because we have a totally different approach to education than the see a problem and punish kids, zero tolerance, no excuses public schools. Works great, too.

//Charter school.

I have you listed as a favorite for a reason, though I am often suspect of how charter schools achieve their behavior goals.  I want to ask, what is the admissions process at your school?  Are families required to attend meetings or sign behavior contracts?  Are their parent volunteer requirements?  What about entrance exams and behavior-record reviews?  Just asking because that often helps to weed out the "general population" that public schools cannot legally exclude.  No snark at all...just would love to know from someone I respect.

My school is a non-profit charter, so it's not affiliated with schools like KIPP or the Teach For America schools. Our admissions process is pretty simple. If you or a sibling already attend our school, you get automatic enrollment for the next year. If you have friends that want to attend and they register in our "early registration" drive in May, you get in for the next year, first come first served for every slot. After May, we put all the kids that register by August 1 into a pool for slots, unless we don't have enough enrollments to fill every available seat. We have had to go to the pool for the last three years at least, because we've had a waiting list. This year, our waiting list was 250 kids, some who didn't get ...


Not to bust your bubble, sounds like your school is doing awesome stuff for kids.

The simple fact that the PARENTS came to you and signed them up for a charter school makes the kids a better breed, because their parents give two shiats about education.

Usually the most disruptive students come from completely broken homes where the parents don't give a shiat. School is a free babysitter.
 
2013-03-19 03:05:17 PM  

Dingleberry Dickwad: Video games? What kind of parent would let their kid sit at home playing video games if they're suspended? My kid isn't the age where he'd get suspended just yet, but if I get a call from the school that he'd been suspended I explain to my boss what happened and go pick that boy up from school, bring him home and have him gather up the power cables for his game systems and computer and throw them in my trunk and give him a list of chores to get done.


I hope that you would have some flexibility there based on what he did to get suspended, because I've seen some stupid ones. My high school, for example, had a zero-tolerance policy on fighting, which meant that kids would get suspended for defending themselves instead of just curling up into a ball and allowing themselves to be beaten by an attacker.
 
2013-03-19 03:06:58 PM  

shortymac: Kimothy: SubBass49: Kimothy: I was at a conference for Dean's and Assistant Principals last week. In a conversation about school discipline, one dean stood up and said that he needed more help because he'd had to expel 83 of the school's 800 students. No lie. He was  bragging about it. I don't care if your school is in Attica prison, expelling ten percent of your student body is ridiculous.


Not to bust your bubble, sounds like your school is doing awesome stuff for kids.

The simple fact that the PARENTS came to you and signed them up for a charter school makes the kids a better breed, because their parents give two shiats about education.

Usually the most disruptive students come from completely broken homes where the parents don't give a shiat. School is a free babysitter.


You aren't busting my bubble. We have plenty of uninvolved parents. Our school is a school of last resort - when they are kicked out of their other schools, their counselors/principals/whomever tell them to come enroll here. When the parents are arrested for their kids truancy, the courts recommend they come here.

You are assuming that all the parents are signing them up voluntarily, which is really not always the case. In fact, some of our worst students (but best success stories) are kids from truancy court or the districts behavior school. (The behavior school is for kids who have been expelled; they have to go there for at least a quarter if they want to return to the school district. Most don't want to or can't because their offense was egregious so they come here).

That's not to say we don't have students with involved parents - the other group of kids we tend to draw from are homeschooled kids whose parents can't manage the upper level math, english, science, etc., of high school, so they come here where their parents can monitor their education and work with teachers. They make up about 10% of our student body and are usually our best students.
 
2013-03-19 04:17:47 PM  

shortymac: jmr61: digitalrain: My oldest is a real piece of work when it comes to school. The kid is a genius but has absolutely
zero ambition. He goes to school because I drag his ass out of bed @ 5:30 every morning. He
gets on the bus, goes to class and does nothing. Sometimes he sleeps, sometimes he goofs off.

They used to suspend him out of school for it until I put my foot down. I told the school admins
that he *wanted* to be sent home and that suspending him out of school did nothing but give him
what he wanted. So they started sending him to in-school suspension. He stopped falling asleep
in class after that.

Sorry sweetheart but little Johnny is FAR from a genius given your description of him. But you and hubby keep telling yourself that and allowing him to go all the way through school sleeping. He'll make quite an adult.

Actually, Johnny sounds like SO MANY boys I knew in High School, including my own brother. (Some smart, some not-so-smart).

Does he never do his homework as well but gets A's on most of the tests so he's barely passing?

I have NO CLUE why so many boys do this, and it's always boys for some reason. It typically takes them flunking out of college in the first semester for them to go "huh, I should do my homework and I'm NOT as smart as I think I am".

/Seen it so many times, makes me ragey
//I call 15-25 "the stupid years" for men
///I think girls do something similar in middle school, but it isn't as drastic


Exactly. And nothing my husband or I do makes a bit of difference. No consequence dire enough,
no reward tantalizing enough. We've gone through more types of therapy than I care to count in
an effort to get to the bottom of why he is the way he is. As frustrating as it is, though, it is a real
cakewalk compared to how he *used* to be. He's gotten a handle on his anger issues in recent
years, so no more attacking his teachers, threatening to snap his brother's neck, sending me to
the ER w/ internal bleeding, etc... His middle school years were a time of terror. Knives had to be
locked up, alarms on doors, juvenile detention, baker acts, etc... Fun times.

He's 18 now and his doctors say maturity wise, he is several years behind his chronological age.
 
2013-03-19 05:36:08 PM  

digitalrain: shortymac: jmr61: digitalrain: My oldest is a real piece of work when it comes to school. The kid is a genius but has absolutely
zero ambition. He goes to school because I drag his ass out of bed @ 5:30 every morning. He
gets on the bus, goes to class and does nothing. Sometimes he sleeps, sometimes he goofs off.

They used to suspend him out of school for it until I put my foot down. I told the school admins
that he *wanted* to be sent home and that suspending him out of school did nothing but give him
what he wanted. So they started sending him to in-school suspension. He stopped falling asleep
in class after that.

Sorry sweetheart but little Johnny is FAR from a genius given your description of him. But you and hubby keep telling yourself that and allowing him to go all the way through school sleeping. He'll make quite an adult.

Actually, Johnny sounds like SO MANY boys I knew in High School, including my own brother. (Some smart, some not-so-smart).

Does he never do his homework as well but gets A's on most of the tests so he's barely passing?

I have NO CLUE why so many boys do this, and it's always boys for some reason. It typically takes them flunking out of college in the first semester for them to go "huh, I should do my homework and I'm NOT as smart as I think I am".

/Seen it so many times, makes me ragey
//I call 15-25 "the stupid years" for men
///I think girls do something similar in middle school, but it isn't as drastic

Exactly. And nothing my husband or I do makes a bit of difference. No consequence dire enough,
no reward tantalizing enough. We've gone through more types of therapy than I care to count in
an effort to get to the bottom of why he is the way he is. As frustrating as it is, though, it is a real
cakewalk compared to how he *used* to be. He's gotten a handle on his anger issues in recent
years, so no more attacking his teachers, threatening to snap his brother's neck, sending me to
the ER w/ internal bleeding, etc... His middle schoo ...


That sounds EXACTLY like my brother John, except he wasn't so smart (didn't do well in school until college) and wasn't as violent (He was terrified of my Dad). Hell, he was so bad in high school he was sleeping outside in a tent because all the other punishments didn't work. That didn't work either.

Thankfully, he's calmed down a bit now that he's out of high school, into college (getting As!), and works a very physical job, and is eating a much healthier diet. I think the physical activity, healthier diet, and then the maturity of age have helped a lot.

Thank you so much for taking your son to therapy, I really mean that.  I strongly suspect my brother has severe ADD (he still can't sit still) and I begged my parents to get him tested, who then buried their head in the sand and just said "Oh he's just bad/lazy, more punishment will do the trick!" ad infinitum.

My other brother Ryan, did the lazy high school route (he had no issues until then) and I think he's just cocky and spoiled, and has to have life bite his ass HARD before he matures. He's the youngest and is used to having someone bail his ass out. My hubby think ADD factors into his behavior as well but I'm not so convinced. (Hubby has ADD).

/The good child :)
 
2013-03-19 06:46:24 PM  

shortymac: Actually, Johnny sounds like SO MANY boys I knew in High School, including my own brother. (Some smart, some not-so-smart).

Does he never do his homework as well but gets A's on most of the tests so he's barely passing?

I have NO CLUE why so many boys do this, and it's always boys for some reason.


It's called boredom. We already know the material (hence the A's on tests), and don't see any point in practicing it over and over (aka 'homework')- homework is for the dumb ones who need to do it over and over and over and over to pound it into their heads. We already know it.

As for why it's only boys- long story, but it boils down to boys are competitive, girls are cooperative.
 
2013-03-19 06:51:56 PM  

shortymac: digitalrain: shortymac: jmr61: digitalrain: My oldest is a real piece of work when it comes to school. The kid is a genius but has absolutely
zero ambition. He goes to school because I drag his ass out of bed @ 5:30 every morning. He
gets on the bus, goes to class and does nothing. Sometimes he sleeps, sometimes he goofs off.

They used to suspend him out of school for it until I put my foot down. I told the school admins
that he *wanted* to be sent home and that suspending him out of school did nothing but give him
what he wanted. So they started sending him to in-school suspension. He stopped falling asleep
in class after that.

Sorry sweetheart but little Johnny is FAR from a genius given your description of him. But you and hubby keep telling yourself that and allowing him to go all the way through school sleeping. He'll make quite an adult.

Actually, Johnny sounds like SO MANY boys I knew in High School, including my own brother. (Some smart, some not-so-smart).

Does he never do his homework as well but gets A's on most of the tests so he's barely passing?

I have NO CLUE why so many boys do this, and it's always boys for some reason. It typically takes them flunking out of college in the first semester for them to go "huh, I should do my homework and I'm NOT as smart as I think I am".

/Seen it so many times, makes me ragey
//I call 15-25 "the stupid years" for men
///I think girls do something similar in middle school, but it isn't as drastic

Exactly. And nothing my husband or I do makes a bit of difference. No consequence dire enough,
no reward tantalizing enough. We've gone through more types of therapy than I care to count in
an effort to get to the bottom of why he is the way he is. As frustrating as it is, though, it is a real
cakewalk compared to how he *used* to be. He's gotten a handle on his anger issues in recent
years, so no more attacking his teachers, threatening to snap his brother's neck, sending me to
the ER w/ internal bleeding, etc... His ...


It's nice to know I'm not the only one who's ever had to go through this - but at the same time, I
feel awful that anyone else has had to go through what our family has gone through. My son is
both bipolar and has ADHD. We've done in-home behavior therapy, out-patient behavior therapy,
anger management, psych counseling, family counseling, even equine therapy (very cool , btw).
None of it helped. He's been medicated, had meds changed, reduced, and now he's off of them
altogether. I am convinced that the Concerta he was on when he was in elementary school had
something to do with exacerbating his violent tendencies.

I cling to the hope that as he grows older, eventually *something* will happen that will motivate
him to do something more than convert oxygen to CO2. What that will be, I have no idea. I don't
care if it's a boyfriend, girlfriend, finding God, Buddha, Allah, FSM, I don't care what it is. I just
want him to be able to live a life that he'll find joy in.
 
2013-03-19 10:15:09 PM  

digitalrain: shortymac: digitalrain: shortymac: jmr61: digitalrain: My oldest is a real piece of work when it comes to school. The kid is a genius but has absolutely
zero ambition. He goes to school because I drag his ass out of bed @ 5:30 every morning. He
gets on the bus, goes to class and does nothing. Sometimes he sleeps, sometimes he goofs off.

They used to suspend him out of school for it until I put my foot down. I told the school admins
that he *wanted* to be sent home and that suspending him out of school did nothing but give him
what he wanted. So they started sending him to in-school suspension. He stopped falling asleep
in class after that.

Sorry sweetheart but little Johnny is FAR from a genius given your description of him. But you and hubby keep telling yourself that and allowing him to go all the way through school sleeping. He'll make quite an adult.

Actually, Johnny sounds like SO MANY boys I knew in High School, including my own brother. (Some smart, some not-so-smart).

Does he never do his homework as well but gets A's on most of the tests so he's barely passing?

I have NO CLUE why so many boys do this, and it's always boys for some reason. It typically takes them flunking out of college in the first semester for them to go "huh, I should do my homework and I'm NOT as smart as I think I am".

/Seen it so many times, makes me ragey
//I call 15-25 "the stupid years" for men
///I think girls do something similar in middle school, but it isn't as drastic

Exactly. And nothing my husband or I do makes a bit of difference. No consequence dire enough,
no reward tantalizing enough. We've gone through more types of therapy than I care to count in
an effort to get to the bottom of why he is the way he is. As frustrating as it is, though, it is a real
cakewalk compared to how he *used* to be. He's gotten a handle on his anger issues in recent
years, so no more attacking his teachers, threatening to snap his brother's neck, sending me to
the ER w/ internal bleeding, etc... His ...

It's nice to know I'm not the only one who's ever had to go through this - but at the same time, I
feel awful that anyone else has had to go through what our family has gone through. My son is
both bipolar and has ADHD. We've done in-home behavior therapy, out-patient behavior therapy,
anger management, psych counseling, family counseling, even equine therapy (very cool , btw).
None of it helped. He's been medicated, had meds changed, reduced, and now he's off of them
altogether. I am convinced that the Concerta he was on when he was in elementary school had
something to do with exacerbating his violent tendencies.

I cling to the hope that as he grows older, eventually *something* will happen that will motivate
him to do something more than convert oxygen to CO2. What that will be, I have no idea. I don't
care if it's a boyfriend, girlfriend, finding God, Buddha, Allah, FSM, I don't care what it is. I just
want him to be able to live a life that he'll find joy in.


Excuse me, I relate to all of this in a way. May I try to ease this?

I am one of those fed on superlatives regarding my intellect, even to this day!

A man can't ask for a hug, we seek attention but we can't tell anyone or ask for it.

It's that simple, hug the farking fark out of people if you see them having a bad day.

It goes so far.

I didn't get out of bed until 5 today. If anyone has a lack of ambition, it's me.

/needs a hug...
 
2013-03-20 11:35:35 AM  

fredklein: shortymac: Actually, Johnny sounds like SO MANY boys I knew in High School, including my own brother. (Some smart, some not-so-smart).

Does he never do his homework as well but gets A's on most of the tests so he's barely passing?

I have NO CLUE why so many boys do this, and it's always boys for some reason.

It's called boredom. We already know the material (hence the A's on tests), and don't see any point in practicing it over and over (aka 'homework')- homework is for the dumb ones who need to do it over and over and over and over to pound it into their heads. We already know it.

As for why it's only boys- long story, but it boils down to boys are competitive, girls are cooperative.


Hey smart guy, here's a tip.  Do what I did and half-ass your homework and get A's and B's!

None of the hassle of parent's yelling, teacher's disappointment, principal visits, guidance counselors nagging, ISS, etc. You can also get scholarships for having such a great GPA.

I think Men (especially teenage men) are not long-term planners and only see "This homework is boring and stupid" instead of "This homework is so easy, I'm spend 30 mins and bullshiat my way through this so I can keep my GPA and get into a good college!"
 
2013-03-20 12:18:26 PM  

digitalrain: shortymac: digitalrain: shortymac: jmr61: digitalrain: My oldest is a real piece of work when it comes to school. The kid is a genius but has absolutely
zero ambition. He goes to school because I drag his ass out of bed @ 5:30 every morning. He
gets on the bus, goes to class and does nothing. Sometimes he sleeps, sometimes he goofs off.

They used to suspend him out of school for it until I put my foot down. I told the school admins
that he *wanted* to be sent home and that suspending him out of school did nothing but give him
what he wanted. So they started sending him to in-school suspension. He stopped falling asleep
in class after that.

Sorry sweetheart but little Johnny is FAR from a genius given your description of him. But you and hubby keep telling yourself that and allowing him to go all the way through school sleeping. He'll make quite an adult.

Actually, Johnny sounds like SO MANY boys I knew in High School, including my own brother. (Some smart, some not-so-smart).

Does he never do his homework as well but gets A's on most of the tests so he's barely passing?

I have NO CLUE why so many boys do this, and it's always boys for some reason. It typically takes them flunking out of college in the first semester for them to go "huh, I should do my homework and I'm NOT as smart as I think I am".

/Seen it so many times, makes me ragey
//I call 15-25 "the stupid years" for men
///I think girls do something similar in middle school, but it isn't as drastic

Exactly. And nothing my husband or I do makes a bit of difference. No consequence dire enough,
no reward tantalizing enough. We've gone through more types of therapy than I care to count in
an effort to get to the bottom of why he is the way he is. As frustrating as it is, though, it is a real
cakewalk compared to how he *used* to be. He's gotten a handle on his anger issues in recent
years, so no more attacking his teachers, threatening to snap his brother's neck, sending me to
the ER w/ internal bleeding, ...


HUG, it's tough but you have to keep going, you've done a lot. If he's gotten a hold on his anger issues that is a HUGE step forward. EIP if you want to talk.

Here's what I found helped my brother John a lot:

1) Get him into a co-op situation/apprenticeship program in a topic he really likes, something that isn't sitting at a desk all day. My brother went into a high school program for robotics and had a great time with it.

2) Try a SCD or gluten-free diet, my hubby says it helps make his brain feel less "busy". You're probably not going to convince the kid to follow it 100% but if you feed him only GF foods you'll probably notice a change in behavior.

3) Try getting him interested in something like D&D and encourage him to write and join a forum like fark so he can interact with like minded people. My brother John loves Anime and has a bunch of online Anime nerd friends which made him more confident in interacting with people in "meatspace".
 
2013-03-20 07:14:48 PM  

The Stealth Hippopotamus: Always wondered about that myself. I came to the conclusion that school isn't there for the children, it's to give a job to people who can't get a real job. When you make their job difficult you got to go.


I figure it's to get rid of them so everyone else can try to learn & teach. If they're disrupting the learning of others, the net loss is higher than it is from just sending the one or two home.

Ideally, children should have learned basic civilized behaviors from their parents before they even learn to talk. Unfortunately, this is increasingly rare.
 
Displayed 24 of 174 comments

First | « | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | » | Last | Show all

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is archived, and closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »






Report