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(The New York Times)   Good News Everyone- all those newspapers you've been keeping in your attic may turn out to be important after all- and you should keep those wrappers and potato chip bags, too, just in case   (nytimes.com ) divider line
    More: Interesting, crisps, wrappers  
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11289 clicks; posted to Main » on 17 Mar 2013 at 6:46 PM (3 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-03-17 07:11:29 PM  
3 votes:
Something I love about newspapers, is that their content can't be easily redacted by corporate sponsored editors from the Ministry of Truth, and no government is interested in changing their content now. Yes, knowledge needs to be updated, but digital content has no protection at all against revisionism, whereas print media give excellent snapshots of bias and public imagination/memory. Digital media is fundamentally undemocratic - it is too susceptible to manipulation to be trusted. It turns every bit of text into one of Stalin's family photographs, ready for revisions from anywhere, at any time.
2013-03-17 06:53:49 PM  
3 votes:
2013-03-17 09:45:04 PM  
1 vote:

Bennie Crabtree: Something I love about newspapers, is that their content can't be easily redacted by corporate sponsored editors from the Ministry of Truth, and no government is interested in changing their content now. Yes, knowledge needs to be updated, but digital content has no protection at all against revisionism, whereas print media give excellent snapshots of bias and public imagination/memory. Digital media is fundamentally undemocratic - it is too susceptible to manipulation to be trusted. It turns every bit of text into one of Stalin's family photographs, ready for revisions from anywhere, at any time.


This, this, and more this. Digital media can be edited, corrupted and not to mention lost forever if the software used to create it disappears. And you must have an electronic device (with the proper OS and software, etc.) powered by electricity to view/read digital media. If you want to keep those precious digital memories, suck it up and print them out as physical media. Don't get so caught up in the convenience of digital media that you forget how ephemeral is really is.
2013-03-17 07:33:50 PM  
1 vote:
After North Korea EMP's the server farms in the northwest you'll need something to read on the toilet.
2013-03-17 07:13:37 PM  
1 vote:
Good job greenlighting something you need to have a membership to read.
2013-03-17 06:52:14 PM  
1 vote:
"These poor journals of to-day, which everybody is ready to stigmatize as trash, not worth the room to store or the money to bind, are the very materials which the man of the future will search for with eagerness, and for some of which he will be ready to pay their weight in gold." - A.R. Spofford, Librarian of Congress
2013-03-17 06:12:26 PM  
1 vote:
That is one fascinating collection of fish wrappers.


///  The six-week job of selecting the best items for an exhibition fell to Sinead McCoole, an author and historian who came the 150 miles from Dublin. She knew that this curious fish man, Jackie Clarke, was said to have acquired a rare, original copy of the 1916 Easter Proclamation - Ireland's Declaration of Independence - but local collections rarely warrant the enthusiasm of their owners. Her expectations remained at low tide.

Ms. McCoole made her way down the town's ancient commercial row to the home above the shop, where the sight of some old but unremarkable books left her wondering whether six weeks in Ballina would be a few weeks too long. But then the widow, Anne Clarke, led the skeptical scholar to her husband's "locked room," for many years off limits even to family. Inside were bundles and bundles wrapped in parcel paper; fish boxes and fish boxes packed with documents; stuff, and stuff, and more stuff.

Six weeks became six months, and then a year, and then - well, Ms. McCoole is still in Ballina nearly eight years later, still immersed in what is now known as the Jackie Clarke Collection: an astounding treasure of more than 100,000 items that provide an intimate retelling of Ireland's long struggle to free itself of English rule. Fragile maps and rare newspapers, political posters and editorial cartoons, books, diaries, photographs, films, and even a scrapbook that Clarke began as a boy.

Looking back on that summer in 2005, Ms. McCoole cannot point to any one moment of epiphany. Was it when she saw the 1916 letter from the commander of Kilmainham jail, asking a priest named Father Aloysius to visit the Easter Rebellion leader  before his execution? Was it the 1910 poster advertising a talk by another rebellion leader,, at Cavanagh's Restaurant in New York City?

Or was it the fabric flower, called a cockade, thatWolfe Tone - Wolfe Tone! - wore affixed to his hat when he was captured while leading a failed rebellion against the English in 1798? When Ms. McCoole showed the cockade to a scholar friend steeped in that era, the scholar began to weep...
 
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