If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(The New York Times)   Good News Everyone- all those newspapers you've been keeping in your attic may turn out to be important after all- and you should keep those wrappers and potato chip bags, too, just in case   (nytimes.com) divider line 60
    More: Interesting, crisps, wrappers  
•       •       •

11264 clicks; posted to Main » on 17 Mar 2013 at 6:46 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



60 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

Archived thread

First | « | 1 | 2 | » | Last | Show all
 
2013-03-17 05:52:19 PM
NYT?  Really??

"Please log in"...etc...

Besides, I'll believe it when I read it on a Fair and Balanced site, not this left leaning site.
 
2013-03-17 06:12:26 PM
That is one fascinating collection of fish wrappers.


///  The six-week job of selecting the best items for an exhibition fell to Sinead McCoole, an author and historian who came the 150 miles from Dublin. She knew that this curious fish man, Jackie Clarke, was said to have acquired a rare, original copy of the 1916 Easter Proclamation - Ireland's Declaration of Independence - but local collections rarely warrant the enthusiasm of their owners. Her expectations remained at low tide.

Ms. McCoole made her way down the town's ancient commercial row to the home above the shop, where the sight of some old but unremarkable books left her wondering whether six weeks in Ballina would be a few weeks too long. But then the widow, Anne Clarke, led the skeptical scholar to her husband's "locked room," for many years off limits even to family. Inside were bundles and bundles wrapped in parcel paper; fish boxes and fish boxes packed with documents; stuff, and stuff, and more stuff.

Six weeks became six months, and then a year, and then - well, Ms. McCoole is still in Ballina nearly eight years later, still immersed in what is now known as the Jackie Clarke Collection: an astounding treasure of more than 100,000 items that provide an intimate retelling of Ireland's long struggle to free itself of English rule. Fragile maps and rare newspapers, political posters and editorial cartoons, books, diaries, photographs, films, and even a scrapbook that Clarke began as a boy.

Looking back on that summer in 2005, Ms. McCoole cannot point to any one moment of epiphany. Was it when she saw the 1916 letter from the commander of Kilmainham jail, asking a priest named Father Aloysius to visit the Easter Rebellion leader  before his execution? Was it the 1910 poster advertising a talk by another rebellion leader,, at Cavanagh's Restaurant in New York City?

Or was it the fabric flower, called a cockade, thatWolfe Tone - Wolfe Tone! - wore affixed to his hat when he was captured while leading a failed rebellion against the English in 1798? When Ms. McCoole showed the cockade to a scholar friend steeped in that era, the scholar began to weep...
 
2013-03-17 06:32:51 PM
I'm just getting through March 1764 of the The Providence Gazette, and Country Journal. Can you people please stop piling up things for me to read!!!
 
2013-03-17 06:48:23 PM
i.pgcdn.com

A comprehensive collection of half-completed circle-the-word magazines. The history of our civilization preserved...
 
2013-03-17 06:51:34 PM
Something about signing up for an account to read their articles... yeah... not doin' that.
 
2013-03-17 06:52:14 PM
"These poor journals of to-day, which everybody is ready to stigmatize as trash, not worth the room to store or the money to bind, are the very materials which the man of the future will search for with eagerness, and for some of which he will be ready to pay their weight in gold." - A.R. Spofford, Librarian of Congress
 
2013-03-17 06:53:49 PM
 
2013-03-17 06:55:57 PM

JohnnyC: Something about signing up for an account to read their articles... yeah... not doin' that.


Looks like they fixed it.
 
2013-03-17 06:57:54 PM

Candygram4Mongo: [i.pgcdn.com image 260x260]

A comprehensive collection of half-completed circle-the-word magazines. The history of our civilization preserved...


I'm pretty sure my collection of comic books, cooking mags, Playgirl mags and half finished coloring books are closer to the truth. All of mine have PICTURES. So, like ancient Egypt and its hieroglyphics, they are eternal.
 
2013-03-17 06:58:47 PM

NewportBarGuy: JohnnyC: Something about signing up for an account to read their articles... yeah... not doin' that.

Looks like they fixed it.


Im still hitting a pay wall
 
2013-03-17 06:59:10 PM

NewportBarGuy: JohnnyC: Something about signing up for an account to read their articles... yeah... not doin' that.

Looks like they fixed it.


Not for me, and I was already signed into my NYT account on another tab.
 
2013-03-17 07:00:53 PM
www.drivingnowhere.com
 
2013-03-17 07:04:14 PM

Candygram4Mongo: A comprehensive collection of half-completed circle-the-word magazines. The history of our civilization preserved...


I used to edit those puzzle books. I was only there a few months though.
 
2013-03-17 07:04:57 PM
is the paywall the joke here?
 
2013-03-17 07:06:05 PM

Hagbardr: Candygram4Mongo: A comprehensive collection of half-completed circle-the-word magazines. The history of our civilization preserved...

I used to edit those puzzle books. I was only there a few months though.


How do you edit those things? I might want to write an article about that someday...
 
2013-03-17 07:06:54 PM

Alonjar: NewportBarGuy: JohnnyC: Something about signing up for an account to read their articles... yeah... not doin' that.

Looks like they fixed it.

Im still hitting a pay wall


Get rid of all the junk off the paywall URL (including the "nc" right before NYTimes.com) and it works just fine assuming you've cleared your cookies.
 
2013-03-17 07:11:29 PM
Something I love about newspapers, is that their content can't be easily redacted by corporate sponsored editors from the Ministry of Truth, and no government is interested in changing their content now. Yes, knowledge needs to be updated, but digital content has no protection at all against revisionism, whereas print media give excellent snapshots of bias and public imagination/memory. Digital media is fundamentally undemocratic - it is too susceptible to manipulation to be trusted. It turns every bit of text into one of Stalin's family photographs, ready for revisions from anywhere, at any time.
 
2013-03-17 07:12:02 PM

Dr.Zom: "These poor journals of to-day, which everybody is ready to stigmatize as trash, not worth the room to store or the money to bind, are the very materials which the man of the future will search for with eagerness, and for some of which he will be ready to pay their weight in gold." - A.R. Spofford, Librarian of Congress


Knda like drew is doing with the Daily Fail? Except he's binding them here. And making their weight in... erm... bitcoin or summink.
 
2013-03-17 07:13:00 PM

notmtwain: That is one fascinating collection of fish wrappers.


///  The six-week job of selecting the best items for an exhibition fell to Sinead McCoole, an author and historian who came the 150 miles from Dublin. She knew that this curious fish man, Jackie Clarke, was said to have acquired a rare, original copy of the 1916 Easter Proclamation - Ireland's Declaration of Independence - but local collections rarely warrant the enthusiasm of their owners. Her expectations remained at low tide.

Ms. McCoole made her way down the town's ancient commercial row to the home above the shop, where the sight of some old but unremarkable books left her wondering whether six weeks in Ballina would be a few weeks too long. But then the widow, Anne Clarke, led the skeptical scholar to her husband's "locked room," for many years off limits even to family. Inside were bundles and bundles wrapped in parcel paper; fish boxes and fish boxes packed with documents; stuff, and stuff, and more stuff.

Six weeks became six months, and then a year, and then - well, Ms. McCoole is still in Ballina nearly eight years later, still immersed in what is now known as the Jackie Clarke Collection: an astounding treasure of more than 100,000 items that provide an intimate retelling of Ireland's long struggle to free itself of English rule. Fragile maps and rare newspapers, political posters and editorial cartoons, books, diaries, photographs, films, and even a scrapbook that Clarke began as a boy.

Looking back on that summer in 2005, Ms. McCoole cannot point to any one moment of epiphany. Was it when she saw the 1916 letter from the commander of Kilmainham jail, asking a priest named Father Aloysius to visit the Easter Rebellion leader  before his execution? Was it the 1910 poster advertising a talk by another rebellion leader,, at Cavanagh's Restaurant in New York City?

Or was it the fabric flower, called a cockade, thatWolfe Tone - Wolfe Tone! - wore affixed to his hat when he was captured while leading ...


Thanks for the copypasta!!
 
2013-03-17 07:13:37 PM
Good job greenlighting something you need to have a membership to read.
 
2013-03-17 07:14:42 PM

12349876: assuming you've cleared your cookies.


and my milk. still paywall though. :-/
 
2013-03-17 07:17:33 PM
TFA, copied, pasta'd
 
2013-03-17 07:17:47 PM

Dr. Goldshnoz: Good job greenlighting something you need to have a membership to read.


It's the farking New York Times. Best journalism in the world. Sign up for your free account already, and stop being an unengaged dumbass. Plenty of ways to get around the paywall, too. Clear your cookies, use private browsing- it's not hard.
 
2013-03-17 07:18:44 PM
graphics8.nytimes.com
 
2013-03-17 07:19:16 PM

MissFeasance: Not for me, and I was already signed into my NYT account on another tab.


*sigh*

I know they need to make money. I just wish they'd all establish an a la cart system where I can pay $10-15 a month access various sites on the network. It would have to be quality stuff though. Bloomberg, NYT, maybe $1-2 per major city paper. Something like that. They are going about this pay system ass-backwards and they've been doing it that way for years.

Just click the hyperlink above if you want to read it, I think. Worked for me. Not subby, but really sick of the lack of effort they are putting into a system that might work for all of us and not break the bank. If they keep it cheap they will get volume. Meh...

/Rant off.
 
2013-03-17 07:20:40 PM
I never understand how so many have trouble with NYT links. My clicks always go thru fine and I'd never buy a subscription to that rag.
 
2013-03-17 07:20:55 PM
Link pops to slideshow in TFA
 
2013-03-17 07:22:19 PM

Nick Nostril: I never understand how so many have trouble with NYT links. My clicks always go thru fine and I'd never buy a subscription to that rag.


Oh, you hipster sack of crap! ;-P
 
2013-03-17 07:24:35 PM

JohnnyC: Something about signing up for an account to read their articles... yeah... not doin' that.


Keep all those login pages!
One day they'll be of historical interest!
 
2013-03-17 07:27:37 PM

cptjeff: Sign up for your free account already


Actually I DO appreciate that the new york times is top notch journalism, but its expensive as fark.

This led me to not inquire as to the price of the website membership, I'm both shocked and elated it's free.

cptjeff: get around the paywall


ah, so it's free until i read 100 words?
 
2013-03-17 07:28:52 PM

uttertosh: [graphics8.nytimes.com image 600x357]


Wife material right there.
 
2013-03-17 07:30:33 PM

Dr. Goldshnoz: cptjeff: Sign up for your free account already

Actually I DO appreciate that the new york times is top notch journalism, but its expensive as fark.

This led me to not inquire as to the price of the website membership, I'm both shocked and elated it's free.

cptjeff: get around the paywall

ah, so it's free until i read 100 words?


The membership is free, and you get 15 articles free a month or something like that. Unlimited access and access to the archives (everything they've ever published) will cost you money, but you can get around at least the limit by clearing cookies or using private browsing.
 
2013-03-17 07:31:38 PM
There are plenty of doctors in the world. It needs more dreamers.
 
2013-03-17 07:31:42 PM
Better to have it on display here in his beloved Ballina, as he had always wished, than to lose it, God forbid, in a fire in the family home above the family shop, Clarke's Salmon Smokery.

Now I'm wondering what salmon smoked with burning newspapers would taste like...
 
2013-03-17 07:32:36 PM

cptjeff: Dr. Goldshnoz: cptjeff: Sign up for your free account already

Actually I DO appreciate that the new york times is top notch journalism, but its expensive as fark.

This led me to not inquire as to the price of the website membership, I'm both shocked and elated it's free.

cptjeff: get around the paywall

ah, so it's free until i read 100 words?

The membership is free, and you get 15 articles free a month or something like that. Unlimited access and access to the archives (everything they've ever published) will cost you money, but you can get around at least the limit by clearing cookies or using private browsing.


I subscribe to it on the Kindle ($20/month), and they throw in access to all the online digital archives. It's nice to read articles by people who actually seem to have something to say...
 
2013-03-17 07:32:54 PM

Candygram4Mongo: Hagbardr: Candygram4Mongo: A comprehensive collection of half-completed circle-the-word magazines. The history of our civilization preserved...

I used to edit those puzzle books. I was only there a few months though.

How do you edit those things? I might want to write an article about that someday...


Depending on the book, we would use a mixture of word lists submitted to us and lists from the archives or only archival lists. I would look through the lists to check them for errors, freshen them up by removing or adding some words if necessary, or delete the whole list and make one myself. There was a custom program we used to make the grids. It ran on DOS, so my computer was a Pentium II running Windows 98 in 2010. The program would make the grids, flag any curse words generated, and indicate which words were used and which were left out. If I didn't like the grid, I would generate another one until I was satisfied. Some books required a title, description, or a hidden word or phrase in the unused letters, so those could be input as well.
 
2013-03-17 07:33:50 PM
After North Korea EMP's the server farms in the northwest you'll need something to read on the toilet.
 
2013-03-17 07:34:29 PM

Hagbardr: Candygram4Mongo: Hagbardr: Candygram4Mongo: A comprehensive collection of half-completed circle-the-word magazines. The history of our civilization preserved...

I used to edit those puzzle books. I was only there a few months though.

How do you edit those things? I might want to write an article about that someday...

Depending on the book, we would use a mixture of word lists submitted to us and lists from the archives or only archival lists. I would look through the lists to check them for errors, freshen them up by removing or adding some words if necessary, or delete the whole list and make one myself. There was a custom program we used to make the grids. It ran on DOS, so my computer was a Pentium II running Windows 98 in 2010. The program would make the grids, flag any curse words generated, and indicate which words were used and which were left out. If I didn't like the grid, I would generate another one until I was satisfied. Some books required a title, description, or a hidden word or phrase in the unused letters, so those could be input as well.


Thanks. Always wondered about that...
 
2013-03-17 07:35:56 PM

Candygram4Mongo: cptjeff: Dr. Goldshnoz: cptjeff: Sign up for your free account already

Actually I DO appreciate that the new york times is top notch journalism, but its expensive as fark.

This led me to not inquire as to the price of the website membership, I'm both shocked and elated it's free.

cptjeff: get around the paywall

ah, so it's free until i read 100 words?

The membership is free, and you get 15 articles free a month or something like that. Unlimited access and access to the archives (everything they've ever published) will cost you money, but you can get around at least the limit by clearing cookies or using private browsing.

I subscribe to it on the Kindle ($20/month), and they throw in access to all the online digital archives. It's nice to read articles by people who actually seem to have something to say...


My parents have a weekend subscription, which you can attach two online accounts to, so I have access that way. It's my primary news site, and the phone app gets ridiculously heavy use too.
 
2013-03-17 07:39:44 PM

Hagbardr: Candygram4Mongo: Hagbardr: Candygram4Mongo: A comprehensive collection of half-completed circle-the-word magazines. The history of our civilization preserved...

I used to edit those puzzle books. I was only there a few months though.

How do you edit those things? I might want to write an article about that someday...

Depending on the book, we would use a mixture of word lists submitted to us and lists from the archives or only archival lists. I would look through the lists to check them for errors, freshen them up by removing or adding some words if necessary, or delete the whole list and make one myself. There was a custom program we used to make the grids. It ran on DOS, so my computer was a Pentium II running Windows 98 in 2010. The program would make the grids, flag any curse words generated, and indicate which words were used and which were left out. If I didn't like the grid, I would generate another one until I was satisfied. Some books required a title, description, or a hidden word or phrase in the unused letters, so those could be input as well.


Played around with a program that generated those things in elementary school, think it ran off a floppy. Don't think it flagged curse words, but this was probably 2nd grade or so, so that wouldn't have registered with me.

Crosswords are the ones I've always wondered about. I can't imagine building one of those things.
 
2013-03-17 07:45:10 PM

cptjeff: Hagbardr: Candygram4Mongo: Hagbardr: Candygram4Mongo: A comprehensive collection of half-completed circle-the-word magazines. The history of our civilization preserved...

I used to edit those puzzle books. I was only there a few months though.

How do you edit those things? I might want to write an article about that someday...

Depending on the book, we would use a mixture of word lists submitted to us and lists from the archives or only archival lists. I would look through the lists to check them for errors, freshen them up by removing or adding some words if necessary, or delete the whole list and make one myself. There was a custom program we used to make the grids. It ran on DOS, so my computer was a Pentium II running Windows 98 in 2010. The program would make the grids, flag any curse words generated, and indicate which words were used and which were left out. If I didn't like the grid, I would generate another one until I was satisfied. Some books required a title, description, or a hidden word or phrase in the unused letters, so those could be input as well.

Played around with a program that generated those things in elementary school, think it ran off a floppy. Don't think it flagged curse words, but this was probably 2nd grade or so, so that wouldn't have registered with me.

Crosswords are the ones I've always wondered about. I can't imagine building one of those things.


Apparently it's an art form, like flamenco guitar...
 
2013-03-17 07:53:02 PM

cptjeff: Hagbardr: Candygram4Mongo: Hagbardr: Candygram4Mongo: A comprehensive collection of half-completed circle-the-word magazines. The history of our civilization preserved...

I used to edit those puzzle books. I was only there a few months though.

How do you edit those things? I might want to write an article about that someday...

Depending on the book, we would use a mixture of word lists submitted to us and lists from the archives or only archival lists. I would look through the lists to check them for errors, freshen them up by removing or adding some words if necessary, or delete the whole list and make one myself. There was a custom program we used to make the grids. It ran on DOS, so my computer was a Pentium II running Windows 98 in 2010. The program would make the grids, flag any curse words generated, and indicate which words were used and which were left out. If I didn't like the grid, I would generate another one until I was satisfied. Some books required a title, description, or a hidden word or phrase in the unused letters, so those could be input as well.

Played around with a program that generated those things in elementary school, think it ran off a floppy. Don't think it flagged curse words, but this was probably 2nd grade or so, so that wouldn't have registered with me.

Crosswords are the ones I've always wondered about. I can't imagine building one of those things.


The better crosswords are still made by experts picking and placing words with or without computer assistance. The ones in the puzzle books are computer generated and then we would pick from a list of clues for each word. I would make a new clue for a small percentage of the words.
 
2013-03-17 07:59:00 PM

notmtwain: That is one fascinating collection of


Or was it the fabric flower, called a cockade, thatWolfe Tone - Wolfe Tone! - wore affixed to his hat when he was captured while leading ...


Kinda looks like a guy that would wear a flower in his hat.
www.libraryireland.com
 
2013-03-17 08:00:35 PM
And people say I'm crazy for saving up my used toilet paper in a 55 gallon drum in the living room.
 
2013-03-17 08:08:42 PM
Fark simply needs to stop linking at all to any site with a login requirement.
 
2013-03-17 08:18:41 PM

Dr.Zom: "These poor journals of to-day, which everybody is ready to stigmatize as trash, not worth the room to store or the money to bind, are the very materials which the man of the future will search for with eagerness, and for some of which he will be ready to pay their weight in gold." - A.R. Spofford, Librarian of Congress


Dear lord, can you imagine how much money an original hard drive from MySpace will fetch someday?
 
2013-03-17 08:36:07 PM
th76.photobucket.com

Historians use many different kinds of sources, including artifacts and ephemera.
 
2013-03-17 08:36:38 PM

Silly_Sot: Fark simply needs to stop linking at all to any site with a login requirement.


And yet for some reason, fark elects to link to websites that deliver high quality content rather than bowing to a few idiots who can't bother to have a free account on one of the most important sites pages on the internet and don't want to take the 30 seconds to create one.

The rest of us don't have to suffer just because you're lazy. I enjoyed the article. It was an interesting look at a treasure trove of historic documents popping up in a completely random place. But I hear E! News doesn't require a login, why don't you bum around there for a while? Go ahead, I'm sure you'll get the same quality of writing and insight as you'll get from the New York Times.
 
2013-03-17 08:44:08 PM

HempHead: Kinda looks like a guy that would wear a flower in his hat.


Pretty common way to identify yourself with a movement back in the day. Make it in the right colors, and you mark yourself as a revolutionary.

See the thing Gavroche is wearing on his jacket? That's a cockade.

eternalrocksbeneath.files.wordpress.com
\Pic chosen because it includes Sam Barks.
 
2013-03-17 08:45:12 PM

uttertosh: 12349876: assuming you've cleared your cookies.

and my milk. still paywall though. :-/


Did you do the other part I mentioned?  Delete everything in the URL before "nytimes.com" including the "www.nc-" and get rid of everything after the .html
 
Displayed 50 of 60 comments

First | « | 1 | 2 | » | Last | Show all

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »






Report